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Zwischenzug
26-10-2006, 01:29 PM
http://www.entertainmentjourney.com/index1.htm

Hi. I stumbled across this site a while ago that details how to get to 1900. Has anyone been to this site? What is your opinion about this site?

MichaelBaron
26-10-2006, 04:01 PM
http://www.entertainmentjourney.com/index1.htm

Hi. I stumbled across this site a while ago that details how to get to 1900. Has anyone been to this site? What is your opinion about this site?


First of all...there is a big difference in the amound and kind of work required to get to 1900 depending whethere you are 1300 or 1800...

Zwischenzug
26-10-2006, 04:19 PM
First of all...there is a big difference in the amound and kind of work required to get to 1900 depending whethere you are 1300 or 1800...

Well I am around 1400 if its any help. I need to work heavily on tactics (launching tactics and defensing against them) and I need to stop leaving pawns en prise.

BEN DOVER
27-10-2006, 10:24 PM
Well I am around 1400 if its any help. I need to work heavily on tactics (launching tactics and defensing against them) and I need to stop leaving pawns en prise.

Working on tactics and playing alot of tournaments is the best way to improve

MichaelBaron
30-10-2006, 03:27 PM
Well I am around 1400 if its any help. I need to work heavily on tactics (launching tactics and defensing against them) and I need to stop leaving pawns en prise.

Do work on tactics but make sure you also learn some positional chess:hmm:

Garvinator
30-10-2006, 03:37 PM
why would you want to work on getting to 1900, when 2000 is so close :P and also is that 1900 elo or 1900 acf?

pax
30-10-2006, 05:03 PM
"Stop making blunders" is enough to get you pretty close to 1900.

MichaelBaron
08-11-2006, 08:34 AM
"Stop making blunders" is enough to get you pretty close to 1900.

Agreed. But unfortunately stopping blunders is easier said than done. There are various strategies for reducing the amount of blunders/oversights made. Blunders (occasionally) happen at all levels. Thus, stopping them completely is mission impossible.

There was an interesting moment in my game against Teichmann in round 6 in Elwood. I was so preoccupied at increasing my positional advantages that at one stage i missed a simple tactic that would force me to sacrifce the pawn and would make the position quite unclear (in fact i suspect black would be better in that line). The trouble was that my opponent's bishop was under attack and i automatically started all the lines i was analysing with the bishop's retreat. No other moves were given a consideration while Eric could simply leave the bisop under attack and move another piece.

Luckily for me, Teichmann also felt that if a piece is under attack it has to be moved away so he retreated the bishop without much hesitation. If i put the diagram with that position up in this forum. I am sure all the 1600+ players will find the correct continuation for black within a minute. All the 1300 + players will find the correct continuation after a few minutes. Yet, 2 FMs ignored this possibility completely.

Why did it happen? When you are playing it is common to miss simple things in the heat of the moment.

Another interesting example is my game against Solomon (the one that "FM" Jones is referring to when suggesting i can not play endgames, I do find this suggesting a bit insulting. by the way given that i have won a couple of equal endgames against Solo in our previous meetings -something that not many players in australia can boast since Solo is our best-recognized endgame master. If i could do it every time, I would be a 2500 rated player not a 2300 rated one..but of course for a player of my calibre my score against solo is reasonalble). Anyway, i was analysing the position during the game and i noticed that in one of the lines, Solo was threatening f7-f5 push. I have taken a note of it and tried to make sure that i am prepared for that push. Suddenly Solo played f7-f6! (which was by the way an exellent move both from psychological and from the purely chess prospectives) Once he made the move I stopped worrying about f5 cause hey - the f pawn has moved already. Subconsiously the f5 threat no longer existed in my mind. As a result, i missed the treat completely. Suddenly Solo played f6-f5! after a couple of moves when i did not expect it any more and crushed me from there onwards comprehensively.

Steve K
08-11-2006, 09:57 AM
These are excellent examples of chess psychology at play Michael. It would be good if you could post the positions so that we all can get a better appreciation of the situations you've described.

Thanks, SK

MichaelBaron
08-11-2006, 10:21 AM
These are excellent examples of chess psychology at play Michael. It would be good if you could post the positions so that we all can get a better appreciation of the situations you've described.

