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Kaitlin
26-11-2005, 02:20 PM
"What is the Cardon square?"....

Rincewind
26-11-2005, 03:20 PM
"What is the Cardon square?"....

A handy thing to know in King and pawn endgames. ;)

Kaitlin
27-11-2005, 11:40 AM
When and what was the first computer chess program?

Careth
27-11-2005, 12:23 PM
Many concepts occured, although the first, The Turk which was an automaton, (and a hoax) created in 1769. Funnily enough another case of this happened just 99 years later with the Ajeeb automaton. Both of these had human chess players inside them, and that why they were hoaxes.

The first machine was built in 1912 and could analyse King and Rook versus King endgames, a large thing for people then. It was built by a man called Leonardo Torres y Quevedo and was called El Ajedrecista (The Chessplayer). Very creative in naming people were. ;)

In the 1950's the first program came into existence, and was a problem in itself. On a 6x6 board, it was Bishopless. It was called the Maniac 1 I believe, but that may be wrong. Many papers were made before this program on such subjects as evaluation function.

Kaitlin
27-11-2005, 12:41 PM
The answer I had was:

In 1958 a chess-playing program written by Alex Bernstein was able to play against a human opponent. The computer lost in 22 moves!

...but I like the idea of having a human chess player inside a box - that reminds me I better check on JGB < - (shoutbox joke from 26-11-2005 12:59 PM )

pballard
27-11-2005, 02:28 PM
The answer I had was:

In 1958 a chess-playing program written by Alex Bernstein was able to play against a human opponent.

FWIW, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_chess agrees (and also with Careth). Wikipedia is an amazing mine of information.

Careth
27-11-2005, 05:06 PM
I know pballard- thats where I got my answer from ;) interesting though, apparently Leonardo Torres y Quevedo used electromagnets to move the pieces.

Garvinator
29-11-2005, 10:12 AM
where was yesterday's question?

Kaitlin
29-11-2005, 10:46 AM
:silenced: There isnt going to be a question everyday.....
Cause they are harder to find/think of, than you think.

Phil Bourke
29-11-2005, 11:49 AM
A handy thing to know in King and pawn endgames. ;)

I am still none the wiser, so here is a chance for you to win either way, you can further my chess education by revealing what is the Cardon Square, or let me in on the joke :hmm:

Rincewind
29-11-2005, 01:46 PM
I am still none the wiser, so here is a chance for you to win either way, you can further my chess education by revealing what is the Cardon Square, or let me in on the joke :hmm:

Sorry, Phil. Here is how I replied to Kaitlin via PM

Cardon Square, or just the Square is a method to work out quickly whether a king can stop a pawn from queening. Imagine a square with one edge being the pawn's current square to the queening square. project this edge into a square in the direction of the opponent's king. This is the Cardon square. If the opponent's king can move into this square on his move then he can stop the pawn, otherwise he cannot.

I have never heard this referred to as 'Cardon' square before, but I know the term is used in the chesskit training area and I believe this is what they are referring to.

Hope this helps.

Trent Parker
29-11-2005, 02:37 PM
for those lower rated or not rated.....

what is reti's idea in king and pawn endgames?

Kaitlin
29-11-2005, 05:56 PM
In the sixth century the rules of Chess were expaned to see the Queen become the major influential piece. Explain in 20 words or less how this predicted the future and is representive of the true socio-gender workload inbalance.

(see post 12 for todays serious question - as im sure this one is destined for the too hard basket :whistle: )

Dozy
30-11-2005, 03:08 PM
In the sixth century the rules of Chess were expaned to see the Queen become the major influential piece. Explain in 20 words or less how this predicted the future and is representive of the true socio-gender workload inbalance.

(see post 12 for todays serious question - as im sure this one is destined for the too hard basket :whistle: )Kaitlin, I'm glad somebody raised this issue at last, no matter how belatedly. I tried to draw attention to it on the Rooty Hill site a few months ago:


Checkmate occurs when the king cannot avoid capture on the next move. He is spared the ignominy and disgrace of being led away in irons like some wanton criminal. Not so his consort. The queen enjoys no such immunity and it reflects poorly on the disciples of Germaine Greer and Amelia Bloomer that such a situation has been allowed to continue unremarked by modern feminists. The chess queen is no shrinking violet – she's a warrior nonpariel, an Amazon,and she deserves . . .If you want to read on, go to Sweet & Sour Chess at http://www.rootyhillchess.org/sweetsour.html

Kaitlin
04-12-2005, 09:54 AM
In the sixth century the rules of Chess were expaned to see the Queen become the major influential piece. Explain in 20 words or less how this predicted the future and is representive of the true socio-gender workload inbalance. (see post 12 for todays serious question - as im sure this one is destined for the too hard basket :whistle: )

About 1580 an Italian suggested making the Queen the strongest piece instead of the weakest. The new game was nicknamed ‘Scacchi all rabiosa’ (crazy Chess) by the Italians, and by the French, ‘Echecs de la dame enragee’ (Chess of the maddened Queen). The average game was halved in length. ... so maybe they should have called it "the end of the lazy King Chess" - oh wait :lol: he is still lazy

And as Dozy said:
"Cherchez la reine — or, watch out for your queen!
...The chess queen is no shrinking violet – she's a warrior nonpariel, an Amazon,and she deserves ..." to WIN

:classic:

hitman84
06-12-2005, 04:37 PM
Is it another name for the rule of square in K&p ending where in we work out if a passer can be caught by the opponent King.I'm guessing!

Kaitlin
08-01-2009, 07:59 PM
Who said

"A threat is greater than its execution"

Bereaved
08-01-2009, 08:07 PM
Nimzovich

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Ian Murray
08-01-2009, 08:29 PM
In the sixth century the rules of Chess were expaned to see the Queen become the major influential piece. Explain in 20 words or less how this predicted the future and is representive of the true socio-gender workload inbalance.

If you'd said sixteenth century, it might have been easier to reach the answer

Kaitlin
08-01-2009, 08:39 PM
Correct Macavity

Sixth .. Sixteeth ... its close.. only an eeth out .. :P

Next Question:

What was the shortest games ever played?

CameronD
08-01-2009, 08:41 PM
1 ply

That game where the player was disqualified for not shaking that english guys hand

pappubahry
08-01-2009, 08:58 PM
1 ply

That game where the player was disqualified for not shaking that english guys hand

That game went 1. e4 c5 before the disqualification. I'm sure there are a couple of games twice as short as that. Something like 1. c4 1-0.

Desmond
08-01-2009, 09:05 PM
pretty sure there are some cases of a draw with no moves being played at all.

Ian Murray
08-01-2009, 09:09 PM
That game went 1. e4 c5 before the disqualification. I'm sure there are a couple of games twice as short as that. Something like 1. c4 1-0.
As in Spassky-Fischer, Reykjavik 1972 (Game 2?). Spassky opened 1.e4 (or whatever), Fischer didn't show, so 1-0

Ian Murray
08-01-2009, 09:18 PM
A quick peek at The Complete Addict - the Icelandic game was actually Fischer-Spasky. Fischer forfeited without playing a move - common enough except never before or since at world championship level.

Then there was Miles - Reuben, Luton 1975:
1.Draw agreed

Kaitlin
08-01-2009, 09:21 PM
The answer I had was this one -

What was the shortest games ever played?

In 1972 the game between Hubner and Rogoff lasted all but 1 move. The game went: 1.c4 Draw Agreed.

Ian Murray
08-01-2009, 09:26 PM
The answer I had was this one -

What was the shortest games ever played?

In 1972 the game between Hubner and Rogoff lasted all but 1 move. The game went: 1.c4 Draw Agreed.
If you're using Wikipedia it's not a reliable source.

Of all the games ever played, how would anyone know which are the shortest - better to ask which grandmaster game (i.e. on the record)

Desmond
08-01-2009, 09:31 PM
Maybe better to ask for the shortest game with a decisive result that was not a forfeit.

Ian Murray
08-01-2009, 09:47 PM
Maybe better to ask for the shortest game with a decisive result that was not a forfeit.

Maybe we should stop being so picky and leave Kait alone :lol:

Kaitlin
09-01-2009, 06:34 PM
If you're using Wikipedia it's not a reliable source.

I didnt make up the Q?'s and nope not from Wikipedia ... I sourced them from ChessKit -> http://www.chesskit.com/trivia/ <- so yes :D ..stop being so picky .. rofl

Kaitlin
09-01-2009, 06:58 PM
and
Of all the games ever played, how would anyone know which are the shortest - better to ask which grandmaster game (i.e. on the record)

its all about giving the right answer :boohoo: .... not necessarly the correct answer ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb4LoTG3C8E ... and no-one likes a smartypants, plus they'll hit you if your clever.. but they dispise a fool.. till your so fup dupd you cant frollow the rules... so remember this....

