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Capablanca-Fan
27-09-2008, 08:26 PM
Meteorite experiment deals blow to 'bugs from space' theory (http://www.physorg.com/news141539594.html)

Many chemical evolutionists have been driven to panspermia in desperation, because even given evolutionary dating, there is not enough time for chemical evolution to have occurred. (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/5620/#origin) But panspermia has been dealt a blow, since it's more likely that even the hardiest germs would have been fried on entry into the earth's atmosphere:


A novel experiment has dealt a setback to a theory that life on Earth was kickstarted by bacteria that hitched a ride on space rocks.

The "pan-spermia" hypothesis is that cells were transported to the infant Earth on rocks that were bumped off other planets or even came from another star system

...

Seeking to find out more, European scientists have devised "artificial meteorites" to see what happens when rocks bearing fossil traces and living bacteria are exposed to the fiery heat of entering Earth's atmosophere.

In research to be unveiled on Thursday, they attached small rocks two centimetres (0.8 of an inch) thick to a Russian unmanned Foton M3 capsule that was launched in September 2007 and returned to Earth 12 days later.

The samples were imbedded on the capsule's heat shield, which reached a peak velocity of 7.6 kilometres (4.75 miles) per second (17,000 miles, or 27,200 kms, per hour) during the controlled descent.

One sample comprised a 3.5-billion-year piece of sedimentary rock from Pilbara, Australia, that contained carbonaceous microfossils.

The other was a piece of lake sedimentary rock from the Orkney Islands, Scotland, containing chemical traces of past organisms.

The back of both rocks was smeared with a living bacterium called Chroococcidiopsis -- a hardy, primitive species that lives on the underside of stones in the desert, surviving on tiny droplets of moisture.

Some scientists have considered it, or a relative of it, to be a good candidate for a Martian germ.

Recovered and analysed after the return, the Pilbara sample was found to be covered with a creamy-white fusion crust about half a millimetre (0.02 of an inch) thick but, underneath, its microfossils were intact.

The Orkney samples lost nearly a third of its mass, but otherwise survived, as did its biomolecules.

But there was bad news for the Chroococcidiopsis. The bugs were burnt to a crisp, although their carbonised outline remained intact.
"The STONE-6 experiment suggests that, if Martian sedimentary meteorites carry traces of past life, these traces could be safely transported to Earth," said investigator Frances Westall, of the Centre of Molecular Biophysics in Orleans, France.

"However, the results are more problematic when applied to pan-spermia," she said a press release.

"STONE-6 showed at least two centimetres (0.8 of an inch) of rock is not sufficient to protect the organisms during [atmospheric] entry."

Capablanca-Fan
28-09-2008, 04:44 PM
Important new step toward producing stem cells for human treatment (http://www.physorg.com/news141572679.html)

This uses harmless adenoviruses to turn adult cells into pluripotent stem cells:


“We get stem cell lines,” said Hochedlinger. “They are all pluripotent” – meaning that they can become any type of cell –“and they have no traces of the adenovirus.” Even more important, he said, thus far none of the mice carrying the new cells lines have shown any signs of developing tumors – and tumors were being frequently reported in mice carrying the cell lines created using retroviruses.

“The next step is to reproduce this work using human cells, and there’s no reason why it can’t work,” Hochedlinger said, adding that “this basically provides us with a system with which to test the question of whether iPS cells are the equivalent of human embryonic stem cells. That’s a question that, in my opinion, hasn’t been answered yet.”

Don't expect the Leftmedia or Democrats to take note: they are obsessed with embryonic stem cells that have yet to provide a cure, while adult stem cells have cured over 70 conditions (http://www.stemcellresearch.org/facts/treatments.htm). See further documentation at Stem cells and Genesis (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/1845/).

Capablanca-Fan
28-09-2008, 04:45 PM
Some butterflies, such as the blue morpho (Morpho menelaus) of South America and the male mountain blue don (Papilio ulysses) of northern Australia are known for their brilliant iridescent blues. But their spectacular colours are not caused by pigments but by diffraction gratings, i.e. the scales are sub-micrometre photonic structures. The very deep black on the borders is likewise not due to a black pigment but due to photonic structures that trap light. See Beautiful black and blue butterflies (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/4317) for explanation.

But recent research shows that Lamprolenis nitida has scales with two diffraction gratings superimposed, which give two main signals.

Dual gratings interspersed on a single butterfly scale (http://journals.royalsociety.org/content/r179718646008t4p)J. Royal Soc. 5(28):1387–1390, 6 November 2008
DOI 10.1098/rsif.2008.0227


Iridescent butterfly wing colours result from the interaction of light with sub-micrometre structures in the scales. Typically, one scale contains one such photonic structure that produces a single iridescent signal. Here, however, we show how the dorsal wings of male Lamprolenis nitida emit two independent signals from two separate photonic structures in the same scale. Multiple independent signals from separate photonic structures within the same sub-micrometre device are currently unknown in animals. However, they would serve to increase the complexity and specificity of the optical signature, enhancing the information conveyed. This could be important during intrasexual encounters, in which iridescent male wing colours are employed as threat displays. Blazed diffraction gratings, like those found in L. nitida, are asymmetric photonic structures and drive most of the incident light into one diffraction order. Similar gratings are used in spectrometers, limiting the spectral range over which the spectrometer functions. By incorporating two interchangeable gratings onto a single structure, as they are in L. nitida, the functional range of spectrometers could be extended.

Desmond
29-09-2008, 11:36 AM
I occasionally wonder, Jono, why you bother citing things that can or cannot occur in a number of billion years to support your position, when your ultimate position is that the world is much younger than that anyway.

Capablanca-Fan
29-09-2008, 12:18 PM
I occasionally wonder, Jono, why you bother citing things that can or cannot occur in a number of billion years to support your position, when your ultimate position is that the world is much younger than that anyway.
Boris, it is not unreasonable or even uncommon to grant an opponent's premise just for the purpose of the argument, and show that the opponent's position is untenable anyway. Then a fortiori, how much worse is the position if that premise is false?

