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mayonnaise
12-01-2008, 03:42 PM
Hi

This is my first post here.

I'm relatively new at chess, although I've been playing for a while. I have not had any training, although I know the basics (develop my pieces, control the centre, etc).

For the time I've been playing, I have not improved my game a lot, because it feels like I'm doing the same thing, making the same mistakes. I can analyse my losses as far as what's the last mistake I made which lost me the game. In most positions, I struggle to find a plan. I can't evaluate the "best" move in a given position unless its bleedingly obvious and in front of my eyes (which never happens vs good players because they don't give me these opportunities - I have to play for them)

It seems as if endless games doesn't do anything. I will not pay for tuition. Also, nobody around me plays chess. So I'm limited to the resources on the net. Does anyone have any advice on how I can improve?

Kevin Bonham
12-01-2008, 04:23 PM
Hi mayonnaise, welcome to the forum.

Analysing your games to see where you made mistakes is a good start, but to benefit from it fully you need to try to work out what kinds of mistakes you are making a lot. That way you can keep those kinds of mistakes in mind and try to avoid them in future games. Also if you know you're making particular kinds of errors, it's much easier to recommend ways to get around them. Of course, also try to work out what things you are doing well in games. If you find that you play a certain kind of position well, then aim for that kind of position. eg some people like to exchange queens, some prefer to keep them on, some people like open positions, some people like closed ones (etc).

If you post a few games here you may find people here can give you useful comments. It's more useful if you post games played at reasonably slow time limits (say 15 mins for the game and up; blitz and bullet games are not as useful to analyse and playing only at fast time limits doesn't improve your chess as much anyway.)

Rincewind
12-01-2008, 04:51 PM
I can't evaluate the "best" move in a given position unless its bleedingly obvious and in front of my eyes (which never happens vs good players because they don't give me these opportunities - I have to play for them)

Hi

If you can get regular games against good opposition then you should be able to improve. Whenever possible go through some postmortem analysis with your opponent, especially when you lose. This is a good way to improve.

I'm not sure what level you're playing at but IMHO most beginners usual fail from lack of tactical capacity. Practice lots of tactics. The best sort are positions from games and there are several books which have a large number of these sorts of problems. Doing lots of these is one way to improve this sort of capacity.

Once you are past this obstacle, not missing tactics and not making rank blunders then the next best way to improve your results is to know end games. There are a few good books on these too. See if you can get a reasonably comprehensive book which suits your level and study end game positions and these will win you many games.

Lastly, have fun. Don't make the work more pain than the enjoyment you get from playing (and winning). ;)

mayonnaise
12-01-2008, 10:09 PM
Thx for the replies

I started playing on FICS today. I found that the level of play is high and also I'm able to play higher rated opponents easily, which should be good for me. After 10 games my rating is about 1200.

The main problem in my games is not tactics. I can see tactics when they are there. I just can't play to positions where they are possible. In most of my losses vs higher rated opponents, I find myself in a hopeless position after about 15-20 moves. I especially hate redundant positions where there are no tactical opportunities - I have no idea what to do in those positions and I usually blunder sooner or later.

I've tried to analyse my losses, but it's hard by myself. I can identify my last mistake but not the ones which put me in that position. Perhaps I'll record one of my games and get some advice on my poor moves and how they can be improved, but I'd really like to be able to think for myself. If I can do this after the game, I can do this during the game.

sleepless
12-01-2008, 10:25 PM
I would none-the-less recommend "Understanding Chess Tactics" by Martin Weteschnik. It's brilliant as 1. you don't need a chessboard to follow it and 2. it will make an immediate difference to your play.
You can buy it cheapest over the internet from Amazon.com

MichaelBaron
13-01-2008, 01:47 AM
Hi

This is my first post here.

I'm relatively new at chess, although I've been playing for a while. I have not had any training, although I know the basics (develop my pieces, control the centre, etc).


It seems as if endless games doesn't do anything. I will not pay for tuition. Also, nobody around me plays chess. So I'm limited to the resources on the net. Does anyone have any advice on how I can improve?

Hi, mayonnaise.

Use the money you save through "not paying for tuition" to buy chess strategy and tactics books!

I gather that your level is around 1100 (well my knowledge of FICS ratings is outdated so i might be wrong). In this case you can start out by looking at some introductory books on chess strategy such as "Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur" by M. Ejwe. Also get a collection of simple tactical puzzles (e.g. 250 traps and combinations by Nejshtadt) and go through 10-15 positions daily.