..you should only ever give the correct answer when your asking the question to yourself...

..and you should never ask a question to another person unless you already know the answer.. then you will know if they are lying to you...

... and yes I know :rolleyes:.. take it to my philoisphy/psychology thread... lol

Ian Murray
09-01-2009, 07:57 PM
and

its all about giving the right answer :boohoo: .... not necessarly the correct answer ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb4LoTG3C8E ... and no-one likes a smartypants, plus they'll hit you if your clever.. but they dispise a fool.. till your so fup dupd you cant frollow the rules... so remember this....

..you should only ever give the correct answer when your asking the question to yourself...

..and you should never ask a question to another person unless you already know the answer.. then you will know if they are lying to you...

... and yes I know :rolleyes:.. take it to my philoisphy/psychology thread... lol

sorry, kait (looking down and scraping foot)

Kaitlin
29-01-2009, 05:53 PM
the "Who aM I" part of the Chess Question of the Day is a bit like a quiz.. a little hint is given every now and then.. untill someone guesses the right answer

.................................................

1. Because I had some knowledge of mathematics and geometry when I joined the guerrilla fighters I was given command of a unit with a heavy mine thrower and a machine gun.

antichrist
29-01-2009, 05:58 PM
the "Who aM I" part of the Chess Question of the Day is a bit like a quiz.. a little hint is given every now and then.. untill someone guesses the right answer

.................................................

1. Because I had some knowledge of mathematics and geometry when I joined the guerrilla fighters I was given command of a unit with a heavy mine thrower and a machine gun.

That Che guy? The Cuban Revolution?

Has it got to be a chessplayer?

Kaitlin
29-01-2009, 06:05 PM
Its the Chess Question of the Day so its kinda related to chess ..yes :eh:

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:12 PM
Its the Chess Question of the Day so its kinda related to chess ..yes :eh:

Kaitlin, I will work on this while you work on your next move as I will only be here a few more minutes.

Rincewind
29-01-2009, 06:12 PM
1. Because I had some knowledge of mathematics and geometry when I joined the guerrilla fighters I was given command of a unit with a heavy mine thrower and a machine gun.

Che Guevara was a medico and I haven't heard that he was particularly keen on chess. He was an Argentinian not a Cuban but both countries have a reasonably strong chess tradition.

I'm going to guess Fidel Castro as I have heard he is keen on chess and even got to play Bobby Fischer on one occasion. However I don't believe Castro had any particular mathematical or geometrical training.

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:14 PM
Che Guevara was a medico and I haven't heard that he was particularly keen on chess. He was an Argentinian not a Cuban but both countries have a reasonably strong chess tradition.

I'm going to guess Fidel Castro as I have heard he is keen on chess and even got to play Bobby Fischer on one occasion. However I don't believe Castro had any particular mathematical or geometrical training.

Because the fighter was assigned to a unit I presume that it could not be a leader, as the leader would assign people not be assigned. Castro did assign Che a few times.

Kevin Bonham
29-01-2009, 06:20 PM
Che Guevara was a medico and I haven't heard that he was particularly keen on chess.

He was very passionately keen on the game but there is a fair amount of argument about how strong he actually was. See the story about Korchnoi refusing to give him a diplomatic simul draw (#119 here (http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess2/diary_6.htm)); on the other side, Fox and James report that IM Bob Wade said he was 180-200 BCF (2150-2250 ELO) based on casual games.

I used to troll Resistance activists in student newspaper columns by playing up chess as being Guevara's main claim to fame, eg calling his death "a pointless loss to chess" or similar.

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:23 PM
Well Kaitlin, dont keep us in suspension, am I correct? I am missing out on din din trying to work this out

Rincewind
29-01-2009, 06:25 PM
He was very passionately keen on the game but there is a fair amount of argument about how strong he actually was. See the story about Korchnoi refusing to give him a diplomatic simul draw (#119 here (http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess2/diary_6.htm)); on the other side, Fox and James report that IM Bob Wade said he was 180-200 BCF (2150-2250 ELO) based on casual games.

Perhaps Wade didn't test him with the Catalan. :)

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:26 PM
He was very passionately keen on the game but there is a fair amount of argument about how strong he actually was. See the story about Korchnoi refusing to give him a diplomatic simul draw (#119 here (http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess2/diary_6.htm)); on the other side, Fox and James report that IM Bob Wade said he was 180-200 BCF (2150-2250 ELO) based on casual games.

I used to troll Resistance activists in student newspaper columns by playing up chess as being Guevara's main claim to fame, eg calling his death "a pointless loss to chess" or similar.

KB, your political stance is quite similar to my right-wing Hungarian brother-in-law. He used to pelt tomatoes at anti-Vietnam demonstrators. He goes in debates with greenies and left wingers just because right wingers don't even discuss the issues he is interested in - wat a boring life you bods must have - no warm inner glow and brotherhood and all those free love sit ins.

Kaitlin sorry to mes up your thread by KB Startered it. To stay on topic my brother in law is also a chess player, and he first beat his father on the Hungarian border when fleeing after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution that was crushed by the nasty Soviets. He plays his cous who crushes prisoners in nsw prison revolts

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:35 PM
Ow about, the winner of daily question gets the privilege of posing the next question - the winner stays in so to speak. Put Kaitlin out of a job

Adamski
29-01-2009, 06:42 PM
Che Guevara was a medico and I haven't heard that he was particularly keen on chess. He was an Argentinian not a Cuban but both countries have a reasonably strong chess tradition.

I'm going to guess Fidel Castro as I have heard he is keen on chess and even got to play Bobby Fischer on one occasion. However I don't believe Castro had any particular mathematical or geometrical training.Two guesses - both Drs. Emmanuel Lasker (mathematician) and Savielly Tartakower (resistance fighter inter alia).

antichrist
29-01-2009, 06:45 PM
Two guesses - both Drs. Emmanuel Lasker (mathematician) and Savielly Tartakower (resistance fighter inter alia).

But did they have machine guns in their day? The first world war. I am too hungry I am going to get fish fingers

Capablanca-Fan
29-01-2009, 07:05 PM
1. Because I had some knowledge of mathematics and geometry when I joined the guerrilla fighters I was given command of a unit with a heavy mine thrower and a machine gun.
Svetozar Gligorić?

Adamski
29-01-2009, 07:28 PM
But did they have machine guns in their day? The first world war. I am too hungry I am going to get fish fingersWhen they were older, their day was later!

ER
29-01-2009, 07:31 PM
But did they have machine guns in their day? The first world war. I am too hungry I am going to get fish fingers

they were used as far back as the American Civil War!

Kaitlin
29-01-2009, 07:34 PM
1. Because I had some knowledge of mathematics and geometry when I joined the guerrilla fighters I was given command of a unit with a heavy mine thrower and a machine gun.

2. I started to compete a little when I was 13 and managed to win champion of the city 14's and under the next year, but was late in learning the rules of chess as my parents knew little of the game (and had passed on by the time I was 17).

-> Was checking that there was no correct guesses so far before I posted after typing all that .. and Jono guessed correct

ps: anyone can put a Chess Q's of the Day - Jono has first option since he guessed it :)

Capablanca-Fan
29-01-2009, 09:44 PM
ps: anyone can put a Chess Q's of the Day — Jono has first option since he guessed it :)
Thanks. OK, here goes:

Capablanca died the year before Fischer was born, and both were very hard to defeat. Yet four players managed to beat both of them ...

ER
29-01-2009, 10:08 PM
geez that's a tough one! I can only think of one, or maybe two, at best three! I give up!

Adamski
29-01-2009, 10:17 PM
Thanks. OK, here goes:

Capablanca died the year before Fischer was born, and both were very hard to defeat. Yet four players managed to beat both of them ...Botvinnik, Tal, Keres and Reshevsky?

ER
29-01-2009, 10:28 PM
Jonathan, I don't think (edited out) is amongst them, he was born 1936 (leaving the clue) I think and Capa died in 1943! I am thinking (edited out) must be a good chance! hmmm I dont know if I should suggest names so I deleted them!

Adamski
29-01-2009, 10:54 PM
Yeah, Tal out (his autobiography does not mention playing against Capa in any simul in Tal's early years!). I will have to think some more about Number 4. Maybe Salo Flohr?

