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Kevin Bonham
13-04-2009, 06:11 PM
Fourth event in the now downgraded GP circuit (the GP circuit now qualifies two players to the eight player Candidates tournament) is to be held in Nalchik, Russia from 14-29 April. 14 April is just the opening ceremony so they probably play some chess late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning our time.

The eligible suspects are: Akopian (Armenia), Alekseev (Russia), Aronian (Armenia), Bacrot (France), Eljanov (Ukraine), Gelfand (Israel), Grischuk (Russia), Ivanchuk (Ukraine), Kamsky (USA), Karjakin (Ukraine), Kasimdzhanov (Uzbekistan), Leko (Hungary), Mamedyarov (Azerbaijan) and Svidler (Russia).

This will be Grischuk's fourth and final event of the six - if he does very well here he will have some chance of grabbing one of the two spots but I don't think an ordinary result will do.

Garvinator
13-04-2009, 09:18 PM
Who will Shak accuse of cheating this tourney;)

Kevin Bonham
16-04-2009, 01:10 AM
Must start earlier at night than I realised (perhaps 9pm our time?) as most round 1 games are over as I type.

Including this one in which Mamedyarov just never seems to have much of a clue against Aronian:

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d3 Na5 5. Nge2 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. a4 Nxc4 8.
dxc4 d6 9. b3 Be6 10. a5 c6 11. a6 b6 12. Ba3 Qc7 13. f4 Rad8 14. Kh1 Bc8 15.
Bb2 Ng4 16. Qd3 exf4 17. Nxf4 Bh4 18. Qe2 Rfe8 19. h3 Ne5 20. Nd1 Bg5 21. Nh5
Qe7 22. Ne3 g6 23. Nf4 Nd7 24. Nh5 Qxe4 25. Qf2 f5 26. Ng4 gxh5 27. Nh6+ Bxh6
28. Qg3+ Kf7 29. Rae1 Rg8 30. Qf2 Qxg2+ 31. Qxg2 Rxg2 32. Kxg2 0-1

Desmond
16-04-2009, 02:44 PM
Sac'ed two knights for a queen check. Would expect better from someone half his rating.

Ian Rout
16-04-2009, 04:37 PM
Not entirely on topic, except that it came to light during this event and not worth a whole thread unless anybody wants to discuss it at length. Chess Today reports that Sergey Karjakin is going to defect to Russia.

The report indicates that it isn't because of any sort of squabble in Ukraine, just for financial reasons. Unless it's an April 1st story that got held up.

Kevin Bonham
16-04-2009, 09:11 PM
Sac'ed two knights for a queen check. Would expect better from someone half his rating.

Shipov writes "Shakhriyar was unable to cope with his temper, imagination and creative mood." He also refers to the sacs as a product of being short on time.

Chessbase had a new kind of live game viewer up on their site yesterday but I can't find it there today.

ElmirGuseinov
16-04-2009, 09:24 PM
Aronian is a very uncomfortable opponent for Shakh..
Very silly loss!

Denis_Jessop
16-04-2009, 09:28 PM
Must start earlier at night than I realised (perhaps 9pm our time?) as most round 1 games are over as I type.



The web site says the games start at 15.00 local time being GMT +3. Currently, according to my time calculating widget we in Eastern Aus are on GMT +9 so that makes the staring time 9.00pm our time if my maths are right. That should mean that rd 2 started almost 30 minutes ago. That looks pretty right as there are 7 games on line with about a dozen moves played in each.

DJ

Kevin Bonham
17-04-2009, 01:03 AM
Sigh. Another time trouble disaster for Ivanchuk losing an otherwise sharp game on move 29 against Svidler. I'm not sure his flag fell or if he managed to resign first. He was in the game on the board until the last half-dozen moves when terminal time trouble caused him to make too many mistakes.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bb7 7.d3 Be7 8.a4 0-0 9.Re1 d6 10.Nbd2 Re8 11.Nf1 h6 12.Ne3 Bf8 13.g4 Nd4 14.Nxd4 exd4 15.Nf5 d5 16.axb5 dxe4 17.dxe4 axb5 18.Rxa8 Qxa8 19.e5 Ne4 20.e6 fxe6 21.Nxd4 Rd8 22.Bxe6+ Kh8 23.g5 Rxd4 [23...Qa4 deserves a look here but it's a bit hard to look at anything when you've only left yourself a minute for seventeen moves.] 24.Qxd4 Bc5 25.Qe5 Bxf2+ 26.Kf1 Qf8 27.gxh6 Bxe1+ 28.Bf4 Nd2+ 29.Ke2 1-0

