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hitman84
07-12-2005, 02:23 AM
What does "Zwis chen Zug" mean i came across in an old book.

Spiny Norman
07-12-2005, 06:19 AM
What does "Zwis chen Zug" mean i came across in an old book.
I believe the literal translation is something like: Between course (courtesy of Babelfish, I don't speak German ... and don't mention the war!)

It means an intermediate move that disrupts the expected flow of moves ... it might be a check against your opponents king that you play before making an obvious recapturing move, or some other kind of intermediate threat.

Here's an example that I played in a recent (losing) game. My move 38 is a useful check as it forces black's king backwards before I retreat the knight. Of course, it wasn't enough to help me win the game! But afterwards my opponent said that he "hadn't seen that move coming" so I guess it at least had a small surprise factor. Others can probably offer better examples of a more powerful zwischenzug.

[Date "2005.11.17"][White "Stephen Frost"][Black "N.Y.Wong"][Result "0-1"][ECO "A00"][WhiteElo "1360"][BlackElo "2106"][PlyCount "92"]
1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 g6 3.d4 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 Bg4 7.0-0 Nbd7 8.Be3 c6 9.Qd2 e5 10.dxe5 dxe5 11.Rfd1 Qe7 12.h3 Bxf3 13.Bxf3 Rfd8 14.Qc2 b6 15.Rd2 Nf8 16.Rad1 Ne6 17.Ne2 Rxd2 18.Rxd2 Rd8 19.Rxd8+ Qxd8 20.Qd2 Qc7 21.Ng3 Bf8 22.Bg4 Nxg4 23.hxg4 Bc5 24.Bxc5 Nxc5 25.f3 Qd7 26.Qxd7 Nxd7 27.Ne2 a5 28.Kf2 Kf8 29.Ke3 Ke7 30.g5 Kd6 31.Kd3? Nc5+ 32.Kc2 Ne6 33.Kc3 Nxg5 34.b4 h5 35.bxa5 bxa5 36.Nc1 h4 37.Nb3? a4 38.c5+! Kc7 39.Nd2 Ne6 40.Nc4 f6 41.Kb4 Nf4 42.Ne3 Nxg2! 43.Ng4 h3 44.Kxa4 Ne1 45.Nh2 g5 46.Kb3 Nxf3! 0-1

Rincewind
07-12-2005, 07:04 AM
I believe Frosty is right on the money. It is an inbetween move. You sometimes also see the italian word intermezzo used with similar meaning.

jack
27-08-2006, 11:48 AM
an in-between move before an obvious one(like a recapture)is known as a zwischenzug.:owned:

ElevatorEscapee
27-08-2006, 12:39 PM
Is it just me, or does the Wiki defenition leave something lacking:

"Zwischenzug is where one player threatens the other and, instead of countering the direct threat from player one (as expected), player two plays a move which poses an even more serious threat to player one. The first player must then counter the threat from player two, which will ideally change the entire situation to the second player's advantage. Such moves are also called intermezzos, or intermediate moves."

I always thought of zwischenzugs as occuring in the middle of a sequence of forcing moves, where, instead of a forcing move, the attacking player plays an 'inbetween' move, which subtly rearranges the pieces to make the combination work.

Rincewind
27-08-2006, 01:44 PM
Is it just me, or does the Wiki defenition leave something lacking:

"Zwischenzug is where one player threatens the other and, instead of countering the direct threat from player one (as expected), player two plays a move which poses an even more serious threat to player one. The first player must then counter the threat from player two, which will ideally change the entire situation to the second player's advantage. Such moves are also called intermezzos, or intermediate moves."

I always thought of zwischenzugs as occuring in the middle of a sequence of forcing moves, where, instead of a forcing move, the attacking player plays an 'inbetween' move, which subtly rearranges the pieces to make the combination work.

You seem to viewing zwischenzug as a combinatorial tool for the instigator of the forcing sequence. Wiki seems to be viewing it as a defensive resource to be used against a combination. Other than that I can't see any difference.

I think most often zwischenzugs are defensive resources which invalidate combinations. Attacking zwischenzugs are usually just called brilliancies. ;)

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2006, 11:54 PM
Is it just me, or does the Wiki defenition leave something lacking:

"Zwischenzug is where one player threatens the other and, instead of countering the direct threat from player one (as expected), player two plays a move which poses an even more serious threat to player one. The first player must then counter the threat from player two, which will ideally change the entire situation to the second player's advantage. Such moves are also called intermezzos, or intermediate moves."

I think of a zwischenzug as any move that defers what would normally be an expected reply (typically a player, rather than recapturing immediately, does something else first and then recaptures later.)

Here is a failed example I saw in a rated G60 tonight which I thought was interesting.

3R4/pp3ppk/2p2n1p/7q/2P4r/4PN2/PB2QPPP/6K1 w - - 0 1

(Probably not quite the exact position - unsure about the q-side pawns, but essentially correct.)

White is totally winning and plays 1.Bxf6. Black attempts a zwischenzug (and a swindle) with 1...Rxh2 threatening mate rather than take the bishop back at once. If White takes the rook, White loses her queen, and ...Rh1# is threatened. Black was probably hoping for 2.Kf1?? to avoid the mate when 2...Rh1+ 3.Ng1 Rxg1+ wins white's queen and black is winning without ever needing to recapture the bishop!

Nice try but unfortunately for Black, 2.Qd3 was check. 2...Qg6 and white swaps queens then gets the rook, or 2...g6 3.Rh8 mate, so Black resigned.