Kaitlin
27-01-2008, 06:12 PM
1. Discover Chess cause your pissed off that too many people use car with rocket launchers in Age of Empires on online games and you dont know the cheat codes.

2. Check out the other games in Game Zone and find most are either 'click quick' or 'repeat' to win games.. read the instructions for chess and decide it would be hard for people to cheat in it.

3. Play a few games and eventually work out the 'L" shape is 3 and 1 across and you only have to move the King to get the castleing magic to work.

4. Workout that if you make patterns you can win

5. Discover klizberg enables people to cheat and be annoying and you cant turn it off

6. Persist in playing and discover ChessKit.com

7. Annoy people at ChessKit.com then one day one of them slips up and mentions FICS

8. Go to FICS and find that people cant refuse to play you if you join a touney :)

9. Have someone nice at ChessKit community try to teach you 'tattics'

11. Collect four chess books but dont read them cause they are boring and you cant work out what the hell e4xf5.

12. Play some corro games but give up cause it takes you an hour to set up the chess board to try and see your next move and you set it up wrong anywho.

13. Develop a crush on a chess player and decide you want to have intelligent children

14. Realise you are losing most of your games casue you run out of minutes.

15. Discover Crazyhouse and dabble in Bughouse (transfer) but find no-one will play you casue you are way to slow

16. Join a weekly tourney and find that you are not that well organised and relaise you are a complusive player

17. Play instant tourneys all the time and anyone else who will play you.. denie chess is addictive and say you can give up anytime want... keep chasing that easy win.

18. Then today ..realise that you mostly win your first games of the day and you should prob only play 1 game a day

19. Admit to yourself that this isnot going to happen.. and sign bak into FICs :(

eclectic
27-01-2008, 06:41 PM
1. Discover Chess ... (edited for brevity)

Kaitlin,

you ought to release that post as plaque or as a wall poster!

!!CLASSIC!!

(can't do that classic smiley anymore :()

i'd even rob gunner duggan's bank just to give you 10000 HCD's for the effort

:clap: :clap: :clap:

Kaitlin
28-01-2008, 12:47 PM
Wat are HDC's

Kevin Bonham
28-01-2008, 10:18 PM
Wat are HDC's

They're worth rather less than these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_z%C5%82oty) were before revaluation.

CameronD
28-01-2008, 10:26 PM
Wat are HDC's

I thought they were exchangable..

... 10 HCD can be used to ban gunner from chesschat for a minute :D

UELleida
31-01-2008, 01:31 AM
13. Develop a crush on a chess player and decide you want to have intelligent children

lol!

Southpaw Jim
01-02-2008, 09:18 PM
They're worth rather less than these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_z%C5%82oty) were before revaluation.
For some reason, when I was studying the mechanics of exchange rates in finance at uni, they were always the currency used in examples. Not sure if it was the course text or the lecturer's choice, I always cringed when the lecturer pronounced it as:

"zzz-LL-otties"

incorrectly assuming it was an 'L'. Mind you, this lecturer was an A-grade tosser, and writes a economics-ish column for the local rag (KB will probably guess who).

(BTW, it's actually pronounced 'zwoty')

Capablanca-Fan
02-02-2008, 12:02 AM
For some reason, when I was studying the mechanics of exchange rates in finance at uni, they were always the currency used in examples. Not sure if it was the course text or the lecturer's choice, I always cringed when the lecturer pronounced it as:

"zzz-LL-otties"

incorrectly assuming it was an 'L'. Mind you, this lecturer was an A-grade tosser, and writes a economics-ish column for the local rag (KB will probably guess who).

(BTW, it's actually pronounced 'zwoty')
Then it should be written złoty, with the slash through the l.

Southpaw Jim
02-02-2008, 10:37 PM
Tak, poprawny! ;)

gm_afiq
16-07-2008, 03:42 PM
My Suggestions:

1. Find Chess coach
2. Buy chess books
3. Spend your time for play & learn (50-50)

MichaelBaron
17-07-2008, 11:25 PM
My Suggestions:

1. Find Chess coach
2. Buy chess books
3. Spend your time for play & learn (50-50)

Very good points!

EcoChess
20-10-2008, 12:14 AM
1.Training: you must see, after tournament, your own games.

