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Basil
16-05-2008, 12:31 AM
Regular readers would have noted the northward march of this writer's ratings over recent periods as well as storming around Adelaide and Parramatta in the vege divisions.

Instead of cruising through the 1600s and staring down the 1700s, this writer has managed a feat that makes Slumpsville look like a welcome alternative.

Ladies and gentleman, I present ... Insane In The Endgame!

Offering #1
Duggan to move {white} misses Rf6 (+7), but the move played (Rxf5) is still +3.
Duggan turns this into a loss :wall: Capital work :clap:

r1k2br1/1pp2R2/1q6/4PpP1/2BP4/pP6/P3Q3/2KR4 w - - 0 31

Basil
16-05-2008, 12:34 AM
Offering #2

Who can forget the self destructo Bxc5. Dead drawn, ahead all game. Result? Loss. Cracking work :clap:

8/2k2p2/1p2pPp1/1Pp1Pn1p/K1P2P2/8/5B1P/8 w - - 18 48

Basil
16-05-2008, 12:37 AM
Offering #3

What about the stupefying tossed off +3 against Garvo. Result? Another monster round zero with sugar on top :doh:

5k1r/pb6/1p2p3/3pPPpq/8/PP1B4/1BPN1K2/6Q1 w - - 3 31

Basil
16-05-2008, 12:43 AM
Ladies and gentleman, I present ... Insane In The Endgame!
So Slumpsville is not being able to get one's usual game together. I find I am playing the best chess of my life and this is what's happening.

I ain't choking (in that I'm not feeling pressure) at the critical moments. Is there a name for this - apart from stupidity.

Basil
16-05-2008, 01:19 AM
Just occurred to me that #1 and #3 I had minutes on the clock. Could it be time trouble? :wall:

Southpaw Jim
16-05-2008, 08:34 AM
Gunner, I feel your pain. Albeit at a lower level.

After a successful year last year, beating or drawing several higher rated players than me and scoring 7.5/24 games as the 2nd lowest rated player in the club, I have returned to form, scoring 1/9 so far this year - with the 1 being against the only player rated lower than me. So, after clawing my way to nearly 1300, I rather suspect that I will also be heading south this winter :doh: :wall: :(

Now is the winter of our discontent.

Spiny Norman
16-05-2008, 09:19 AM
Gunner, #1 above is an awesome effort ... ;)

Still, bishops of opposite colour can be tricky, so perhaps you can draw some solace from that? May I enquire as to (a) the rating of your opponent; and (b) time left on the clock when things went bad?

Basil
16-05-2008, 10:11 AM
Gunner, #1 above is an awesome effort ... ;)
:cool:


Still, bishops of opposite colour can be tricky
Not to mention passers galore and ten ways to win :wall:


May I enquire as to (a) the rating of your opponent;
Notionally 1800 at the beginning of the tournament. We suspect less. In a prior game he was better against the Tool but then blundered (apparently).


(b) time left on the clock when things went bad?
1-2 minutes +10 secs

Basil
16-05-2008, 10:27 AM
Gunner, I feel your pain. Albeit at a lower level.
:D


I rather suspect that I will also be heading south this winter :doh: :wall: :(Have you identified the reason?
a) You are a goose/ clown/ wally/ talentless
b) You are simply playing poorly (work, stress, distractions, family)
c) You don't know
d) Everyone else is getting better! :P

Spiny Norman
16-05-2008, 11:17 AM
1-2 minutes +10 secs
There you have it ... time pressure does strange things to people!

Desmond
16-05-2008, 11:35 AM
Just a thought to ponder, Gunner, do you find it easier to win when there is a single available path to victory or when there are many roads to Rome? Perhaps being spoilt for choice can be a curse. Perhaps when several of the lines you look at lead to wins, it makes you complacent.

Garvinator
16-05-2008, 11:54 AM
Just a thought to ponder, Gunner, do you find it easier to win when there is a single available path to victory or when there are many roads to Rome? Perhaps being spoilt for choice can be a curse. Perhaps when several of the lines you look at lead to wins, it makes you complacent.
Also having the many roads option can lead to time trouble cause time is spent dithering on which good path to take.

Southpaw Jim
16-05-2008, 01:45 PM
:D

Have you identified the reason?
a) You are a goose/ clown/ wally/ talentless
b) You are simply playing poorly (work, stress, distractions, family)
c) You don't know
d) Everyone else is getting better! :P
Hmm, introspection time... I might actually have a look over the past 9 games tonight and see. Without having done that, I would say:
a) no, but certainly not talented;
b) yes, probably. I'd blame the baby, but sleep deprivation is not occurring. I blame it primarily on not playing often enough, so I'm not warming up my chess muscles in advance of club nights by putting my study into practice;
c) well, I often don't know until Fritz or Jono tells me :doh:
d) bastards! must... sabotage...

As I say, not enough playing (cf study). Plus other bad habits, eg too eager to exchange, analysing and not finding a clear answer so impulsively pick a move I haven't analysed ("I can't see anything better, so what the Hell! Let's see what happens... doh!").

ER
16-05-2008, 02:05 PM
Hey Howie, you don't play that bad! If that helps, I have seen worse! :P
Cheers and good luck!

Kevin Bonham
16-05-2008, 03:01 PM
Notionally 1800 at the beginning of the tournament. We suspect less. In a prior game he was better against the Tool but then blundered (apparently).

This is the game in question. It's not just a straightforward blunder - it's also a case of white being too clever for his own good (or ability) with sharp tactics in a position in which getting into them in the first place is completely unnecessary. Neither of them has a clue what they are doing and there is a passage of play with three complete howlers in a row:

32.Qe6?? in a position where white has already terribly messed up his piece sac to push the pawn and should be starting to think about a draw.

32...Rh6?? which should lose instead of 32...Qg7 winning the exchange with a mate threat.

33.Qxc6?? losing because he has overlooked the rook going to c8 after ...Re8+ when anyone over a rating of 1200 should have immediately realised that white has three pieces hitting e8 to two defending it and therefore 33.Qe8+ wins even if one of the pieces defending the square is a bishop.

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.e5 Nfd7 6.Bxe7 Qxe7 7.f4 a6 8.Nf3 c5 9.Bd3 Nc6 10.O-O cxd4 11.Ne2 Nc5 12.Nexd4 Nxd4 13.Nxd4 Nxd3 14.Qxd3 Bd7 15.Kh1 h5 16.Rae1 h4 17.f5 Qg5 18.Qc3 Rc8 19.Qa3 Rc4 20.f6 gxf6 21.exf6 Kd8 22.Qe7+ Kc8 23.Nf3 Qg8 24.Ne5 Be8 25.Nxc4 dxc4 26.Rxe6 fxe6 27.f7 Qf8 28.Qxe6+ Bd7 29.Qxc4+ Bc6 30.Re1 Kb8 31.h3 Ka8 32.Qe6 Rh6 33.Qxc6 Rxc6 34.Re8+ Rc8 35.Rxf8 Rxf8 36.g3 Rxf7 37.gxh4 Rg7 38.Kh2 Kb8 39.h5 Kc7 40.h6 Rh7 41.Kg3 Rxh6 42.h4 Kd7 43.Kg4 Ke7 44.Kg5 Rc6 45.c3 Kf7 46.Kf5 Rc5+ 47.Kf4 Kg6 48.Ke4 Rc4+ 49.Kd5 Rxh4 50.Kc5 Rh2 51.b4 Rxa2 52.Kb6 Rb2 53.Kxb7 a5 54.Kc6 a4

Kevin Bonham
16-05-2008, 04:17 PM
Also having the many roads option can lead to time trouble cause time is spent dithering on which good path to take.

Yep. I've noticed that many, possibly most, lower rated (<1600) players are too perfectionist when short of time, especially if they are in good positions that are not quite straightforward.

They'll have, say, eight minutes left and they'll spend four minutes on one move that doesn't really make such a great difference to the state of the game.