In this particular case, if these things can't even occur in billions of years that the evos accept, then goo-to-you evolution is dead. So how much more so if the earth is much younger than they need.

Desmond
30-09-2008, 12:04 PM
http://hasthelargehadroncolliderdestroyedtheworldyet.com/

Capablanca-Fan
30-09-2008, 12:24 PM
http://hasthelargehadroncolliderdestroyedtheworldyet.com/
Just as we said: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC): will a black hole swallow us? (http://www.creationontheweb.com/content/view/6025/) and Large Hadron Collider continues to confuse (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6049/).

pax
30-09-2008, 02:16 PM
Just as we said: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC): will a black hole swallow us? (http://www.creationontheweb.com/content/view/6025/) and Large Hadron Collider continues to confuse (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6049/).

Cos creationists are the people you really want to talk to about matters of theoretical physics :doh: :doh:

Capablanca-Fan
30-09-2008, 02:27 PM
Cos creationists are the people you really want to talk to about matters of theoretical physics :doh: :doh:
If the creationist is a Ph.D. physicist like Dr Russell Humphreys (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/3568/), with plenty of secular publications, awards and patents, then for sure.

pax
30-09-2008, 03:16 PM
If the creationist is a Ph.D. physicist like Dr Russell Humphreys (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/3568/), with plenty of secular publications, awards and patents, then for sure.

I count three secular journal publications since he received his PhD 35 years ago. Overall it's a decent record, but you can find many more distinguished and qualified Physicists if belief in a 6000 year old universe is not a prerequisite.

Capablanca-Fan
30-09-2008, 04:41 PM
I count three secular journal publications since he received his PhD 35 years ago. Overall it's a decent record, but you can find many more distinguished and qualified Physicists if belief in a 6000 year old universe is not a prerequisite.
What are you on about?


Recently measured helium diffusion rate for zircon suggests inconsistency with U-Pb age for Awards Fenton Hill granodiorite (lead author is Humphreys), Eos, Transactions of the American and Geophysical Union 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V32C-1047 (December 2003). Poster at <http://www.icr.org/pdf/research/AGUHeliumPoster_Humphreys.pdf>.
The enigma of the ubiquity of 14C in organic samples older than 100 ka (lead author is J. R. Baumgardner), Eos, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V32C-1045 (December 2003). Poster at <http://www.icr.org/pdf/research/AGUC-14_Poster_Baumgardner.pdf>.
Comparison of experimental results and calculated detector responses for PBFA II thermal source experiments, Review of Scientific Instruments 63(10), October 1992.
Inertial confinement fusion with light ion beams, 13th Internat. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Washington, D.C. 1–6, October 1990.
Progress toward a superconducting opening switch, Proceedings of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 1987, pp. 279–282.
Scaling relations for the Rimfire multi-stage gas switch, Proceedings of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, VA, 29 June – 1 August 1987.
Rimfire: a six megavolt laser-triggered gas-filled switch for PBFA-II, Proceedings of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 10–12 June 1985, pp. 262–269.
PBFA II, a 100 TW pulsed power driver for the inertial confinement fusion program, Proceedings of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 10–12 June 1985.
Uranium logging with prompt fission neutrons, International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 34:261–268, 1983.
Scientific creationism, Physics Today 35:84–86, June 1982.
Uranium logging with prompt fission neutrons, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, NS–28 (1981) 1691–1695.
Wide-range multi-channel analog switch, Nuclear Instruments and Methods 121 :505–508, 1974.
The 1/γ velocity dependence of nucleon-nucleus optical potentials, Nuclear Physics A182 (1972) 580.

Can you find any actual errors in the articles, or was this just an excuse to show your misotheistic bigotry?

Capablanca-Fan
11-10-2008, 03:20 AM
Meteorite experiment deals blow to 'bugs from space' theory (http://www.physorg.com/news141539594.html)
See fuller account of this, Panspermia theory burned to a crisp: bacteria couldn’t survive on meteorite (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6077).

Aaron Guthrie
11-10-2008, 06:24 AM
See fuller account of this, Panspermia theory burned to a crisp: bacteria couldn’t survive on meteorite (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6077).I see you haven't gone the cautious route and waited for the proceedings of, or journal article to be published.
However, this didn’t stop the leading researcher asserting that 2 cm of rock was insufficient, both in a press release and in their abstract.They didn't assert that 2cm of rock was insufficient in the abstract.
However, living organisms may need more than 2cm of rock protection.

Capablanca-Fan
11-10-2008, 10:07 AM
I see you haven't gone the cautious route and waited for the proceedings of, or journal article to be published.They didn't assert that 2cm of rock was insufficient in the abstract.
I was cautious enough to quote their caveats in the paper you cited, Westall, F. et al., STONE 6: Sedimentary meteors from Mars (http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EPSC2008/00407/EPSC2008-A-00407-1.pdf), European Planetary Science Congress Abstracts 3, EPSC2008-A-00407, 2008. I even cited the same part of the abstract you did. However, one would think that Frances Westall, the first author, knows what is likely even if a paper is more cautiously worded. As the spacecraft was ascending more slowly than a meteorite (deliberately so because of the blunt body theory of optimal re-entry), the germs had a better chance on it.

Aaron Guthrie
11-10-2008, 08:19 PM
I was cautious enough to quote their caveats in the paper you cited, Westall, F. et al., STONE 6: Sedimentary meteors from Mars (http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EPSC2008/00407/EPSC2008-A-00407-1.pdf), European Planetary Science Congress Abstracts 3, EPSC2008-A-00407, 2008. I even cited the same part of the abstract you did. However, one would think that Frances Westall, the first author, knows what is likely even if a paper is more cautiously worded. As the spacecraft was ascending more slowly than a meteorite (deliberately so because of the blunt body theory of optimal re-entry), the germs had a better chance on it.This might address the first half of my post, but it doesn't address the second half. Namely that the abstract did not make the claim you claim that it made.