2. Openings: Example:
You White: If you play 1.e4: 1...c5 (most probably): 2.Nc3
1...e5 (most probably): 2.Nc3
1...c6 : 2.Nc3!
1...e6; 2.d4-d5; 3.Nc3!
You Black: If White plays: 1.e4-e5 and 2...Nc6!
If White plays: 1.d4-d5; 2.c4-Nc6!? (Chigorin defense)
If White plays: 1.c4-e5; 2.Nc3-Nc6 (Inverted sicilian)

You see Nc3 (or Nc6) give a especifically position for your Queen's knight, you don't forget piece's structure. (IE: Nbd2-d3-g3-Bg2-Nf3, in many openings, KIA (king's Indian Attack)).

3. Tactical: It's the most important in chess. You must resolve 10-20 puzzles each day to improve your chess.
4. Endings: Fundamental to understand chess openings. You must begin with Pawn's endings. (Kings and pawns, no pieces).
You must divide 1 day in 3 parts:
1 hour (in the morning):chess endings
2 hour (in the afternoon): puzzles.
1 hour (in the evening): chess opening. 4 hours by day it's excellent:

5.Play chess: NO BLITZ, you must play chess 1 hour a finish or 2 hours by game, at least.

6. You don't smoke (health live):D
You can find many information to improve your chess in
http://www.ecochess.com/

Miranda
20-10-2008, 07:38 AM
If I was you, I'd learn some openings, study tactics, and get a coach! I know it's expensive but it's really good having someone to help you

MichaelBaron
20-10-2008, 03:05 PM
One sure way to improve in chess...is contact me for chess lessons :D

Capablanca-Fan
20-10-2008, 03:16 PM
If I was you, I'd learn some openings, study tactics, and get a coach! I know it's expensive but it's really good having someone to help you
What's the going rate for chess coaches these days?

CameronD
20-10-2008, 08:39 PM
What's the going rate for chess coaches these days?

http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=7811&highlight=lessons

Capablanca-Fan
21-10-2008, 11:56 AM
http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=7811&highlight=lessons
Thanx Cam. So how does one do Internet lessons?

Miranda
21-10-2008, 12:34 PM
Well, the way I've had them, is you and your coach log onto ICC [or whatever] at the same time, then you talk/play games/analyse positions. It's very convenient.

I find it best to have a real board next to me, and when i'm given a puzzle or something to solve, to set it up in real life then solve it, rather than try and work it out on the computer.

MichaelBaron
21-10-2008, 03:05 PM
Thanx Cam. So how does one do Internet lessons?

I can answer this as i am the one coaching Cameron :).

All that you have to do is
a) log into a chess server
b) enter examination mode
c) make your student/teacher examiner
d) there is also a chat window next to the board so you can talk as well as move the pieces

Capablanca-Fan
21-10-2008, 05:38 PM
I can answer this as i am the one coaching Cameron :).

All that you have to do is
a) log into a chess server
b) enter examination mode
c) make your student/teacher examiner
d) there is also a chat window next to the board so you can talk as well as move the pieces
Thanx Michael. Payment is through Paypal or what?

MichaelBaron
21-10-2008, 08:12 PM
Thanx Michael. Payment is through Paypal or what?

Yep, payment can be made via PayPal. Otherwise, you can ask students to send money to your bank account directly. Also in the light of the currency exchange rate. Try to get more US students :)

Capablanca-Fan
25-10-2008, 09:38 PM
Yep, payment can be made via PayPal. Otherwise, you can ask students to send money to your bank account directly. Also in the light of the currency exchange rate. Try to get more US students :)
Thanx again. Good thought about the US :)

Ivanchuk_Fan
26-10-2008, 11:35 AM
1.Training: you must see, after tournament, your own games.

2. Openings: Example:
You White: If you play 1.e4: 1...c5 (most probably): 2.Nc3
1...e5 (most probably): 2.Nc3
1...c6 : 2.Nc3!
1...e6; 2.d4-d5; 3.Nc3!
You Black: If White plays: 1.e4-e5 and 2...Nc6!
If White plays: 1.d4-d5; 2.c4-Nc6!? (Chigorin defense)
If White plays: 1.c4-e5; 2.Nc3-Nc6 (Inverted sicilian)

You see Nc3 (or Nc6) give a especifically position for your Queen's knight, you don't forget piece's structure. (IE: Nbd2-d3-g3-Bg2-Nf3, in many openings, KIA (king's Indian Attack)).