Successful play against the clock requires some kind of judgement of when you can afford to take the time to play the best move and when you just have to find something that's not too abysmal fairly quickly. (This might seem to be less the case with increments but in some ways it is more so, since you can use that to get yourself "off the rack" when you get down to a minute or so.)

The other side of the coin is that many endgames demand care - especially pure pawn endings; it is generally worth running yourself down to, say, 2 minutes in a pure pawn ending if you're not certain what the best move to play is.

Garvinator
16-05-2008, 04:22 PM
KB, that game was Ryan Stevens (white) v [Alex] (black). Ryan will probably end up with an acf rating of 1600 or so.

Basil
16-05-2008, 06:20 PM
Just a thought to ponder, Gunner, do you find it easier to win when there is a single available path to victory or when there are many roads to Rome? Perhaps being spoilt for choice can be a curse. Perhaps when several of the lines you look at lead to wins, it makes you complacent.
Wise.


Hey Howie, you don't play that bad! If that helps, I have seen worse! :P
Cheers and good luck!
You utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter utter :lol:

Basil
16-05-2008, 06:27 PM
Neither of them has a clue what they are doing ...
:lol: :lol: :lol: a coupla HCDs there

Kevin Bonham
16-05-2008, 07:24 PM
I am curious about how you managed to mangle offering #1. Has the full horror been posted here before?

Southpaw Jim
16-05-2008, 09:16 PM
Well, I just started going through the games from this tournament, and found my own Insane in the Endgame gem (we should co-author a book!):

Going from a crushing endgame advantage, I am white with the move...
1. Re5? Kg8 2. Rg5+ Kh8 3. Rf5 Kg8 4. h7+ Kxh7 5. Rxf7+ Kg8 6. Rf5 Kg7 7. Kg4 Kg6 8. Kf4 Kg7 9. Ke4 Kg6 10. Re5 Kf6 11. Kd4 Rd6+ 12. Kc4?? Kxe5 0-1

To a completely blown endgame 12 moves later...

Basil
16-05-2008, 09:16 PM
I am curious about how you managed to mangle offering #1. Has the full horror been posted here before?

I should charge admission for this sort of stuff.

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 g6 3. e3 Bg7 4. Bd3 O-O 5. Nd2 d5 6. Bxf6 Bxf6 7. f4 Nc6 8. c3 e6 9. Ngf3 Bd7 10. h4 Bg7 11. h5 Qf6 12. g4 Rfe8 13. hxg6 hxg6 14. Ne5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Qe7 16. g5 Qc5 17. Qe2 Kf8 18. Rh7 Kg8 19. Rh3 Kf8 20. O-O-O Ke7 21. Rh7 Rg8 22. e4 d4 23. Nb3 Qb6 24. cxd4 a5 25. Nc5 a4 26. Nxd7 Kxd7 27. f5 a3 28. b3 gxf5 29. exf5 Kc8 30. Bc4 Bf8 31. Rxf7 exf5 32. Rxf5 Rh8 33. Qg4 Kb8 34. g6 Qb4 35. Qf3 Ka7 36. Rxf8 Raxf8 37. Bf7 Rh2 38. Kb1 Rd2 39. d5 Qd4 0-1

Kevin Bonham
16-05-2008, 09:36 PM
Ta. From that and the Garvin one it would appear that you're a natural target for Swindles because when winning you try to crash through, and ignore or underestimate opposing threats.

Basil
16-05-2008, 09:43 PM
Ta. From that and the Garvin one it would appear that you're a natural target for Swindles because when winning you try to crash through, and ignore or underestimate opposing threats.
Right, changing avatar now ...

Basil
20-05-2008, 11:50 PM
This is of course more. That was merely a sampling as to depths of present ineptitude from good positions. Here's a gem from this BB. Put down the glasses (well not quite) but white can see his house and the hose is turned on ...