Capablanca-Fan
29-01-2009, 11:12 PM
Botvinnik played only one game with Fischer, and he was fortunate to draw.

ER
30-01-2009, 12:21 AM
Botvinnik played only one game with Fischer, and he was fortunate to draw.

Yes, it is in Fischer's book 60MG

Saragossa
30-01-2009, 12:22 AM
Olaffson perhaps one of them?

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 09:38 AM
Olaffson perhaps one of them?
He was 7 when Capa died ...

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 09:39 AM
Yeah, Tal out (his autobiography does not mention playing against Capa in any simul in Tal's early years!).
I'm not counting simuls, although I doubt it would help.

Ian Rout
30-01-2009, 10:25 AM
My answers >>>> Reshevsky, Keres, Euwe, Eliskases <<<<

Saragossa
30-01-2009, 10:30 AM
He was 7 when Capa died ...

oh I see :wall: :wall: :wall:

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 11:14 AM
My answers >>>>
Excellent—4/4!

Adamski
30-01-2009, 11:29 AM
Not having the complete Fischer games collection, or a complete record of his career, I would never have known Eliskases beat Fischer! The others are logical, but when did Fischer lose to Euwe?

Rincewind
30-01-2009, 11:40 AM
Not having the complete Fischer games collection, or a complete record of his career, I would never have known Eliskases beat Fischer! The others are logical, but when did Fischer lose to Euwe?

New York, 1957. (20 moves!)

Ian Rout
30-01-2009, 02:03 PM
I had to cheat a little on this one. I was fairly sure of Euwe, and Reshevsky and Keres are obvious suspects, but the fourth could be many players after eliminating names like Botvinnik (only the one draw v Fischer), Fine (retired) and Petrosian, Tal and Larsen (too young).

It would probably be someone born 1910-1920 though possibly older (as Euwe is) and with a reasonably long career. Probably Najdorf and Smyslov were the first names that came to mind but then there were others like Gligoric, Benko, Taimanov, Averbakh, Denker etc who roughly fitted the profile but I had no recollection of them beating or even playing both Capablanca and Fischer. Not to mention the possibility of a lesser light being in the right place at the right time twice.

Fortunately this is what we have the Internet for.

Incidentally I have read an interview where Gligoric describes his wartime activities in a similar but more interesting way. I think the wording was along the lines of "As I was an intellectual I was put in charge of the semi-heavy artillery."

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 02:31 PM
Fortunately this is what we have the Internet for.
Or books like Mednis' How to Beat Bobby Fischer that gave all his losses in serious play from US Champs to taking the world title, and Keres' Practical Chess Endgames that discusses the bishop endgame where Eliskases beat Capa.

Well done though. :clap: You now have first pop at asking the next question.


Incidentally I have read an interview where Gligoric describes his wartime activities in a similar but more interesting way. I think the wording was along the lines of "As I was an intellectual I was put in charge of the semi-heavy artillery."
His collection of his best games I Play Against Pieces mentions his partisan activities. Good games too!

antichrist
30-01-2009, 04:39 PM
A quick peek at The Complete Addict - the Icelandic game was actually Fischer-Spasky. Fischer forfeited without playing a move - common enough except never before or since at world championship level.

Then there was Miles - Reuben, Luton 1975:
1.Draw agreed

But at least the pieces were set up - whereas in the St George Comp a few years ago the entrants did not even mention the hall nor the pieces set up

antichrist
30-01-2009, 04:44 PM
they were used as far back as the American Civil War!

I thought they were a first world war invention??

Some people's tongues are like machine guns

ER
30-01-2009, 04:50 PM
I thought they were a first world war invention??


http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWmachinegun.htm

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 05:54 PM
OK, back to questions. It's Ian Rout's go, but here's a quicker one in the mean time:

Name the two players who beat each of the first four world champs (Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine).

Ian Rout
30-01-2009, 06:56 PM
As it's approximately the anniversary of Bobby Fischer's death something on the 1972 World Championship would be appropriate. These shouldn't be too hard so there are three parts:

(a) How many games had Fischer and Spassky played against each other before the match and what was the overall score (W/L/D)?

(b) What was Fischer's first choice of host city for the match?

(c) How many Elo rating points did Fischer gain from the match?

Capablanca-Fan
30-01-2009, 07:24 PM
(a) How many games had Fischer and Spassky played against each other before the match and what was the overall score (W/L/D)?
+3-0=2 to Spassky


(b) What was Fischer's first choice of host city for the match?
Belgrade (more prize money)


(c) How many Elo rating points did Fischer gain from the match?
He didn't—he lost 5 points!

Ian Rout
30-01-2009, 07:33 PM
Yes, Jono's answers are all correct.

Adamski
30-01-2009, 09:07 PM
OK, back to questions. It's Ian Rout's go, but here's a quicker one in the mean time:

Name the two players who beat each of the first four world champs (Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine).I haven't got time to research it in depth but I'll try Janowski and Tartakower.

ER
30-01-2009, 09:36 PM
Name the two players who beat each of the first four world champs (Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine).

ok I go for Bogoliubov and Rubinstein

Denis_Jessop
30-01-2009, 11:11 PM
Tarrasch was one of them but the other eludes me; Rubinstein is a guess but I don't think he ever played Steinitz though he beat the others. Another near miss is Schlechter who beat three of them but, as far as I know only played Capablanca once , the result being a draw.

DJ

Capablanca-Fan
31-01-2009, 12:29 AM
To JaK: 0/2 sorry. Both were too young to play Steinitz, and Bogo never beat Capa.

Basil
31-01-2009, 01:12 AM
Name the two players who beat each of the first four world champs (Steinitz, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine).
Their fathers and the school bully.

Adamski
31-01-2009, 07:09 AM
Tarrasch was one of them but the other eludes me; Rubinstein is a guess but I don't think he ever played Steinitz though he beat the others. Another near miss is Schlechter who beat three of them but, as far as I know only played Capablanca once , the result being a draw.

DJTartakower never beat Steinitz (nothing played before 1905) so I am changing to Janowski and Tarrasch.

Desmond
31-01-2009, 08:01 AM
How about Nimzo?

Ian Rout
31-01-2009, 08:43 AM
Tarrasch is an obvious try. For the other I will go for >>>>> Janowski <<<<<

Capablanca-Fan
31-01-2009, 09:29 AM
Adamski and Ian Rout are right.

Adamski
31-01-2009, 09:41 AM
Here's one with a Kiwi flavour. During the 1970s in Dunedin 2 men set what was then the world record for continuous 5 minute chess playing. (They took on all comers and when there was no other opposition played against each other.) The record has since been eclipsed. I saw part of this marathon. I want you to name both men. (One is better known than the other.)

Adamski
31-01-2009, 10:30 AM
New York, 1957. (20 moves!)I once played in a simul (in Dunedin again) against Dr Max Euwe. He was about 70 at the time and President of FIDE. Also a very pleasant man. You will know the result when I tell you that I have a 0% record as a participant in simuls.

Denis_Jessop
31-01-2009, 11:40 AM
I once played in a simul (in Dunedin again) against Dr Max Euwe. He was about 70 at the time and President of FIDE. Also a very pleasant man. You will know the result when I tell you that I have a 0% record as a participant in simuls.

On the same world tour Euwe came to Australia and I met him in Canberra as I was then ACTCA President. He didn't give a simul here but did give a lecture on computer chess which was then in a very primitive stage. Euwe had been engaged by some European governments to devise a computer chess program as they thought that the same type of program could be used for language translation. Unfortunately it didn't work either way.

DJ

ER
31-01-2009, 12:19 PM
If I can add to anecdotal facts about Dr Euwe, one of our Box Hill Chess Club namely Mrs Marieke van Dijk was a student of his while in High School at the time of one of the matches vs Dr Alekhine.

Adamski
31-01-2009, 12:23 PM
Here's one with a Kiwi flavour. During the 1970s in Dunedin 2 men set what was then the world record for continuous 5 minute chess playing. (They took on all comers and when there was no other opposition played against each other.) The record has since been eclipsed. I saw part of this marathon. I want you to name both men. (One is better known than the other.)Ok, some help. One of them has played at Olympiad level. The other only played at club level so I apologise to my non-Kiwi friends that he would be unguessable. You would have to have been in NZ at the time or maybe own an old copy of The Guinness Book of Records. The record did make it into that famous book and got good local press publicity.

Taking further pity on my non-Kiwi friends, here is an easy one. What was the christian name and surname of the reporter who in January 2009 published a story (with photo) on a well-known Sydney father and son chess-playing combination in The North Shore Times?

