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Phil Bourke
18-09-2007, 09:44 PM
At the start of the tournament, you enter the colour for the player in Nr 1 starting postion to determine the allocation of colours for the remaining players in that round. My question is how is this determined? Does the Nr 1 player choose what colour he wants in the 1st round? Or does the arbiter play the old one pawn in either hand, and the Nr 1 player choose a hand?
Sorry for such a simple question.

Kevin Bonham
18-09-2007, 09:54 PM
Or does the arbiter play the old one pawn in either hand, and the Nr 1 player choose a hand?

This is usual. It has to be some kind of random draw. "Before the first round the color preference of one player (often the highest one) is determined by lot"

Aaron Guthrie
18-09-2007, 09:59 PM
Or does the arbiter play the old one pawn in either hand, and the Nr 1 player choose a hand?Sheep. Baaaa. (See candidate matches in elista (I think that was the one))

eclectic
18-09-2007, 10:01 PM
Sheep. Baaaa. (See candidate matches in elista (I think that was the one))

you're looking forward to a repeat of that at queenstown, aren't you? ;)

Garvinator
18-09-2007, 10:02 PM
Sheep. Baaaa. (See candidate matches in elista (I think that was the one))
Yes, elista candidates. Judit's reaction was priceless :whistle:

As long as you get to keep the sheep of course :uhoh:

Garvinator
18-09-2007, 10:03 PM
This is usual. It has to be some kind of random draw. "Before the first round the color preference of one player (often the highest one) is determined by lot"
Agreed. Some pairing programs allow the arbiter to let the computer choose which colour the Number 1 seed is.

Phil Bourke
18-09-2007, 10:03 PM
Thanks for the answers.

Garvinator
18-09-2007, 10:10 PM
Judit with sheep.

Davidflude
19-09-2007, 08:18 PM
Sheep. Baaaa. (See candidate matches in elista (I think that was the one))

The rules for round robins are different to the rules for Swiss Tournaments. In swiss tournaments the Highest rated player selects his colour by the traditional
method of selecting one from the DOP.

In round robins each player draws a number to select his place in the draw. In over the board round robin tournaments there are usually an even number of players. So half the field gets one more white than black and the other half of the field ets one more black than white. The solution to this adopted in really important tournaments is to play a double round robin where each player plays each other player with both colours.

In correspondence chess the solution chosen is to have an odd number of players. Although in fixed openings tournaments there are often an odd number of platers and you play each opponent with both colours.

This is an important question. I have seen arbiters get it wrong for round robins.

Aaron Guthrie
19-09-2007, 08:28 PM
The rules for round robins are different to the rules for Swiss Tournaments.Indeed, but as ewe know, for matches, it is sheep all the way.

Garvinator
19-09-2007, 08:40 PM
Indeed, but as ewe know, for matches, it is sheep all the way.
Does this mean you are not a fan of camels?

Aaron Guthrie
19-09-2007, 08:42 PM
Does this mean you are not a fan of camels?I ram not anti camel.

eclectic
19-09-2007, 09:03 PM
I ram not anti camel.

but turn it upside down and i can "c" by "l" that "ewa"

(howie, does this make it to the worst puns thread? :rolleyes:)

Garvinator
19-09-2007, 09:09 PM
(howie, does this make it to the worst puns thread? :rolleyes:)Phil B, how are we doing at wrecking your thread?

Phil Bourke
20-09-2007, 10:05 AM
Seeing as my question has long been answered, why would I care what direction the thread goes :D
Mind you, it is fun to occassionally drop in and see what fun is developing. :)