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Maxwell843
07-10-2007, 06:15 PM
hi,
I was just reading an article summing up the 2007 world championship in Mexico. http://washingtontimes.com/article/20071006/ENTERTAINMENT/110060019/1007
He made some interesting points especially about opening theory and the apparent shift away from the traditional sicilian defence to other openings like ruy lopez and petroff.

"Given the pre-tournament preparation and ingenuity of the players, such high-class events often serve as harbingers for major shifts in chess opening theory. Based on the play in Mexico City, the Queen's Gambit Semi-Slav is about to be the "it" opening, while White faces major challenges getting anything more than a draw out of the Ruy Lopez Marshall Gambit or the dreaded Petroff's.

And in a stunning shift in tastes, Anand's critical Round 11 win over Morozevich was only the second Sicilian played in the tournament. The fighting defense favored by Kasparov and Bobby Fischer, once ubiquitous at the elite level, was played just four times in the 56 games of the event."

I was wondering what people's thoughts are on the matter. Will the sicilan fade in popularity for the other openings?

Aaron Guthrie
07-10-2007, 06:20 PM
But the slav, petroff and ruy have been popular for a while. Will the sicilian fade in popularity among who (and for how long)?

Davidflude
08-10-2007, 11:32 AM
hi,
I was just reading an article summing up the 2007 world championship in Mexico. http://washingtontimes.com/article/20071006/ENTERTAINMENT/110060019/1007
He made some interesting points especially about opening theory and the apparent shift away from the traditional sicilian defence to other openings like ruy lopez and petroff.

"Given the pre-tournament preparation and ingenuity of the players, such high-class events often serve as harbingers for major shifts in chess opening theory. Based on the play in Mexico City, the Queen's Gambit Semi-Slav is about to be the "it" opening, while White faces major challenges getting anything more than a draw out of the Ruy Lopez Marshall Gambit or the dreaded Petroff's.

And in a stunning shift in tastes, Anand's critical Round 11 win over Morozevich was only the second Sicilian played in the tournament. The fighting defense favored by Kasparov and Bobby Fischer, once ubiquitous at the elite level, was played just four times in the 56 games of the event."

I was wondering what people's thoughts are on the matter. Will the sicilan fade in popularity for the other openings?

The use of Spanish and Petroff is classic round robin and match play tactics. The aim is to draw with black and as white beat the weakies and draw or win against your stronger opponents. A similar approach is often employed in correspondence chess when a player decides to play for rating points rather than to win the tournament.

Of course in swiss tournaments the aim is to avoid draws and so assymetric fighting defences are employed.