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PHAT
02-06-2004, 12:35 PM
There appears to be another out break of war in Mexico over the turf we could call School Chess. It is far from bilaterial in nature with Cordover, Glutzman, and Caissa in one corner hating eachother and CV and regional coordinators in the other corner.

This is a clash of cultures, Voluteerism Vs. Commercialism. Both of these have powerful motives to kill the other, one a code of inclusiveness, the other of profit. Of course there is overlap and and any balance between them will sit somewhere on a continuum. It is inevitable that NSW will have to meet this challenge sooner or later. Therefore, I pose the following questions, not as a platform for the Victorian combatants, but for our edification

What experiances - good and bad - have people here had, with trying to wed these two beasts?
What are the common objectives?
What are the points of conflict?
Using specific examples, how can both sides win?

skip to my lou
02-06-2004, 05:39 PM
There appears to be another out break of war in Mexico over the turf we could call School Chess. It is far from bilaterial in nature with Cordover, Glutzman, and Caissa in one corner hating eachother and CV and regional coordinators in the other corner.

This is a clash of cultures, Voluteerism Vs. Commercialism. Both of these have powerful motives to kill the other, one a code of inclusiveness, the other of profit. Of course there is overlap and and any balance between them will sit somewhere on a continuum. It is inevitable that NSW will have to meet this challenge sooner or later. Therefore, I pose the following questions, not as a platform for the Victorian combatants, but for our edification

What experiances - good and bad - have people here had, with trying to wed these two beasts?
What are the common objectives?
What are the points of conflict?
Using specific examples, how can both sides win?

Till date Chess Kit is non-profit.

A few commercial companies have offered to take over chess kit. Many have wanted to sell through chess kit, including chess central, chessbase, ace.

Common objectives would be to advertise, increase profit, increase popularity.

Instead of selling directly, I did offer them a chance to sponsor prizes for competitions run on the site. This I did not mind, because the site did not get commercialised and still the companies got much exposure.

What is best for both sides may not be best for chess. If you really want chess to grow, then it either has to be heavily funded by government or run/sponsored by many commercial entities.

Volunteering is neither. If you volunteer to do something, and do it wrong, nobody can do anything about it (especially if no one else wants to volunteer for that position). If someone is paid and gets it wrong, he/she is either fired or has to get it right before being paid.

When people rely on chess as a source of income, its basically a do or die situation, which is ultimately good for chess.

JGB
02-06-2004, 07:57 PM
Till date Chess Kit is non-profit.
...

And thats why I like it, because it is so small scale and freindly (usually :D ) The people who are here have common interests and without company intervention this site has no single objective, which in this case is perfect. Chesskit has little to do with money and everything to do with Australian Chess, the real stories are disscused and argued here in an almost completely open forum. The little personal skirmishes between the folkes here is also a nice departure from larger forums where the behaviour is often banned or frowned upon. Here its a source of laughter (for me anyway).

Good work Chesskit!

skip to my lou
02-06-2004, 08:17 PM
JGB - Thank the moderators, they set the moderation standards.

Also, as you said, it is small-scale compared to giants such as chessbase and lokasoft. But then again, chess wouldn't be where it is now without chessbase. Most master players do have a laptop + chessbase + several million quality games.

JGB
02-06-2004, 09:13 PM
JGB - Thank the moderators, they set the moderation standards.

Also, as you said, it is small-scale compared to giants such as chessbase and lokasoft. But then again, chess wouldn't be where it is now without chessbase. Most master players do have a laptop + chessbase + several million quality games.

Ok, thanks moderators ;)

I have chessbase also, and spend a fair amount of time on the Fritz server, analysing games over Chessbase, but here is more personal, and thats why I like it. Just over Chessbase's megadatabase I have 10 millgames, plus the latest online downloads, its more than you could imagine. But you have to weed through the junk in databases these days. Before the games were all master games, now most games in the Big tournies are going into the databases, thats not always so good.