No. Duggan's in charge of the white pieces and he's cocked this one up too. White (Duggan) to move and errr lose :uhoh:

r1b2rk1/ppnqppbp/6p1/2ppP3/2PP4/1P1BP3/PB1N2PP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 1 12

Capablanca-Fan
21-05-2008, 12:02 PM
Well, I just started going through the games from this tournament, and found my own Insane in the Endgame gem (we should co-author a book!):

Going from a crushing endgame advantage, I am white with the move...
1. Re5? Kg8 2. Rg5+ Kh8 3. Rf5 Kg8 4. h7+ Kxh7 5. Rxf7+ Kg8 6. Rf5 Kg7 7. Kg4 Kg6 8. Kf4 Kg7 9. Ke4 Kg6 10. Re5 Kf6 11. Kd4 Rd6+ 12. Kc4?? Kxe5 0-1

To a completely blown endgame 12 moves later...
At least make him demonstrate the win. How would you do it as black if White plays 13. Kc5 ? Would your opponent have found it?

Basil
21-05-2008, 01:11 PM
Well, I just started going through the games from this tournament, and found my own Insane in the Endgame gem (we should co-author a book!):
My God man! I missed this first time around. You idiot!!! Yes, we make a right pair ;)

MichaelBaron
21-05-2008, 10:09 PM
Offering #2

Who can forget the self destructo Bxc5. Dead drawn, ahead all game. Result? Loss. Cracking work :clap:

8/2k2p2/1p2pPp1/1Pp1Pn1p/K1P2P2/8/5B1P/8 w - - 18 48


The position is obviously drawn..however black is marginaly better here! White still has to be accurate to draw it as knight is better than bishop here :hmm:

MichaelBaron
21-05-2008, 10:11 PM
At least make him demonstrate the win. How would you do it as black if White plays 13. Kc5 ? Would your opponent have found it?

Rg5 instead of Re5 wins on the spot!

Southpaw Jim
24-05-2008, 09:41 PM
At least make him demonstrate the win. How would you do it as black if White plays 13. Kc5 ? Would your opponent have found it?
This game was against Janice, who as you'll have seen from her win over Kevin, is a very canny fighter for her rating. The game did continue after this point, but I don't have the moves as I was critically low on time (hence missing the winning move Rg5, and also hanging my rook).

How would I play it in her position? Hmm, well as I see it white's only hope is to get stalemated on or about the 8th rank. As black, I'd take the rook to the first rank to give harassing checks while I manoeuvred my king to guard the queening square - and from memory this is what Janice did - I tried to engineer some kind of stalemate possibility but Janice was having none of it.

Capablanca-Fan
24-05-2008, 10:25 PM
This game was against Janice, who as you'll have seen from her win over Kevin, is a very canny fighter for her rating. The game did continue after this point, but I don't have the moves as I was critically low on time (hence missing the winning move Rg5, and also hanging my rook).
Oh, I got the impression that you gave up as soon as you hung the R. That's why I asked whether you would be sure of a win from there if you had Black.


How would I play it in her position? Hmm, well as I see it white's only hope is to get stalemated on or about the 8th rank. As black, I'd take the rook to the first rank to give harassing checks while I manoeuvred my king to guard the queening square — and from memory this is what Janice did — I tried to engineer some kind of stalemate possibility but Janice was having none of it.
Yes, that's right — the rook usually belongs behind the passed pawn, whether your own or your opponent's. Then the K approaches, and the white K must either block the P or step to the a-file, when Black's K moves to the c-file. If possible, the White K should move towards the Black K as a "shouldering" maneuvre to prevent his approach.

[corrected version] I presume the stalemating possibility is the P on b7 and K on a8, against the enemy K on c6 and R on b file, hoping for Rxb7. But Kc7 first foils that because White must release the stalemate position.

Southpaw Jim
25-05-2008, 12:06 AM
Oh, I got the impression that you gave up as soon as you hung the R. That's why I asked whether you would be sure of a win from there if you had Black.
Sorry my bad - but your comment still stands, as I have a tendency to resign too early. My game against Markovitz is a case in point - I was, on the board, losing (2 pawns down, crummy position) not lost. The fact that he's rated nearly 2100 shouldn't stop me from making him finish me off.