Capablanca-Fan
13-10-2008, 02:31 PM
More marvellous machinery: ‘DNA scrunching’ (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6033)

...


Richard H. Ebright and his team from Rutgers University have discovered more intricacies in the process of transcription, where information from the right part of the DNA is copied onto a strand of messenger RNA (mRNA). Indeed, it is this mRNA that is translated into proteins in the complex machines known as ribosomes.

DNA is double stranded, so must first be unwound, so that the right strand can be copied onto mRNA, in a sense like a photographic negative. So the machine, called RNA polymerase (RNAP), first locks on to the start of the gene. Ebright and colleagues demonstrated what happens next with two complementary techniques, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and single-molecule DNA nanomanipulation, and were able to rule out other ideas of how it works.

The next stage is that the anchored RNAP then reels in the DNA—scrunching (figure 1).10 This unwinds the double strand so the messenger RNA copy can be formed off one of them. Also, the unwinding stores energy, just like winding the rubber band of a rubber-band-powered airplane. And just like the toy plane, this energy is eventually released, with the machine then breaking free of its starting point and shooting forward. This also rewinds the unwound DNA (‘unscrunching’) which escapes from the back of the machine.

Ebright states that this research should also enable them to develop antibacterial agents that target the bacterial version of this machine.
...


PhysOrg.com, Nanotech tools yield DNA transcription breakthrough (http://www.physorg.com/news82910354.html), 16 November 2006. Return to text.
Revyakin, A., Liu, C., Ebright, R.H. and Strick T.R., Abortive initiation and productive initiation by RNA Polymerase involve DNA scrunching, Science 314(5802):1139–1143, 17 November 2006. Return to text.
Kapanidis, A.N., Margeat, E., Sam On Ho, Kortkhonjia, E., Weiss, S. and Ebright, R.H., Initial transcription by RNA polymerase proceeds through a DNA-scrunching mechanism, Science 314(5802):1144–1147, 17 November 2006.

TheJoker
17-10-2008, 11:12 AM
More marvellous machinery: ‘DNA scrunching’ (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/6033)

Simple what came first the "chicken or the egg" type arguement.

Of course just becasue we cannot explain how the process of DNA coding came about does not discount evolution in the slightest. It is possible that the DNA coding process itself evolved from some other process yet to be observed. The current method of replicating DNA may not be the original method.

Sice you want to pick at evolution based on the point of origin of the process. Then let's apply the same logic to the YEC arguement.

What is the origin of God?

Miranda
17-10-2008, 01:29 PM
Then let's apply the same logic to the YEC arguement.

What is the origin of God?

There is no God. Simple :P

Adamski
17-10-2008, 01:31 PM
Simple what came first the "chicken or the egg" type arguement.

Of course just becasue we cannot explain how the process of DNA coding came about does not discount evolution in the slightest. It is possible that the DNA coding process itself evolved from some other process yet to be observed. The current method of replicating DNA may not be the original method.

Sice you want to pick at evolution based on the point of origin of the process. Then let's apply the same logic to the YEC arguement.

What is the origin of God?God is eternal so He has no origin. He always was and He always will be.

Capablanca-Fan
17-10-2008, 01:49 PM
Simple what came first the "chicken or the egg" type arguement.
And it's a powerful one.


Of course just becasue we cannot explain how the process of DNA coding came about does not discount evolution in the slightest. It is possible that the DNA coding process itself evolved from some other process yet to be observed. The current method of replicating DNA may not be the original method.
How would it evolve by mutation/selection before there was a mechanism for accurate copying and decoding of the selected information?


Since you want to pick at evolution based on the point of origin of the process. Then let's apply the same logic to the YEC arguement.

What is the origin of God?
Already addressed this boring old canard at The old ‘Who created God?’ canard revisited: Who designed the Designer?

Capablanca-Fan
17-10-2008, 01:50 PM
There is no God. Simple :P
You're certainly "simple" to come up with that :P

pax
17-10-2008, 02:09 PM
Sorry, this is an old message, but note the following.


What are you on about?


Recently measured helium diffusion rate for zircon suggests inconsistency with U-Pb age for Awards Fenton Hill granodiorite (lead author is Humphreys), Eos, Transactions of the American and Geophysical Union 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V32C-1047 (December 2003). Poster at <http://www.icr.org/pdf/research/AGUHeliumPoster_Humphreys.pdf>.
The enigma of the ubiquity of 14C in organic samples older than 100 ka (lead author is J. R. Baumgardner), Eos, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V32C-1045 (December 2003). Poster at <http://www.icr.org/pdf/research/AGUC-14_Poster_Baumgardner.pdf>.
Inertial confinement fusion with light ion beams, 13th Internat. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Washington, D.C. 1–6, October 1990.
Progress toward a superconducting opening switch, Proceedings of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 1987, pp. 279–282.
Scaling relations for the Rimfire multi-stage gas switch, Proceedings of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, VA, 29 June – 1 August 1987.
Rimfire: a six megavolt laser-triggered gas-filled switch for PBFA-II, Proceedings of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 10–12 June 1985, pp. 262–269.
PBFA II, a 100 TW pulsed power driver for the inertial confinement fusion program, Proceedings of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, Virginia, 10–12 June 1985.


Above are all conferences, not journals.



Scientific creationism, Physics Today 35:84–86, June 1982.
This doesn't count for obvious reasons.





Comparison of experimental results and calculated detector responses for PBFA II thermal source experiments, Review of Scientific Instruments 63(10), October 1992.
Uranium logging with prompt fission neutrons, International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 34:261–268, 1983.
Uranium logging with prompt fission neutrons, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, NS–28 (1981) 1691–1695.
Wide-range multi-channel analog switch, Nuclear Instruments and Methods 121 :505–508, 1974.
The 1/γ velocity dependence of nucleon-nucleus optical potentials, Nuclear Physics A182 (1972) 580.