Kevin Bonham
17-04-2009, 08:53 PM
Nice conversion in the endgame by Aronian against Akopian. Aronian 2/2.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nf3 a6 6.c5 Nbd7 7.b4 b6 8.Bb2 a5 9.a3 Be7 10.Bd3 0-0 11.0-0 Qc7 12.Qe2 axb4 13.axb4 Bb7 14.h3 bxc5 15.bxc5 Rxa1 16.Rxa1 Ra8 17.Qd1 Rxa1 18.Qxa1 h6 19.Qa4 Bd8 20.Na2 Qa5 21.Qxa5 Bxa5 22.Bc3 Bc7 23.Nd2 Kf8 24.Nb3 Ke7 25.Ba5 Kd8 26.Nb4 Nb8 27.Kf1 Bxa5 28.Nxa5 Kc7 29.Ke2 Bc8 30.Nb3 Ng8 31.f3 Ne7 32.e4 dxe4 33.fxe4 Nd7 34.Ke3 Bb7 35.Bc4 Nf6 36.Nd2 Nd7 37.Ba2 Kd8 38.Nc4 Nc8 39.Bb3 Kc7 40.e5 f6 41.Nd3 Ba6 42.Nf4 Nf8 43.Nd6 Kd7 44.Nh5 fxe5 45.dxe5 Ne7 46.g3 g5 47.Nf6+ Kc7 48.Nf7 Bf1 49.Nxh6 Bxh3 50.Ne4 g4 51.Kd4 Bg2 52.Nf6 Bd5 53.Bd1 Bf3 54.Bc2 Kd8 55.Ne4 Nd5 56.Nf2 Ne7 57.Bd3 Kc7 58.Be4 Bxe4 59.Kxe4 Nd7 60.Nd3 Nd5 61.Nxg4 Kd8 62.Nh2 Nc3+ 63.Ke3 Nd5+ 64.Kd4 Ne7 65.Ke4 Ng6 66.Nf3 Ke7 67.Nd4 Nb8 68.Kf3 Kf7 69.Kg4 Ne7 70.Kh5 Nf5 71.Ne2 Ne3 72.g4 Nd5 73.g5 Nd7 74.g6+ Kg7 75.Kg5 Kg8 76.Nef4 Nxf4 77.Kxf4 Kf8 78.Kg4 Kg8 79.Kh5 Kh8 80.Kh6 Kg8 81.Kg5 Kg7 82.Nf4 Nxe5 83.Nxe6+ Kg8 84.Kf6 Nd7+ 85.Kf5 Kh8 86.Kg5 Kg8 87.Kh6 Ne5 88.Nd4 Ng4+ 89.Kg5 Ne5 90.Nf5 Kh8 91.Kf6 Ng4+ 92.Ke6 Kg8 93.Ne7+ Kg7 94.Nxc6 1-0.

