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bunta
30-10-2005, 08:28 AM
OK, my tactics are really bad and i need hardwork on them and i want to improve fast, lol. What is the order to look for in tactics in a certain position?

Rincewind
30-10-2005, 09:12 AM
OK, my tactics are really bad and i need hardwork on them and i want to improve fast, lol. What is the order to look for in tactics in a certain position?

Don't think there is an order as such bunta. I suggest getting a book or better still a database of chess positions from real games where tactics/best moves exist. Then work through them. Do as many as you can as fast as you can and as often as you can. If you can manage it, something like 30 minutes to 1 hour, 5 times a week would be good. This will improve your rating by 100s of points pretty quickly by making you aware of different tactical possibilities and improving your pattern recognition at the board.

PHAT
30-10-2005, 11:08 AM
OK, my tactics are really bad and i need hardwork on them and i want to improve fast, lol. What is the order to look for in tactics in a certain position?

Very interesting question!

The phrase "the order to look," suggests mechanical approach. It is the approach recommended to learning players. The conscious act of systematically looking for:

knight forks, bishop forks, bishop pins/skewers. and so on -

trains (reinforces) the visual cortex to prefrontal connections. When this connection becomes "stronger" ie. more sensitive, the patterns become more quickly and reliably recogized. Appearence of the pattern triggers a conscious recogition.

One important attribute of the accomplished player is the ability to "see" the board. This is not mearly observation of the position of the pieces. It is the next step up from observation, that distinguishes the beggining player from the accomplished player.

The brain must imagine in the mind's eye the potential positions and have the recogition system monitoring those imagined images. Thus the player can "see" the board.

How to improve tactically? Practise. But what? Two things:
1. Look over your games by looking at moves that were too bazzar and frightening to play OTB. By exposing your brain too the postions that come out of those bazzar positons, you will find some new patterns that work, which importantly, apply to the kinds of postions your games/openings regularly generate.
2. Follow instructive GM games - not any old GM games. This will expose you to new patterns that work. The more you see them, the more you will find opportunites to use those new patterns in your own games. Also, lokk over these games more than once - eg on three successive days. This is sound learning practise.

Note: Always examine games at a real tournament board! Do not do it on a computer screen. They do not look the same and the visual patterns you learn on the screen will not be as reliably recalled when looking at a real board in a real game.



:hmm: maybe I should write a book ;)

bergil
30-10-2005, 10:43 PM
Very interesting question!

The phrase "the order to look," suggests mechanical approach. It is the approach recommended to learning players. The conscious act of systematically looking for:

knight forks, bishop forks, bishop pins/skewers. and so on -

trains (reinforces) the visual cortex to prefrontal connections. When this connection becomes "stronger" ie. more sensitive, the patterns become more quickly and reliably recogized. Appearence of the pattern triggers a conscious recogition.

One important attribute of the accomplished player is the ability to "see" the board. This is not mearly observation of the position of the pieces. It is the next step up from observation, that distinguishes the beggining player from the accomplished player.

The brain must imagine in the mind's eye the potential positions and have the recogition system monitoring those imagined images. Thus the player can "see" the board.

How to improve tactically? Practise. But what? Two things:
1. Look over your games by looking at moves that were too bazzar and frightening to play OTB. By exposing your brain too the postions that come out of those bazzar positons, you will find some new patterns that work, which importantly, apply to the kinds of postions your games/openings regularly generate.
2. Follow instructive GM games - not any old GM games. This will expose you to new patterns that work. The more you see them, the more you will find opportunites to use those new patterns in your own games. Also, lokk over these games more than once - eg on three successive days. This is sound learning practise.

Note: Always examine games at a real tournament board! Do not do it on a computer screen. They do not look the same and the visual patterns you learn on the screen will not be as reliably recalled when looking at a real board in a real game.



:hmm: maybe I should write a book ;)
I you knew anything about tactics you wouldn't have been banned for as long as you were! :doh:

PHAT
31-10-2005, 06:42 AM
I you knew anything about tactics you wouldn't have been banned for as long as you were! :doh:

'Twas an pawn sacrifice for a won endgame. :lol:

bergil
31-10-2005, 07:18 AM
'Twas an pawn sacrifice for a won endgame. :lol:
I thought it was a risky gambit but if you say so I'll believe you. ;)

PHAT
31-10-2005, 02:34 PM
I thought it was a risky gambit but if you say so I'll believe you. ;)

Some blunders become a brilliancy - in hindsite.

rob
01-11-2005, 03:36 PM
Very interesting question!

The phrase "the order to look," suggests mechanical approach. It is the approach recommended to learning players. The conscious act of systematically looking for:

knight forks, bishop forks, bishop pins/skewers. and so on -

trains (reinforces) the visual cortex to prefrontal connections. When this connection becomes "stronger" ie. more sensitive, the patterns become more quickly and reliably recogized. Appearence of the pattern triggers a conscious recogition.

One important attribute of the accomplished player is the ability to "see" the board. This is not mearly observation of the position of the pieces. It is the next step up from observation, that distinguishes the beggining player from the accomplished player.

The brain must imagine in the mind's eye the potential positions and have the recogition system monitoring those imagined images. Thus the player can "see" the board.

How to improve tactically? Practise. But what? Two things:
1. Look over your games by looking at moves that were too bazzar and frightening to play OTB. By exposing your brain too the postions that come out of those bazzar positons, you will find some new patterns that work, which importantly, apply to the kinds of postions your games/openings regularly generate.
2. Follow instructive GM games - not any old GM games. This will expose you to new patterns that work. The more you see them, the more you will find opportunites to use those new patterns in your own games. Also, lokk over these games more than once - eg on three successive days. This is sound learning practise.

Note: Always examine games at a real tournament board! Do not do it on a computer screen. They do not look the same and the visual patterns you learn on the screen will not be as reliably recalled when looking at a real board in a real game.



:hmm: maybe I should write a book ;)
:clap: :clap: