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pax
07-03-2006, 08:56 AM
Nakamura has had a shocking start to his title defence, and is sitting on 0.5/3!!

Maybe it is in protest over the ludicrous tournament system:



The titles of 2006 US and US Women's chess champion will be decided. The 64 players are separated by rating into two 32-player groups of equal strength, Group A and Group B. All of the players in each group, men and women, participate in the same event, called a "swiss system" tournament. Players with the same number of points play against each other in each round, so leaders face leaders and a winner can be found quickly despite the large number of players.

After nine rounds (games), the group winners meet in the championship match the next day for the title. The top-scoring woman in each group advances to the women's championship match. These matches are of two games of rapid chess, with blitz tiebreaks.

It's quite incredible. They play nine rounds of proper chess (at 40/100'+30", 20/50'+30", g10'+30"), and then decide the titles in skittles (not to mention the qualifiers for the skittles will be determined by tie-break). I'm gobsmacked. I hope they have live coast-to-coast coverage of the final, because that's the only possible reason to debauch the game so horribly.

Ian Rout
07-03-2006, 10:45 AM
Nakamura has had a shocking start to his title defence, and is sitting on 0.5/3!!

Maybe it is in protest over the ludicrous tournament system:

An interesting theory. I thought the purpose of the system must be to maximise the chances of Nakamura winning, with the reasoning that it would be good publicity if he did.

Kevin Bonham
07-03-2006, 11:56 AM
That tournament system is a shocker. They are even worse than FIDE. I don't think any amount of coverage justifies determining your national championship with a compulsory rapid playoff.

Ian Rout
09-03-2006, 07:50 AM
The other explanation that comes to mind for the system is that a couple of years ago a number of players went into the last round tied for equal first and most of them took short draws with each other, so the 2006 system prevents that happening.

On the other hand the motivation for taking the draw in those circumstances is that guaranteeing a bit of loose change from a share of second or third prize means more than the prestige of being US Champion, so making the title less prestigious doesn't address that. I would have thought the Sofia system or some variant would be a better bet.

Nakamura has won two straight to go to 2.5/5 and has a nice round 6 pairing. It's probably mathematically possible for 6.5/9 to take equal first in the section but it will need a few things to go right, including getting to 6.5.

pax
09-03-2006, 08:12 AM
Nakamura has won two straight to go to 2.5/5 and has a nice round 6 pairing. It's probably mathematically possible for 6.5/9 to take equal first in the section but it will need a few things to go right, including getting to 6.5.

But of course even if he does that, he will lose the tiebreak :doh:

pax
09-03-2006, 08:17 AM
Nakamura has won two straight to go to 2.5/5 and has a nice round 6 pairing. It's probably mathematically possible for 6.5/9 to take equal first in the section but it will need a few things to go right, including getting to 6.5.

But of course even if he does that, he will lose the tiebreak :doh:

Ian Rout
09-03-2006, 08:52 AM
But of course even if he does that, he will lose the tiebreak :doh:
Yes, looking at the field he's played that's a certainty, so he's gone.

arosar
09-03-2006, 03:27 PM
Are you looking at the US Champ Blog? Excellent stuff. For our next Nationals we should emulate this. It's great.

And who cares about tournament format really? They have more money and strong players. THat's it!

AR