Kamsky - Bacrot. The OCB ending with two pawns to nil is instructive. Sometimes these are won when pawns are so far separated but after 71...Be8! white's problems became clear. He has to keep the black king out of the a8-corner or black can simply sac the bishop for the g-pawn and draw. A sac of the bishop for the a-pawn loses, but white has no way to use his king to shepherd the a-pawn forwards without black being able to get his king into the corner. Therefore it is unwinnable.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.d4 Bd6 13.Re1 Qh4 14.g3 Qh3 15.Qe2 Bd7 16.Qf1 Rae8 17.Rxe8 Qxf1+ 18.Kxf1 Rxe8 19.Bd2 Nb6 20.Be3 Nd5 21.Bxd5 cxd5 22.Nd2 a5 23.Nb3 a4 24.Nc5 Bh3+ 25.Ke2 Ra8 26.Bf4 Be7 27.Kd2 g5 28.Bc7 Rc8 29.Bb6 Rc6 30.Re1 Bf8 31.Bd8 Bxc5 32.dxc5 Rxc5 33.Be7 Rc4 34.Bxg5 d4 35.Bh6 f6 36.Re7 a3 37.Rg7+ Kh8 38.Rf7 Rc8 39.bxa3 dxc3+ 40.Kc1 Be6 41.Rxf6 Bxa2 42.Kc2 Kg8 43.Rf3 Bd5 44.Rxc3 Be4+ 45.Kd2 Rxc3 46.Kxc3 Kf7 47.Kd4 Bg2 48.Ke5 Kg6 49.Bd2 Bh3 50.Kf4 h5 51.f3 Be6 52.g4 hxg4 53.fxg4 Bb3 54.h3 Bd1 55.Ke4 Be2 56.Ke3 Bd1 57.Ba5 Kg5 58.Bd8+ Kg6 59.Be7 Kf7 60.Bg5 Kg6 61.Bf4 Kf7 62.Bc7 Kf6 63.Bf4 Kf7 64.Kd4 Be2 65.Kc5 Bf1 66.h4 Be2 67.Kc6 Ke6 68.h5 Kf7 69.g5 Bxh5 70.Kxb5 Ke6 71.Kc6 Be8+ 72.Kc5 Kd7 73.Bg3 Ke6 74.Bf4 Kd7 75.Bh2 Ke6 76.Bg3 Kf5 77.Bh4 Kg4 78.Kd6 Kxh4 79.Ke7 Bg6 80.Kf6 Kh5 81.a4 Bc2 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
18-04-2009, 12:21 AM
Aronian 2/3. :rolleyes: Lost quickly to Karjakin:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.a4 b4 9.d4 d6 10.dxe5 dxe5 11.Qxd8 Rxd8 12.Nbd2 Bd6 13.a5 h6 14.Bc4 Kf8 15.b3 Ke7 16.Bd5 Nxd5 17.exd5 Na7 18.Nxe5 Kf8 19.Ndc4 Bxe5 20.Rxe5 Nc6 21.Bg5 hxg5 22.dxc6 f6 23.Rc5 Be6 24.Nb6 Rab8 25.Nd7+ Bxd7 26.cxd7 Rxd7 27.Rc6 Rb5 28.Rxa6 Rd2 29.Ra8+ Kf7 30.g4 Rc5 31.a6 Rcxc2 32.Rc8 c6 33.a7 Rxf2 34.Rh8 1-0

Kevin Bonham
21-04-2009, 05:45 PM
Kamsky lost a drawn KRB vs KR to Akopian in round five, including missing a fairly obvious stalemate trap save.

Ivanchuk, having a shocker, got done by Kasimdzhanov (0-1 in 25 moves!)

+2 Grischuk
+1 Karjakin, Leko, Aronian, Alekseev
= Kamsky, Kasimdzhanov, Bacrot, Svidler
-1 Mamedyarov, Eljanov, Gelfand, Akopian
-2 Ivanchuk

Kevin Bonham
22-04-2009, 09:56 PM
Aronian leads after round 6. Round 7 on now.

Game from last night. Akopian finishes off Karjakin by knighting a pawn (queening would have allowed a draw):

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bh4 g5 9.Bg3 Bg7 10.h3 Nf6 11.Qf3 Qb6 12.0-0-0 Nc6 13.Nxc6 Qxc6 14.Be2 Nd7 15.Nd5 Ne5 16.Qa3 b5 17.h4 Be6 18.hxg5 Rc8 19.Rd2 hxg5 20.Rxh8+ Bxh8 21.Qe3 Nc4 22.Bxc4 bxc4 23.c3 f6 24.Qa7 Bd7 25.f3 Bg7 26.Nb6 Rd8 27.Qxa6 Be6 28.Qa7 Kf7 29.Nd5 Bxd5 30.exd5 Qa8 31.Qc7 Rc8 32.Qd7 Rh8 33.Qe6+ Kf8 34.a3 Rh1+ 35.Rd1 Rxd1+ 36.Kxd1 Qa4+ 37.Kd2 Qb3 38.Kc1 Qb6 39.Be1 Qg1 40.g4 Qf1 41.Qe4 Ke8 42.Kd2 Kd8 43.Qe2 Qh1 44.Kc2 f5 45.gxf5 Qh3 46.Qxc4 Qxf3 47.Qd3 Qg2+ 48.Kb3 g4 49.a4 Be5 50.a5 Qg1 51.Qb5 Qxe1 52.a6 Qa1 53.Qb8+ Kd7 54.Qb5+ Kd8 55.Qb6+ Kc8 56.Qc6+ Kd8 57.Qa8+ Kd7 58.Qc6+ Kd8 59.Qa8+ Kd7 60.Qb7+ Kd8 61.Qb8+ Kd7 62.a7 Qd1+ 63.Kb4 Bxc3+ 64.Kxc3 Qc1+ 65.Kb3 Qd1+ 66.Kb4 Qe1+ 67.Kb5 Qf1+ 68.Kb6 Qg1+ 69.Ka6 Qa1+ 70.Kb7 Qc1 71.a8=N 1-0

Kevin Bonham
23-04-2009, 01:31 AM
Karjakin-Kamsky round 7. Very messy Winawer but unfortunately Kamsky's poor clock handling gets him again - with only a few minutes for 14 moves he can't play accurately and eventually he runs out of time in a poor position.