Thanks, SK

Good Idea, Steve I will do it tonight if i can remember the games. the organisers asked the players to submit all the scoresheets (since the event is fide-rated) but no carbon copies were provided. Or well..I will remember i guess :)

Brian_Jones
08-11-2006, 12:33 PM
Good Idea, Steve I will do it tonight if i can remember the games. the organisers asked the players to submit all the scoresheets (since the event is fide-rated) but no carbon copies were provided. Or well..I will remember i guess :)

No worries Michael, I will publish it in the next Australian Chess magazine.

It is an excellent example of a bad bishop!

MichaelBaron
08-11-2006, 12:46 PM
No worries Michael, I will publish it in the next Australian Chess magazine.

It is an excellent example of a bad bishop!

Ta..good idea...
I will be happy if people can learn from my mistakes. Hopefully, I myself will be able to learn too :). I will be happy to annotate it for you if required ..or Solo can do it....or any other IM or FM who understands chess :)

bunta
09-11-2006, 06:09 AM
Do work on tactics but make sure you also learn some positional chess:hmm:

when you say tactics.. exactly how much? Do you think doing 1 hour everyday is sufficient?

MichaelBaron
09-11-2006, 09:37 AM
when you say tactics.. exactly how much? Do you think doing 1 hour everyday is sufficient?

The answer is yes. In fact if you can devote 1 hour every day to studying chess, that is going to make a great difference to your game:clap: .

The problem is that most adult players have great difficulty in allocating regular time slots for studying chess. Otherwise, you can improve at any age! With the tactics, its good to start out with simple exercises and gradually move on to positions that are more complicated. Take things gradually!!!

MichaelBaron
09-11-2006, 07:56 PM
Ok here is the game i was referring to (Sigh, I do miss my scoresheet).

Baron-Solomon

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c6 3. e3 Bf5 4. c4 e6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7.Qxd3 Nbd7 - I can recall having a similar position against Solo about 10 years ago and i won that time (even though i got a bit lucky cause i had no advantage and the position was equal throughout the game) 8.0-0 Bd6 9. e4?! looks natural but turned out to be premature 9...dxc4! (9...dxe4 would lead to a slightly better position for white) 10. Qxc4 e5! 11.h3 0-0 12. Bg5 h6 - white has been playing natural moves while black has been playing ..strong moves! and here you can see the result - after 12 moves only and without committing any major mistake it is white who has to think of ways to hold on to equality 13.Bh4 Re8 14.Re1 exd4 15.Qxd4 Ne5 16.Rad1 Nxf3 17.gxf3 Be5 18. Qxd8 Rad8 19. Bg3 Bd4 20. Kf1 Nh5 21.Bc7! Rd7 22. Ne2 c5 23.Nxd4 cd 24.Bh2 - Ok, this is the critical position that i was referring to in my previous post. I saw the threat of f5 and tried to make sure that i am prepared for it. i was ready for immidiate f5. But suddenly Steph played 24...f6!. Ok, so f pawn has moved! after this, i forgot all about the threat of f5. and played 25.Ke2? and after 25..f5! Solo got a big advantage.

25. Ke2 was obviously a blunder by me. the main reason i made this seemingly obvious blunder was that "F pawn has moved already so it will not move again" Thats how funny my brain works sometimes. I guess i am not the only one with such problem.

in another game of the same tournament against Teichman something similar has happened but in that case both myself and my opponent have overlooked the opportunity.

Desmond
10-11-2006, 07:43 AM
Did you have an extra c-pawn?

MichaelBaron
10-11-2006, 08:30 AM
Did you have an extra c-pawn?

I had no extra pawns:(

Desmond
10-11-2006, 08:41 AM
I had no extra pawns:(
2.c4
4.c4

Bereaved
10-11-2006, 09:10 AM
Hi Boris,

I suspect it is really 1.d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. e3 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.Nc3 Nf6....and on we go.

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

MichaelBaron
10-11-2006, 09:34 AM
opps sorry..2.Nf3 and 4.c4. apologies:(

Zwischenzug
14-11-2006, 02:50 PM
Ok here is the game i was referring to (Sigh, I do miss my scoresheet).

