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Trent Parker
02-10-2007, 02:17 PM
Further to the discussion DanielBell and I had last night about laptops:

tell me what you think of this for $799

HP Presario F555AU AMD Turion 64 Mobile Tech 2.0GHz
512 Meg DDR2
80Gig Hard Drive
15.4 TFT Screen Widescreen
3 USB
NVidia GEForce 6150
DVD/CD-RW combo
56K Modem
Wireless 802.11B/G
Windows Vista Home Basic.

DanielBell
02-10-2007, 03:37 PM
http://www.getprice.com.au/HP_Presario_F555AU_GG199PA_Laptop_Gppv_24--11001

Try knock em back a bit... :)

pax
02-10-2007, 03:41 PM
Further to the discussion DanielBell and I had last night about laptops:

tell me what you think of this for $799

HP Presario F555AU AMD Turion 64 Mobile Tech 2.0GHz
512 Meg DDR2
80Gig Hard Drive
15.4 TFT Screen Widescreen
3 USB
NVidia GEForce 6150
DVD/CD-RW combo
56K Modem
Wireless 802.11B/G
Windows Vista Home Basic.

Looks pretty standard for the price.

The low end Dell Inspiron is similar. Sempron 3500+, 1GB, 120GB, ATI Xpress 1150. Inferior processor, but more memory. Up to you..
http://www1.ap.dell.com/content/products/features.aspx/notebooks_good?c=au&cs=audhs1&l=en&s=dhs

Desmond
02-10-2007, 07:21 PM
I would really, really, really, really recommend against these cheap-end notebooks.

Trent Parker
03-10-2007, 12:46 AM
Reason?

pax
03-10-2007, 08:48 AM
I would really, really, really, really recommend against these cheap-end notebooks.

Yeah, why? Most people have absolutely no need for top-end processors and graphics cards, 2+GB RAM etc. If you buy into that game, you play into the manufacturer's hands. One caveat is that if you can salary sacrifice, you get laptops very cheap, so the extra cost of top-end gear is not so much.

I'm looking forward to the release of the Asus Eee, retailing between US$200 and $400 .

Ian Rout
03-10-2007, 10:43 AM
Yeah, why? Most people have absolutely no need for top-end processors and graphics cards, 2+GB RAM etc.
Pax, what do you reckon is sufficient for what most chess players would use a laptop for, such as databases and chess-playing programs, assuming they are not also into high-resource activities in their spare time?

pax
03-10-2007, 12:06 PM
Pax, what do you reckon is sufficient for what most chess players would use a laptop for, such as databases and chess-playing programs, assuming they are not also into high-resource activities in their spare time?

Any of the above would handle chess databases and programs, along with web browsing, word processing etc with absolutely no problems.

Only if you wanted to do very in-depth chess analysis would you find it to be insufficient.

Rincewind
03-10-2007, 02:20 PM
I would really, really, really, really recommend against these cheap-end notebooks.

I'm speculating to what Boris meant here but one possible rationale is that most new laptops are coming with Vista these days which has a memory requirement over and above what is running at the application layer. So if you are running Vista, make sure you have enough memory. The other issue is generally laptops are not so easy to upgrade compared to desktops so it is a little more necessary to plan for future use as well.

That being said there are other options.

If your laptop comes with Vista Business or Ultimate you should be able to take advantage of Miscrosoft's downgrade to XP option which is less memory intensive than Vista. Check out this option with your supplier but if you are looking to install XP then paying $20 to upgrade from Vista Home -> Business and then downgrade to XP at install time is much cheaper than buying XP off the shelf.

Secondly, there are plenty of users for whom a low-end notebook will always be sufficient. Therefore, assess your situation and expected usage realistically and purchase accordingly.

Desmond
03-10-2007, 11:51 PM
Yeah, why? Most people have absolutely no need for top-end processors and graphics cards, 2+GB RAM etc. If you buy into that game, you play into the manufacturer's hands.No, that's not what I had in mind.

You get what you pay for. HP is a major vendor that offers notebooks in every price point from the sub-$1000 up to (and I'm guessing here) $5000+. So, why do they do that? Is it just because some people are suckers and will pay 5 grand for something that they can get for less than a fifth of the price and walk away with just as good a product? No, the reason is that when you buy a notebook you aren't just buying a stack of components shoved into a little box that you can carry around with you.

Have a look at the specs TCN gave in the opening post. The purpose of this is not to look at the speeds and feeds, but to examine what part of that notebook is actually specific to HP.

