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Kevin Bonham
08-11-2008, 08:11 PM
Looks like it is finally the end of the road for the incredibly resilient Helen Clark - based on the most likely distribution of seats National will be governing with support from ACT.

Capablanca-Fan
08-11-2008, 11:38 PM
Looks like it is finally the end of the road for the incredibly resilient Helen Clark — based on the most likely distribution of seats National will be governing with support from ACT.
Some sanity remains in the world — and in Kiwiland; who'd have thought. ACT is the main libertarian party, so that's good. One report (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=10541889)says:


With less than one per cent of the vote left to count National has 45.5 per cent of the vote to Labour's 33.8 per cent.

National has 59 seats and will make that up to a coalition of 65 MPs with Act's 5 seats and Peter Dunne from United Future.
Peter Dunne is not too bad; he was my local MP in my long-ago Kiwi days (starting as Labour), and is married to my year 10 chemistry and biology teacher.

Andrew Bolt has information and commentary, Labour thrashed in New Zealand (http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/labour_thrashed_in_new_zealand/#commentsmore):

Clark is giving a concession speech that sounds defiant, almost as if she won, with the crowd cheering and clapping her on. Grace is sure missing, as is humility and any McCain-style appeal to bi-partisanship, with Clark saying she hopes all her work doesn’t “go up in flames” in the “bonfire of Right-wing politics”. Not a single good wish is paid to the Nationals or its leader, other than a congratulations for their win.

Rincewind
09-11-2008, 04:09 AM
Looks like it is finally the end of the road for the incredibly resilient Helen Clark - based on the most likely distribution of seats National will be governing with support from ACT.

Shouldn't this have been posted in the state politics thread? :P

Just additional evidence of the growing shakiness of Labo(u)r at the state level.

Igor_Goldenberg
09-11-2008, 04:26 PM
Clark is giving a concession speech that sounds defiant, almost as if she won, with the crowd cheering and clapping her on. Grace is sure missing, as is humility and any McCain-style appeal to bi-partisanship, with Clark saying she hopes all her work doesn’t “go up in flames” in the “bonfire of Right-wing politics”. Not a single good wish is paid to the Nationals or its leader, other than a congratulations for their win.
It also contrast with humble and gracious Howard's concession speech.

Kevin Bonham
09-11-2008, 04:36 PM
I'd need to see the speech itself rather than Andrew Bolt's summary of it to comment.

Few interesting things from Times Online (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/article5112669.ece):

1. John Key is relatively inexperienced having been in parliament only six years. Yet another sign that voters do not consider experience a be-all-and-end-all.

2. Key is described as more moderate than Brash and having extensively shadowed Labour's policies. If so, so much for Jono's assertion that Labo(u)r-lite tories do not win.

3. Key was a merchant banker. Perhaps there is hope for Malcolm Turnbull yet.

4. The article claims that anti-smacking legislation may have played a role in the government's downfall.

Capablanca-Fan
09-11-2008, 08:28 PM
2. Key is described as more moderate than Brash and having extensively shadowed Labour's policies. If so, so much for Jono's assertion that Labo(u)r-lite tories do not win.
More moderate than Brash? That would be saying a lot. I doubt that Pommy newspapers necessarily judge Kiwi leaders right. In any case, there are exceptions to political rules although the fate of Labour-Lite torie state parties and RINO presidential candidates bears me out.

It's interesting that the free-market ACT is now in government, while the Greens lost votes. Snow in November can't have helped their alarmist cause, that sees pristine NZ coughing up billsions of dollars to polluted Russia under the Kyoto boondoggle.


4. The article claims that anti-smacking legislation may have played a role in the government's downfall.
I'm sure. There was a load of grassroots opposition to a Labour-Green nanny state criminalizing ordinary parental discipline.

Adamski
10-11-2008, 09:10 AM
I read that some long-standing non-electorate labour MPs have lost their seats. I am still a Kiwi national and happy to see Helen out. Key had come across well with friends of mine in Auckland - he is from North Shore I think- an affluent area of NZ. Well done!

Davidflude
11-11-2008, 11:43 AM
As the new PM is going to be his own PM I shall write to him. It disgusts me that the Treble Cone Gondola was stopped. Treble Cone is my favourite ski field and the gondola would have meant no mountain road. The road up Treble Cone is a black diamond road.

I have skied Treble Cone since it had a rope tow with a nutcracker.

Davidflude
12-11-2008, 09:52 AM
I read that some long-standing non-electorate labour MPs have lost their seats. I am still a Kiwi national and happy to see Helen out. Key had come across well with friends of mine in Auckland - he is from North Shore I think- an affluent area of NZ. Well done!