3. Tactical: It's the most important in chess. You must resolve 10-20 puzzles each day to improve your chess.
4. Endings: Fundamental to understand chess openings. You must begin with Pawn's endings. (Kings and pawns, no pieces).
You must divide 1 day in 3 parts:
1 hour (in the morning):chess endings
2 hour (in the afternoon): puzzles.
1 hour (in the evening): chess opening. 4 hours by day it's excellent:

5.Play chess: NO BLITZ, you must play chess 1 hour a finish or 2 hours by game, at least.

6. You don't smoke (health live):D
You can find many information to improve your chess in
http://www.ecochess.com/

If you want to play ...Nc6 setups with Black against 1.d4, a better option is probably the King's Indian (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7), since there Black can soundly play ...Nc6 at some point in almost every single variation.

Desmond
27-10-2008, 10:52 AM
My Suggestions:

1. Find Chess coach
2. Buy chess books
3. Spend your time for play & learn (50-50)
Don't buy lots of books. Buy one, read it, then buy another. Too many chess players have lots of books that they don't read.

Igor_Goldenberg
03-11-2008, 11:02 AM
My suggestions:
1. Learn endgame.
2. Learn endgame.
3. Play more games, then
4. Learn endgame.
5. Have a look at some broad opening book to get some basic principles (control of the centre, development, etc.).
6. Learn endgame.
7. Tactics training (solving combinations to learn patterns).

After you reach about 1300 level, study middlegame, opening, play more and don't forget to:
8. Learn endgame.

Miranda
03-11-2008, 05:49 PM
My suggestions:
1. Learn endgame.
2. Learn endgame.
3. Play more games, then
4. Learn endgame.
5. Have a look at some broad opening book to get some basic principles (control of the centre, development, etc.).
6. Learn endgame.
7. Tactics training (solving combinations to learn patterns).

After you reach about 1300 level, study middlegame, opening, play more and don't forget to:
8. Learn endgame.

Hm, for some reason I think Igor reckons that the endgame's pretty important ;)

Capablanca-Fan
03-11-2008, 06:06 PM
Hm, for some reason I think Igor reckons that the endgame's pretty important ;)
And I would agree. Capablanca pointed out that it can be studied in its own right, but openings and middlegames must be studied in relation to the endgame. And before England became a chess powerhouse, Karpov noted that the Brits back then studied openings a lot but not much in the endgames, and advised the opposite.

Igor_Goldenberg
06-11-2008, 01:38 PM
Hm, for some reason I think Igor reckons that the endgame's pretty important ;)
Learnt from some bitter personal experience.

MichaelBaron
23-11-2008, 02:44 PM
Speaking of improvement: Chess Cafe has a very good article by Nakamura's step-dad discussing importance of learning patterns rather than memorizing moves!

Garvinator
23-11-2008, 03:50 PM
Speaking of improvement: Chess Cafe has a very good article by Nakamura's step-dad discussing importance of learning patterns rather than memorizing moves!
Susan Polgar in the program My Brilliant Brain talked quite a bit about clustering and learning to remember and recognise chess clusters and formations.

The point being that a top player can easily recognise a pattern or set up of pieces and recognise what to do. The lesser player, with less experience and tactical know how, either will take too long to work out what to do, or will not be able to recognise the correct formation required for the pattern displayed.

Ghost Dog
24-11-2008, 10:21 PM
this is my first post,too:D

I think solving lots of puzzles will improve your chess tactics...and also you should study the openings and chess strategy as well!!:P

Space_Dude
24-11-2008, 10:40 PM
I have studied many puzzles and tactics and somehow managed to look few moves ahead, but somtimes that doesnt go according to plan and it gets back fired at me...:( :(

MichaelBaron
24-11-2008, 11:49 PM
I have studied many puzzles and tactics and somehow managed to look few moves ahead, but somtimes that doesnt go according to plan and it gets back fired at me...:( :(

Keep up the good work!

Miranda
25-11-2008, 07:27 AM
Parents have confiscated my laptop for a week. So last night I spent from 3:30pm - 9:30pm studying chess, with a 20-min break for dinner. This will probably continue for the next week :lol: . Hopefully once I'm allowed back on my laptop (and ICC!) I'll go up a few rating points ;)

MichaelBaron
25-11-2008, 03:24 PM
Parents have confiscated my laptop for a week. ;)

Let me guess why :)

WhiteElephant
25-11-2008, 04:02 PM
Let me guess why :)

I am not so sure I would want my my kids frequenting Chess Chat :D

Saragossa
25-11-2008, 07:29 PM
Play eight pawns chess over and over again until you (and spaaring partner) feel up to adding a bishop, then two bishops. But then take the bishops off and add a single knight. Play with two knights and then a knight and bishop.