I presume the stalemating possibility is the P on b7 and K on a8, against the enemy K on c7 and R on b file, hoping for Rxb7. But a tempo move with the R foils that.
That's the kind of thing I was aiming for, yes, but I knew it'd depend on Janice blundering away her advantage. I think it got to the point of me giving up the pawn or getting mated, at which point I threw in the towel.

BTW, as discussed in the other thread (Rocky Road) I've ordered Mednis' Middlegame into the Endgame. Rather than buy Averbakh's ending text, I've decided I should finish Silman's first. In the meantime I've bought Alekhine's best games (the Nunn compilation of the 2 Alekhine volumes and the CHOD Alexander volume) - apparently this is one of the best games collections in terms of annotation quality and instructional value :hmm:

MichaelBaron
25-05-2008, 01:32 AM
I've ordered Mednis' Middlegame into the Endgame. Rather than buy Averbakh's ending text, :

I can not believe some ppl seriousy consider buying books by Silman, Mednis, Keene etc. - these guys write a lot of books...but few of these books are actually any good.

Southpaw Jim
25-05-2008, 07:29 AM
I can not believe some ppl seriousy consider buying books by Silman, Mednis, Keene etc. - these guys write a lot of books...but few of these books are actually any good.
Michael, whilst I respect you and your opinion as a chess player and teacher, I find your comment to be unhelpful. You imply that I've wasted my money on two books - however, you don't suggest any specific alternatives.

Re the Mednis text, I'm not aware of any other texts that specifically deal with middlegame to endgame transitions - can you please suggest a couple that are better than Mednis' work?

Re Silman, I bought his endgame text because I find his writing style to be lively and accessible, something that is sadly lacking in most endgame texts. I wasn't aware of the Averbakh text at the time, and I'll probably buy that or Howell's introductory text (which I've read many positive reviews of) next to supplement what I've already learned.

After that, then Dvoretsky! :)

Desmond
25-05-2008, 11:00 AM
I have read the Mednis book, and I think it is actually very good.

Capablanca-Fan
25-05-2008, 01:36 PM
I have read the Mednis book, and I think it is actually very good.
I too thought that one was good.

Keene has written some dreadful books, such as The Opening Repertoire for the Attacking Club Player, but his book on Nimzovich is very good, as is his new one on Petrosyan.

Andy Soltis is another mixed bag. His book on the Italian is not worth getting, but his books on Frank Marshall, Bobby Fischer and Soviet Chess are very well done.

Alekhine's games are good. I think there is a single volume of them. Worth getting Capablanca's too.

Dvoretsky's books are too advanced; I think you'd need to be at least as strong as C. Chadwick, say, to gain much benefit.

Southpaw Jim
25-05-2008, 02:58 PM
Andy Soltis is another mixed bag. His book on the Italian is not worth getting, but his books on Frank Marshall, Bobby Fischer and Soviet Chess are very well done.
How are his books Pawn Structure Chess and Turning Advantage into Victory (similar in subject, I guess, to the Mednis text) ? I've been weighing up PSC for a while against Marovic's Dynamic Pawn Play (I have Marovic's other pawn text Understanding Pawn Play, but haven't read it yet).


Alekhine's games are good. I think there is a single volume of them.
I think that's the one I'm getting, edited by Nunn, foreword by Kasparov. There's another 1 volume work of all his games (~3000), but I think there's less annotation in that one.


Worth getting Capablanca's too.
Noted ;)


Dvoretsky's books are too advanced; I think you'd need to be at least as strong as C. Chadwick, say, to gain much benefit.
Yes, I've read that you need to be at the 1800-2000 level before you bother with him.

MichaelBaron
25-05-2008, 06:40 PM
Michael, whilst I respect you and your opinion as a chess player and teacher, I find your comment to be unhelpful. You imply that I've wasted my money on two books - however, you don't suggest any specific alternatives.

Re the Mednis text, I'm not aware of any other texts that specifically deal with middlegame to endgame transitions - can you please suggest a couple that are better than Mednis' work?

Re Silman, I bought his endgame text because I find his writing style to be lively and accessible, something that is sadly lacking in most endgame texts. I wasn't aware of the Averbakh text at the time, and I'll probably buy that or Howell's introductory text (which I've read many positive reviews of) next to supplement what I've already learned.