Saragossa
31-01-2009, 12:34 PM
How about Nimzo?

I'm not sure that Nimzo beat Capa.

Capablanca-Fan
31-01-2009, 12:50 PM
I'm not sure that Nimzo beat Capa.
He didn't. Neither did Bogo.

Denis_Jessop
31-01-2009, 02:57 PM
I'm not sure that Nimzo beat Capa.

According to Chessgames.com, they played 11 games with 5 wins to Capa and 6 draws. All of Capa's wins were with Black; he had White in only 4 of the 11 games.

DJ

Denis_Jessop
31-01-2009, 03:07 PM
If I can add to anecdotal facts about Dr Euwe, one of our Box Hill Chess Club namely Mrs Marieke van Dijk was a student of his while in High School at the time of one of the matches vs Dr Alekhine.

I've met Marieke several times at the Doeberl Cup in the past and she seems very proud of her Euwe connection - who wouldn't be. How is she these days?

By the way, was Euwe the last Gentleman World Champion (as in the old English cricketing distinction between gentlemen - amateurs - and players - professionals)? Botvinnik was essentially a pro though he did take some time off to do electrical engineering work (his other qualification) for a time. I think all the rest are, or were, full-time chess pros.

DJ

Kaitlin
31-01-2009, 03:34 PM
I should have titled this thread "Six degrees of separation" :angel:

antichrist
31-01-2009, 03:46 PM
+3-0=2 to Spassky


Belgrade (more prize money)


He didn't—he lost 5 points!

my computer shows no answers for these questions [offtopic trolling deleted - mod]

ElevatorEscapee
31-01-2009, 09:34 PM
On the request of antichrist:

"What is the Wurzburger trap?" :)

ER
01-02-2009, 12:23 AM
1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d5 4. fxe5 Nxe4 5. d3 Qh4+ 6. g3 Nxg3 7. Nf3 Qh5 8. Nxd5 Bg4 9. Nf4 Bxf3 10. Nxh5 Bxd1 11. hxg3 Bxc2? 12. b3

and the Bishop is trapped!

Adamski
01-02-2009, 12:31 AM
Here's one with a Kiwi flavour. During the 1970s in Dunedin 2 men set what was then the world record for continuous 5 minute chess playing. (They took on all comers and when there was no other opposition played against each other.) The record has since been eclipsed. I saw part of this marathon. I want you to name both men. (One is better known than the other.)Ok, maybe this was too hard! The answer is Alan Grant Kerr (usually known as Grant Kerr, who represented NZ at Olympiad level) and Aldous Skuja, local Dunedin student and player. Nobody picked up that I yesterday added a note to Grant Kerr's chessgames.com page which would have given you the answer! See http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=98476

ER
01-02-2009, 03:24 AM
ok I presume it's ok to give you a quick one for the road, before the legitimate current Champ gives you the next question...
Dr Tarrasch started his chess career unofficially at a cafe in Breslau! What' was the name of that place?
Clue: It was named after its two proprietors one of which had the same surname as a future World Chess Champion...

ER
01-02-2009, 03:50 AM
I've met Marieke several times at the Doeberl Cup in the past and she seems very proud of her Euwe connection - who wouldn't be. How is she these days?

By the way, was Euwe the last Gentleman World Champion (as in the old English cricketing distinction between gentlemen - amateurs - and players - professionals)? Botvinnik was essentially a pro though he did take some time off to do electrical engineering work (his other qualification) for a time. I think all the rest are, or were, full-time chess pros.

DJ

Hi Denis, how are you?
I haven't seen Marieke since last Doeberl where we met over the board and we had a very interesting discussion before and after the game. Topic? What else? Dr Euwe! I am sure she will be there this year as well and we might have a get together over a nice cupa.
She doesn't come to the BHCC very often, since we moved to the new place! I think she must be with Croydon CC if I am not mistaken and I stand to be corrected if I am wrong! Wherever she goes though, she is very popular especially amongst juniors! Juniors of all ages that is! :)
I think yes, Dr Euwe mast have been the last gentleman. As for the others, for at least as long they held the Crown, they had no other profession, apart maybe some (chess related) journalistic, or book writing activities re Tahl, Spassky, Karpov, Kasparov, Kramnik etc. However, Karpov went into business after his tenure as Champion, whereas Kasparov was deeply involved in politics while he was a Champion.
But as being involved in a traditional professional career, Dr Euwe must be the last!

Tony Dowden
01-02-2009, 09:18 AM
Here's one with a Kiwi flavour. During the 1970s in Dunedin 2 men set what was then the world record for continuous 5 minute chess playing. (They took on all comers and when there was no other opposition played against each other.) The record has since been eclipsed. I saw part of this marathon. I want you to name both men. (One is better known than the other.)

Grant Kerr (NZ rep at Nice OL) and Aldous Skuja - but I needed some help ;)

Capablanca-Fan
01-02-2009, 09:38 AM
ok I presume it's ok to give you a quick one for the road, before the legitimate current Champ gives you the next question...
Dr Tarrasch started his chess career unofficially at a cafe in Breslau! What' was the name of that place?
Clue: It was named after its two proprietors one of which had the same surname as a future World Chess Champion...
In his autobiograhical game collection Three Hundred Chess Games, Tarrasch says:

One day five of us ventured into the café of Fischer and Busch where every afternoon there was a chess gathering.

Tony Dowden
01-02-2009, 03:05 PM
Ok, maybe this was too hard! The answer is Alan Grant Kerr (usually known as Grant Kerr, who represented NZ at Olympiad level) and Aldous Skuja, local Dunedin student and player. Nobody picked up that I yesterday added a note to Grant Kerr's chessgames.com page which would have given you the answer! See http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=98476
Ha, I now see I gave the answer too late!! (I didn't peek but I did get some help from a fellow ex-Dunedinite)

ER
01-02-2009, 10:50 PM
(as if there was any doubt) Jono got my question right!!! :clap:

Ninja
01-02-2009, 11:09 PM
She doesn't come to the BHCC very often, since we moved to the new place! I think she must be with Croydon CC if I am not mistaken and I stand to be corrected if I am wrong!
President of Ranges Chess Club

ER
02-02-2009, 01:56 AM
Thanks Ninja, I am sure that with Marieke as president, the Club will continue its imperssive performance!!! Please give her and all your members my best regards!!!
And of course my apologies for not knowing that she is involved in your administration in such an important position.
CAGLES

Adamski
02-02-2009, 11:46 AM
Taking further pity on my non-Kiwi friends, here is an easy one. What was the christian name and surname of the reporter who in January 2009 published a story (with photo) on a well-known Sydney father and son chess-playing combination in The North Shore Times?
Repeating the question as it is a bit hidden in the thread!

ER
02-02-2009, 01:43 PM
hmmm shall i go for Kate Winslet ?

Adamski
02-02-2009, 10:18 PM
Repeating the question as it is a bit hidden in the thread!OK I don't have a great record as an asker of questions here that people can answer. Though tonight one Chess Chat member told me at Manly he refrained from answering to give someone else a chance. And that was not drug!

Anyway, no surprise that the players in question are Vladimir and Anton Smirnov. What interested me, was the reporter's name, Katrina Adamski (sorry JaK, not Kate Winslet)! We chatted when the interview was being organised and she told me her dad was (no surprise to me) Polish.

Time for someone else to ask a question!

antichrist
04-02-2009, 08:02 PM
What was the highest number of prawn promotions in what game at grandmaster level?

In one of my games that took approx 8 hours maybe 6 pawns were promoted to queens, after each one a major battle would take place and queens lost, then more promoted. That game was in 1973 and the guy would not play me again, reakon the game was too tough - he also lost.

Kevin Bonham
04-02-2009, 09:11 PM
What was the highest number of prawn promotions in what game at grandmaster level?