Can you find any actual errors in the articles, or was this just an excuse to show your misotheistic bigotry?

Leaving five journal articles, one since 1983, and two of which appear to be prior to his PhD.

Capablanca-Fan
17-10-2008, 02:12 PM
Above are all conferences, not journals.
They are journals in the normal sense, since they are refereed science publications in his fields, and evidence of real scientific research. Why isn't Review of Scientific Instruments a journal?


This doesn't count for obvious reasons.
It's in Physics Today though, which is a real journal.

Miranda
17-10-2008, 02:16 PM
You're certainly "simple" to come up with that :P

i just see through all the lies :P

TheJoker
17-10-2008, 03:17 PM
TheJoker, demonstrating the close alliance of misotheism and the Left that far outweighs "religious right" alliance that the Leftmedia bleat about

Actually I don't deny the possible existence of a God. I just find the evidence overwhelmingly favours evolution to YEC/ID. Just as the Big Bang theory is not mutually exclusive of the existence of God neither is evolution. (e.g. what caused the "Big Bang" was it a God?)


How would it evolve by mutation/selection before there was a mechanism for accurate copying and decoding of the selected information?[/QUOTE]

Perhaps there was another mechanism for its "reproduction" that has since been replaced by the current method. For example sharks generally reproduce sexually, but do maintain the ability to reproduce asexually. Just because sexual reproduction cannot happen without a male shark, does not mean that the first shark reproductions involved a male. Just be cause DNA "reproduction" has been observed to occur in a specifc way does not mean that other methods are not possible. Science discovers new things all the time that were previously thought impossible.



Already addressed this boring old canard at The old ‘Who created God?’ canard revisited: Who designed the Designer?

Not saying you haven't tried to address it just pointing out the same criticism applies to YEC (unprovable mechanism for the point of origin of life).

pax
17-10-2008, 04:10 PM
They are journals in the normal sense, since they are refereed science publications in his fields, and evidence of real scientific research.

They are most certainly not journals in the normal sense. If you claimed conference publications as journal papers you would be done for academic misconduct. There is a massive difference between peer reviewed journals and peer reviewed conferences.


Why isn't Review of Scientific Instruments a journal?

It is, the original reply was an error which I corrected.


It's in Physics Today though, which is a real journal.

I don't know - it looks like a magazine to me. Is it even peer reviewed in the normal sense?

pax
17-10-2008, 04:17 PM
Can you find any actual errors in the articles, or was this just an excuse to show your misotheistic bigotry?

Anyway, the main point is that a guy whose only publications in the last 15 years are two conference posters (on Geophysics, that somebody else wrote) is not the first person I turn to for expert advice on the LHC.

Rincewind
17-10-2008, 04:21 PM
I don't know - it looks like a magazine to me. Is it even peer reviewed in the normal sense?

From their web-site...

http://www.physicstoday.org/faq.html


Can I send in an article for publication in Physics Today?

If you wish to contribute something for our readers, you may submit a brief proposal. The proposal should include (i) an explanation of why the topic is of general interest, (ii) a brief outline of the article's contents, and (iii) information about yourself (and any possible coauthors; note that no more than three total authors are allowed). Please send your proposal via e-mail to pt@aip.org. Everyone is welcome to send letters for publication to ptletters@aip.org

Sounds like a magazine (not a research journal) to me.

Rincewind
17-10-2008, 04:46 PM
I've just read of the said article

"Scientific" creationism, Physics Today 35:84–86, June 1982.

Which was in fact a letter to the magazine. The page numbering of this citation flatters the "contribution" greatly (page 85 comprises 2 half page advertisments) and the content of the letter is four reasonably short paragraphs. It references two prior works: the first a two part Physics Today article on Thermodynamics of Evolution from 1972 and the second to Duane Gish's comical book, Evolution - The fossils say no! There is no new contribution in the letter just an expression of the author's opinion that evolution should stand or fall on its own merits.

Regardless of the status of Physics Today (which looks much morelike a magazine than a journal) the specific item in question is most definitely not a research article.

pax
17-10-2008, 05:06 PM
I've just read of the said article

"Scientific" creationism, Physics Today 35:84–86, June 1982.

Which was in fact a letter to the magazine. The page numbering of this citation flatters the "contribution" greatly (page 85 comprises 2 half page advertisments) and the content of the letter is four reasonably short paragraphs. It references two prior works: the first a two part Physics Today article on Thermodynamics of Evolution from 1972 and the second to Duane Gish's comical book, Evolution - The fossils say no! There is no new contribution in the letter just an expression of the author's opinion that evolution should stand or fall on its own merits.

Regardless of the status of Physics Today (which looks much morelike a magazine than a journal) the specific item in question is most definitely not a research article.

That's a shocker.

Capablanca-Fan
17-10-2008, 05:07 PM
Anyway, the main point is that a guy whose only publications in the last 15 years are two conference posters (on Geophysics, that somebody else wrote) is not the first person I turn to for expert advice on the LHC.
I.e. you couldn't find any actual errors in an article by a physicist who is clearly a researcher of proven ability.


They are most certainly not journals in the normal sense. If you claimed conference publications as journal papers you would be done for academic misconduct. There is a massive difference between peer reviewed journals and peer reviewed conferences.
They are prefectly proper to list on a publication record. Indeed, a conference is likely to present state-of-the-art research.

pax
17-10-2008, 05:22 PM
I.e. you couldn't find any actual errors in an article by a physicist who is clearly a researcher of proven ability.
I never said there were errors. I just pointed out that there are many many people who I would go to for opinions on the LHC before this guy. But obviously you think he's top dog just because he's a creationist.



They are prefectly proper to list on a publication record. Indeed, a conference is likely to present state-of-the-art research.

