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Chang
09-11-2006, 01:39 AM
Hi,

http://www.chesschat.org//attachment.php?attachmentid=723&stc=1&d=1163000192


The above is the pairing info of two players 5 and 23 before and after the pairing of the ninth round which both are paired to play. Before the pairing, both are White absolute color preference (W=3 B=5). However, 5 has 6 pts. While 23 is lower rated and has 5.5 pts. Both Swiss-48 and Swiss98 give White to 23 instead of 5 who is stronger and higher.
According to FIDE Swiss rule…
E2. Grant the stronger colour preference
E4. Grant the colour preference of the higher ranked player
Why? Is there any exception?
Thanks for any comment.

Regards,
Chang

Kevin Bonham
09-11-2006, 02:13 AM
E2 is not very well worded. "Stronger" in E2 means the player with the stronger colour preference, not the stronger player by rating. So if one player had an absolute colour preference and the other didn't, or if one player had a strong colour preference and the other had a weak one, then E2 would apply. In this case both players have an absolute colour preference so E2 does not apply. Since they are paired I assume it is the final round.

In this case E3 applies. The most recent round in which they played with different colours was four rounds ago when 23 had black and 5 had white, so this time it is the other way round and 23 gets white and 5 gets black.

This is very similar to a surprising pairing in the Launceston Weekender which turned out on close checking to be correct.

Desmond
09-11-2006, 08:41 AM
FMD, it's easier to play a good game of chess than to do the pairings.

Chang
09-11-2006, 09:34 PM
Hi all,

Thank you Kevin for your reply.
You are right Boris. But, if no one wants to be an arbiter, there would be no chess tournament on this planet. :(

Regards,
Chang

Garvinator
10-11-2006, 12:10 AM
Hi all,

Thank you Kevin for your reply.
You are right Boris. But, if no one wants to be an arbiter, there would be no chess tournament on this planet. :(

Regards,
Chang
and that is quite often why people become arbiters.