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Garvinator
09-01-2007, 08:52 PM
2007 Corus starts on 12th Jan and goes until 28th Jan:

Single round robin, no draw done yet.

Participants:


GM Veselin Topalov BUL 2783 1
GM Viswanathan Anand IND 2779 2
GM Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2766 3
GM Levon Aronian ARM 2744 7
GM Teymour Radjabov AZE 2729 11
GM Peter Svidler RUS 2728 12
GM Ruslan Ponomariov UKR 2723 14
GM David Navara CZE 2719 15
GM Alexey Shirov ESP 2715 17
GM Magnus Carlsen NOR 2690 24
GM Loek van Wely NED 2683 26
GM Sergey Karjakin UKR 2678 29
GM Sergey Tiviakov NED 2667 36
GM Alexander Motylev RUS 2647 58

Poll attached for outright winner, ties for first decided by tie break for the poll.

WhiteElephant
09-01-2007, 09:41 PM
Ok, not a fashionable choice, but you can't go past Topalov in tournament play.

I'll also be following Navara with interest after some of his recent amazing results.

Kevin Bonham
09-01-2007, 09:43 PM
I think last time there was a poll for one of these things I voted for Aronian and he scored about minus three out of ten.

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 12:57 PM
Play starts:
10:30pm tonight Brisbane
11:30pm NSW,VIC, TAS and ACT time
11pm SA
9:30pm WA

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 01:00 PM
Round 1 - Sat. Jan. 13th

V. Topalov - A. Motylev
L. van Wely - T. Radjabov
S. Karjakin - V. Kramnik
A. Shirov - P. Svidler
S. Tiviakov - M. Carlsen
D. Navara - L. Aronian
R. Ponomariov - V. Anand

Round 2 - Sun. Jan. 14th

A. Motylev - V. Anand
L. Aronian - R. Ponomariov
M. Carlsen - D. Navara
P. Svidler - S. Tiviakov
V. Kramnik - A. Shirov
T. Radjabov - S. Karjakin
V. Topalov - L. van Wely

Round 3 - Mon. Jan. 15th

L. van Wely - A. Motylev
S. Karjakin - V. Topalov
A. Shirov - T. Radjabov
S. Tiviakov - V. Kramnik
D. Navara - P. Svidler
R. Ponomariov - M. Carlsen
V. Anand - L. Aronian

Round 4 - Tues. Jan. 16th

A. Motylev - L. Aronian
M. Carlsen - V. Anand
P. Svidler - R. Ponomariov
V. Kramnik - D. Navara
T. Radjabov - S. Tiviakov
V. Topalov - A. Shirov
L. van Wely - S. Karjakin

Round 5 - Thurs. Jan. 18th

S. Karjakin - A. Motylev
A. Shirov - L. van Wely
S. Tiviakov - V. Topalov
D. Navara - T. Radjabov
R. Ponomariov - V. Kramnik
V. Anand - P. Svidler
L. Aronian - M. Carlsen

Round 6 - Fri. Jan. 19th

A. Motylev - M. Carlsen
P. Svidler - L. Aronian
V. Kramnik - V. Anand
T. Radjabov - R. Ponomariov
V. Topalov - D. Navara
L. van Wely - S. Tiviakov
S. Karjakin - A. Shirov

Round 7 - Sat. Jan. 20st

A. Shirov - A. Motylev
S. Tiviakov - S. Karjakin
D. Navara - L. van Wely
R. Ponomariov - V. Topalov
V. Anand - T. Radjabov
L. Aronian - V. Kramnik
M. Carlsen - P. Svidler

Round 8 - Sun. Jan. 21nd

A. Motylev - P. Svidler
V. Kramnik - M. Carlsen
T. Radjabov - L. Aronian
V. Topalov - V. Anand
L. van Wely - R. Ponomariov
S. Karjakin - D. Navara
A. Shirov - S. Tiviakov

Round 9 - Tues. Jan. 23th

S. Tiviakov - A. Motylev
D. Navara - A. Shirov
R. Ponomariov - S. Karjakin
V. Anand - L. van Wely
L. Aronian - V. Topalov
M. Carlsen - T. Radjabov
P. Svidler - V. Kramnik

Round 10 - Wed. Jan. 24th

A. Motylev - V. Kramnik
T. Radjabov - P. Svidler
V. Topalov - M. Carlsen
L. van Wely - L. Aronian
S. Karjakin - V. Anand
A. Shirov - R. Ponomariov
S. Tiviakov - D. Navara

Round 11 - Fri. Jan. 26th

D. Navara - A. Motylev
R. Ponomariov - S. Tiviakov
V. Anand - A. Shirov
L. Aronian - S. Karjakin
M. Carlsen - L. van Wely
P. Svidler - V. Topalov
V. Kramnik - T. Radjabov