It amazes me that these top-40 GMs can so often blow games by poor time management. Are the benefits of pushing the envelope really so great?

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Ne7 7.Qg4 cxd4 8.Qxg7 Rg8 9.Qxh7 Qc7 10.Ne2 Nbc6 11.f4 dxc3 12.Qd3 d4 13.Ng3 Bd7 14.Be2 0-0-0 15.0-0 Qb6 16.Ne4 Nd5 17.Nd6+ Kb8 18.Nxf7 Rdf8 19.Nd6 Nce7 20.Bf3 Bc6 21.a4 Nb4 22.a5 Qc5 23.Qh7 d3+ 24.Kh1 d2 25.Bxd2 cxd2 26.Qxe7 Rxf4 27.Rab1 Rgf8 28.c4 a6 29.h3 Ka8 30.Qg7 Qe3 31.Kh2 d1=Q 32.Rbxd1 1-0

Garvinator
23-04-2009, 12:11 PM
It amazes me that these top-40 GMs can so often blow games by poor time management. Are the benefits of pushing the envelope really so great?
It does seem that it would be better if top tournaments used a 30 second increment from the start, instead of having 40 in 120 with no increment. Shame fide got rid of that option.

Kevin Bonham
23-04-2009, 12:53 PM
It does seem that it would be better if top tournaments used a 30 second increment from the start, instead of having 40 in 120 with no increment. Shame fide got rid of that option.

It's a shame from the point of view of the quality of the games (so many ruined masterpieces, sigh) but I also like the point that increments are not there to save players from losing because of lousy time management and therefore you only need them in the final phase of the game.

Ian Rout
23-04-2009, 03:40 PM
It's a shame from the point of view of the quality of the games (so many ruined masterpieces, sigh) but I also like the point that increments are not there to save players from losing because of lousy time management and therefore you only need them in the final phase of the game.
This is true, though I find attaching some special significance to move 40 seems archaic when you no longer need to stop and adjust the clock.

arosar
23-04-2009, 10:10 PM
It seems like only yesterday.

http://www.auschess.org.au/bulletins/acfb138.txt
http://www.auschess.org.au/bulletins/acfb139.txt

AR

Denis_Jessop
24-04-2009, 04:08 PM
It seems like only yesterday.

http://www.auschess.org.au/bulletins/acfb138.txt
http://www.auschess.org.au/bulletins/acfb139.txt

AR

The ACF adopted the 90/30 limit as FIDE had then just approved it as the "official" time limit. Later we started using a 60spm increment but only for consistency with the Junior Championships.

I can see no point in having time controls that operate on a X moves in Y minutes basis now that there are no adjournments.

As for GMs losing because of poor clock management, that has always been the case with some of them. Reshevsky was notorious for getting into time trouble but he was not the only one.

DJ

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2009, 06:42 PM
I think one point in having a large time top-up at a particular point is that it gives players time to take a rest, go to the toilet etc during a game. At even a time limit such as 90/+60 once you get low on time there is no such respite for hours, unless you build up time by moving faster than you need to over several moves. With 30 second increments it is difficult to even do that.

I saw this sort of issue in the classic Kengis vs Arlandi game at Mt Buller. Kengis had K+Q vs K+R+P in the endgame. Kengis was also a smoker. This endgame went on for hours. It was eventually drawn on move 143 after 7 hours 25 minutes of play although Kengis had forced tablebase wins at various stages. For much of the game Kengis would play faster than he needed to do get up to say 10 mins on the clock then disappear outside for 5 mins for a smoke.

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2009, 12:53 AM
Shak will be checking all available supercomputers for percentage matches after this demolition job from Bacrot who sacrificed two pawns in a row then won in impressive fashion.

Bacrot - Mamedyarov

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Bd3 d5 8.0-0 Nf6 9.Re1 Be7 10.e5 Nd7 11.Qg4 g6 12.Na4 c5 13.c4 Qa5 14.Qd1 dxc4 15.Be4 Rb8 16.Bh6 Rb4 17.Nc3 Rxb2 18.Qc1 Rb8 19.Bc6 Bb7 20.Ba4 Kd8 21.Rd1 Bd5 22.Qc2 Rb4 23.Bd2 Ba8 24.Be1 Rxa4 25.Nxa4 Qb5 26.Rab1 Qc6 27.f3 Ke8 28.Rxd7 Kxd7 29.Qd1+ Kc8 30.Nb6+ Kb7 31.Nd5+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2009, 01:50 AM
Forget whose comment it was but I recently saw a quote which was either "fortieth moves are often a cause for regret" or "forty-first moves are often a cause for regret". Forget which it was (and regret forgetting) but here's an example of the latter.