According to Tim Krabbe there are only three known serious games with six promotions. None involved grandmasters though one was between an
IM and an FM:

Panchenko (IM) - Vnukov (FM) 1999

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. Qc2 Bg4 5. Ne5 e6 6. Nxg4 Nxg4 7. e3 f5 8. Nc3 a6 9. h3 Nf6 10. g4 g6 11. gxf5 gxf5 12. Bd2 Rg8 13. O-O-O Nbd7 14. Be2 b5 15. c5 Bh6 16. Rdg1 Rg6 17. f3 Qe7 18. f4 Kf7 19. Qd1 Rag8 20. Bf3 Qf8 21. Ne2 Rxg1 22. Rxg1 Rxg1 23. Qxg1 Qg8 24. Qxg8+ Kxg8 25. Ba5 Ne4 26. Kc2 Kf7 27. Nc1 e5 28. Nd3 exd4 29. exd4 Bg7 30. Bh5+ Ke6 31. Ne5 Bxe5 32. fxe5 Ng5 33. h4 Nf7 34. Bd2 Nf8 35. Kb3 Ng6 36. Bxg6 hxg6 37. Kb4 Kd7 38. Ka5 Nd8 39. Kxa6 Ne6 40. Be3 f4 41. Bf2 f3 42. Kb6 Nf4 43. Be3 Nd3 44. e6+ Kxe6 45. Kxc6 b4 46. a4 Nxb2 47. a5 Nc4 48. a6 Nxe3 49. a7 f2 50. a8=Q f1=Q 51. Qe8+ Kf6 52. Qxe3 Qc4 53. Kd6 b3 54. c6 Qb4+ 55. Kd7 b2 56. Qe5+ Kf7 57. Qxd5+ Kg7 58. c7 Qa4+ 59. Kd8 b1=Q 60. c8=Q Qb6+ 61. Qc7+ Qxc7+ 62. Kxc7 Qa7+ 63. Kc8 Kh6 64. Qg5+ Kh7 65. Qc5 Qa8+ 66. Kc7 Qe4 67. h5 Qf4+ 68. Kc8 Qf5+ 69. Qxf5 gxf5 70. d5 f4 71. d6 f3 72. d7 f2 73. d8=Q f1=Q 74. Qd6 Qf5+ 1/2-1/2

Here is one all-GM game which has five promotions (one of them to a knight!)

Campora (GM) - Suba (GM) 1992. I do not know the time limit.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. O-O a6 5. Be2 Ngf6 6. d3 g6 7. c4 Bg7 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Ng5 h6 10. Nh3 Nb8 11. f4 Nc6 12. g4 Nd4 13. f5 b5 14. Nf4 g5 15. Nfd5 e6 16. Nxf6+ Qxf6 17. Bf3 Qe5 18. Bg2 Rb8 19. Rb1 Re8 20. Qd2 bxc4 21. dxc4 Rb4 22. Qd3 Nc6 23. Be3 Na5 24. a3 Rxc4 25. Rbd1 exf5 26. gxf5 Bb7 27. Bf2 h5 28. Qe2 h4 29. Qg4 Qf4 30. Qxf4 gxf4 31. Rxd6 Bxc3 32. bxc3 h3 33. Bh1 Kh7 34. Rfd1 Rxc3 35. Rd7 Rg8+ 36. Kf1 Bc6 37. Rxf7+ Kh6 38. Rd6+ Kg5 39. Be1 Bb5+ 40. Kf2 Rc2+ 41. Rd2 Rc1 42. a4 Nc4 43. axb5 Nxd2 44. Bxd2 Rxh1 45. Kf3 Rf1+ 46. Ke2 Ra1 47. b6 Kg4 48. b7 f3+ 49. Kf2 Rb1 50. Rc7 Rb2 51. Ke3 f2 52. Rc8 f1=N+ 53. Kd3 Rxd2+ 54. Kc3 Rdd8 55. b8=Q Rxc8 56. Qd6 Rcd8 57. Qe6 Nxh2 58. f6+ Kg3 59. f7 Rh8 60. Qe5+ Kg2 61. Qg7+ Kf3 62. e5 Ng4 63. e6 h2 64. e7 Kg3 65. exd8=Q Rxd8 66. Qh7 a5 67. Qe4 a4 68. Qe1+ Kf4 69. Qf1+ Kg5 70. f8=Q Rxf8 71. Qxf8 h1=Q 72. Qxc5+ Kg6 73. Kb4 Qd1 74. Qc6+ Nf6 75. Qxa4 Nd5+ 76. Ka3 Qc1+ 77. Kb3 1/2-1/2

So the record is five but I do not know if there are any other GM games with five promotions. I reckon there probably are.

antichrist
05-02-2009, 12:40 PM
Thanks a million, and the beauty of them is that they are openings that I use.

Kevin Bonham
05-02-2009, 02:43 PM
My pleasure. The Campora-Suba game is in an opening I play but it is a strange and fascinating game as well; I had not seen it until I went looking for an answer to your question.

Davidflude
06-02-2009, 11:08 AM
But did they have machine guns in their day? The first world war. I am too hungry I am going to get fish fingers

Of course they had machine guns and they were deadly.

The first practical machine gun was the Gatling gun invented and used by both Union and Confederates in the US war of the states. It is still the fastest firing machine gun ever. General George Custer left his Gatling guns behind when he went to the Little Big Horn.

The heavy machine guns used in the First World war caused carnage. For example 50,000 British casualties in the first morning of the battle of the Somme.

The Second World War saw the introduction of sub-machine guns and assault rifles.

Adamski
06-02-2009, 11:42 AM
What was the highest number of prawn promotions in what game at grandmaster level?Do prawns get promoted to scallops or oysters? Or, since they are cockroaches of the sea, do they get demoted to cockroaches? :hmm:

Desmond
06-02-2009, 11:51 AM
They could get promoted to king prawns.

Adamski
06-02-2009, 12:11 PM
They could get promoted to king prawns.LOL. But whoever heard of promoting to a King in chess?

ER
06-02-2009, 12:48 PM
Desperate call to all concerned, this is a great thread please do not make a seafood menu out of it! :rolleyes:

Desmond
06-02-2009, 12:49 PM
LOL. But whoever heard of promoting to a King in chess?Whereas scallops and oysters are commonplace? :lol:

Adamski
06-02-2009, 02:29 PM
Time for someone to ask a question!

ER
07-02-2009, 09:45 AM
ok I will have another go!

X (a well known master who was born in the 19th C and played a World Championship Match) was the composer of a problem in which white underpomotes into a black knight and mates! To those who tried to refer to the rules of the game etc he answered: "well trained and bred horses need not to be judged by their colour"! Who was X?

Basil
07-02-2009, 10:03 AM
Chigorin?

Ivanchuk_Fan
07-02-2009, 12:58 PM
Lowenthal.

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 01:05 PM
Tarkatower or Tarrasch?

Denis_Jessop
07-02-2009, 02:29 PM
So as to limit wild guesses, I'll be a nark and say that the answer must come from among the following as they were the only players to contest a world championship match before WWII:

Steinitz
Zukertort
Chigorin
Gunsberg
Lasker (Em)
Marshall
Tarrasch
Janowsky
Schlechter
Capablanca
Alekhine
Bogoljubow
Euwe

That doesn't make it all that much easier :)

DJ

Kevin Bonham
07-02-2009, 02:49 PM
Additionally, Euwe was born in 1901 and it probably wasn't Chigorin, Steinitz, Lasker, Capa, Alekhine or Bogo as they all played more than one WC match.

So it was most likely

Zukertort
Gunsberg
Marshall
Tarrasch
Janowski
or Schlechter

antichrist
07-02-2009, 03:17 PM
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?

Basil
07-02-2009, 03:37 PM
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?
Triple :lol:
1. For the spelling
2. For the randomness that is AC's mind
3. For the answer :uhoh:

ER
07-02-2009, 04:24 PM
Chigorin?
Nop!

ER
07-02-2009, 04:25 PM
Lowenthal.

Nop!

ER
07-02-2009, 04:26 PM
Tarkatower or Tarrasch?

Neither!

ER
07-02-2009, 04:28 PM
So as to limit wild guesses, I'll be a nark and say that the answer must come from among the following as they were the only players to contest a world championship match before WWII:

Steinitz
Zukertort
Chigorin
Gunsberg
Lasker (Em)
Marshall
Tarrasch
Janowsky
Schlechter
Capablanca
Alekhine
Bogoljubow
Euwe

That doesn't make it all that much easier :)

DJ

No multiples please!

ER
07-02-2009, 04:29 PM
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?

Do you have to stuff up everything?

ER
07-02-2009, 04:30 PM
Additionally, Euwe was born in 1901 and it probably wasn't Chigorin, Steinitz, Lasker, Capa, Alekhine or Bogo as they all played more than one WC match.

So it was most likely

Zukertort
Gunsberg
Marshall
Tarrasch
Janowski
or Schlechter

No Multiples please!

Kevin Bonham
07-02-2009, 04:33 PM
I'll go Marshall.

Adamski
07-02-2009, 05:10 PM
I'm with KB. I read that Frank Marshall composed a number of chess problems. Though not as many as another American named Sam!

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 05:11 PM
My third guess is Schlechter. mistake corrected.

ER
07-02-2009, 05:23 PM
I'll go Marshall.