After that, then Dvoretsky! :)

Unfortunately i do not know what your rating is so its hard to make specific reccomendations that are tailored to your needs.

Yes, Dvoretsky's books are simply great! I would like to strongly recomment them to everyone of playing strength of 1600+

Averbakh's endgames books are monumental works of art! They are suitable for all levels. Other excellent endgame books are the the ones by John Nunn and Alexander Baburin (in fact Baburin's books is currently being reviewed by www.chesscafe.com - the website contains extract from the book that is a must to read for all chess players)

Regarding transition from middlegame to endgame: There is a very good book by Shereshevsky called "Endgame Strategy".

Regarding buying books: it is always a good idea to buy them from a book seller (unless you are ordering online) who is an experienced chess player and reads chess books as well as sells them. Not sure what state you are from but for example, in victoria - Marcus Raine (our leading seller of chess books) is very helpful in helping his customers choose books that are best-tailored to their needs. Hopefully, there are similar honest (means trying to help you rather than make a sale like we know some book sellers do :) ) in other states. As far as i remember, in Sydney - Peter Parr is always happy to help his customers make a selection.

cheers,
Michael

Kevin Bonham
25-05-2008, 08:58 PM
The game did continue after this point, but I don't have the moves as I was critically low on time (hence missing the winning move Rg5, and also hanging my rook).

I got them (see #555 in HICC thread) - your last move in the sequence from your post above was actually 73.Kc5 (not Kc4) and there followed ...Kxe5 74.b6 Rd1 75.Kc6 Rc1+ 76.Kb7 Kd6 77.Kb8 Rb1 78.b7 Kc6.

As I noted on the thread at the time:

It's normal to miss a difficult save after making a big blunder in time trouble (eg the atrocity in post 16 on this thread) but it's worth knowing in case you ever have to defend KP vs KR again but with more time on the clock, that the unlikely looking 76.Kd7! actually holds on (every other K move loses).

Southpaw Jim
25-05-2008, 09:31 PM
Hi Michael :)


Unfortunately i do not know what your rating is so its hard to make specific reccomendations that are tailored to your needs.
Well, I'm currently about 1300. I expect to drop to closer to 1200 in the June September ratings period, I've had a bad tournament :(


Yes, Dvoretsky's books are simply great! I would like to strongly recomment them to everyone of playing strength of 1600+
Yep, Dvoretsky is my aim, but I've got to master the basics first!


Averbakh's endgames books are monumental works of art! They are suitable for all levels. Other excellent endgame books are the the ones by John Nunn and Alexander Baburin (in fact Baburin's books is currently being reviewed by www.chesscafe.com - the website contains extract from the book that is a must to read for all chess players)
Noted, thankyou ;) Once I've finished Silman's endgame book, I'll move on to Averbakh!


Regarding transition from middlegame to endgame: There is a very good book by Shereshevsky called "Endgame Strategy".
I'm aware that this is the endgame theory text, but as far as I'm aware this is currently above my level. It's part of my future study plan ;)


Regarding buying books: it is always a good idea to buy them from a book seller (unless you are ordering online)
Being in Tasmania, I'm forced to buy online :( I've always bought from Brian Jones, but I bought the Mednis and Alekhine books from Peter Parr (because Brian didn't have the Mednis book).

Capablanca-Fan
26-05-2008, 02:59 PM
I got them (see #555 in HICC thread) - your last move in the sequence from your post above was actually 73.Kc5 (not Kc4) and there followed ...Kxe5 74.b6 Rd1 75.Kc6 Rc1+ 76.Kb7 Kd6 77.Kb8 Rb1 78.b7 Kc6.
Aw, gwon, try 79. Ka8; nothing to lose.