Alekseev - Karjakin

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 e6 7.g4 d5 8.exd5 Nxd5 9.Nde2 Bb4 10.Bg2 0-0 11.0-0 Nxc3 12.Nxc3 Nc6 13.Qxd8 Rxd8 14.Na4 e5 15.c3 Be7 16.Nb6 Rb8 17.Nxc8 Rbxc8 18.Be3 Kf8 19.Rfd1 Rd6 20.Kf1 Na5 21.Rxd6 Bxd6 22.Rd1 Ke7 23.b3 Nc6 24.Be4 b5 25.b4 Nd8 26.Rc1 Ne6 27.Ke2 Rb8 28.Ra1 Nf4+ 29.Kd2 Nxh3 30.Rh1 Nf4 31.Rxh7 Kf6 32.Kc2 Bc7 33.Ba7 Rd8 34.Rh1 a5 35.Rb1 axb4 36.Rxb4 Kg5 37.f3 g6 38.Rxb5 f5 39.gxf5 gxf5 40.Bb7 Ng2 41.Bf2 Bd6 42.a4 Kf4 43.a5 e4 44.fxe4 fxe4 45.Bb6 Rg8 46.a6 e3 47.Kd3 1-0

After 41.Bf2 white does have the extra pawn, but it's a very difficult position to win. There is the risk of running out of pawns, and maybe having to try to win KRB vs KR, given that black's pawns are dangerous and black's king well placed to assist them. With ...Kf4 black could certainly make white work hard, since 42.a4 e4! is looking pretty unwinnable, and if 42.Rb4 then the bishop guarding a5 means white will not advance that pawn any time soon.

Instead black plays 41...Bd6 unprotecting a5 and white can simply charge the a-pawn. There are some pretty lines here, eg suppose black tries 46...Bb8 then white has 47.Rb4 Re8 48.Bxe4 Rxe4 49.Bc7+ and the a-pawn promotes. Karjakin had used very little time after the time control before making white's life so much easier in this one.

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2009, 03:15 AM
Even the second time control can bite these guys - here's Rustam (after some nice play in a positionally complex game) blowing a win when playing his 60th with very little time on the clock

Eljanov Pavel - Kasimdzhanov Rustam [D37]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.a3 b6 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Nxd5 exd5 9.e3 c5 10.Bd3 c4 11.Bc2 Nc6 12.h4 b5 13.Ng5 h6 14.Qh5 Qe8 15.Nf3 f5 16.g4 Qxh5 17.gxh5 Bf6 18.Rg1 Kh8 19.Kd2 Be6 20.Be5 a5 21.Bxf6 gxf6 22.Ne1 Ne7 23.Ng2 Rg8 24.Nf4 Bf7 25.Kc3 Rg4 26.Rh1 Rgg8 27.Rhg1 Rg4 28.Rh1 Rgg8 29.Kd2 b4 30.Rhb1 b3 31.Bd1 Nc8 32.Bf3 Nb6 33.a4 Rg7 34.Ne2 Rag8 35.Nc3 Be6 36.Rh1 Kh7 37.Ne2 Rd8 38.Nf4 Bf7 39.Bg2 Bxh5 40.Bh3 Bf7 41.Bxf5+ Kh8 42.Bh3 Rgg8 43.Ne2 Rg7 44.Nc3 Rdg8 45.Rhe1 f5 46.Rf1 Be6 47.Ke2 Nc8 48.Rh1 Ne7 49.Kd2 Bf7 50.Ne2 Bh5 51.Nf4 Bf3 52.Rhf1 Ng6 53.Nxg6+ Rxg6 54.Bxf5 Rf6 55.Bh3 Be4 56.f3 Rxf3 57.Rxf3 Bxf3 58.Rf1 Be4 59.Rf4 Rg1 60.Bf1 Rh1?? 61.Bxc4! dxc4 62.Rxe4 Rh2+ 63.Kc1 Rh1+ 64.Kd2 Rh2+ 65.Kc1 Rh1+ -

60...Bg2 would have won easily.

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2009, 04:05 AM
The last game going was extremely dramatic. White was better for most of the game but finally lost after all sorts of mad complications.