HP Presario - HP owns the name Presario.
AMD Turion 64 Mobile Tech 2.0GHz - In case anyone doesn't realize, AMD is the manufacturer of this processor.
512 Meg DDR2 - there are 3 memory manufacturers in the world. HP is not one of them.
80Gig Hard Drive - There are 3 (or 4?) hard drive manufacturers in the world. HP is not one of them.
3 USB - HP would buy this from the cheapest yum-cha vendor on the day.
NVidia GEForce 6150 - nVidia make the chipsets. HP would re-badge them; actually, since it's internal to a notebook, it might not even have a HP badge on it at all.
DVD/CD-RW combo - HP would buy this from the cheapest yum-cha vendor on the day.
56K Modem - HP would buy this from the cheapest yum-cha vendor on the day.
Wireless 802.11B/G - HP would buy this from the cheapest yum-cha vendor on the day.
Windows Vista Home Basic. - Microsoft excretes this at an alarming rate.

So how did we go? The only thing in that description that is unique to HP is the name of the notebook. Oh, and you might get a HP logo on the machine somewhere. Forget the 'might'. You'll get half a dozen of the things.

So why is any of this relevant? Simple. Vendors (HP, Lenovo, Asus, Acer etc etc) all have access to the same junk. They all make notebooks out of the same junk. They need a way to differentiate themselves.

Different vendors have different ways to differentiate themselves from each other. For example, Lenovo have a titanium skeleton in the notebook frame on their T-series machines. They house the hard drive in a special casing that is resistant to shock damage (eg dropping the notebook), they have designed a the keyboard into the chassis in such a way that you can spill a decent amount of liquid right onto the keyboard, and it just drains away rather than going up in a puff of smoke.

I addition to the hardware nuances, the vendors use their R&D teams to develop software for the notebook. Some of it might be a bit nancy-fancy for the average home user, but much of it is geared towards things that reallt do matter - like saving energy and prolonging the battery life on your machine.

So by now, if your still reading, you must be saying, "wow, the vendors give me all this for $799!" Guess again. These types of features are available on the higher end notebooks, typically a sliding scale down to the cheap-end notebooks where you get, basically, just a heap of junk in an portable box. Make sure you don't drop it, leave it in the sun, spill a drop of coffee on it, or look at in the wrong way. Because your warranty won't cover it.


Any of the above would handle chess databases and programs, along with web browsing, word processing etc with absolutely no problems.

Only if you wanted to do very in-depth chess analysis would you find it to be insufficient.
You're kidding yourself. Vista on 512MB - your OS will consume all the system resources and then still want more. 1GB would be the absolute minimum recommended for Vista. I hope your battery doesn't run out while the thing is booting.


If your laptop comes with Vista Business or Ultimate you should be able to take advantage of Miscrosoft's downgrade to XP option which is less memory intensive than Vista. Check out this option with your supplier but if you are looking to install XP then paying $20 to upgrade from Vista Home -> Business and then downgrade to XP at install time is much cheaper than buying XP off the shelf.That is true that you can do it. Before you do so however, be very sure that the vendor is offering all the applicable drivers for the machine. You can get stuck in a situation where, say, your webcam doesn't work now that your running XP on a Vista machine. Do you think HP will care about you for $799?

XP machine are still available - in fact Microsoft recently announced that they will be shipping XP to OEM's for an additional 6 months. If you really want an XP machine, buy one that way.

pax
04-10-2007, 06:37 AM
You're kidding yourself. Vista on 512MB - your OS will consume all the system resources and then still want more. 1GB would be the absolute minimum recommended for Vista. I hope your battery doesn't run out while the thing is booting.

I never said anything about Vista. Vista is not necessary to any of the above. Quite the opposite. I am not aware as yet of *any* hardware that works in Vista but not XP (or even works better in Vista).

pax
04-10-2007, 06:47 AM
As for the rest of it, it's true enough. However to get a laptop with the features you are describing, you have to pay at least three times as much. The problem is that the majority of this extra cost is *not* for the box at all, but for all the top end components that you don't actually need.

So if you're really on a budget, I don't see any problem with getting a cheap laptop. Get a good case for it, look after it, and maybe even pay the extra $150 or whatever to get 3-5 years warranty.

You might be able to drop your Thinkpad from 2m and pour your coffee on it, but most people try to avoid doing that in the first place!