Round 12 - Sat. Jan. 27th

A. Motylev - T. Radjabov
V. Topalov - V. Kramnik
L. van Wely - P. Svidler
S. Karjakin - M. Carlsen
A. Shirov - L. Aronian
S. Tiviakov - V. Anand
D. Navara - R. Ponomariov

Round 13 - Sun. Jan. 28th

R. Ponomariov - A. Motylev
V. Anand - D. Navara
L. Aronian - S. Tiviakov
M. Carlsen - A. Shirov
P. Svidler - S. Karjakin
V. Kramnik - L. van Wely
T. Radjabov - V. Topalov

rob
13-01-2007, 01:24 PM
Play starts:
10:30pm tonight Brisbane
11:30pm NSW,VIC, TAS and ACT time
11pm SA
9:30pm WA

Shouldn't that be:
9:30pm tonight WA (straight after The Bill !)
10:30pm Brisbane
11:30pm NSW,VIC, TAS and ACT time
11pm SA

Official website is hard to remember :) http://www.coruschess.com

Round 1
V. Topalov - A. Motylev
L. van Wely - T. Radjabov
S. Karjakin - V. Kramnik
A. Shirov - P. Svidler
S. Tiviakov - M. Carlsen
D. Navara - L. Aronian
R. Ponomariov - V. Anand

Average rating is 2719. Category 19.

Kevin Bonham
13-01-2007, 07:44 PM
Any live coverage of this?

I just put the mockers on Vishy. You're going down now Anand, you are doomed!

soupman_2
13-01-2007, 08:12 PM
From http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/ re the top seeds

"Title - Name - Country - Rating - World Ranking

GM Veselin Topalov BUL 2783 1
GM Viswanathan Anand IND 2779 2
GM Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2766 3
GM Levon Aronian ARM 2744 7

There are a few important notes about the top 4 seeds. After the drawing today, it has been determined that Topalov will have 7 games with White and 6 with Black. Anand, Kramnik and Aronian all have 6 games with White and 7 with Black.

Another important note is Topalov will have White against both Kramnik and Anand while Kramnik has White against Anand. Anand is the unlucky one with 2 Blacks against his main rivals. Aronian has White against Kramnik and Topalov and Black against Anand."

****************************
Just as interesting to me are the games of
GM Magnus Carlsen NOR 2690 24

Here is a short biography from http://www.chessgames.com/ (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=52948&kpage=385)

MAGNUS CARLSEN
(born Nov-30-1990) Norway
Magnus Carlsen was born November 30, 1990. He learned chess at the age of eight and received the title of International Master in 2003. In 2004, after having gained over 300 rating points in little over a year, he became the second-youngest grandmaster in chess history, behind only Sergey Karjakin. With wins over players such as Nigel Short and Alexey Shirov under his belt, Carlsen hopes to continue improving his rating and become a contender for the World Championship in the future. He took a big step toward that goal by placing tenth at the FIDE World Cup (2005), becoming the youngest player ever to qualify for the Candidates.


How many scalps will he take?

JGB
13-01-2007, 08:24 PM
MAGNUS CARLSEN ... becoming the youngest player ever to qualify for the Candidates.

How many scalps will he take?

The boy is an awesome player. I talked with his father in Austria a few years back, who has been playing tournaments longer than the boy is alive and yet only has a rating of about 2000. He simply could not understand how his son aquired the 'gift'.
Great people.

pax
13-01-2007, 08:38 PM
It's a very impressive lineup this year. Good to see both Carlsen and Karjakin in the lineup, along with Navara and Radjabov. The "Dutch Open" has been kept to a minimum this year, with just Van Wely and Tiviakov.

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 09:49 PM
Any live coverage of this?

I just put the mockers on Vishy. You're going down now Anand, you are doomed!
I cant seem to find a link for the live games on www.coruschess.com. Chessbase only say to watch on playchess, when they normally also give the main website live games link as well. :confused:

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 10:06 PM
Live game link is now on the home page, but isnt working just yet.

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:07 PM
Did you see the individual biography of the players, the pictures in particular, talk about space cadets! :cool:

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:12 PM
see if i can get some live games posted here, looks like there live link is down atm, unless it comes up before the game?

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:27 PM
People on playchess / schach.de are having problems accessing any live site to watch the games also. Most people think its a first round delay problem. If they get going early enough ill post some games directly in here if anyone is interested? Ill wait out.

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 10:31 PM
People on playchess / schach.de are having problems accessing any live site to watch the games also. Most people think its a first round delay problem. If they get going early enough ill post some games directly in here if anyone is interested? Ill wait out.
they are locked in the toilet ;)

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:33 PM
they are locked in the toilet ;)

That normally happens after the games have started! ;) Don't want anyone peeking at Fritzy-baby once the opening has ended!