There is nothing wrong with conference papers, nor with listing them on a publication record. But the standard for reputable journals (and the review procedure) is much, much higher.

On the other hand, there is something very wrong about listing an unreviewed letter to a magazine as a research publication.

Capablanca-Fan
18-10-2008, 11:11 AM
I never said there were errors. I just pointed out that there are many many people who I would go to for opinions on the LHC before this guy. But obviously you think he's top dog just because he's a creationist.
I wouldn't trust any old creationist, but he is an expert in physics, including theoretical partical physics as it relates to cosmology. His article was considerably better than the usual newspaper and even science magazine articles.


There is nothing wrong with conference papers, nor with listing them on a publication record. But the standard for reputable journals (and the review procedure) is much, much higher.
Really? Those working in industry may well publish in conference journals. The standard may even be higher, because of the open competition of experts in the field who know the work in practice, as opposed to referees of a journal who don't repeat the experiment.


On the other hand, there is something very wrong about listing an unreviewed letter to a magazine as a research publication.
It is a publication; it didn't say "research publication", but you have a valid point that it doesn't strengthen a CV.

Kevin Bonham
21-10-2008, 10:05 AM
Conference presentations are not refereed publications nor are they necessarily publications at all - at many conferences those things that scientists call "papers" are actually delivered orally and only their abstracts are published. Thus pax's original comment on the number of this scientist's secular journal publications appears to be correct. Of course conference presentations are still research output and can indeed be of very high standard but they do not have the same status as publications.

Capablanca-Fan
03-11-2008, 12:18 PM
Gold bugs and beyond: a review of iridescence and structural colour mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera) (http://journals.royalsociety.org/content/lv72q21116mm0977)

Members of the order Coleoptera are sometimes referred to as ‘living jewels’, in allusion to the strikingly diverse array of iridescence mechanisms and optical effects that have arisen in beetles. A number of novel and sophisticated reflectance mechanisms have been discovered in recent years, including three-dimensional photonic crystals and quasi-ordered coherent scattering arrays. However, the literature on beetle structural coloration is often redundant and lacks synthesis, with little interchange between the entomological and optical research communities. Here, an overview is provided for all iridescence mechanisms observed in Coleoptera. Types of iridescence are illustrated and classified into three mechanistic groups: multilayer reflectors, three-dimensional photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Taxonomic and phylogenetic distributions are provided, along with discussion of the putative functions and evolutionary pathways by which iridescence has repeatedly arisen in beetles.

Capablanca-Fan
03-11-2008, 12:20 PM
Biologists discover motor protein that rewinds DNA (http://www.physorg.com/news144592678.html)

The enzyme HARP "rewinds" sections of the double-stranded DNA molecule that become unwound, like the tangled ribbons from a cassette tape.

Two biologists at the University of California, San Diego have discovered the first of a new class of cellular motor proteins that "rewind" sections of the double-stranded DNA molecule that become unwound, like the tangled ribbons from a cassette tape, in "bubbles" that prevent critical genes from being expressed.

"When your DNA gets stuck in the unwound position, your cells are in big trouble, and in humans, that ultimately leads to death" said Jim Kadonaga, a professor of biology at UCSD who headed the study. "What we discovered is the enzyme that fixes this problem."

The discovery represents the first time scientists have identified a motor protein specifically designed to prevent the accumulation of bubbles of unwound DNA, which occurs when DNA strands become improperly unwound in certain locations along the molecule.

The UCSD researchers' findings, detailed in the October 31 issue of Science, are also important because they provide biomedical scientists with a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to a rare genetic disorder called Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. The discovery will eventually allow medical researchers to design future treatments for this devastating genetic disorder, which causes strokes, congestive heart failure, kidney failure and death in young children.

...

"This will open up a whole new area of study," said Kadonaga. "There are very few enzymes known that alter DNA structure. And we've discovered an entirely new one. This was not expected to happen in the year 2008. We should have found them all by now."

"I believe it's going to go beyond DNA. Just as there are DNA-DNA helicases, there are RNA-DNA helicases and RNA-RNA helicases. So it doesn't take a lot of imagination to foresee that there are probably going to be RNA-DNA annealing helicases and RNA-RNA annealing helicases. The field potentially can be fairly large. And as more and more people discover additional annealing helicases, this field will expand."

Kadonaga and Yusufzai are already searching for more annealing helicases, but they also plan to continue their studies of HARP.

...

Source: University of California - San Diego

Capablanca-Fan
21-11-2008, 12:55 PM
A woman’s windpipe was repaired with her own stem cells! (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2008/6010.html)

Claudia Castillo, a 30-year-old Colombian mother of two living in Barcelona, Spain, suffered respiratory damage from tuberculosis, which also clogged her windpipe. A pan-European surgical team obtained a seven-centimetre tracheal segment from a 51-year-old transplant donor who had died of cerebral haemorrhage. They removed all the donor cells and antigens leave the connective tissue ‘skeleton’. Then they obtained bone marrow cells from Castillo, cultured into a large population, then some were matured into cartilage cells (chrondrocytes) by a method devised by Professor Anthony Hollander at the University of Bristol, and others were used to generate epithelial cells. Using a novel bioreactor which incubates cells, developed at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, chondrocytes were then seeded into donor trachea on the outside on the outside, while the epithelial cells were seeded on the inside to form the lining. Four days later, this manufactured windpipe was used to replace Castillo's left bronchus. A month after that, it bled during a biopsy, showing that blood vessels had already grown back normally.
Martin Birchall, Professor of Surgery at the University of Bristol, stated:

‘Surgeons can now start to see and understand the very real potential for adult stem cells and tissue engineering to radically improve their ability to treat patients with serious diseases. We believe this success has proved that we are on the verge of a new age in surgical care.’
Anthony Hollander, Arthritis Research Campaign Professor of Rheumatology and Tissue Engineering at the University of Bristol, agreed:

‘This successful treatment manifestly demonstrates the potential of adult stem cells to save lives.’This major medical breakthrough for adult stem cell cures was published in The Lancet (http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2808%2961598-6/fulltext).