Aaron Guthrie
04-10-2007, 11:51 AM
You might be able to drop your Thinkpad from 2m and pour your coffee on it, but most people try to avoid doing that in the first place!Do they? :whistle:

pax
04-10-2007, 01:02 PM
Do they? :whistle:

Hmm.. Comprehensive accidental cover due to expire... Whoops!

Desmond
04-10-2007, 07:48 PM
As for the rest of it, it's true enough. However to get a laptop with the features you are describing, you have to pay at least three times as much. The problem is that the majority of this extra cost is *not* for the box at all, but for all the top end components that you don't actually need.

So if you're really on a budget, I don't see any problem with getting a cheap laptop. Get a good case for it, look after it, and maybe even pay the extra $150 or whatever to get 3-5 years warranty.Sure, if you have that budget and need a notebook, not much choice is there. Just be aware that it will perform like a dog.


You might be able to drop your Thinkpad from 2m and pour your coffee on it, but most people try to avoid doing that in the first place!Even the safest of drivers would not purchase a car that had no seatbelts.

Kruupy
08-10-2007, 11:50 PM
Hi TCN,

This laptop doesnt sound too bad at all. However I really recommend that you DO NOT use Vista ON ANYTHING, and especially not this laptop. If you buy this laptop please do yourself a favour and install XP or Linux (Ubuntu).

Also TCN, most importantly is the Battery Life of the Laptop - this is extremely important and I treat it to be as important as the cpu speed.

Cheers,
Kruupy.

Davidflude
09-10-2007, 11:31 AM
Check out Dell as well as HP. One of their packages might be marginally better.

It is amazing how much extra memory helps. I discovered this morning that just sending out a bulk mail was using half of my 2 gigs.

Rincewind
09-10-2007, 05:13 PM
It is amazing how much extra memory helps. I discovered this morning that just sending out a bulk mail was using half of my 2 gigs.

Maybe I will have to ban you as a spammer. :P

Davidflude
10-10-2007, 10:53 AM
Maybe I will have to ban you as a spammer. :P

Then i might sulk and no more Chess Victoria bulletins or blurbs for tournaments.

Remember I only send messages to subscribers to a list. Spammers try for everyone and his dog.

arosar
04-04-2008, 01:31 PM
Do anyone of youse blokes use anyone of the following lappy brands: Asus, Acer, Dell, Compaq?

I need to buy a new one. The Dell XPSM1330 is presently the front runner as the spec per $ is the best of the lot. Problem is I've heard bad stories about Dell's after sales service and build quality.

OTOH, I presently use an Asus. These machines are great, good spec, good $. Problem with them is battery. If you have an Asus, what is your experience?

I won't consider a Mac because they're a bit underpowered + I don't want to run into problems with software installs.

Thanks,
AR

Denis_Jessop
04-04-2008, 02:48 PM
Do anyone of youse blokes use anyone of the following lappy brands: Asus, Acer, Dell, Compaq?

I need to buy a new one. The Dell XPSM1330 is presently the front runner as the spec per $ is the best of the lot. Problem is I've heard bad stories about Dell's after sales service and build quality.

OTOH, I presently use an Asus. These machines are great, good spec, good $. Problem with them is battery. If you have an Asus, what is your experience?

I won't consider a Mac because they're a bit underpowered + I don't want to run into problems with software installs.

Thanks,
AR

I don't know what power you want so won't comment on that but the "problems with installs" has me puzzled. Mac programs are much easier to install than Windows ones. If you want use Windows programs you can do so "native" on Boot Camp or you can buy an emulator like Parallels or VM Ware fusion though in either case that means also having a copy of a Windows OS.

DJ

Spiny Norman
04-04-2008, 02:54 PM
My new (Dell) laptop provided by my work has 2GB RAM. I was putting 512MB RAM in my desktop PCs 8 years ago, so definitely get more than that! I have no problem at all with Dell build quality ... BUT ... and that is a big BUT ... we don't buy the "specials" off their website ... we talk to Dell once a year, get them to quote on a certain specification (we buy Latitude D630 notebooks at present) and stick to a single, preset spec.

arosar
04-04-2008, 03:06 PM
Mac programs are much easier to install than Windows ones.

That's because the lot of you are bloody incompetent mate.

Anyways, I got stories that me Chessbase software, for example, won't run on Macs. I can't have that. Plus you can't play good games on Macs too.

AR

Denis_Jessop
04-04-2008, 03:22 PM
That's because the lot of you are bloody incompetent mate.

Anyways, I got stories that me Chessbase software, for example, won't run on Macs. I can't have that. Plus you can't play good games on Macs too.