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:35 PM
Games are up, be back shortly

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:38 PM
Here is Junior in Action...


[Round "1"]
[White "GM Tiviakov, Sergei(NED)"]
[Black "GM Carlsen, Magnus(NOR)"]

1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. Bc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 d5 7. exd6 Qxd6 8.Na3 a6 9. O-O Bf5 10. d4 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Nxd4 12. cxd4 e6 13. Qf3 Qd7 14. d5 Nxd5

I will update this game pretty often in this PGN.

JGB
13-01-2007, 10:46 PM
Looks like the only 1.e4 game so i've posted it also.

Round 1
White "GM Karjakin, Sergey
Black "GM Kramnik, Vladimir

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Bf4 O-O
8. Qd2 Nd7 9. O-O-O Nc5 10. Be3 Re8 11. Bc4 Be6 12. Bxe6 Nxe6 13. h4 Qd7 14.
Qd3 Qc6 15. Qf5 Qc4 16. Ng5 Bxg5 17. hxg5 Nf8 18. Kb1

Garvinator
13-01-2007, 11:27 PM
Susan Polgar is already tipping draw in the Kramnik game.

JGB
13-01-2007, 11:34 PM
[White "GM Tiviakov, Sergei(NED)"]


1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. Bc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 d5 7. exd6 Qxd6 8. Na3 a6 9. O-O Bf5 10. d4 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Nxd4 12. cxd4 e6 13. Qf3 Qd7 14. d5 Nxd5 15. Rd1 Bxa3 16. bxa3 O-O 17. h4 Rac8 18. Bxd5 exd5 19. Rxd5 Qe6 20. Rxf5 Qe1+
21. Kh2 Rxc1 22. Rxc1 Qxc1

[B]DRAWN 0-0

JGB
13-01-2007, 11:36 PM
[White "GM Karjakin, Sergey(UKR)"]
[Black "GM Kramnik, Vladimir(RUS)"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Bf4 O-O
8. Qd2 Nd7 9. O-O-O Nc5 10. Be3 Re8 11. Bc4 Be6 12. Bxe6 Nxe6 13. h4 Qd7 14.
Qd3 Qc6 15. Qf5 Qc4 16. Ng5 Bxg5 17. hxg5 Nf8 18. Kb1 Re5 19. Qd3 Qxd3 20. cxd3
Rae8 21. Rh3 b6 22. Kc2 R5e6 23. Rdh1 f6 24. gxf6 Rxf6

JGB
13-01-2007, 11:42 PM
Anyone wants to take over go please go ahead, (GG ill give you 2 claps! ;) ) I'm off early in the morning and should be sound asleep by now. Night all.

JGB
13-01-2007, 11:51 PM
looks like both games are drawn anyway.

I am predicting many, many, many draws this tourney folks! :(

Garvinator
14-01-2007, 02:29 AM
1 win, 6 draws. Only two games got past move 30 and only one makes the 40 move time control.

Radjabov leads the tournament.


Round 2 - Sun. Jan. 14th

A. Motylev - V. Anand
L. Aronian - R. Ponomariov
M. Carlsen - D. Navara
P. Svidler - S. Tiviakov
V. Kramnik - A. Shirov
T. Radjabov - S. Karjakin
V. Topalov - L. van Wely

ER
14-01-2007, 03:06 AM
Excellent coverage G/G ty very much!
Cheers and good luck!

Garvinator
15-01-2007, 12:14 AM
GM Motylev (2647) - GM Anand (2779) [B97]
Corus Wijk aan Zee, Netherlands, 14.01.2007

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Qb6 8.Qd2 Qxb2 9.Rb1 Qa3 10.e5 h6 11.Bh4 dxe5 12.fxe5 Nfd7 13.Ne4 Qxa2 14.Rd1 Qd5 15.Qe3 Qxe5 16.Be2 Bc5 17.Bg3 Bxd4 18.Rxd4 Qa5+ 19.Rd2 0-0 20.Bd6 Rd8 21.Qg3 Qf5 22. Be5

Kevin Bonham
17-01-2007, 02:28 AM
A game I was talking about in the shoutbox tonight, in which Topalov gave up the exchange quite early but eventually won (I have not yet checked the theory status of all this):