Ian Murray
21-11-2008, 01:28 PM
...A pan-European surgical team obtained a seven-centimetre tracheal segment from a 51-year-old transplant donor who had died of cerebral haemorrhage. They removed all the donor cells and antigens leave the connective tissue ‘skeleton’. Then they obtained bone marrow cells from Castillo, cultured into a large population, then some were matured into cartilage cells (chrondrocytes) by a method devised by Professor Anthony Hollander at the University of Bristol, and others were used to generate epithelial cells. Using a novel bioreactor which incubates cells, developed at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, chondrocytes were then seeded into donor trachea on the outside on the outside, while the epithelial cells were seeded on the inside to form the lining....
Sounds like something anyone can do at home in the laundry tub

Kevin Bonham
21-11-2008, 11:06 PM
Members of the order Coleoptera are sometimes referred to as ‘living jewels’, in allusion to the strikingly diverse array of iridescence mechanisms and optical effects that have arisen in beetles.

I think there must be some especially interesting stuff going on with colour and the scales of weevils. Most beetles when preserved in ethanol solution (usually c.70% is used) appear approximately true to their colour when dried. However, many weevils appear to be black when wet in ethanol. When they are dried, the seemingly "black" weevils can turn out to be any of several different colours (frequently somewhere in the white-grey-black spectrum but not always), and often to have rich colour patterns that are scarcely if at all apparent on wet specimens. Then again, some of them, when dried, really turn out to just be black.

I am currently sorting some beetles collected on the expedition to an island in the Furneaux Group that I was on about a month ago, and am taking out most of the weevils to dry them individually for checking for this reason.

Capablanca-Fan
22-11-2008, 09:59 AM
Sounds interesting: looks like the weevils have structural rather than pigment colours. Please keep us updated.

Capablanca-Fan
15-01-2009, 06:34 PM
Spookfish Uses Mirrors For Eyes (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090107134539.htm)
ScienceDaily (Jan. 8, 2009)


A remarkable new discovery shows the four-eyed spookfish to be the first vertebrate ever found to use mirrors, rather than lenses, to focus light in its eyes.

...

While the spook fish looks like it has four eyes, in fact it only has two, each of which is split into two connected parts. One half points upwards, giving the spookfish a view of the ocean — and potential food — above. The other half, which looks like a bump on the side of the fish’s head, points downwards into the abyss below. These ‘diverticular’ eyes are unique among all vertebrates in that they use a mirror to make the image.

...

It was when looking at sections of the eye that had been prepared for microscopy that Professor Partridge realised that the diverticular mirrors where something exciting. The mirror uses tiny plates, probably of guanine crystals, arranged into a multi-layer stack. This is not unique in the animal kingdom (it’s why silvery fish are silvery) but the arrangement and orientation of the guanine crystals is precisely controlled such that they direct the light to a focus. Partridge’s computer simulation showed that the precise orientation of the plates within the mirror's curved surface is perfect for focusing reflected light onto the fish’s retina.

The use of a single mirror has a distinct advantage over a lens in its potential to produce bright, high-contrast images. That must give the fish a great advantage in the deep sea, where the ability to spot even the dimmest and briefest of lights can mean the difference between eating and being eaten.

The lobster eye has long been known to be reflective (see my article Lobster eyes — brilliant geometric design (http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/382/)), but the above is the first known reflective eye in a vertebrate.

Capablanca-Fan
25-03-2009, 01:52 PM
Deep-sea rocks point to early oxygen on Earth (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-03/ps-dsr032409.php)
Eureka Alert, 2 March 2009


Red jasper cored from layers 3.46 billion years old suggests that not only did the oceans contain abundant oxygen then, but that the atmosphere was as oxygen rich as it is today, according to geologists. This jasper or hematite-rich chert formed in ways similar to the way this rock forms around hydrothermal vents in the deep oceans today. …

“We found that the hematite from this core was made of a single crystal and therefore was not hematite made by ultra violet radiation,” said [Hiroshi] Ohmoto [professor of geochemistry, Penn State].

This could only happen if the deep ocean contained oxygen and the iron rich fluids came into contact at high temperatures. Ohmoto and his team believe that this specific layer of hematite formed when a plume of heated water, like those found today at hydrothermal vents, converted the iron compounds into hematite using oxygen dissolved in the deep ocean water. …

In fact, the researchers suggest that to have sufficient oxygen at depth, there had to be as much oxygen in the atmosphere 3.46 billion years ago as there is in today’s atmosphere. To have this amount of oxygen, the Earth must have had oxygen producing organisms like cyanobacteria actively producing it, placing these organisms much earlier in Earth’s history than previously thought.

Capablanca-Fan
15-05-2009, 04:01 PM
Color-shifting cuttlefish inspire TV screens (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30702154/)
Prototype uses less than one-hundredth the power of traditional displays
Eric Bland, 12 May 2009


Cuttlefish change their color by secreting different chemicals to change the spacing between membranes," said Edwin Thomas, a professor at MIT who recently co-authored a paper describing his team's new screen in the journal Advanced Materials.

"We have created an artificial electrical system to control the spacing between layers," he said, thereby changing the colors on the screen.

Southpaw Jim
20-05-2009, 08:58 AM
The missing link? (http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/05/20/2575451.htm)


Scientists in New York unveiled the skeleton of what they said could be the common ancestor to humans, apes and other primates.

The tiny creature, officially known as Darwinius masillae, but dubbed Ida, lived 47 million years ago and is unusually well preserved, missing only five per cent of its skeleton.

The finding was displayed at a press conference at New York's Natural History Museum overnight.

Organisers said that scientists led by Norway's fossil expert Professor Jorn Hurum worked for two years on Ida, first discovered in 1983 by private collectors who failed to understand her importance.

