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forcelima
01-03-2006, 08:47 PM
Hi, I'm 17 and I wanted to start playing chess seriously, now my IQ is nowhere near 180 like that of Bobby Fischer's (or so they say in an article I read) but I want to get really good at chess.

I've only started playing a lot of chess two weeks ago and so far I'm going to get

Nunn's chess openings
Play winning chess
1001 Brilliant ways to checkmate
1001 Chess Sacrifices
Fundamental Chess Endings
Reassess your chess
Winning chess endings
Winning chess tactics
The art of attack in chess

Are there any other books I should get that would improve my chess? I haven't read the books listed above but I'm planning on getting them though. I've only read up to about ch10 in "Idiot's guide to chess" and so far, my rating on yahoo is around 1200(probably more around 1100 in my opinion though).

Are there any other things I should get to improve my chess? I was thinking about getting fritz 9. I also bought chess sets about the same 9.5 cm high so I could practise looking at the chess board with those big pieces in my way (I reckon I can play better online because I view the board from a birds-eye perspective than I play on a board).

Since I'm doing VCE this year I don't have time to go to a chess club (I think Box Hill is the closest one for me) but I'll probably go once I finish VCE.

So far I understand very basic chess tactics and developing chess pieces (I just try to dominate the center as much as I can but it probably doesn't actually help me to win games). I really want to improve a lot more so what books would you recommend? I don't mind books that are very complicated at first (as in you need to focus hard) but I probably can't understand books that build up on knowledge that I don't already have.

What are the books you would recommend and the order in which I should read each book? Also, what should my rating be after reading the books.

Thanks

eclectic
01-03-2006, 08:56 PM
http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/coaching.html

is an online link which might be of value

apparently anand speaks highly of this site

Rincewind
01-03-2006, 09:01 PM
Your enthusiasm for the game will be your most valuable asset in the quest for improving your chess. If you have all those books you listed, I wouldn't worry too much about increasing your library until you have had a chance to go through them. Going through Fundamental Chess Endings alone will take a substantial amount of time. But doing so will doubtless improve you game, especially if you have never studied endings before.

I think the key is to set achievable goals so that you are not discouraged. You have to factor in the amount of time you have to devote to studying chess. As you are doing VCEs I'd recommend a relatively light chess study workload. Like around 5 hours a week as a maximum. Your chess will improve and you will still have time to do your school work which should have the priority.

Once you have gotten through a few of these books you already have you will begin to have a fair idea of where your needs and interests in more books lie.

Kevin Bonham
02-03-2006, 01:52 AM
I agree with Rincewind's comments.


What are the books you would recommend and the order in which I should read each book? Also, what should my rating be after reading the books.

Reading books alone doesn't help as much as some people might think. It's better to play a bit, read a bit, play a bit and so on. It's impossible to predict how much studying will improve your rating, although it will do something if you play as well. There is a thing called match toughness that you cannot easily learn in books that is worth about 400 ratings points. It's the thing, that some players pick up better than others from their experience, that keeps you alive and kicking in bad positions, and that enables you to put opponents away without falling for traps in winning ones.

Openings books like NCO aren't there to be read, they're there to dabble in as you learn particular lines (though the chapter intros are useful in deciding what lines might suit your style). A good way to use any openings book is, after each game you play, look up the book lines and see what else either side could have done instead.

qpawn
04-03-2006, 07:49 PM
Yep. I agree on that match toughness. I would be about 2000 elo but I ain't got any match toughness: in fact I am so deficient it costs me 1000 -points leaving me a total [patzer :D

eclectic
04-03-2006, 08:14 PM
Yep. I agree on that match toughness. I would be about 2000 elo but I ain't got any match toughness: in fact I am so deficient it costs me 1000 -points leaving me a total [patzer :D

yep match toughness is important qpawn

why we could even arrange a training match where we are surrounded by the bulletin board's top posters continually haranging each other

that would really toughen us up ... heh! :rolleyes:

:cool:

forcelima
04-03-2006, 09:41 PM
What exactly is match toughness? Oh does anyone else have trouble finding strategies on a real life board compared to playing on the internet?

eclectic
04-03-2006, 09:53 PM
What exactly is match toughness? Oh does anyone else have trouble finding strategies on a real life board compared to playing on the internet?

the question may already have been visited in this thread (http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=572)

bobby1972
30-03-2006, 09:59 AM
get this book "The Art of Positional Play (1978). reshevsky" i gained 200 rating points on this book alone went from 1700 something to 1900 something that was the time i inproved maybe the only real improvement but long ago.then my mate read it and went from unrated to 2000 something within a few years and he was in his thrirties at the time that is a great book reshevsky is brilliant writer and one of the all time greats.