AR

Amiel

I told you that you can run Windows programs on Boot Camp and that includes ChessBase and Rybka which I have on my Mac. You can also run Sigma Chess on the Mac itself with Hiarcs 11 which is plenty strong enough for a player of your rating.

Clearly you have little or no experience of loading Mac programs or you wouldn't speak of incompetence. Many Mac programs load simply by moving the downloaded icon to the applications folder. The question of competence is totally irrelevant. I am, and was, speaking of convenience. If you voluntarily choose to go through several steps instead of one that's your problem. It's also one of many convenience problems with Windows OS though they are gradually moving towards the Mac in that respect. Give them another 25 years and who knows how Windows XP will have developed. (Vista will have been abandoned as a bad dream well before then.) :D

DJ

Davidflude
04-04-2008, 03:44 PM
There is a MAC shop halfway between my place and the chess club. I suspect that I could switch to Mac and may well do so in the future unless I go to Linux.

Basically all I use are

1. Browser

2. email

3. Open Office

4. Rbyka

5. Shredder

6. Sendblaster (mass email program)

7. Chessbase

But i have more important things to do such as putting solar panels on the roof.

Desmond
04-04-2008, 06:59 PM
Do anyone of youse blokes use anyone of the following lappy brands: Asus, Acer, Dell, Compaq?Any of those not starting with a "D" should be fine.

Basil
04-04-2008, 07:14 PM
There is a MAC shop halfway between my place and the chess club. I suspect that I could switch to Mac and may well do so in the future ...
David, stop teasing!
General advice for PC clowns peeps is to listen to Boris. The guy's got a clue.
Amiel, DJ has a fair idea about cross platform abilities (as does Bill Gletsos) if you're ever gonna consider a Mac.

As for me, well, I'm a lost cause, but I take this opportunity to note that I bought my first lappy for the company a month ago (for the Gold Coast rep - he's been a PC head all his life) and he's converted!

pax
04-04-2008, 07:27 PM
Hi Amiel,

I have an XPS1330 (the red one). It is a very nice piece of design - light years ahead of previous Dell models. As you say, value for specs wise it is very good. I installed Ubuntu Linux with relatively few problems, and all my hardware works well (although it does seem to run hot sometimes for no apparent reason). Build quality is ok on my machine at least (I lug it a lot).

I had a problem a few weeks ago which required a new motherboard to fix. The service was OK:
-Calls to tech support took a long time to get through
-Once through, the tech was knowledgeable and helpful
-It only took two calls (verifying a reoccurrence of the problem) for them to arrange a replacement mobo. This was not a problem when it was apparent that my problem was legitimate and definitely a hardware failure.
-I had a tech visit my workplace within about a week.
-He took about an hour to replace the mobo (very complex to get at it - had to remove almost everything)
-The Tech had never seen an XPS 1330 before(!!), had to log into the technical website to get the documentation, and I had to point out a few things that he had missed (a plug here, a screw there)!
-This Tech also works for HP, Compaq and Apple so don't expect better techs from those companies.

Based on this experience, I will probably buy an extended warranty in case of further problems. One replacement mobo would cover the extra cost!

I also considered a Macbook, but it is really heavy for it's size. Compaq seems a bit budget to me. I also like Acers and Asus but have never owned one (but I do want an Eee PC).

Pax


Do anyone of youse blokes use anyone of the following lappy brands: Asus, Acer, Dell, Compaq?

I need to buy a new one. The Dell XPSM1330 is presently the front runner as the spec per $ is the best of the lot. Problem is I've heard bad stories about Dell's after sales service and build quality.

OTOH, I presently use an Asus. These machines are great, good spec, good $. Problem with them is battery. If you have an Asus, what is your experience?

I won't consider a Mac because they're a bit underpowered + I don't want to run into problems with software installs.

Thanks,
AR

pax
04-04-2008, 07:30 PM
Mac programs are much easier to install than Windows ones.

and Linux programs are the easiest of all!!

Rincewind
04-04-2008, 07:36 PM
I need to buy a new one. The Dell XPSM1330 is presently the front runner as the spec per $ is the best of the lot. Problem is I've heard bad stories about Dell's after sales service and build quality.

I bought this exact laptop around 6-7 months ago. Mainly because it had the power and low weight I was after and was relatively inexpensive. Before I purchased online I went to the Dell kiosk at Miranda fair to check out the look and feel of the models I was sussing out.