The monkey-like creature was preserved through the ages in Germany's Messel Pit, a crater rich in Eocene Epoch fossils.

Although bearing a long tail, she had several human characteristics, including an opposable thumb, short arms and legs, and forward facing eyes.

"This is the first link to all humans - truly a fossil that links world heritage," Professor Hurum said in a statement.

David Attenborough, the renowned British naturalist and broadcaster, said the "little creature is going to show us our connection with all the rest of the mammals."

"The link they would have said until now is missing ... it is no longer missing," he said.

Capablanca-Fan
21-05-2009, 11:00 PM
"Revolutionary" Fossil Fails to Dazzle Paleontologists (http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2009/519/1?etoc)
By Ann Gibbons
ScienceNOW Daily News
19 May 2009

A fossil skeleton touted as a "revolutionary scientific find that will change everything" was unveiled today at a press conference in New York City. With Mayor Michael Bloomberg and filmmakers in attendance, an international team of researchers introduced the world to "Ida," the skeleton of a primate that, the team claims, may be a missing link between primitive primates and humans. But many experts aren't so enthusiastic. "It's an extraordinarily complete, wonderful specimen, but it's not telling us too much that we didn't know before," says paleoanthropologist Elwyn Simons of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

...

"This is the first link to all humans," said Hurum at the press conference.

Many paleontologists are unconvinced. They point out that Hurum and Gingerich's analysis compared 30 traits in the new fossil with primitive and higher primates when standard practice is to analyze 200 to 400 traits and to include anthropoids from Egypt and the newer fossils of Eosimias from Asia, both of which were missing from the analysis in the paper. "There is no phylogenetic analysis to support the claims, and the data is cherry-picked," says paleontologist Richard Kay, also of Duke University. Callum Ross, a paleontologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois agrees: "Their claim that this specimen should be classified as haplorhine is unsupportable in light of modern methods of classification."

Other researchers grumble that by describing the history of anthropoids as "somewhat speculatively identified lineages of isolated teeth," the PLoS paper dismisses years of new fossils. "It's like going back to 1994," says paleontologist K. Christopher Beard of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who has published jaw, teeth, and limb bones of Eosimias. "They've ignored 15 years of literature."

Bruce Oates
23-05-2009, 04:14 PM
God started making humans 47 million years ago ?
Most teachers would put him in the slow learners class.

Capablanca-Fan
10-06-2009, 07:14 PM
Discovery Raises New Doubts About Dinosaur-bird Links (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090609092055.htm)

ScienceDaily (June 9, 2009) — Researchers at Oregon State University have made a fundamental new discovery about how birds breathe and have a lung capacity that allows for flight – and the finding means it's unlikely that birds descended from any known theropod dinosaurs.

...

It's been known for decades that the femur, or thigh bone in birds is largely fixed and makes birds into "knee runners," unlike virtually all other land animals, the OSU experts say. What was just discovered, however, is that it's this fixed position of bird bones and musculature that keeps their air-sac lung from collapsing when the bird inhales.

...

However, every other animal that has walked on land, the scientists said, has a moveable thigh bone that is involved in their motion – including humans, elephants, dogs, lizards and – in the ancient past – dinosaurs.

The implication, the researchers said, is that birds almost certainly did not descend from theropod dinosaurs, such as tyrannosaurus or allosaurus. The findings add to a growing body of evidence in the past two decades that challenge some of the most widely-held beliefs about animal evolution.

...

Capablanca-Fan
21-06-2009, 03:03 PM
Artificial heart design by Queenslanders a world first (http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,27574,25665418-3102,00.html)

UEENSLANDERS have created the world's first artificial heart which fits inside a human body and can mimic the pumping fluctuations of a healthy heart.

The titanium device – which is about the size of a fist – will provide an alternative to heart transplants, doctors say. It has the potential to save thousands of lives a year worldwide, and will provide significant savings for government-run and private health systems, its inventors believe.

...

The key element of the Bivacor's revolutionary design is a pump that can duplicate the function of both the left and right sides of the heart in a single, small device.

Driven by tiny electromagnets, the pump's twin rotors can alter speed and position to suit blood-flow demands that fluctuate depending on a patient's activity.

...

Professor John Fraser, 40, director of the Critical Care Research Group (CCRG) at Prince Charles and the leader of the Bivacor development team, said the invention was lauded by heart experts.

"After Daniel gave his presentation, the conference concluded that the device would revolutionise artificial heart technology," Prof Fraser said.

"One of the world leaders in cardiology exclaimed, 'Within 10 years, all artificial hearts will be based on this revolutionary Queensland design'."

Once in production, the Bivacor, which has been patented, is expected to cost about $60,000 a unit.

That compares with external heart machines – which cost up to $600,000 each – that are currently used on patients who can wait in hospital for up to six months for a heart transplant.

Remarkably, most of the funding for the Bivacor project – about $250,000 so far – came from the Prince Charles Hospital Foundation raising funds through selling ice creams at the Ekka.

"Despite repeated attempts, there has been no money forthcoming from Queensland Health or Government," Prof Fraser said.

...

kjenhager
23-06-2009, 02:27 AM
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4147551008386395793

Desmond
30-11-2009, 12:02 PM
http://hasthelargehadroncolliderdestroyedtheworldyet.com/


First atom smashed in Hadron Collider (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/975206/first-atom-smashed-in-hadron-collider)


Two circulating beams have produced the first particle collisions in the world's biggest atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), three days after its restart, scientists announced.

...

Scientists want to get the collider running at 1.2 teraelectronvolts or 1.2 trillion electronvolts by year's end - with one teraelectronvolt equal to the energy of a flying mosquito, said a CERN spokeswoman.



(second para quoted as gratuitous attempt at word of the day)

Capablanca-Fan
30-11-2009, 01:14 PM
First atom smashed in Hadron Collider (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/975206/first-atom-smashed-in-hadron-collider)
As you probably know, this is just another example of misleading headlines. They are not smashing atoms but subatomic particles.