The last of these was that 69.Ne6+ apparently draws, since if black takes it, white gets two queens after Qf8+. In the game line with 69.Kh1 Nf3 first, white can also get two queens ... but 72...Qh3# would be a minor technical hitch.

Grischuk - Kamsky

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0-0 9.h3 Nb8 10.d4 Nbd7 11.Nbd2 Bb7 12.Bc2 Re8 13.Nf1 Bf8 14.Ng3 g6 15.a4 c5 16.d5 c4 17.Bg5 h6 18.Be3 Nc5 19.Qd2 h5 20.Bxc5 dxc5 21.Bd1 Rb8 22.Qe3 Kh7 23.Nf1 Qc7 24.Ng5+ Kg8 25.Be2 Bc8 26.Ra2 Qb6 27.Nf3 Kh7 28.Ng5+ Kg8 29.axb5 axb5 30.Nd2 Bh6 31.Qg3 Nh7 32.Ndf3 Qf6 33.h4 Nf8 34.Ra7 Bd7 35.Rea1 Qd6 36.R7a6 Qe7 37.Ra7 Qd6 38.R7a6 Qe7 39.Nh2 Bc8 40.Ra7 Rb7 41.Ra8 Nd7 42.Nf1 Nb6 43.R8a5 Bd7 44.Ne3 Qf6 45.Ra7 Reb8 46.R1a6 Be8 47.Rxb7 Rxb7 48.Bxh5 gxh5 49.Nf5 Bg7 50.d6 Nd7 51.Qf3 Bf8 52.Qxh5 Qg6 53.Qg4 f6 54.Ne7+ Bxe7 55.dxe7 Rb6 56.Rxb6 Nxb6 57.Qe6+ Kg7 58.Nf3 Na4 59.h5 Qxh5 60.g4 Qh3 61.Nxe5 Nxb2 62.Qc8 Qh8 63.Nd7 Nd3 64.Nf8 Qh4 65.Qxe8 Qxf2+ 66.Kh1 Qh4+ 67.Kg2 Qxg4+ 68.Kh2 Ne5 69.Kh1 Nf3 70.Ne6+ Qxe6 71.Qf8+ Kh7 72.Kg2 Nh4+ 73.Kf2 Ng6 74.e8=Q Nxf8 75.Qxf8 b4 76.Qxc5 b3 77.Qc7+ Kg6 78.Qg3+ Kh5 79.Kf3 Qd7 80.Qg8 Qd3+ 81.Kf4 Qd2+ 82.Kf3 Qxc3+ 83.Kf4 Qc1+ 84.Kf3 Qf1+ 85.Ke3 Kh4 86.Kd4 Qd3+ 87.Kc5 Qxe4 88.Qh8+ Kg5 89.Qg7+ Qg6 90.Qb7 Qd3 91.Qg2+ Kf5 92.Qf2+ Ke6 93.Qg2 f5 94.Qg7 f4 95.Qg8+ Kf5 96.Qc8+ Kg5 97.Qg8+ Kh4 98.Qg2 f3 99.Qh2+ Kg4 100.Qg1+ Kf4 101.Qh2+ Ke3 0-1

Alekseev is now joint leader with Aronian, and some players will be very exhausted tomorrow!

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2009, 12:18 AM
Astonishing stuff in Alekseev-Ivanchuk in which, with 45 mins on his clock, Ivanchuk allows a queenswap into what looks like a bad pawn ending. Alekseev with about 17 mins burns 12 of those then doesn't do it.

Game is not finished yet but I post what appears to be a critical line as a variation to indicate how hard it may have been to see.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 h6 9.Bf4 Bd7 10.Nxc6 Bxc6 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f3 Qc7 13.Kb1 b5 14.Bd3 b4 15.Ne2 e5 16.Bd2 a5 17.g4 d5 18.Ng3 dxe4 19.Nxe4 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 Bxe4 21.Qxe4 0-0 22.Rhe1 Rac8 23.Bc1 Bf6 24.Rd5 Rfd8 25.Red1 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 Rd8 27.Be3 Bg5 28.Bxg5 Rxd5 29.Qxd5 hxg5 30.a3 bxa3 31.bxa3 Qc3 32.Qd8+ Kh7 33.Qxg5 was played [unplayed example variation - 33.Qd3+ Qxd3 34.cxd3 Kg6 35.Kc2 Kf6 36.Kb3 Ke6 37.Ka4 Kd5 38.Kxa5 Kc5 39.Ka4 Kd4 40.Kb5 Kxd3 41.a4 f5 42.gxf5 g4 43.fxg4 e4 44.g5 e3 45.f6 gxf6 46.gxf6 e2 47.f7 e1=Q 48.f8=Q]

PS: Game didn't last long. Black took on f3 and white immediately took perpetual.