After sales service? I can't comment as I haven't used it. The website was pretty good for drivers and the like. I also purchased online which I found a breeze to do the configuration of options I wanted.

Build quality? No complaints as I haven't needed the after sales service. :)

Biggest problem. It only came with one build Vista, which wasn't an option for me due to some non-Vista compliant applications I wanted to run. However I was able to use the Vista->XP downgrade option from Microsoft (now lapsed I think) rebuild the laptop myself and get everything working including camera, bluetooth, the works. However, Dell cusomer discussion boards were my main source of information, not the Dell website which provides no support for conscientious Vista objectors. I'd only recommend installing XP yourself if you have some prior experience with doing complete system installs.

Anyway, after a few hours of hard work (which I quite enjoy as well BTW) I now have a M1330 running XP and all the applications I wanted, no issues at all (touch wood).

Denis_Jessop
04-04-2008, 09:01 PM
and Linux programs are the easiest of all!!

I ran Ubuntu Feisty Fawn briefly on Parallels and it looked quite nice. But two operating systems are enough so I ditched it. An IT friend of mine who uses both Mac and PC said that Linux is really best for computer geeks and it acts a bit like that. Unfortunately I'm not one. :) :(

DJ

pax
04-04-2008, 10:54 PM
I ran Ubuntu Feisty Fawn briefly on Parallels and it looked quite nice. But two operating systems are enough so I ditched it. An IT friend of mine who uses both Mac and PC said that Linux is really best for computer geeks and it acts a bit like that. Unfortunately I'm not one. :) :(

DJ

The biggest problem that Linux has is that it is very hard to find a computer pre-installed with it. Most of the headaches people have are related to installation. People think that windows and Mac "just works" because the operating system is preconfigured and installed when they buy the computer. In fact, reinstalling windows can be just as much of a pain as installing Linux (and takes about ten times as long).

The thing that Linux (especially Ubuntu) does *really* now well that PCs and Macs haven't caught onto is binary software repositories. In Ubuntu there is a single desktop application from which I can download and install tens of thousands of different applications with a single click - from Office apps, to Graphics, to programming environments, games, you name it. I can even install a new OS kernel or window manager with a few clicks. The program automatically handles dependencies, so that if one program depends others you can choose to automatically install them. It amazes me that Microsoft hasn't caught onto this model.

On the whole, Linux is still a bit geeky - especially if you want to do anything sophisticated. But the reason geeks like it is that the operating system does not obfuscate what it is doing in the way that Windows often does.

arosar
06-04-2008, 10:30 AM
Cheers boys...I did go to Parra Westfields to check out the machine XPS. I must say, the machine is very good, good weight, etc. But I wasn't too impressed with the sales rep. He was just grumpy.

AR

pax
07-04-2008, 11:23 AM
Cheers boys...I did go to Parra Westfields to check out the machine XPS. I must say, the machine is very good, good weight, etc. But I wasn't too impressed with the sales rep. He was just grumpy.
I was pretty happy with Dell's sales people. When you make your purchase, they assign an actual person to look after your order (this is also true of the service reps) - it's nice to actually talk to the same person twice if you are having a problem or shipping delay etc..

Capablanca-Fan
07-04-2008, 07:00 PM
Our work provides a Dell Laptop for every one of our scientists for both PPT presentations as well as all the other duties, and the service has been pretty good.

Rincewind
07-04-2008, 07:02 PM
Our work provides a Dell Laptop for every one of our scientists

Is that a vacuously true statement?

Desmond
07-04-2008, 07:18 PM
One of the main problem with Dell is that there is no consistency with the components they use. For example, if you take the IBM machine, there is an extremely detailed document (http://www-07.ibm.com/kr/partnerworld/downloads/20070403_intellistation_xref.pdf) available that tells you precisely which components go into which machine. This is of major significance when compared to Dell, since the latter you really have no way of knowing. Say for instance you have a certain application that has been tested to be compatible with the Broadcom BCM5721 as its host GBe port. Buy an IBM, you know that every machine you buy with that model number is going to work, and you can buy them for the next 6-12 months for the life of that model. Go to Dell, buy 5 and get 5 different ones. I laughed when I saw the comment about the Dell tekkie coming on-site and fixing a machine he has never seen before; there are no two alike!

Capablanca-Fan
07-04-2008, 11:28 PM
Is that a vacuously true statement?
No, just a vacuous question.

Capablanca-Fan
07-04-2008, 11:29 PM
Don't waste your time with Dell printers though. Get one that will take generic cartridges. If you're stuck with Dell, get the ink cartridges refilled by something like Cartridge World, rather than getting ripped off by paying for Dell replacement catridges.

pax
08-04-2008, 01:56 AM
Don't waste your time with Dell printers though. Get one that will take generic cartridges. If you're stuck with Dell, get the ink cartridges refilled by something like Cartridge World, rather than getting ripped off by paying for Dell replacement catridges.
I believe Dell printers are rebranded Lexmarks. So yes, they're crap and the cartridge prices are outrageous. Don't even refill them, they're just not worth it when decent printers from Canon or Epson are virtually free.

Capablanca-Fan
08-04-2008, 11:57 AM
I believe Dell printers are rebranded Lexmarks. So yes, they're crap and the cartridge prices are outrageous. Don't even refill them, they're just not worth it when decent printers from Canon or Epson are virtually free.
Thanx, I'll look into that.

Garvinator
08-04-2008, 12:03 PM
Thanx, I'll look into that.
I have also seen laser printers on sale for $74 at Dick Smith. If you a looking for a home printer, I think it is a good buy.

Desmond
08-04-2008, 02:19 PM
I believe Dell printers are rebranded Lexmarks. So yes, they're crap and the cartridge prices are outrageous. Don't even refill them, they're just not worth it when decent printers from Canon or Epson are virtually free.
Not sure about the Dells, but I do know of another brand who use rebranded Lexmarks and you can actually use the Lexmark cartidges in them with no drama. Don't hold me to it as a general rule because they can lock it out in the firmware if they want to (or are smart enough).

BTW, Lexmark tends to be very good at their high-end printers (eg. workgroup lasers and up) but total rubbish in their low-end stuff.

arosar
08-04-2008, 02:27 PM
I just went to check out an Acer TM6292. A good 12.1 lappy with very solid build and good specs. I reckon the machine matches up well to my X61s Lenovo. The best thing is, it comes with XPP.

I'm pretty set on 12.1 - 13.3 lappies because max. portability is what I need for blogging and chess in general. I can't understand these people who carry 17 inchers from tourney to tourney!

AR

Capablanca-Fan
08-04-2008, 04:44 PM
I have also seen laser printers on sale for $74 at Dick Smith. If you a looking for a home printer, I think it is a good buy.
Thanx for the tip. Would this be BW though?

Garvinator
08-04-2008, 05:04 PM
Thanx for the tip. Would this be BW though?
Does BW stand for black/white?

Aaron Guthrie
08-04-2008, 05:09 PM
This printer I guess- http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/47fb175f027177f0273fc0a87f9c0711/Product/View/XP0602

Garvinator
08-04-2008, 05:27 PM
This printer I guess- http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/47fb175f027177f0273fc0a87f9c0711/Product/View/XP0602
That looks familiar ;)

Space_Dude
22-04-2008, 07:01 PM
dont get basics get pro. my brother has a vista basic and it only does the half of the cool stuff pro does. besides it's worth all the money.

pax
22-04-2008, 07:06 PM
dont get basics get pro. my brother has a vista basic and it only does the half of the cool stuff pro does. besides it's worth all the money.
They're both rubbish. Get Linux, get XP, get a mac...

queenant89
23-04-2008, 08:14 PM
Dont know whether you'll be able to get XP for much longer,
Microsoft in a ploy for people to buy vista are pulling XP of shelfs and have stop producing it now. But saying this definately go XP, ive had a try of vista, looks good but so many problems still that need fixing.

Space_Dude
25-04-2008, 10:08 AM
Dont know whether you'll be able to get XP for much longer,
Microsoft in a ploy for people to buy vista are pulling XP of shelfs and have stop producing it now. But saying this definately go XP, ive had a try of vista, looks good but so many problems still that need fixing.
yeh probably better of with xp, vist ahas all the cool stuff but still a lot of problems to be fixed

arosar
05-08-2008, 05:55 PM
Finally bought meself that lappy. I settled for a cheap Asus F9S. I'm happy with the specs - 250HDD, 3GbRAM, G9300M (256Mb) Nividia, T8300 chip with VHU.

Only problem I don't like is that the keyboard has about a 2-3mm flex around the function and numeric keys along the top. Also, and this a persistent problem with Asus machines, battery life is very poor with the standard 6-cell unit.

Other than that, it's all good.

AR

ElevatorEscapee
05-08-2008, 10:01 PM
How much did it cost you?