Garrett
30-11-2009, 02:54 PM
The implication, the researchers said, is that birds almost certainly did not descend from theropod dinosaurs, such as tyrannosaurus or allosaurus.

:eek: :eek:

Capablanca-Fan
08-07-2010, 12:13 AM
One in a million: Baby born at 23 weeks is now a thriving toddler all set for pre-school (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1292465/One-million-Baby-born-23-weeks-thriving-toddler-set-pre-school.html), 7 July 2010.

[Adult] Stem-Cell Cornea Fix: ‘Miracle’ Treatment Restores Sight in People Blinded by Chemical Burns (http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-20008986-10391704.html?tag=latest), reporting on the study Limbal Stem-Cell Therapy and Long-Term Corneal Regeneration (http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/NEJMoa0905955?resourcetype=HWCIT) in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Igor_Goldenberg
09-07-2010, 09:51 AM
Scientists discover AIDS breakthrough (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/breaking-news/scientists-discover-aids-breakthrough/story-fn3dxity-1225889613010)


US researchers have discovered two powerful antibodies that neutralise more than 90 per cent of all known strains of the HIV virus in the lab, new research released today showed.

NIH-led scientists discovered the antibodies known as VRCO1 and VRCO2 that prevent most HIV strains from infecting human cells. The find is a potential breakthrough for advancing HIV vaccine design, and antibody therapy for other diseases.

Kaitlin
17-07-2010, 06:25 AM
I learnt from TV on Monday from Catalayst that the Universe isnt going to last for ever. High entropy is going to win over low entropy.

This is affecting my ability to have nice dreams :( .

Capablanca-Fan
17-07-2010, 06:31 AM
I learnt from TV on Monday from Catalayst that the Universe isnt going to last for ever. High entropy is going to win over low entropy.
I'm not sure what that could mean. Entropy is always increasing.

Desmond
17-07-2010, 06:29 PM
Assuming that the universe is a closed system. On a side note, if the universe was created by a god does that make it a closed system?

antichrist
17-07-2010, 06:42 PM
Assuming that the universe is a closed system. On a side note, if the universe was created by a god does that make it a closed system?

What I have learnt about God is that he does not like fractions. He made light travel at exactly 186,000 miles a second. Why not so many yards, feet inchs as well and into half, milli secs as well. I wonder how he decided on this speed? And why didnt he make the universe light up simultaneously so we could all have the same time zone for watching olympics etc. How did he decide all these universal questions?

I don't know if scientific research goes into these things but you brought it up Boris so you should get a spanking before me. REgards by the way and sorry how that game ended up.

Rincewind
17-07-2010, 07:43 PM
Assuming that the universe is a closed system. On a side note, if the universe was created by a god does that make it a closed system?

I was wondering if the entropy of God is always increasing. :lol:

Adamski
17-07-2010, 08:01 PM
I was wondering if the entropy of God is always increasing. :lol:Rather, the entropy of some evolutionists is increasing. E.g. one R Dawkins. I have tried to read some of his stuff but when it comes to anything remotely to do with the Bible his material is chock-full of simple errors of fact.

Rincewind
18-07-2010, 12:25 AM
Rather, the entropy of some evolutionists is increasing. E.g. one R Dawkins. I have tried to read some of his stuff but when it comes to anything remotely to do with the Bible his material is chock-full of simple errors of fact.

I'm not so sure about that. He certainly has a different interpretation than you, that's for sure. I don't know enough about what he has said to say whether there are errors in fact.

antichrist
19-07-2010, 05:57 PM
I was wondering if the entropy of God is always increasing. :lol:

as God is everywhere and the universe is big-banging expanding therefore God must also be expanding. I hope he has extra large pants with spare elastic

Capablanca-Fan
03-08-2010, 01:58 AM
Morph-osaurs: How shape-shifting dinosaurs deceived us (http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727713.500-morphosaurs-how-shapeshifting-dinosaurs-deceived-us.html)

Triceratops was likely a juvenile form of Torosaurus.

Rincewind
03-08-2010, 07:16 PM
Triceratops was likely a juvenile form of Torosaurus.

I don't think "likely" is supported on the strength of that article but it is an exciting possibility. I'm not a palaeontologist but it seems a little incongruous to me that the article opens with

"Their skulls underwent extreme changes throughout their lives, growing larger, sprouting horns then reabsorbing them, and changing shape so radically that different stages look to us like different species."*

Which is playing up the theory as quite dramatic while later reporting that the independent expert (Brenton from Bristol) says...

"To suggest they are different growth stages of one form is a remarkable observation, and may well prove highly controversial, but the case is persuasive. It has always been difficult to distinguish the two."*

Which seems to say that the plausibility of the thesis is aided by the fact that the two species are problematic to begin with.

Of course we will never know with 100% certainty either way.

(*my emphasis)

Capablanca-Fan
05-08-2010, 11:07 AM
I don't think "likely" is supported on the strength of that article but it is an exciting possibility.
Seems quite compelling to me, getting away from the sensationalism you mention. I.e. Torosaurus specimens are older, and the oldest Triceratops have notable thinning in their frills just where the Torosaurus holes are.

Considering the size of the creatures, Triceratops is no smaller, so it would be better to say that Torosaurus is a mature version. Othniel Marsh named both in the 1880s, considering them separate genera, but he named Triceratops first so this name stands; Torosaurus is the name that must be dropped if this research.

Rincewind
05-08-2010, 05:07 PM
Seems quite compelling to me, getting away from the sensationalism you mention.

It depends on what you mean by likely. If you mean having probability greater than 0.5 then I would say that cannot be assessed at present. The independent comment said it was persuasive but controversial. However, if by likely you just mean plausible. That is probably significantly greater than 0 but not necessarily greater than 0.5 then yes, the hypothesis does appear plausible to me too. But as a general rule, I avoid using likely to mean plausible.