Topalov-Shirov

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.0-0 Bg4 11.f3 Na5 12.Bd3 cxd4 13.cxd4 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Qd4 Bf7 17.Bh6 Re8 18.Bb5 e5 19.Qf2 Re7 20.f4 exf4 21.Qxf4 Qb6+ 22.Kh1 Bxd5 23.exd5 Qxb5 24.Qxf6 Qe8 25.Qd4 Rd8 26.h3 Rf7 27.Rxf7 Qxf7 28.Qc3 b6 29.Ng3 Nb7 30.Ne4 Qe7 31.Nf6+ Kf7 32.Nxh7 Kg8 33.Nf6+ Kf7 34.Ng4 Kg8 35.Qd2 Re8 36.Qf4 Qd6 37.Qf2 Qc5 38.Qg3 Qd4 39.Kh2 Nd8 40.Qd6 Ne6 41.Be3 1-0

arosar
17-01-2007, 07:40 AM
Isn't this an established line (14. d5) to give up the a1 Rook? I believe there is a Tomek Rej game, Tomek is white in the same line, here on this board that is annotated in some detail.

AR

Desmond
17-01-2007, 07:59 AM
Isn't this an established line (14. d5) to give up the a1 Rook? I believe there is a Tomek Rej game, Tomek is white in the same line, here on this board that is annotated in some detail. I'm not sure about specific games, but the exchange sacrifice is certainly thematic, and the Na5 being a long way from the Kingside makes it so much the more tempting.

pax
17-01-2007, 03:04 PM
Isn't this an established line (14. d5) to give up the a1 Rook? I believe there is a Tomek Rej game, Tomek is white in the same line, here on this board that is annotated in some detail.

AR

http://ozbase.paxmans.net/advancedsearch.php?search_white=&search_wratingfrom=&search_wratingto=&search_black=&search_bratingfrom=&search_bratingto=&search_event=&search_site=&search_yearfrom=&search_yearto=&search_result=&submitted=Y&fen=r2q1rk1%2Fpp2ppbp%2F4b1p1%2Fn2P4%2F4P3%2F3BBP2 %2FP3N1PP%2FR2Q1RK1+b+-+-+0+14

Kevin Bonham
17-01-2007, 08:49 PM
Isn't this an established line (14. d5) to give up the a1 Rook? I believe there is a Tomek Rej game, Tomek is white in the same line, here on this board that is annotated in some detail.

You are right and actually the person who started the thread commenting on it was ...

... me! :doh:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?p=3956

Kevin Bonham
17-01-2007, 10:12 PM
Rest day today. Rest days also on the 22nd and 25th (after rounds eight and ten).

Kevin Bonham
19-01-2007, 04:07 AM
Navara-Radjabov

Works best flicked through rapidly in game viewer, especially so you can see the very hungry caterpillar eat its way towards Radjabov's king between moves 23 and 26. It did become a beautiful butterfly in the end, but as with some insects, its mature life wasn't very long.

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nc3 0-0 5.Bg5 c5 6.d5 b5 7.Nxb5 Ne4 8.Bc1 a6 9.Na3 Qa5+ 10.Nd2 e6 11.g3 exd5 12.Bg2 Nxd2 13.Bxd2 Qd8 14.cxd5 a5 15.Bc3 d6 16.0-0 Ba6 17.Qd2 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Nd7 19.Rab1 f5 20.Nb5 Ne5 21.e4 Nc4 22.Qc1 a4 23.exf5 Qd7 24.fxg6 Bxb5 25.Qg5 Ne5 26.gxh7+ Kh8 27.Rfe1 Bd3 28.Rb6 Rae8 29.Re3 Nc4 30.Rxd3 Re1+ 31.Bf1 Qh3 32.Qg8+ Rxg8 33.hxg8=Q+ Kxg8 34.Rb8+ Kg7 0-1

Radjabov is now +4 and leads Anand and Topalov on +2.

The above was described as a Benko but seems more like some kind of Benko-KI hybrid. It follows this recent game by two c.2500 rated Belarusian players (Tihonov is a GM, Teterev untitled!) for several moves:

[Event "BLR-ch"]
[Site "Minsk"]
[Date "2006.03.04"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Tihonov,Jurij"]
[Black "Teterev,Vitaly"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "E61"]
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.Nf3 0-0 5.Bg5 c5 6.d5 b5 7.Nxb5 Ne4 8.Bc1 a6
9.Na3 Qa5+ 10.Nd2 e6 11.g3 Bb7 12.Bg2 exd5 13.cxd5 Bxd5 14.0-0 Qb4 15.Nc2 Qb7 16.Ne3 Bc6
17.Ndc4 Nf6 18.Na5 Qb5 19.Nxc6 Nxc6 20.a4 Qb6 21.b3 Rab8 22.Ba3 Qxb3 23.Bxc5 Rfe8 24.Rc1 Qa2
25.Nd5 Qxe2 26.Nxf6+ Bxf6 27.Qxd7 Ne5 28.Qd6 Be7 29.Qd1 Qd3 30.Ba7 Rb2 31.Qxd3 Nxd3 32.Rc3 Nb4
33.Re1 Kf8 34.Be3 g5 35.Be4 Bf6 36.Rc4 Kg7 37.Rd1 Na2 38.Rd7 Rb4 39.Bd5 Be7 40.Rcc7 Rb1+
41.Kg2 Nb4 42.Be4 1-0

Tihonov and Teterev (among others) had played the same line in 2004 with White playing 7.cxb5 and losing then 7.Nxb5 appears for the first time in 2006. Radjabov varies on move 11.