It's normal to miss a difficult save after making a big blunder in time trouble (eg the atrocity in post 16 on this thread) but it's worth knowing in case you ever have to defend KP vs KR again but with more time on the clock, that the unlikely looking 76.Kd7! actually holds on (every other K move loses).
A world championship game was lost in the same way: Alekhine vs Bogoljubov World Championship Match 1929 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1012609). Here, Bogo blundered by 70...Kg4?, when he could have drawn with 70...Ke4, which has the similar "shouldering" effect preventing the enemy K's approach.

Capablanca-Fan
26-05-2008, 03:03 PM
How are his books Pawn Structure Chess and Turning Advantage into Victory (similar in subject, I guess, to the Mednis text) ?
Don't know those ones. BTW, Baburin's book ostensibly about pawn structures covers only IQP positions.

Why not study the Euwe and Kramer bilogy on the middlegame before tackling anything else on strategy?


I've been weighing up PSC for a while against Marovic's Dynamic Pawn Play (I have Marovic's other pawn text Understanding Pawn Play, but haven't read it yet).
Marović's books are a bit advanced.


I think that's the one I'm getting, edited by Nunn, foreword by Kasparov. There's another 1 volume work of all his games (~3000), but I think there's less annotation in that one.
Nunn is a very good author, but has spoiled some classic books with his new editions, including Fischer and Capablanca game collections.

Southpaw Jim
26-05-2008, 04:54 PM
Why not study the Euwe and Kramer bilogy on the middlegame before tackling anything else on strategy?
I (slowly) am ;) I tend to have a 'to buy' list that extends years, many wins and several hundred rating points into the future. I'm also the offspring of 2 librarians, and have a tendency to be a bit of a book magpie :hmm:


Marović's books are a bit advanced.
Yeah, I'm leaving Understanding until I've finished Euwe and Kramer and probably a few others.. :eek: from what I've seen he seems to have a nice clear prose style, though, and from what I can see his 2 pawn books are very worthwhile (when I'm ready for them).


Capablanca game collections.
On that note, which is your preferred? I see that there seems to be a few highly rated (ie on Amazon) collections, Reinfeld, Winter, Golombek, etc.

Capablanca-Fan
26-05-2008, 05:23 PM
On that note, which is your preferred? I see that there seems to be a few highly rated (ie on Amazon) collections, Reinfeld, Winter, Golombek, etc.
Winter is not a game collection but a documented account of his life with Capa's own writings and annotations. Either of the others would be adequate, although some of the opening remarks are dated.

MichaelBaron
26-05-2008, 06:09 PM
Hi Michael :)


Well, I'm currently about 1300. I expect to drop to closer to 1200 in the June September ratings period, I've had a bad tournament :(


Yep, Dvoretsky is my aim, but I've got to master the basics first!


Noted, thankyou ;) Once I've finished Silman's endgame book, I'll move on to Averbakh!


I'm aware that this is the endgame theory text, but as far as I'm aware this is currently above my level. It's part of my future study plan ;)


Being in Tasmania, I'm forced to buy online :( I've always bought from Brian Jones, but I bought the Mednis and Alekhine books from Peter Parr (because Brian didn't have the Mednis book).

Ok, given that you are 1300..I better review my reccommendation.
For middlegame - Eiwe Books (the ones he co-authored with with Kramer and Holden) are great.

For endgames - my reccommendation of Averbakh stands :)

For tactics - there is a great book called "Chess Practicum" by Neishtadt

Southpaw Jim
26-05-2008, 11:23 PM
For tactics - there is a great book called "Chess Practicum" by Neishtadt
Is there an English language version of this? Peter Parr has several books by Neishtadt, but not this one. I can only find the Russian versions :(

MichaelBaron
27-05-2008, 01:57 AM
Is there an English language version of this? Peter Parr has several books by Neishtadt, but not this one. I can only find the Russian versions :(

Good Question. I would think there is :hmm: What are the other Neishtadt Books Peter has on tactics? Could be that when translated into English the book got 're-branded". Basically, Neistadt is famous for his tactics books.

Southpaw Jim
27-05-2008, 06:21 AM
Nothing that jumps out as an obvious re-branded version:

Attacking the King
Exchanging to Win in the Endgame
Tactical Chess Exchanges
Test Your Tactical Ability
Your Move