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Zwischenzug
20-10-2006, 11:11 AM
Hi. Don't know if this is asked before but, what are the pros and cons of chess coaching over learning the game on your own from books? Do you reccommend it?

Brian_Jones
20-10-2006, 11:30 AM
Hi. Don't know if this is asked before but, what are the pros and cons of chess coaching over learning the game on your own from books? Do you reccommend it?

I give up. What's the answer?

eclectic
20-10-2006, 11:38 AM
I give up. What's the answer?

If Roger Waters had released Pros and Cons of Chess Coaching instead would fewer or us now be hitting The Wall?

:eek:

MichaelBaron
20-10-2006, 12:07 PM
No chess book can substitute lessons with an experienced professional chess coach. If you are serious about your chess it is important to ensure that you coach is not an "entertainer" but a professional trainer who can put together an "action plan" for two of you to follow.

In australia, few players were recieving good coaching in the past. As a result there was a generation of very talented players like Levi, Hacche, Firegoat etc. who are very creative and play extremely strongly in sharp tactical positions (as i felt on my bones many times :( ) but for example can not play endgames at all. Someone like Levi or even Hacche could easily become an IM some years ago if only they were put through some rigorous positional training (just look at some of their games against the IMs where they were successful in getting particular positions that they like)

There are many players who play tournament chess for 30 years yet, never gain sufficient positional anderstanding to advance. The "beauty" of a structured coaching program is that any person, even if he is not an outstanding talent can become a master these days.

eclectic
20-10-2006, 12:28 PM
I would add this caveat to Michael's preceding comment and suggest maybe going through the books then playing games to raise yourself to a rating which interests a coach before asking.

This applies especially if you are an adult because if you ask for coaching and your rating is contemptible in their eyes they are simply not interested.

If you keep notes etc on your self study or "home labaratory" as some Russian chess pedagogues like the late Alexei Suetin called it this gives a prospective coach an indication that you are prepared to do the work.

(Of course these days who reads books? It's all software, databases and chess servers.)

Zwischenzug
20-10-2006, 12:53 PM
I have a number of chess books on various topics (e.g. endgames, openings, planning, tactics and checkmate puzzles...etc). I have trouble trying to follow the annotations and explanations in some of these books (following variations whilst looking at a game confuses me like hell!).

I am not much of a visual person, I prefer to physically see and hear what is happening as opposed to trying to visualizing it. I also sometimes have trouble figuring out what is general right or wrong with my play. Perhaps these are the reasons why I am considering a chess coach.