Southpaw Jim
19-01-2007, 06:34 PM
I tipped Radjabov in the poll, although they do say "win early, lose late".. :D

Garvinator
19-01-2007, 11:16 PM
I tipped Radjabov in the poll, although they do say "win early, lose late".. :D
and Radjabov hasn't played the top seeds yet. So he still has his bunch of short draws still to come ;)

Kevin Bonham
20-01-2007, 03:33 AM
One of them was today.

Kramnik beat Anand while Topalov couldn't win so it's now Radjabov +4 leads Topalov and Kramnik +2 with Anand, Karjakin and Aronian all +1.

Shirov (0.5/6) is now dead last by one and a half points and has qualified for a match with Matthew Sweeney. :lol:

Kevin Bonham
20-01-2007, 03:46 AM
Motylev - Carlsen

A very messy game showing again that the Four Knights isn't boring! Carlsen played the rare 8...c6 offering a knight (which has apparently never been accepted, since white loses castling rights and comes under heavy attack). The game seesawed a fair bit and it looked like Motylev was winning but for some inexplicable reason played 28.g4 getting himself in trouble instead of 28.Re1 which appears to win.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bb5 Nd4 5.Ba4 Bc5 6.Nxe5 0-0 7.Nd3 Bb6 8.e5 c6 9.0-0 Ne8 10.Ne2 Qh4 11.Nxd4 Qxd4 12.Bb3 d5 13.Qe2 f6 14.e6 Nc7 15.c3 Qh4 16.g3 Qh6 17.Nc5 Bxc5 18.d4 Qh3 19.dxc5 Nxe6 20.Be3 Re8 21.Qd2 Nf8 22.Rae1 Ng6 23.f3 h5 24.Bd4 Bf5 25.c4 Ne7 26.Re3 Be6 27.Qe2 Kf7 28.g4 Ng6 29.f4 Bxg4 30.cxd5 Bxe2 31.dxc6+ Kf8 32.Rxh3 Bxf1 33.Kxf1 bxc6 34.f5 Nf4 35.Rh4 Nd3 36.Be6 Rab8 37.Rxh5 Rb4 38.Rh8+ Ke7 39.Bxf6+ Kxf6 40.Rxe8 Rxb2 41.Rf8+ Ke5 42.Rf7 Nxc5 43.Rxg7 Rxh2 44.Rxa7 Nxe6 1/2-1/2

PS: Steve Giddins from chessbase on Navara's caterpillar pawn (see above): " a completely misjudged tactical operation, which ultimately costs him the game."

Garvinator
20-01-2007, 09:36 PM
Kevin,

Are you going to inform the Mexico organisers of who you are going to select to win the World Champ round robin?

Kevin Bonham
21-01-2007, 03:14 AM
Kevin,

Are you going to inform the Mexico organisers of who you are going to select to win the World Champ round robin?

I trust any player I put the mockers on publicly to self-destruct or agree a zillion draws without any need to do this.

Of course, any player who I pick in a tournament but do not make that pick public performs outstandingly. I will take lie detector tests on this matter concerning Zhao ... and Wei. :rolleyes:

Garvinator
21-01-2007, 03:21 AM
Of course, any player who I pick in a tournament but do not make that pick public performs outstandingly. I will take lie detector tests on this matter concerning Zhao ... and Wei. :rolleyes:Wei is not home yet as I am sure you would be fully aware of, just remember Suttor at Mt Buller.

Kevin Bonham
21-01-2007, 03:23 AM
Wei is not home yet as I am sure you would be fully aware of, just remember Suttor at Mt Buller.

True.

Kevin Bonham
22-01-2007, 01:25 AM
Topalov-Anand

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.Bc3 d5 9.Ne5 Nfd7 10.Nxd7 Nxd7 11.Nd2 0-0 12.0-0 Nf6 13.e4 dxe4 14.a4 Nd5 15.cxd5 Bxf1 16.d6 Bxg2 17.dxe7 Qxe7 18.Kxg2 f5 19.b4 Qd7 20.Qe2 Qd5 21.f3 exf3+ 22.Nxf3 h6 23.Re1 Rfe8 24.Qc2 Rad8 25.Bd2 Qd7 26.Kf2 Rc8 27.Bf4 Qd5 28.Re5 Qd7 29.h4 Ra8 30.Bd2 Rac8 31.Qc4 Kh7 32.Bc3 Qd6 33.Ne1 b5 34.Qc5 Qd8 35.Nd3 1-0

It appears Anand resigned in that position. :eek:

Kevin Bonham
22-01-2007, 04:27 AM
Anand did indeed feel the positional squeeze was too much for his dodgy pawns and gave up at that point.

