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George Xie
30-03-2006, 02:17 PM
I find a interesting article from chessbase, its really funny.

http://www.chessbase.com/newsprint.asp?newsid=2833

qpawn
30-03-2006, 02:28 PM
Nonono, let me give you a basic lesson in chess theology. Chess was created by the cavemen who began to eat red meat. To help their brains grow the cavemen dreamt up this square with all these funny little pieces. Chess was a bit different from ours in their time.

Rook = wooly mammoth
knight = elephant
bishop = cave shaman
pawn = pigs
queen = head cavewoman who had borne the most kids
king = head hunter who had killed the most tigers

Chess. The ancient game. We were meant to play it. :lol:

Axiom
30-03-2006, 08:29 PM
yes! more meat, less potatoes!

Igor_Goldenberg
31-03-2006, 02:41 PM
I especially like the way the saying "between opening and endgame God created middlegame" is referenced.

antichrist
02-04-2006, 06:18 PM
If you declare your God is uncaused, then I say the same about the universe. Checkmate!

Andrew Moody (Vic) SMH 1/4/06

antichrist
09-10-2006, 05:14 PM
Is it true that the queen in chess was modelled on the powers of Queen Isabella of Spain of about 500 years ago, who with Fredericko maybe, enforced the Inquisitions - or so said the program on Inquisition last night on SBS?

Rincewind
09-10-2006, 05:21 PM
If you declare your God is uncaused, then I say the same about the universe. Checkmate!

Peter, Speaking of rationalism I see your name mentioned in an article in the latest issue of The Skeptic. The article is titled "Frightened freethinkers: a case of attempted censorship" by Nigel Sinnott and your are involved in your capacity (at the time) as editor of the Rationalist News.

antichrist
09-10-2006, 07:10 PM
Peter, Speaking of rationalism I see your name mentioned in an article in the latest issue of The Skeptic. The article is titled "Frightened freethinkers: a case of attempted censorship" by Nigel Sinnott and your are involved in your capacity (at the time) as editor of the Rationalist News.

That case was years ago and went on for ages and it shows that they have the same mentality of some of the posters here who have nothing better to do then argue about something for years. But why bring it up again now?? The article was a book reveiw that libelled very rich people who had been cleared of the crime in court - is that the case? And had nothing to do with censorship.

Rincewind
09-10-2006, 10:41 PM
That case was years ago and went on for ages and it shows that they have the same mentality of some of the posters here who have nothing better to do then argue about something for years. But why bring it up again now?? The article was a book reveiw that libelled very rich people who had been cleared of the crime in court - is that the case? And had nothing to do with censorship.

Probably talking about the same thing. Just letting you know that you're mentioned in case you're interested. I certainly found it interesting reading and thought you might like to check it out.

MichaelBaron
10-10-2006, 01:40 AM
Is it true that the queen in chess was modelled on the powers of Queen Isabella of Spain of about 500 years ago, who with Fredericko maybe, enforced the Inquisitions - or so said the program on Inquisition last night on SBS?


I believe there were queens on the chessboard long before 1506:hmm:

Rincewind
10-10-2006, 06:38 AM
I believe there were queens on the chessboard long before 1506:hmm:

That's true however I think their powers were greatly enhanced sometime in the last few hundred years. If what I read is true (and my memory is not playing tricks) before that the queen used to be able to move just one square in any direction. Not sure of the timing and inspiration for upgrading her powers but Peter's theory could have some basis in fact. Though there have been many famously powerful queens in history which could have equally been the inspiration instead of Isabella.

As a pedantic side point. Isabella's husband was Ferdinand II of Aragon not Fredericko [sic].

Rincewind
10-10-2006, 06:44 AM
According to this link the rule reforms occurred c.1475. It makes no mention of Isabella of Castile but she was probably the most powerful queen of that time.

http://www.chessvariants.org/piececlopedia.dir/queen.html

MichaelBaron
10-10-2006, 12:58 PM
According to this link the rule reforms occurred c.1475. It makes no mention of Isabella of Castile but she was probably the most powerful queen of that time.

http://www.chessvariants.org/piececlopedia.dir/queen.html


I think the queens were part of chess before 1475. However, their "powers" have probably been changed a lot over the years.

A few hundered years ago, there used to be a chess piece that could move both as a queen and as a knight (I forgot the name of the piece unfortunately).

antichrist
10-10-2006, 07:13 PM
Probably talking about the same thing. Just letting you know that you're mentioned in case you're interested. I certainly found it interesting reading and thought you might like to check it out.

I will and thanks, I may re-enter the fray with an uppercut, I don't have to mince words and be Mr Nice Guy like I had to be all those years ago.

antichrist
10-10-2006, 07:19 PM
According to this link the rule reforms occurred c.1475. It makes no mention of Isabella of Castile but she was probably the most powerful queen of that time.

http://www.chessvariants.org/piececlopedia.dir/queen.html

She certainly was and I think it may fit in very nicely with her time frame. The TV program attributed the shift in queen powers to her powers so it's a good story anyway. And the queen was more powerful than the bishops in chess and life, her and her hubbie insured that, and I did remember it was Ferdinand as the name of my sister-in-law's father.

Shows power can go to the head of women as well and they can be just as ruthless. As queens have now lost their power in real life should the chess variety also be knackered?

Rincewind
11-10-2006, 12:30 AM
Apparently there is a book my Marilyn Yalom which makes the chess rule reform Queen Isabella link. It's called Birth of the Chess Queen: A History. It isn't a bad theory.