No Marshall and no elimination process either!!!

ER
07-02-2009, 05:23 PM
I'm with KB. I read that Frank Marshall composed a number of chess problems. Though not as many as another American named Sam!

No Marshall!!

ER
07-02-2009, 05:24 PM
My third guess is Schlecter.

Imrpessed with your knowledge, but no Schlecter!
Kev, Jono, Adamski, Denis, Rince anyone, am I missing a (or is it an) H in the Master's surname?

ER
07-02-2009, 05:27 PM
ok a vital clue! He was born in the 19th C and died in the 19th C!

Kevin Bonham
07-02-2009, 05:27 PM
Imrpessed with your knowledge, but no Schlecter!
Kev, Jono, Adamski, Denis, Rince anyone, am I missing a (or is it an) H in the Master's surname?

Carl's surname was definitely "Schlechter" if that's what you're asking (or even if it isn't!)

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 05:30 PM
Zukertort (if it's not him i give in).

Rincewind
07-02-2009, 05:39 PM
Zukertort (if it's not him i give in).

With the new clue it is probably either him for Steinitz. Since Zuker is gone, I'll go Steinitz.

ER
07-02-2009, 05:50 PM
Carl's surname was definitely "Schlechter" if that's what you're asking (or even if it isn't!)
Yes, thanks and I thought his first name was spelled with a K!

ER
07-02-2009, 05:53 PM
And the winner is

LAWRENCE!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Indeed it was Johannes Zukertort.
My source was Exeter Chess Club's related section.

Lawrence you will find a treasure of material in their website, if you don't use it already that is!

http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/index.php

By the way i had changed the wording of the question so it was impossible to google it :P

Capablanca-Fan
07-02-2009, 06:30 PM
And the winner is

LAWRENCE!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Indeed it was Johannes Zukertort.
My source was Exeter Chess Club's related section.

Lawrence you will find a treasure of material in their website, if you don't use it already that is!

http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/index.php

By the way i had changed the wording of the question so it was impossible to google it :P
OK then, where is it now? I recall that KB and I had discussed such a position on this site's predecessor, but I couldn't remember where I'd first come across the idea.

antichrist
07-02-2009, 07:39 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by antichrist
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?

Triple
1. For the spelling
2. For the randomness that is AC's mind
3. For the answer
__________________
Now we have that other boring question out of the way now we can down to the nitty gritty question?

Howard, console me that I have not lost my HCDs

Basil
07-02-2009, 07:54 PM
Howard, console me that I have not lost my HCDs
Well assuming that this is your 'chess question of the day', then no you haven't lost any HCDs :eek:

antichrist
07-02-2009, 08:01 PM
[QUOTE=antichrist]Quote:
Originally Posted by antichrist
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?

The original question still stands - warts and all. None of you nerds have experienced both that is why there are no answers

ER
07-02-2009, 08:04 PM
OK then, where is it now? I recall that KB and I had discussed such a position on this site's predecessor, but I couldn't remember where I'd first come across the idea.

Here Jono!
http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/Stories/several.html

I do not think they provide the position though, it is just the (badly written) story!

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 08:09 PM
And the winner is

LAWRENCE!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Indeed it was Johannes Zukertort.
My source was Exeter Chess Club's related section.

Lawrence you will find a treasure of material in their website, if you don't use it already that is!

http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/index.php

By the way i had changed the wording of the question so it was impossible to google it :P


Wow that site is awesome cheers for the link.the clue that tipped me over was the 19th century life and death thing.

Adamski
07-02-2009, 08:57 PM
[QUOTE=antichrist]Quote:
Originally Posted by antichrist
What last longer the europhea(?) from good loving or a good chess win?

The original question still stands - warts and all. None of you nerds have experienced both that is why there are no answersHow many days before AC learns to use the quote function?

Adamski
07-02-2009, 09:00 PM
Here Jono!
http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/Stories/several.html

I do not think they provide the position though, it is just the (badly written) story!Just after the Zukertort story, this appears. (Note, Boris!) Some other famous problem composer, I do not remember who, had another interesting variation: Black, in order to escape mate, "promotes" his pawn to a new KING. White retaliates by promoting HIS pawn to ANOTHER BLACK KING, and goes on to mate all three of them!!! :clap:

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 09:20 PM
ok I have to come up with a question now I'll get there in a sec.

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 09:26 PM
Josh waitzkin and Maurice Ashley developed an opening in the french.
What was the opening(variation etc)? and links to two examples.

hint: C.M

Kevin Bonham
07-02-2009, 09:30 PM
^^^
Gee, I should know that one off the top of my head, but I don't. :rolleyes:

Saragossa
07-02-2009, 09:39 PM
Note. If you can generally explain ideas behind the opening system thats fine compared to move order or anything too technical.

Capablanca-Fan
07-02-2009, 09:45 PM
Just after the Zukertort story, this appears. (Note, Boris!) Some other famous problem composer, I do not remember who, had another interesting variation: Black, in order to escape mate, "promotes" his pawn to a new KING. White retaliates by promoting HIS pawn to ANOTHER BLACK KING, and goes on to mate all three of them!!! :clap:
I saw it in a book by George Koltanowski ages ago, and it's revisited here (http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/posts/1195378623.shtml).

Capablanca-Fan
07-02-2009, 09:52 PM
Here Jono!
http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/Stories/several.html

I do not think they provide the position though, it is just the (badly written) story!
Thanx JaK. This works: White to play and mate in 1:

8/5RPk/6N1/6K1/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1

Adamski
07-02-2009, 11:35 PM
I saw it in a book by George Koltanowski ages ago, and it's revisited here (http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/posts/1195378623.shtml).Ta, Jono. Cool link!

Desmond
08-02-2009, 07:21 AM
Not sure about then, but these days it is not allowed to promote to the opponent's piece.

When a pawn reaches the rank furthest from its starting position it must be exchanged as part of the same move for a new queen, rook, bishop or knight of the same colour. The player`s choice is not restricted to pieces that have been captured previously. This exchange of a pawn for another piece is called `promotion` and the effect of the new piece is immediate.

Capablanca-Fan
08-02-2009, 10:32 AM
Not sure about then, but these days it is not allowed to promote to the opponent's piece.
You're right. The above was trying to work out a possibility that Zukertort (in the apocryphal account) could have composed to show that sometimes it was advantageous to promote to an opposing piece, if such were allowed.

antichrist
08-02-2009, 03:58 PM
Not sure about then, but these days it is not allowed to promote to the opponent's piece.

When a pawn reaches the rank furthest from its starting position it must be exchanged as part of the same move for a new queen, rook, bishop or knight of the same colour. The player`s choice is not restricted to pieces that have been captured previously. This exchange of a pawn for another piece is called `promotion` and the effect of the new piece is immediate.

If the promotion square is a black one, can a white-squared bishop be promoted? And what square does it go on? The definition of the law show above does not disallow such?

Denis_Jessop
08-02-2009, 04:55 PM
If the promotion square is a black one, can a white-squared bishop be promoted? And what square does it go on? The definition of the law show above does not disallow such?

You have almost answered the question yourself. The piece must go on the promotion square - the law cannot be read any other way; that is, the exchange of pawn for piece is part of the move. Thus the colour of the bishop is necessarily that of the square to which the promoted pawn moved. Should the pawn have the option of either moving direct to the promotion rank or diagonally by way of capture, the player could have the option of having a White- or black-squared Bishop but that's the only way it could happen.

DJ

antichrist
08-02-2009, 04:58 PM
You have almost answered the question yourself. The piece must go on the promotion square - the law cannot be read any other way; that is, the exchange of pawn for piece is part of the move. Thus the colour of the bishop is necessarily that of the square to which the promoted pawn moved. Should the pawn have the option of either moving direct to the promotion rank or diagonally by way of capture, the player could have the option of having a White- or black-squared Bishop but that's the only way it could happen.

DJ

thanks, when gambling and in trouble I try to pull such rule tricks out of the bag - sometimes I get away with them to great consternation

Capablanca-Fan
08-02-2009, 05:20 PM
thanks, when gambling and in trouble I try to pull such rule tricks out of the bag — sometimes I get away with them to great consternation
IOW you cheat.

antichrist
08-02-2009, 06:47 PM
IOW you cheat.

Listen mate, after seeing two players in a tourney leave their kings checking each other for about 3 moves I believe we can get away with anything and the more the better - just ask Israel

Capablanca-Fan
08-02-2009, 07:35 PM
Listen mate, after seeing two players in a tourney leave their kings checking each other for about 3 moves I believe we can get away with anything and the more the better -
Mistakes like that don't justify intentional cheating.


just ask Israel
Why feed the troll?