6 Topalov
5.5 Radjabov (beaten by Aronian today)
5 Kramnik, Aronian, Svidler, Karjakin (doing well)
4 Anand, Navara
3.5 Ponomariov
3 Motylev, Tiviakov, Van Wely
2.5 Carlsen
1.5 Shirov

Garvinator
22-01-2007, 11:59 AM
1.5 ShirovI see he has decided to stop digging.

Garvinator
22-01-2007, 12:07 PM
Anand did indeed feel the positional squeeze was too much for his dodgy pawns and gave up at that point.

Susan Polgar= White is better here but I am not sure why Anand resigned so early. I would have played on. Perhaps he is not feeling well but I do not understand this. I also think that he resigned a little bit too early against Kramnik too. This is the luck of the draw that Anand get 2 Black against both Topalov and Kramnik which is a big disadvantage.

pax
27-01-2007, 02:03 PM
Svidler beats Topalov, and now there is a substantial pack chasing him down. Topalov still has to play Radjabov and Kramnik, so I suspect he will be overhauled by someone like Aronian who has Shirov and Tiviakov...

Garvinator
27-01-2007, 02:44 PM
Svidler beats Topalov, and now there is a substantial pack chasing him down. Topalov still has to play Radjabov and Kramnik, so I suspect he will be overhauled by someone like Aronian who has Shirov and Tiviakov...
Svidler has black against Van Wely and white against Karjakin ;)


Round 12 - Sat. Jan. 27th

A. Motylev - T. Radjabov
V. Topalov - V. Kramnik
L. van Wely - P. Svidler
S. Karjakin - M. Carlsen
A. Shirov - L. Aronian
S. Tiviakov - V. Anand
D. Navara - R. Ponomariov

Round 13 - Sun. Jan. 28th

R. Ponomariov - A. Motylev
V. Anand - D. Navara
L. Aronian - S. Tiviakov
M. Carlsen - A. Shirov
P. Svidler - S. Karjakin
V. Kramnik - L. van Wely
T. Radjabov - V. Topalov

Kevin Bonham
27-01-2007, 04:35 PM
Topalov should have won that but blew it with mistakes. Apparently 31...Qc5 was a win and then 35...f5 changed it from an advantageous position to a losing one.

This was pretty impressive:

Aronian - Karjakin

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 d5 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Bg2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 b5 9.Qc2 Bb7 10.Bd2 Ra7 11.Rc1 Be4 12.Qb3 Nc6 13.e3 Qa8 14.Qd1 Nb8 15.Ba5 Bd6 16.a3 Nbd7 17.Nbd2 Bd5 18.Qf1 c5 19.dxc5 Bxc5 20.Rc2 Qb7 21.Rac1 Bb6 22.Bxb6 Qxb6 23.Nd4 Ne5 24.Bxd5 Nxd5 25.N4f3 Nxf3+ 26.Nxf3 Rd8 27.Qd3 Ne7 28.Qe4 Rad7 29.Kg2 f6 30.h4 e5 31.h5 Qb7 32.Qg4 Kf7 33.Rc5 Rc8 34.Rxc8 Nxc8 35.Qf5 g6 36.Qg4 Ne7 37.hxg6+ hxg6 38.Rh1 f5 39.Rh7+ Ke6 40.Qg5 Qe4 41.Qh6 f4 42.Qf8 Nc6 43.Qc8 Ne7 44.Qe8 Kd6 45.Qf8 Qd5 46.e4 Qe6 47.Ng5 1-0

It's all bunched up nicely after that round. Svidler as well as Aronian now has a decent shot at it.

Kevin Bonham
27-01-2007, 11:00 PM
One of the previous games from current position in Topalov-Kramnik (move 12)

[Event "Isle of Lewis"]
[Site "Isle of Lewis"]
[Date "1995.??.??"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Agdestein,Simen"]
[Black "Short,Nigel D"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "D37"]
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.a3 Nc6
9.Qc2 Qa5 10.0-0-0 Be7 11.h4 Rd8 12.Nd2 Rd7 13.Bd3 Qd8 14.cxd5 exd5 15.Nf3 Qf8 16.g4 Ne4
17.Ne5 Nxe5 18.Bxe5 f6 19.Bd4 Rc7 20.f3 Nxc3 21.Bxh7+ Kh8 22.Bxc3 Bxa3 23.Rxd5 Bxg4 24.fxg4 Rxc3
25.Qxc3 Rc8 26.Qxc8 Qxc8+ 27.Bc2 Be7 28.Rhd1 Kg8 29.Rd7 Kf8 30.Kb1 a5 31.h5 Qc6 32.Bf5 a4
33.Rc1 1-0

Garvinator
27-01-2007, 11:35 PM
it just continues- my comment. From chessbase.