Baron-Solomon

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c6 3. e3 Bf5 4. c4 e6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7.Qxd3 Nbd7 - I can recall having a similar position against Solo about 10 years ago and i won that time (even though i got a bit lucky cause i had no advantage and the position was equal throughout the game) 8.0-0 Bd6 9. e4?! looks natural but turned out to be premature 9...dxc4! (9...dxe4 would lead to a slightly better position for white) 10. Qxc4 e5! 11.h3 0-0 12. Bg5 h6 - white has been playing natural moves while black has been playing ..strong moves! and here you can see the result - after 12 moves only and without committing any major mistake it is white who has to think of ways to hold on to equality 13.Bh4 Re8 14.Re1 exd4 15.Qxd4 Ne5 16.Rad1 Nxf3 17.gxf3 Be5 18. Qxd8 Rad8 19. Bg3 Bd4 20. Kf1 Nh5 21.Bc7! Rd7 22. Ne2 c5 23.Nxd4 cd 24.Bh2 - Ok, this is the critical position that i was referring to in my previous post. I saw the threat of f5 and tried to make sure that i am prepared for it. i was ready for immidiate f5. But suddenly Steph played 24...f6!. Ok, so f pawn has moved! after this, i forgot all about the threat of f5. and played 25.Ke2? and after 25..f5! Solo got a big advantage.

25. Ke2 was obviously a blunder by me. the main reason i made this seemingly obvious blunder was that "F pawn has moved already so it will not move again" Thats how funny my brain works sometimes. I guess i am not the only one with such problem.

in another game of the same tournament against Teichman something similar has happened but in that case both myself and my opponent have overlooked the opportunity.


Just felt like putting Michael's game through the PGN viewer.

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c6 3. e3 Bf5 4. c4 e6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7.Qxd3 Nbd7 8.0-0 Bd6 9. e4?! dxc4! 10. Qxc4 e5! 11.h3 0-0 12. Bg5 h6 13.Bh4 Re8 14.Rfe1 exd4 15.Qxd4 Ne5 16. Rad1 Nxf3 17.gxf3 Be5 18. Qxd8 Raxd8 19. Bg3 Bd4 20. Kf1 Nh5 21.Bc7! Rd7 22. Ne2 c5 23.Nxd4 cxd4 24.Bh2 f6! 25.Ke2? f5!

Vlad
15-11-2006, 06:16 PM
Why did you exchange your "beautiful" knight for a "stupid" bishop which has nowhere to run? Why did not you play 23. Ba5, with the idea of playing 24. Bc3 and exchanging bishops? Then the pawn on d4 will be quite weak and you will have some winning chances I think.

MichaelBaron
15-11-2006, 07:12 PM
Why did you exchange your "beautiful" knight for a "stupid" bishop which has nowhere to run? Why did not you play 23. Ba5, with the idea of playing 24. Bc3 and exchanging bishops? Then the pawn on d4 will be quite weak and you will have some winning chances I think.

I did not see Bc3 and I did not like the threat of Nf4. Would I see Bc3 I guess I would consider Ba5

anyway, if i do not play Ke2 white is probably Ok

MichaelBaron
18-11-2006, 10:47 AM
At least I lasted for some moves.

I found a game where Anand lost in 6 moves only (http://australianchess.blogspot.com)

Bereaved
18-11-2006, 10:54 AM
Hi Michael,

The thing was that the game played between Zapata and Anand was following a very quick agreed draw from a tournament, which was obviously pre arranged, and was in fact unsound; I think that the game is referred to in one of Dvoretsky's books,

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

MichaelBaron
19-11-2006, 05:35 PM
Due to "popular demand" I have started tackling the issue of "good and bad openings" in my Blog. If I get the time, I will post "Part 2" tonight giving examples of opening repertoire selection.

Desmond
19-11-2006, 06:27 PM
Due to "popular demand" I have started tackling the issue of "good and bad openings" in my Blog. If I get the time, I will post "Part 2" tonight giving examples of opening repertoire selection.
umm, thus far cannot see any opening specified :hmm:

MichaelBaron
19-11-2006, 07:54 PM
umm, thus far cannot see any opening specified :hmm:

Sigh...If not tonight than tomorrow..I just finished 2 consequtive chess lessons, now time for dinner and local walk -after i get back i will try to get it done. In the meantime do not forget "There are no good and bad openings- just pick the openings that are best suitable for your playing style"

Desmond
19-11-2006, 07:58 PM
Sigh...If not tonight than tomorrow..I just finished 2 consequtive chess lessons, now time for dinner and local walk -after i get back i will try to get it done. In the meantime do not forget "There are no good and bad openings- just pick the openings that are best suitable for your playing style"That might be good advice for a good player, but probably about 0 help to a beginner.

MichaelBaron
20-11-2006, 12:14 AM
That might be good advice for a good player, but probably about 0 help to a beginner.

Okie, Done.

I do not think it is 0 to beginners. I guess all 1500+ players need to be able to identify their playing style and try to select openings that lead to positions that are suitable for them