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2009, 12:36 AM
Kasimdzhanov slaughtered by Leko/himself; Leko may well be joint leader now:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Nc3 Nxc3 9.bxc3 Bg4 10.Re1 0-0 11.Bf4 Bd6 12.Bxd6 Bxf3 13.Qxf3 Qxd6 14.Re3 Rae8 15.Rae1 Rxe3 16.Rxe3 g6 17.h4 Nb8 18.h5 Nd7 19.g4 Nf6 20.h6 Kh8 21.Re5 c6 22.c4 Ng8 23.Qe3 dxc4 24.Bxc4 g5 25.Rxg5 Nxh6 26.Qe4 f6 27.Rh5 f5 28.gxf5 Nxf5 29.Be6 Qxd4 30.Rxh7+ 1-0

Leko has defeated two Petroffs with consecutive whites! :lol:

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2009, 05:01 PM
Joint leaders by a point Aronian - Leko play in the final round tonight.

Oepty
29-04-2009, 06:09 PM
Astonishing stuff in Alekseev-Ivanchuk in which, with 45 mins on his clock, Ivanchuk allows a queenswap into what looks like a bad pawn ending. Alekseev with about 17 mins burns 12 of those then doesn't do it.

Game is not finished yet but I post what appears to be a critical line as a variation to indicate how hard it may have been to see.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 h6 9.Bf4 Bd7 10.Nxc6 Bxc6 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f3 Qc7 13.Kb1 b5 14.Bd3 b4 15.Ne2 e5 16.Bd2 a5 17.g4 d5 18.Ng3 dxe4 19.Nxe4 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 Bxe4 21.Qxe4 0-0 22.Rhe1 Rac8 23.Bc1 Bf6 24.Rd5 Rfd8 25.Red1 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 Rd8 27.Be3 Bg5 28.Bxg5 Rxd5 29.Qxd5 hxg5 30.a3 bxa3 31.bxa3 Qc3 32.Qd8+ Kh7 33.Qxg5 was played [unplayed example variation - 33.Qd3+ Qxd3 34.cxd3 Kg6 35.Kc2 Kf6 36.Kb3 Ke6 37.Ka4 Kd5 38.Kxa5 Kc5 39.Ka4 Kd4 40.Kb5 Kxd3 41.a4 f5 42.gxf5 g4 43.fxg4 e4 44.g5 e3 45.f6 gxf6 46.gxf6 e2 47.f7 e1=Q 48.f8=Q]

PS: Game didn't last long. Black took on f3 and white immediately took perpetual.

Thank you for posting this Kevin. Very interesting.
Scott

Kevin Bonham
29-04-2009, 06:48 PM
Re Alekseev-Ivanchuk notes on the official site reckon that the endgame is actually drawn.

They follow the line I gave above but deviate with 38...Kd4; however the deviation is immaterial. This is the endgame they give with some comments added by me on some lines:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 h6 9.Bf4 Bd7 10.Nxc6 Bxc6 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f3 Qc7 13.Kb1 b5 14.Bd3 b4 15.Ne2 e5 16.Bd2 a5 17.g4 d5 18.Ng3 dxe4 19.Nxe4 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 Bxe4 21.Qxe4 0-0 22.Rhe1 Rac8 23.Bc1 Bf6 24.Rd5 Rfd8 25.Red1 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 Rd8 27.Be3 Bg5 28.Bxg5 Rxd5 29.Qxd5 hxg5 30.a3 bxa3 31.bxa3 Qc3 32.Qd8+ Kh7 33.Qd3+ Qxd3 34.cxd3 Kg6 35.Kc2 Kf6 36.Kb3 Ke6 37.Ka4 Kd5 38.Kxa5 Kd4 39.a4 Kxd3 40.Kb5 f5 41.a5 [41.gxf5 g4! well it's the only move that saves but it needs more analysis, KB adds the following lines 42.fxg4 e4 43.g5 e3 44.f6 gxf6! (44...e2?! 45.f7 (45.fxg7?! e1=Q 46.g8=Q Qe5+ 47.Kc6 Qc3+ 48.Kd7 Qd4+ 49.Ke7 etc draw) 45...e1=Q 46.f8=Q and could anyone say for sure that this is drawn?) 45.gxf6 e2 46.f7 e1=Q 47.f8=Q tablebase draw] 41...e4 42.fxe4 fxe4 43.a6 e3 44.a7 e2 45.a8=Q e1=Q 46.Qd5+ Ke2 47.Qxg5 Qb1+ 48.Kc5 Kf3 49.Qxg7 Qc2+ 50.Kd5 Qe4+ 51.Kd6 Qxg4 52.Qxg4+ Kxg4 draw

It seems that it actually is a tablebase draw with best play but there is some scope for black to go wrong and risk losing, so assuming white saw everything it would have made sense to go down this path anyway.