27.01.2007 This is a very grave question to ask, but it was posed in today's issue of one of Germany's largest and best respected newspapers, the Süddeutsche Zeitung. In the story IM Martin Breutigam, a longtime contributer to this and other major broadsheets, reports what he observed in rounds two and three of the current Wijk aan Zee tournament. Translation.

The following story appeared today, Saturday January 27,2007, in the printed edition of one of Germany's largest newspapers, the Süddeutsche Zeitung. It was put online on the web site of the newspaper on the previous day. The author is Martin Breutigam, an International Chess Master and longtime contributor to the Süddeutsche Zeitung, Der Tagesspiegel, Berlin, and other major newspapers. We have translated the article and publish it with permission of the author. The translation is as close to the original as possible, even it that meant we had to occasionally forgo a more natural turn of phrase in English, in the interest of accuracy.

With the thumb in the corner of the mouth
Is there foul play in chess? Observations around the world’s top ranked player Veselin Topalov
By Martin Breutigam

For over a year rumours have persisted that Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria may have used illegal resources to win the title at the world champion in San Luis, Argentina. The allegations raised by other participants in the world championship, who however did not want to be named, was that his manager Silvio Danailov may have been surreptitiously signalling him moves checked with a computer.

Just a conspiracy theory of bad losers? Or does the 31-year-old, who in the meantime has lost his title, secretly receive help in some of his games? If so how?

In the tournament in Wijk aan Zee, Netherlands, which ends this Sunday, the behaviour of Topalov and Danailov provided grounds for new speculations. Anyone who watched the two during rounds two and three could definitely get the impression that a process of non-verbal communication was taking place between the two – only noticed by those who watched carefully, in the “De Moriaan” hall, which was filled with many hundreds of people, with world class players and amateurs participating in different tournaments under the same roof.
The manager on the phone

In the second round Topalov had the white pieces against the six times Dutch champion Loek van Wely. He castled queenside, van Wely kingside. Until the middlegame nothing special happened. This changed when manager Danailow entered the hall.

During the following hour a strange ritual kept repeating itself. As soon as van Wely made a move Danailov rushed out of the hall and pulled his mobile phone out of his jacket. Did he just want to transmit birthday greetings? Check stock rates? He could also, every few minutes, have been phoning someone who, somewhere around the world, was following the game on the Internet.

Whatever the explanation, Danailov would return to the hall after a short time, always move to the same corner of the spectator area and put on a pair of glasses, although he has not been known to wear spectacles before. Topalov sat on the left-hand side, from the point of view of the spectators, Danailov stood on the right-hand side, behind a barrier and in the anonymity of the masses, about 15 meters away from Topalov.

From this vantage point he could see nothing of the game, not even the monitor that showed the position; but from that corner he could establish direct visual contact without Topalov having to move his head. Indeed Topalov looked up, when it was his turn to move, and as soon as he caught sight of Danailov in the corner, he would usually put his elbows on the table and fold his hands across his forehead.

In this thinking pose it looked as though his eyes must be directed at the board, but he could also be peeking through his fingers at Danailov, who sometimes executed some strange movements.

On move 26, for instance, he held his thumb between his teeth and moved it back and forth in the right corner of his mouth. After this Topalov took a knight on c5 with his bishop. Usually Danailov would immediately take off his glasses and disappear from the corner. The ritual would be repeated as soon as van Wely had made his move:

Danailov would hurry out of the hall, make a phone call, and usually return after one to three minutes, going to the same corner and putting on his glasses. And while Topalov took on his thinking pose, his manager would scratch himself three to six times behind his ear, tap with his index finger on the glasses or execute other strange movements.

On move 31 he once again had his thumb in his mouth, and Topalov captured a pawn on d3 with his rook. After 35 moves van Wely resigned in a hopeless position. Later it turned out that all the moves that Topalov had played in this decisive phase are also the first choices of the popular chess programs. “During the game I did not at all have the impression that anything was fishy, but I was also told that Danailov was behaving in a very suspicious fashion,” said van Wely.