Saragossa
09-02-2009, 12:39 PM
(Bump) I'll post the answer up tonight.

ER
09-02-2009, 12:59 PM
LMAO :clap: :clap: :clap:

Desmond
09-02-2009, 01:11 PM
What was the question?

Saragossa
09-02-2009, 01:19 PM
Josh waitzkin and Maurice Ashley developed an opening in the french.
What was the opening(variation etc)? and links to two examples.

hint: C.M
Note. If you can generally explain ideas behind the opening system thats fine compared to move order or anything too technical.

ER
09-02-2009, 01:34 PM
lol sorry Lawrence my "LOL :clap: :clap: :clap: was for what I thought was your response to Jono's "Why feed the troll question"! :doh:

Saragossa
09-02-2009, 01:54 PM
Thats alright Jak we can just pretend it was and still get the laughs :P

Saragossa
09-02-2009, 07:08 PM
ok the answer is in white. Josh waitzkin and Maurice ashley developed a system in the exchange french so. 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.c4!? ok this is a regular idea in the exchange french giving white the IQP but in turn he gets a big attack.
As well as playing against the IQP black still has the bad queens bishop which a key idea in this variation is to play against it.
4...Be7 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Bd3 ok so white gives up a tempo to achieve his plan.
Now usually Nf3 would have been played here but the main idea of waitzkin and Ashley is counter attacking the d5 square which it seems black will have firm control over, however through slow build up white trys to take it so the IQP becomes extremely strong.
6...exc4 7.Bxc4 Nbd7 (the idea being to go to b6 and play c6 creating a strong hold on d5)8.Nge2 with the idea of coming to f4 later to help attack d5.

Two games both featuring this system both played by waitzkin are Waitzkin vs Lunna and Waitzkin vs Friedmen.
The clue C.M refers to the program chessmaster upon which these games can be found.

Saragossa
21-02-2009, 10:45 PM
Bumpity bump i guess anyone can ask a question atm.

antichrist
26-02-2009, 04:04 PM
Who was the first person in Australian chess to be turfed out for phone violations?

Miranda
26-02-2009, 08:57 PM
Who was the first person in Australian chess to be turfed out for phone violations?
antichrist, or so he claims

antichrist
26-02-2009, 09:00 PM
he has more of an identity than that

Kevin Bonham
26-02-2009, 09:04 PM
Yeah, I don't regard AC's self-promoting claim as by any means proven. Indeed he wasn't even tossed out for a mobile phone violation as such, since no mobile phone rules existed at the time.

antichrist
26-02-2009, 09:07 PM
Yeah, I don't regard AC's self-promoting claim as by any means proven. Indeed he wasn't even tossed out for a mobile phone violation as such, since no mobile phone rules existed at the time.

But there would have been rules relating to interfering with players concentration or such. Do you mean I could have told Charlie Zworstine to shove off

Saragossa
26-02-2009, 09:08 PM
be actually quite interesting to see the real answer.

Kevin Bonham
26-02-2009, 09:20 PM
But there would have been rules relating to interfering with players concentration or such.

Yes, but it is more accurate to say that your use of a mobile phone violated those rules than that you committed a phone violation.

antichrist
26-02-2009, 09:28 PM
Yes, but it is more accurate to say that your use of a mobile phone violated those rules than that you committed a phone violation.

Well it shows how early I was, the rules were not even invented yet. In essence it was a mobile phone violation. Girls like me coz I am not too finicky, learn from me

antichrist
02-03-2009, 05:01 PM
How many more FIDE rating points does GM Zhao need to surpass GM Rogers highest rating?

I don't want that Mickey Mouse Glicko imintaaaaator stuff - worth nothing on the foreign market

eclectic
02-03-2009, 05:03 PM
How many more FIDE rating points does GM Zhao need to surpass GM Rogers highest rating?

I don't want that Mickey Mouse Glicko imintaaaaator stuff - worth nothing on the foreign market

send a pm to your mate shirty ;)

antichrist
02-03-2009, 05:06 PM
send a pm to your mate shirty ;)

I have not heard from Shirty for ages - maybe he has changed his handle?

Yeah, we are old mates, always will be - I was just trying to help him out in the apology section

antichrist
03-03-2009, 10:20 PM
wouldn't it be a mile stone if and when GM Zhao surpasses GM Roger's top career rating - well then how can we celebrate if we don't even know what their true, dinky-die FIDE ratings are/were?

Doesn't anybody want to see the sentimental old favourite pipped at the post?

Capablanca-Fan
24-11-2009, 03:54 PM
Let's start this thread moving again:

Who was the world's strongest Finnish-speaking player of all time?

ER
24-11-2009, 04:23 PM
For some reason I thought it must have been Paul Keres. I don't know why but it rang a bell!

Capablanca-Fan
24-11-2009, 04:30 PM
Understandable, JaK, since Estonian and Finnish are closely related languages, and part of the Finno-Ugric language group not Indo-European, but not the answer I had in mind.

Mtanner
25-11-2009, 07:53 PM
Let's start this thread moving again:

Who was the world's strongest Finnish-speaking player of all time?

Paul Keres?

ER
25-11-2009, 09:41 PM
Hi Michael, select the text after this... This is Elliott your punching bag guy at MCC. :) When we give answers to general questions given by other chatters we use this method (white colour typing) so others can still try to answer without their text being visible. Now, select the text in my first response, and also the text after "Understandable Jak" in Dr Sarfati's response!

Saragossa
25-11-2009, 10:11 PM
Tomi Nyback :cool: :cool: :cool: Joke intended.

Igor_Goldenberg
26-11-2009, 11:15 AM
Let's start this thread moving again:

Who was the world's strongest Finnish-speaking player of all time?
And who was the strongest Startish-speaking player?

black
26-11-2009, 02:22 PM
And who was the strongest Startish-speaking player?

heh (:

Garrett
26-11-2009, 04:27 PM
I've done some research and have no idea.

I'm guessing the person would be not in dispute as being the strongest so must be a very strong player.

Alekhine passed through Finland and Capa did a simul there.

I'll guess Alekhine.

cheers
Garrett.

Capablanca-Fan
26-11-2009, 07:52 PM
Robert Hübner was a candidate twice, which is a far higher achievement than Tomi Nyback's. That he is a fluent Finnish speaker comes out in Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam's interview in The Day Kasparov Quit, and is apparently well known to Finns. When I was in NZ, there was a 2000+ Finnish philosophy Ph.D. student who asked me the same question, and I had no idea either, guessing names of prominent Finnish players. Then he proved it by conversing with Hübner in Finnish (in 1988 when Hübner visited Wellington to play one round of the Plaza International, quitting after losing to Rogers in R1.

ER
26-11-2009, 08:23 PM
heh (:
Don't worry, it's just another Igoristic statement by Igor! :):lol:

Saragossa
26-11-2009, 08:39 PM
Apparently Tomi Nyback's peak rating is higher than Hubner's peak rating (Although I was using wiki which is notoriously unreliable) but I suppose due to inflation this figure may be distorted however Nyback is still improving. You said higher achievement in one of your posts but the question regarded strength so I don't think your justification for Hubner being stronger works in cohesion with the original question.

Capablanca-Fan
26-11-2009, 11:19 PM
Saragossa, Also, rating inflation. Hübner has been in the World's top-10; Nyback has not even cracked the world's top-100. See Chessmetrics:

Hübner
Best World Rank: #6 (on the December 1974 rating list)
Highest Rating: 2732 on the April 1973 rating list, #9 in world, age 24y5m
Best Individual Performance: 2774 in Chicago, 1982, scoring 6.5/8 (81%) vs 2662-rated opposition

Nyback
Best World Rank: #154 (on the January 2005 rating list)
Highest Rating: 2584 on the January 2005 rating list, #154 in world, age 19y9m
Best Individual Performance: 2628 in EU-ch 5th Antalya, 2004, scoring 6/12 (50%) vs 2639-rated opposition

Kevin Bonham
26-11-2009, 11:28 PM
Jono, re above:

Chessmetrics has not been updated since 2005 and hence is not useful as a measure of historical playing strength for Nyback.

Nyback was ranked #73 by FIDE in April 2009.

Of course I agree Hubner was much stronger.

ER
27-11-2009, 12:40 AM
If only his nervous system was stronger!

Saragossa
29-11-2009, 10:11 PM
So is Jono posting another question seeing as no-one got that one?

