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View Full Version : 14 year old girl qualifies as a professional Go player



pax
05-08-2008, 06:59 PM
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24127910-25090,00.html
http://www.australiango.asn.au/files/PressReleases/JOANNE%20PRESS%20RELEASE.html

This is an extraordinary achievement for any Australian, let alone a 14 year old girl!

Denis_Jessop
07-08-2008, 04:24 PM
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24127910-25090,00.html
http://www.australiango.asn.au/files/PressReleases/JOANNE%20PRESS%20RELEASE.html

This is an extraordinary achievement for any Australian, let alone a 14 year old girl!

It would seem so though it's drawing a long bow to say that Go has similarities to Chess. The only one I can think of is that the players sit at a board and think. The two games are said to be equally challenging but they are totally different in concept.

DJ

pax
07-08-2008, 06:06 PM
It would seem so though it's drawing a long bow to say that Go has similarities to Chess. The only one I can think of is that the players sit at a board and think. The two games are said to be equally challenging but they are totally different in concept.

The games are reasonably different, but I think it's probably fair to say that the skills needed to play are similar (though weighted away from the tactical and towards the strategic in the case of Go).

george
08-08-2008, 02:00 PM
Hi All,

I think there are many similarities between chess and go. Both games have extensive "opening theory". Both games can be divided easily into themes ie opening,middle and endgame. Both games have an easily recognisable form of rating and titles. Both games have a well developed culture lasting at least a thousand years. Both are wargames.

kindest Regards

Rincewind
08-08-2008, 03:29 PM
It seems to me the question of similarity is always on of degree and depends on the neighbourhood you are considering. In the neighbourhood of all of human experience the two games are quite similar. For starters (as George points out) they are both games. In the neighbourhood of wargames the distinctions become easier to discern.

I know very little about Go but I would suggest that, while the game may have three distinct phases, the definition and considerations which they require are rather different. Similarly while they are both wargames, one focuses on the capture of opponent pieces while the other (from my limited understanding) it is a question of encirclement. (Although in chess I concede the end goal is to encircle and not capture the king).

Considering these points, I think for the purposes of practical similarity, the question is:

How much does a knowledge of one game aid in the playing of the other?

Again emphasising my limited knowledge (particularly of Go) I feel the answer to that question is "very little". However I would expect that the sort of mind which is good at one game would also do well at the other as facility in abstract thought and perhaps spatial visualisation in particular would be advantageous in both games.

Axiom
08-08-2008, 04:54 PM
War games go back as far as ancient Egypt , even further probably.

Chess has a history beyond India c. 400 ad .

pax
11-08-2008, 11:44 AM
I know very little about Go but I would suggest that, while the game may have three distinct phases, the definition and considerations which they require are rather different. Similarly while they are both wargames, one focuses on the capture of opponent pieces while the other (from my limited understanding) it is a question of encirclement. (Although in chess I concede the end goal is to encircle and not capture the king).

Go is ultimately about capturing territory. Although you also score by capturing (encircling) opposition pieces, territory is is usually much more significant.



How much does a knowledge of one game aid in the playing of the other?

Again emphasising my limited knowledge (particularly of Go) I feel the answer to that question is "very little". However I would expect that the sort of mind which is good at one game would also do well at the other as facility in abstract thought and perhaps spatial visualisation in particular would be advantageous in both games.

Knowledge from one would not help with the other at all, but as you suggest the skills are probably transferrable to a significant degree. I'd be backing the chess player against the scrabble player (or the poker player, or the footballer) every time in a Go match.

Capablanca-Fan
18-08-2008, 07:55 PM
Several nations are fighting over Joanne: born in Brisbane of Australian and Taiwanese parents, moved to Taiwan aged 3, lives in San Diego CA. No one else born in Australasia, to my knowledge, has become strong enough to become a professional (a pro 1-dan (shodan) is at least as strong as an amateur 7-dan).

Capablanca-Fan
04-10-2008, 12:41 PM
Jürgen Dueball (1943–2002) was an IM at chess who played in the German Olympiad team twice (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=21494&kpage=1#reply8), an amateur 5-dan go player who was second in the European Champs (http://senseis.xmp.net/?FelixDueball), and represented Germany in bridge at the European champs (http://www.eurobridge.org/competitions/European_championships/TeamChampMembers.asp?qteamid=1134&qmenudetid=156). It's a rare feat to excel in all three of the most prestigious strategic games.