Miranda
26-11-2008, 02:20 PM
Let me guess why :)
$50 says you won't guess why within 2 guesses. :P

Desmond
26-11-2008, 02:40 PM
Play eight pawns chess over and over again until you (and spaaring partner) feel up to adding a bishop, then two bishops. But then take the bishops off and add a single knight. Play with two knights and then a knight and bishop.I find it is quite effective to do it the other way around, i.e. with pieces and no pawns first. It teaches the power of the pieces when they are unrestricted by pawns. Then when you add the pawns, it is apparent that the pawns should be moved to get out of the way of the pieces. This is a fundamental opening lesson.

Saragossa
26-11-2008, 05:23 PM
You would probably know better than me but I believe endgames are much more important than openings. And a good understanding of pure pawn endgames is the most important because in all endgames there is a possibility to trade down into a pure K&P endgame where wins and losses are decided by small details.

Also by studying endgames openings improve alot for instance after learning about weak squares in a pawn structure i realised why the benko works so well in material down endgames.

I also wonder whether there is a forced win for white from the opening. ( with no pawns that is)

Capablanca-Fan
26-11-2008, 05:46 PM
You would probably know better than me but I believe endgames are much more important than openings. And a good understanding of pure pawn endgames is the most important because in all endgames there is a possibility to trade down into a pure K&P endgame where wins and losses are decided by small details.
Yes, look at Xie's game from the last round of the Olympiad.

Saragossa
26-11-2008, 08:15 PM
I was watching live in dissapointment when he initiated the rook trade. And also his defiance of the activate your king principle also led to what should have been a winning endgame.

Watto
28-11-2008, 07:47 AM
Hm, for some reason I think Igor reckons that the endgame's pretty important ;)
Yes, I had Igor's advice ringing in my head last night as I turned a win into a draw. I went home feeling rather deflated and found a book on endgames in the bookshelf.
For some reason I have not managed to properly read a book on chess yet (except for Purdy's Chess Made Easy when I first started) so hopefully this time I'll actually do it. I'll report back in a few months...

Spiny Norman
28-11-2008, 09:03 AM
In computer-based tests (e.g. Chessmaster) I rate about 250pts higher in endgame skills than in tactics, opening shots, etc. I've always paid a lot of attention to endgame stuff, such as pawn structures, opposition, active pieces vs material, etc ... and I reckon I have won more points converting losses to draws/wins and draws into wins using my endgame technique than just about any other chess skill. So I'd thoroughly recommend people paying a lot of attention to stuff like that!

Desmond
28-11-2008, 10:19 AM
You would probably know better than me but I believe endgames are much more important than openings. And a good understanding of pure pawn endgames is the most important because in all endgames there is a possibility to trade down into a pure K&P endgame where wins and losses are decided by small details.

Also by studying endgames openings improve alot for instance after learning about weak squares in a pawn structure i realised why the benko works so well in material down endgames.

I also wonder whether there is a forced win for white from the opening. ( with no pawns that is)I wasn't advocating it as a way to teach the opening, just a way to teach how the pieces move. A side effect is that they get a lesson in space, by having a wide open board and then contrasted by the pawns adding clutter and restricting the movement of the pieces. Piece/pawn harmony is a lesson that will help with all 3 phases of the game, but it is most obvious in the opening when the pawn strucutre is yet to be determined and the pieces are most restricted.

8 pawns v 8 pawns is not the same as studying pawn endings. If there are no kings on the board all it teaches you is to copy your opponent's moves. If you want to teach pawn endings, start with KP v K in both winning and drawn position and show the technique for each side.

Capablanca-Fan
28-11-2008, 11:22 AM
I think that's a better strategy.

Saragossa
28-11-2008, 04:43 PM
there are kings i should've mentioned that.

How often do you get into endgames without pawns? How many club/tournament games are completely won in the opening?
A low percentage thats for sure with 8 pawns you instantly learn about weak squares in a pawn structure weak diagonals and also it teaches calculating as there are not as many complex variations and the variations can be seen through brute force. I have to go now but this is definately to be continued.

Space_Dude
28-11-2008, 06:31 PM
$50 says you won't guess why within 2 guesses. :P
Why $50 is it all you got??

Desmond
28-11-2008, 11:16 PM
there are kings i should've mentioned that.

How often do you get into endgames without pawns? Much more often than you get endings with 16 pawns left on the board.


How many club/tournament games are completely won in the opening?Depends on what you mean by "won". A game can be decided on move 11 but not finish until move 30.


A low percentage thats for sure with 8 pawns you instantly learn about weak squares in a pawn structure weak diagonals and also it teaches calculating as there are not as many complex variations and the variations can be seen through brute force. I have to go now but this is definately to be continued.Chess should be studied backwards, famous quote I think from Capablanca. For this reason as you point out it is important to study the endgame. If you do not understand the simple you will not understand the complex. And for this reason also, you should teach pawn endings starting with the simplest ones, KP v K, and gradually increase complexity. 8 pawns v 8 pawns might be a fun chess variant but it has no lessons that cannot be taught in conjunction with more practical ones. If you want to teach weak diagonals, show a position where a fianchettoed bishop has been removed from a castled king and combine the lessons with king safety. If you want to teach calculation, give puzzles and combine the lesson with tactical training. Etc.

Saragossa
28-11-2008, 11:24 PM
Much more often than you get endings with 16 pawns left on the board.

Depends on what you mean by "won". A game can be decided on move 11 but not finish until move 30.

Chess should be studied backwards, famous quote I think from Capablanca. For this reason as you point out it is important to study the endgame. If you do not understand the simple you will not understand the complex. And for this reason also, you should teach pawn endings starting with the simplest ones, KP v K, and gradually increase complexity. 8 pawns v 8 pawns might be a fun chess variant but it has no lessons that cannot be taught in conjunction with more practical ones. If you want to teach weak diagonals, show a position where a fianchettoed bishop has been removed from a castled king and combine the lessons with king safety. If you want to teach calculation, give puzzles and combine the lesson with tactical training. Etc.


I know that is what I am advocating the study of the endgame.


And also the pawns are traded so you actually get into a reasonably plausible pawn ending quickly which is conveniant if you need experience.

K+P vs K is simple what you need to know is how are you going to trade down into a winning (if having the pawn) or drawing (without) from a multiple pawn endgame or perhaps even with pieces on.

And even more importantly is knowing when to trade down into a pawn endgame.

Desmond
28-11-2008, 11:41 PM
I know that is what I am advocating the study of the endgame.8p v 8p is not study of the endgame.

And also the pawns are traded so you actually get into a reasonably plausible pawn ending quickly which is conveniant if you need experience.Why not just start there?


K+P vs K is simple what you need to know is how are you going to trade down into a winning (if having the pawn) or drawing (without) from a multiple pawn endgame or perhaps even with pieces on.Simple in chess is a relative term and most people who have not been shown KP v K will not easily work it out for themselves, if at all. So you start there. Complex pawn endings and corresponding square theory is very interesting and indeed beautiful but if you don't know the basics it is a waste of time. Can you name a single endgame book that teaches in the order from most complex to most simple?


And even more importantly is knowing when to trade down into a pawn endgame.All the more reason to start at the simplest and build up complexity.

Saragossa
28-11-2008, 11:45 PM
8 pawns is not very complex pieces are. Startint there is probably a good idea and i do this infact alot of the time against an engine I play with common pawn structures from openings so i get a feel for that opening throughout the entire game.

Kh8mate
16-01-2009, 02:34 AM
I think the best way to improve is to solve hundrets of tactic puzzles and don't use a computer while doing it. Even if you don't find a solution, you spend some time thinking about the moves and that already made you a better player IMO :)

MichaelBaron
17-01-2009, 09:48 AM
I think the best way to improve is to solve hundrets of tactic puzzles and don't use a computer while doing it. Even if you don't find a solution, you spend some time thinking about the moves and that already made you a better player IMO :)

Solving tactical puzzles is not enough. You should also learn how to play positionally.

ER
17-01-2009, 02:46 PM
Can you name a single endgame book that teaches in the order from most complex to most simple?


Actually, Boris a book like that could help one to discover their real level of knowledge! Kids don't try that at home with Maths it simply doesn't work! :)
CAGLES