The chief arbiter, too, had not noticed anything suspicious, but he said that he would be looking out for any conspicuous behaviour during Topalov’s next game. On the next day – in the game against the Russian (sic) Sergey Karjakin – Topalov was sitting more to the right in the playing area. Starting from move 20 the action started again: Danailov marched around. Only this time he went to the opposite side, the left corner. From there he could once again not follow the game, but could establish visual contact with Topalov. At this moment his position already looked precarious; Karjakin had the advantage.
With precise moves to a draw

On move 23, with Danailov standing there with his glasses, the arbiter suddenly moved into the field of view and scrutinised the manager. On move 26 again the ritual was interrupted for a moment, when someone asked Danailov for a spontaneous TV interview. Both left the hall.

When Danailov returned Topalov had already made two moves. After this the well-known game was resumed: Danailov walked out, returned, proceeded to the corner, put on the spectacles, took off the spectacles, etc. Almost on every move, more than twenty times in all. In the end, after a series of precise moves, Topalov achieved a draw. Shortly before the time control (each players has two hours of thinking time for 40 moves) it had become hectic.

“I couldn’t believe it, Danailov rushed in quick step to the place where he could see Topalov, all but pushing away the people who were standing there. It was, after all, a matter of speed,” said one of the spectators, who had been watching these activities for over two hours.

Neither Danailov nor Topalov were available for comment during the past week, in spite of repeated attempts to contact them. Was it just a coincidence that when the thumb was being twiddled in the mouth, or part of a secret communication?

That would have become more difficult by virtue of the seating arrangement in the following round, since in the fourth game Topalov sat close to the wall, facing it. He won the game against grandmaster Alexei Shirov. Danailov hardly appeared at all in the hall on this day. And in the following days the ritual of rounds two and three were not repeated.

The organisers are considering introducing rigorous controls in the next year, amongst other with metal detectors. Background: in the recent past in India and the USA weaker players were caught cheating with the help of radio signals. This time there had been too little time to get reliable detectors for Wijk aan Zee.

(SZ of 27the January 2007)

* Original story on the web site of the Süddeutsche Zeitung

Kevin Bonham
28-01-2007, 01:57 PM
Shirov - Aronian

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8.
h3 Bb7 9. d3 d6 10. a3 Na5 11. Ba2 c5 12. Nc3 Nc6 13. Nd5 Nxd5 14. Bxd5 Qc7
15. c3 Nb8 16. Bxb7 Qxb7 17. Nh2 Nd7 18. Ng4 Nf6 19. Ne3 g6 20. b3 Rab8 21.
Bb2 Rfd8 22. Qf3 d5 23. exd5 Nxd5 24. d4 Nf4 25. Qg3 Nd3 26. Ng4 e4 27. d5
Qxd5 28. c4 Qe6 29. Be5 Bd6 30. Bxd6 Qxd6 31. Nh6+ Kf8 32. Rxe4 Qxg3 33.
fxg3 bxc4 34. bxc4 Rd4 35. Rxd4 cxd4 36. Ng4 h5 37. Nf2 Ne5 38. c5 Rb3 39.
g4 Ke7 40. gxh5 gxh5 41. Ne4 Re3 42. Nd6 Ke6 43. Ne8 a5 44. Nc7+ Kf5 45.
Nb5 Ke4 46. Rd1 Nc6 47. Kf2 a4 48. Nd6+ Kd5 49. Rxd4+ Kxd4 50. Nf5+ Kxc5
51. Kxe3 Ne5 52. g4 hxg4 53. h4 Kc4 54. h5 Kb3 55. Kd4 Nf3+ 56. Kd3 Kxa3
57. Kc3 1/2-1/2

Took me a while to figure out why this is a draw but White has the opposition and the Black knight is constrained to controlling the pawn while the White knight is free, so dead drawn.

Nice swindle 49.Rxd4+!

Bill Gletsos
28-01-2007, 02:48 PM
Nice swindle 49.Rxd4+!52... Nc4+ instead of hxg4 is significantly better (+1.15 compared to +0.23 at depth 22) for Black.

Kevin Bonham
28-01-2007, 09:24 PM
Is a tiebreak used to declare a single winner in this thing? If so, anyone know what it is?

Games start in five mins - early start for last round.

Garvinator
28-01-2007, 11:18 PM
Is a tiebreak used to declare a single winner in this thing? If so, anyone know what it is?

Games start in five mins - early start for last round.
I cant find anything about tie breaks on the main site and chessbase arent showing any berger tie break scores in their cross tables.

Garvinator
29-01-2007, 11:35 AM
Congratulations to soupman_2, who won the tipping competition.

Tantale
30-01-2007, 05:28 AM
taken the eleventh and twelfth round
http://www.jmrw.com/Chess/Wijk_aan_Zee_2007/index.htm