The North shore is so classy.

Capablanca-Fan
09-03-2009, 02:35 PM
New Zealand was worse off than Australia after NZ's years of Layba/Greenstapo rule and our sound economic management of Howard/Costello. Let's see who's better off in three years time as the positions are reversed.

Andrew Bolt on the new Kiwi Prime Minister (http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/key_measures_for_survival/)
Herald Sun, 9 March 2009.

There is an alternative to Ruddernomics — to splashing billions on free-money “stimulus” packages that don’t work.


“We don’t tell New Zealanders we can stop the global recession, because we can’t,” says Prime Minister John Key (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123655156808865323.html?mod=todays_asia_opinion) … “What we do tell them is we can use this time to transform the economy to make us stronger so that when the world starts growing again we can be running faster than other countries we compete with.”

That idea—growing a nation out of recession by improving productivity—puts Mr. Key and his conservative National Party at odds with Washington, Tokyo and Canberra. Those capitals are rolling out billions of dollars in stimulus packages—with taxpayers’ money—to try to prop up growth. That’s “risky,” Mr. Key says. “You’ve saddled future generations with an enormous amount of debt that then they have to repay,” he explains. “There is actually a limit to what governments can do…

Mr. Key’s program focuses first on personal income tax cuts… For now, the prime minister is focusing on chipping away entrenched regulations that drive away foreign capital—a contrast to the U.S. and Australia, which are reregulating their markets… His government is revising legislation meant to protect New Zealand’s pristine environment from private-sector development but misused by greens to stymie all stripes of business plans. Big government is also coming under the gun… The Key government also is wary of climate change orthodoxy.

Maybe Key knows no better than does Rudd how to fight the slump. But his approach has one golden advantage - it at least doesn’t plunge New Zealand deep into a mineshaft of debt. And it might just be that Key actually does understand finance just a little better:


Mr. Key earned a bachelor’s degree in commerce from the University of Canterbury… That kicked off a career as a foreign-exchange trader, with postings in Singapore, London and Sydney—most recently at Merrill Lynch.

Igor_Goldenberg
10-03-2009, 01:18 PM
That idea—growing a nation out of recession by improving productivity—puts Mr. Key and his conservative National Party at odds with Washington, Tokyo and Canberra.

While recessions are by no means pleasant, they play a very important role: correction. They encourage more effective and productive economy.
By throwing away billions (Australia) or trillions(USA) our governments ensure that we still suffer even stronger pain of recession without having a correction.

As a result, we have a greater pain and no gain.

High five to NZ government for using their heads

Capablanca-Fan
11-03-2009, 03:35 PM
Exactly right! John Stossel writes (http://townhall.com/Columnists/JohnStossel/2009/03/11/the_fatal_conceit):

Finding an economist who opposed government spending as a way to fix the economy was easy. More than 350 signed a opposing the bill. (http://www.cato.org/special/stimulus09/cato_stimulus.pdf) ...

"How is it the government is going to be able to spend a dollar in such a way that it generates a dollar or more in value?" asked George Mason University economist Peter Leeson. "A more likely possibility is that a dollar that government takes out of the private sector is a dollar the private sector doesn't have to spend."

Leeson is referring to the "broken-window" fallacy, which comes from Frederic Bastiat's story about a boy who throws a rock through a shop window (http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basEss1.html). Since the shopkeeper has to buy a new window, some believe the mischief will actually stimulate the local economy. The fallacy lies in overlooking that the shopkeeper would have spent the money some other way if he didn't have to replace the window.

Every penny the government spends will first have to be borrowed from someone in the economy. So where's the stimulus?

It's also quite a conceit to believe that a few men in power are smart enough to know precisely how to spend trillions of your dollars.

"They're exploiting a minor correction in the economy. ... Markets go through corrections all the time," Lydia Ortega of San Jose State University told me.

I pointed out that people say this correction is worse -- maybe like the Depression.

"But markets need to go through this correction," she said. "What's happening now, what's making it worse, is that people don't know what's going to happen. There's so much uncertainty generated by the government spending."

The more the government does, the more private investors wait.

"Part of the reason that people aren't spending is they don't know what these characters in Washington are going to do," says Howard Baetjer of Towson University.

"Japan tried six spending packages in the early 1990s. The result? A decade of lost growth," points out Ben Powell of Suffolk University. "It's the government's own policies that contributed to the bubble. The government's not the answer to it."