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boardscholar
15-10-2006, 03:09 PM
Do many of you know by heart many games that you've studied and can recall them from memory?

I'm considering studying several games from great players until I can remember several (perhaps at least ten?) of them by heart. This also serves the benefit of providing lots of chess positions to analyze mentally if I'm bored or waiting around somewhere.

I'm first committing myself to one game that I've been watching live on ICC between GM Akobian and GM Serper. The beginning seemed pretty easy to follow and the last half looks challenging and should be fun to analyze.

Are there any classic games that come to mind that I may want to check out? By the way, I'm a class e player... hopefully class D soon.

likesforests
15-10-2006, 04:10 PM
Do many of you know by heart many games that you've studied and can recall them from memory?

I'm a class C player. I've never memorized a game. I've spent a couple hours on some instructive games, and I've quickly played through dozens of games in my selected openings.


I'm first committing myself to one game ... between GM Akobian and GM Serper.

I don't learn much from those. It's like learning your ABCs from Shakespeare... but they're fun to watch.


Are there any classic games that come to mind that I may want to check out? By the way, I'm a class e player... hopefully class D soon.

The ideal game has lessons pertinent to your level, and annotations so you can grasp those lessons.

A few great books of that sort are Chernev's The Most Instructive Games of Chess Every Played, Chernev's Logical Chess Move by Move, and Nunn's Understanding Chess Move by Move. Do your own analysis before referring to the book's annotations--that's how you learn!

Games between great players and patzers are often easy enough even without annotations. Greco vs NN, Morphy vs NN, and Alekhine vs NN are some. You'll find many more on chessgames.com.

ElevatorEscapee
15-10-2006, 05:35 PM
I believe I could remember the Morphy Opera box game (versus the Duke of Brunswick & Count Isouard) but that's about it. I haven't tried memorizing others, but I believe it could be a worthwhile excercise for those involved in teaching chess (eg memorizing the Evergreen Game, and all the variations of what wasn't played and why, etc)

Bereaved
16-10-2006, 12:03 AM
Hi everyone,

What about your own games; how many do people remember? I am aware that this may not be exactly the right topic at hand, but surely it is easier to remember someone else's games if you can remember your own?

I can remember quite a lot of games I have played, but by no means all.

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

likesforests
16-10-2006, 06:54 AM
What about your own games; how many do people remember?

I can recall the moves of a game an hour later, unless there was a protracted endgame.

A few weeks later, I only remember key mistakes and brillancies. Eg, "That game where I played the Scandinavian but forgot to play Bf5 or Bg4 before e6 and ended up with a trapped and useless bishop." or "That game where someone tried 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.b3??"