ER
29-11-2009, 10:37 PM
Hi Jonathan, yes I believe so, chances are that he is digging deep in his notes to find something really hard so he can torment us again! :) Having said that I really love his questions because they are always challenging! :)

Saragossa
07-12-2009, 11:05 PM
I'm going with a "snooze you lose" take over here. Apparently in Karpov's match vs Korchnoi, Karpov had to receive his yoghurte at the same time, same waiter, same spoon, same flavour. What was his chosen flavour of yoghurte?

Kevin Bonham
07-12-2009, 11:53 PM
Pretty sure that I know this one.

bilberry!!!

Saragossa
09-12-2009, 10:25 PM
Kevin got it right in the first post, well done!

Kevin Bonham
12-12-2009, 12:14 PM
Four (not three) world champions prior to 1990 became world champion without needing to defeat an incumbent world champion in a match. Why is the number four and not three?

Capablanca-Fan
12-12-2009, 01:17 PM
Hmm, obviously Steinitz as the first didn't need to defeat an incumbent; Botvinnik won his title in a match tourney after Alekhine died; Karpov didn't have to beat Fischer over the board because of the no-show. This presumably refers to Capablanca beating Lasker, who had resigned the title beforehand, and the match conditions referred to Capa as champ and Lasker as challenger. not that most of the chess world accepted this, and most date Capa's reign from the +4=10-0 match in 1921.

Kevin Bonham
12-12-2009, 01:45 PM
Correct; Lasker "resigned" the title in 1920 and repeatedly insisted Capablanca was the world champion in the leadup to their match, and the signed conditions for the match stipulated this. The whole arrangement was more or less unanimously criticised, but that was mainly on the grounds that it was absurd that Lasker could just give the title away to a specific player, rather than the grounds that a world champion couldn't abdicate.

I think it's correct to date Capablanca's reign from 1921, but given Lasker's abdication in 1920, and considering what would have happened had the match not been able to be organised, it's rather difficult to say that Lasker was really still the incumbent world champion when the match began, especially when both participants agreed that he was not.

Adamski
12-12-2009, 02:37 PM
So it's your turn again, Jono! Well done.

antichrist
19-10-2013, 06:17 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Chess_Federation
Member federations[edit]

There are at present 158 member federations of FIDE, including 142 UN member states and 16 other entities. There were 159 until recently, when one was dropped. The list fluctuates, as new nations join and sometimes national federations collapse or are unable to pay their dues.
The states are
Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guernsey, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Surinam, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, and Zimbabwe
And the other entities are
Aruba, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Chinese Taipei, England, Faroe Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Jersey, Macau, Netherlands Antilles, Palestine, Puerto Rico, Scotland, US Virgin Islands, and Wales

AC:
why are the British Isles not member states of FIDE, and where does Northern Ireland sit?

machomortensen
19-10-2013, 06:53 AM
And where is Greenland??

Kevin Bonham
19-10-2013, 10:55 AM
AC:
why are the British Isles not member states of FIDE, and where does Northern Ireland sit?

Read the top sentence carefully. You don't have to be a UN member state to be a member of FIDE, meaning that a UN member state that includes multiple countries, such as the UK, may have multiple memberships.

antichrist
19-10-2013, 12:36 PM
Read the top sentence carefully. You don't have to be a UN member state to be a member of FIDE, meaning that a UN member state that includes multiple countries, such as the UK, may have multiple memberships.


So I see now that Brits are listed as non-UN entities. No idea why of course.

And what about Greenland? Is it part of Norway or Iceland?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_FIDE_Member_Federations

antichrist
19-10-2013, 12:42 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_FIDE_Member_Federations
on this site Israel and Palestine are listed under Europe - maybe because of M/E politics or due to Israel not considering itself Middle Eastern but European??
And still Greenland is no where to be found

Kevin Bonham
19-10-2013, 01:17 PM
So I see now that Brits are listed as non-UN entities. No idea why of course.

Because they choose to be members under the banners of England, Scotland and Wales (etc) rather than joining as a single federation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. If the UK federations decided to merge and be a single entity for FIDE purposes then the UK would be listed as one of the UN member states in the list.

Greenland is part of Denmark.

machomortensen might be able to tell us what the chess strength of Greenland is like.

Kevin Bonham
19-10-2013, 01:21 PM
I note the Wikipedia page says "The FIDE does not allow to join new members if they are not U.N. members." Not sure that affects countries within a UN member country (Greenland being an example). Guam was accepted.

I'd guess the reason Greenland isn't a FIDE member is they prefer to just be part of Denmark for FIDE purposes, but perhaps there is some other reason.

antichrist
19-10-2013, 04:11 PM
I note the Wikipedia page says "The FIDE does not allow to join new members if they are not U.N. members." Not sure that affects countries within a UN member country (Greenland being an example). Guam was accepted.

I'd guess the reason Greenland isn't a FIDE member is they prefer to just be part of Denmark for FIDE purposes, but perhaps there is some other reason.

As Palestine is accepted and we know that they are only UN "semi-members " the rules may not be water tight

Kevin Bonham
19-10-2013, 07:03 PM
As Palestine is accepted and we know that they are only UN "semi-members " the rules may not be water tight

The claim was that the rule applied to new federations seeking to join, not that it applied to those that have been members of FIDE for some time. Existing members need not be new members according to the claim.

Of course, a claim by an anonymous Wikipedia editor is an unreliable source anyway.

Bill Gletsos
19-10-2013, 10:37 PM
I note the Wikipedia page says "The FIDE does not allow to join new members if they are not U.N. members."I can find no such requirement in the FIDE Statutes on membership.

The closest to it in the FIDE Statutes is: "For new members, the country of the federation (with the same boundaries) must be a country or territory that is a member of the International Olympic Committee."

Kevin Bonham
19-10-2013, 11:06 PM
I've added a citation request to see if anyone can substantiate the comment.

antichrist
11-03-2015, 08:07 AM
In new terminology when playing BLack the light square bishop referred to I presume is the old Black's queen bishop? (of course idiot) I find the old terminology more meaningful as it means you can attack the opponent's king directly with that bishop whilst it is in original posi or castled posi. Whilst light and dark are neutral terminology. Also I have always thought that the king's bishop is more involved in king's defence and the queen bishop for attack and trading. So the descriptive name actually means something.

Kevin Bonham
11-03-2015, 10:20 AM
I don't know if it is a matter of old terminology vs new. I rather like LSB vs DSB because this refers to permanent properties of the pieces. The fact that a given bishop started out on the queenside is not very useful in designating it at move 20 of some middlegame where it might end up on the opposite side of the board. The attacks on the king you refer to don't happen all that often in the kind of openings I play (indeed my original motive for playing the French as a rather weak junior was to not have to think about defending f7 from bishops!)

Might also be republican sympathies here; the idea that the king and queen own other pieces makes no sense.

antichrist
29-03-2015, 08:10 PM
I thought I had noticed a pattern in successful games, or endings at least. of the king side pieces being still on the board in comparison to the losing side queen size pieces still around. Has a survey ever being done?

jammo
30-03-2015, 02:42 PM
I thought I had noticed a pattern in successful games, or endings at least. of the king side pieces being still on the board in comparison to the losing side queen size pieces still around. Has a survey ever being done?

I think KB is the ideal person to investigate this vital matter for you. Why don't you ask him?

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2015, 03:43 PM
I think KB is the ideal person to investigate this vital matter for you. Why don't you ask him?

You generally seem to have more time to kill on idle posts than me. It's all yours. :lol:

jammo
30-03-2015, 07:43 PM
You generally seem to have more time to kill on idle posts than me. It's all yours. :lol:

You are too modest. You could free up a bit of time by not posting all your games here for us to marvel at. That's what I call a win/win.

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2015, 08:24 PM
You are too modest. You could free up a bit of time by not posting all your games here for us to marvel at. That's what I call a win/win.

I would analyse them anyway in the vain hope of learning somethin (or just because I like knowing the truth about them). Having done that I post them here so I can find them, and so all my opponents can prepare. :)

antichrist
30-03-2015, 10:27 PM
I would analyse them anyway in the vain hope of learning somethin (or just because I like knowing the truth about them). Having done that I post them here so I can find them, and so all my opponents can prepare. :)

Do I have your permission to analyse your games to prove my point - in spite of your previous denials of my hunch?

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2015, 10:32 PM
Do I have your permission to analyse your games to prove my point

You don't need my permission. But we know from past experience that you will quite often come up with some nonsense declaring such and such move to be wrong on some simplistic principle when it is actually theory.

In the context of the rapid I put up, you'd probably try to say 10.Be3 was a bad move. :lol: