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View Full Version : Preparing for an important Tournament!



MARON
24-11-2007, 12:55 PM
Lets say you are 2300 strength and you are going to play in the next Aus Championships.
How would you go about preparing for the tournament??
read opening books?? middle game books?? or endgame books??
suggestions would be helpful:)

Metro
25-11-2007, 01:24 AM
Lets say you are 2300 strength and you are going to play in the next Aus Championships.
How would you go about preparing for the tournament??
read opening books?? middle game books?? or endgame books??
suggestions would be helpful:)

A report suggests before winning Australian Championship(circa 1996),IM West studied combinations.

Intuition
26-11-2007, 11:06 AM
for some reason most over 2300 treat thier preparation as a closely guarded secret...you wont get any ansewers here unfortunately..ive tried in another thread with no luck

Gattaca
26-11-2007, 12:34 PM
I think the top chessplayers in general are amazingly generous with what they reveal, compared to most sports. Perhaps because chess has that element of science where we are all working to discover 'truth'.

Before the 1996 Championship I had recently discovered computer chess and was analysing with a program a lot. At the time not all the top players had programs and databases, which seems amazing now. Plenty did, but for me it made a big difference. It sharpened up my tactics, but more importantly it boosted my confidence by destroying any fear of other human players at the time, because I realised how tactically weak we were.

My mantra became, 'all humans are weak' and whilst that doesn't make you any stronger yourself it certainly frees you psychologically when you're up against players who are higher rated. Fear of the opponent can be subtly paralysing. Also, by being aware of how many tactics are being overlooked by humans all the time you concentrate harder on tactics and perhaps see more.

Things are a bit different now. The top players analyse with computers extensively and have learned to tighten up their tactics. They recognise the kinds of positions where a program might execute a tactic and are more careful. They know that their games will be replayed on Fritz. Often you hear a player say something like, "Fritz would find a forced win here", and often they are right.

In the past a lot of strong players overrated how much they were seeing and if they couldn't see a refutation of something they were hard to convince that there was anything wrong. In my opinion top players have become more intuitive about tactics now, after countless experiences of having loose moves exploited by a program at home.

So nowadays just analysing with a program a lot confers no advantage, and for less experienced players is probably a bad way to prepare. These players should concentrate on increasing their knowledge of positions and their technique. Reading middlegame and endgame books is one of the best ways to prepare. It raises your confidence because you feel like you've learned things. Solving tactical puzzles is good too, (all study helps), but I think it can be a bit wasteful to study tactics too much outside the context of a game. In a real game no-one tells you that you have a forced win (normally :) ) so whilst it is still valuable to do rote tactics, playing over annotated games or reading books where the tactics arise naturally and without being telegraphed is probably better... then you get all the additional positional understanding.

Having said that, all study is good. Arguing over what study is best takes time away from doing the study. My advice would be to just dive and do whatever study you most enjoy first. Once you reach 2500 you should start trying to tailor your study to methodically eliminate weaknesses. If I was able to take my own advice on this subject more often I'd have got a lot better!

ER
26-11-2007, 02:10 PM
for some reason most over 2300 treat thier preparation as a closely guarded secret...you wont get any ansewers here unfortunately..ive tried in another thread with no luck

Hi Intution, according to my experience, stronger players are giving earnest and sound advice whenever they are asked. If you want me to I can give you a list of very strong players who are always willing to help if they are asked.
Guy West is definitely one of them!
Cheers and good luck!

MichaelBaron
26-11-2007, 04:54 PM
I do not think "chess secrets" are well kept :). Majority of the top chess players (e.g. Botvinnik, Petrosian etc.) always discussed their study strategies in their books and articles. Furthermore, it is easy to get a strong player to coach you and to reveal his thinking patterns in a "personal and intimate" atmosphere :). ;)

MARON
26-11-2007, 06:03 PM
Thanks for the reply Gattaca, it was really helpful.:)