Kevin Bonham
30-04-2009, 01:06 AM
Aronian wins by a point! This is the decisive game:

Aronian - Leko

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd3 d5 6.Nf3 c5 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Nbd7 9.Qe2 b6 10.Rd1 cxd4 11.exd4 Bxc3 12.bxc3 Bb7 13.Bb3 Qc7 14.c4 Rfe8 15.Bb2 Qf4 16.Qe3 Qf5 17.Ne1 b5 18.c5 Nd5 19.Qg3 Nf4 20.Rd2 Nf6 21.f3 N6h5 22.Qf2 Bd5 23.Bc2 Qg5 24.Kh1 Bc4 25.g3 Ng6 26.Ng2 Bd5 27.Ne3 Nf6 28.h4 Qh5 29.Nxd5 Nxd5 30.Re1 Red8 31.Rde2 Rab8 32.Bc1 h6 33.Kg2 Nc3 34.Re5 Nxe5 35.Rxe5 f5 36.Bb3 Nd5 37.Rxe6 Kh8 38.Qe1 Nf6 39.Qe5 Re8 40.c6 Rbc8 41.Qxb5 Qg6 42.h5 Qxh5 43.Bf4 a6 44.Qxa6 Nh7 45.c7 Ng5 46.Rxe8+ Qxe8 47.d5 Ra8 48.Qc4 Kh7 49.d6 Qe1 50.Qf1 Qe8 51.Qd3 Qd7 52.Qc4 Qe8 53.Bxg5 hxg5 54.Qg8+ 1-0

Leko had good kingside pressure as compensation for Aronian's passed pawn and bishop pair, but it looks like an indecision problem on 24-26 when he moved his bishop releasing some pressure then moved it back again cost him dearly. His queen got in a mess which Aronian exploited with an exchange sacrifice, and probably the last chance to stay in the game in some sense would have been 37...a5, after that it was all downhill.

Bacrot inflicted another defeat on the Petroff!

Final scores
+ 4 Aronian
+2 Leko, Akopian
+1 Grischuk, Bacrot
= Gelfand, Alekseev
-1 Kamsky, Svidler, Mamedyarov, Karjakin
-2 Eljanov, Ivanchuk, Kasimdjanov

Aronian has now played 2 GPs for two outright 1sts!

Current GP scores ordered by average per event, if I've got this right (worst event removed for those who have played four) :

180 Aronian (2)
121.7 Jakovenko (2)
121.2 Radjabov (3 - average cannot worsen), Grischuk (4 - final)
117.8 Wang Yue (3 - average cannot worsen)
110 Leko (2)
109.4 Gashimov (3 - average cannot worsen)
80 Mamedyarov (3 - average cannot worsen)
78.3 Kamsky (3 - average cannot worsen)
77.5 Akopian (2)
76.7 Svidler (3 - average cannot worsen)
68.3 Karjakin (3 - average cannot worsen)
66.7 Bacrot (3 - average cannot worsen)
60 Alekseev (2)
57.5 Gelfand (2)
50 Kasimdjanov (2)
43.3 Cheparinov (3 - average cannot worsen)
42.5 Ivanchuk (2)
27.5 Eljanov (2)
25 Navara (2)
15 Inarkiev (2)

Obviously with Radjabov and Grischuk both on 363.3 and Aronian certain to exceed that score if he plays in one more event, then only those who can reach at least 363.3 are capable of winning one of the two WC qualifying spots from the Grand Prix.

The following by my calculations cannot make it to the top two positions: Cheparinov, Karjakin, Svidler, Kamsky. (does not matter in Kamsky's case - he is already qualified.)

Bacrot and Mamedyarov can get to 365, which is extremely unlikely to be enough, but no higher.

Also Akopian, Alekseev, Kasimdjanov and Eljanov (the latecomers to the series) are under clouds in terms of who will play in the final two events. It is not possible for more than two of them to compete in four events as opposed to three assuming the field size remains at 14.