PDA

View Full Version : Annotated games



Bereaved
14-09-2005, 01:36 AM
I thought that annotated games, with words and variations, but mainly words should have a place to live

To start off



Nother,A (1600) - Macavity (1660) [A46]
Melbourne Chess Club Open Melbourne (4.12), 30.10.2000
[Macavity]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 c5 4.e3 Qb6 Owing to white's unambitious opening, this early queen development is fully justified; white has problems with his b2 pawn 5.Nc3 a6 [Not 5...Qxb2?! 6.Nb5 when Black is forced to accept a repetition; after the move played, Black is threatening to capture on b2] 6.Rb1 cxd4 presenting white with an unattractive prospect; after a capture on d4 with the e-pawn, white may regret blocking his c-pawn, whereas after the move played 7.Qxd4 black gains time for development with 7...Bc5 8.Qa4 Bb4 9.Nd2 0-0 10.Be2 Qc5 11.Qb3 [11.Be5!? b5 12.Qb3 Qxe5 13.Qxb4 Bb7 14.0-0 Nc6 Black has fully equalised but has no particular advantage; it is fair to say that his pieces come into the game easier though] 11...Bxc3 12.Qxc3 Qxc3 13.bxc3 A position has arisen that will be decided by two factors. Either the power of white's two bishops will be triumphant or the weakened pawn structure will be exploited by black13...Nd5 14.Bd6 Re8 15.Rb3 Nc6 16.e4 Nde7 17.Nc4 b5 18.Nb6 Ra7 19.0-0 Rb7 20.Nxc8 Nxc8 White has secured the two bishops in its purest form. Opposed by two knights, they actually are sufficient only to hold equality. This is primarily owing to black's superior structure and many outposts for his knights.21.Bg3 Nb6 22.Rd1 Rc8 23.f3 Na4 24.Be1 Na5 25.Ra3 Nc4 26.Bxc4 Rxc4 So one of white's bishops has disappeared leaving black in undisputed control of the light squares. Black's pieces effortlessly hold back the advance of white's shattered queenside. The image cast by the white rook on a3 is particularly sad 27.Rd4 Rbc7 28.Rxc4 Rxc4 29.Rb3 Rc6 Black avoids white's attempts to repair his structure following a later Rb4, with the idea of either getting the rooks off the board or activating his rook at d4 30.Kf1 f6 31.Ke2 Kf7 32.Ke3 e5 White must make immediate attempts to forestall black advancing his king and securing his position in the centre. Undermining the pawn on e5 should be of high priority for white. 33.h4 Ke6 34.g4 g6 35.a3 d5 a clear example of the effectiveness of the black pawn majority on the kingside 36.Bd2 h5 Black fixes another white pawn on a dark square in preparation for a possible rook swap 37.gxh5 gxh5 38.exd5+ Kxd5 39.Be1 f5 40.Ke2 Rc4 41.Ke3 Nb6 42.Rb4 The adjourned position. Black's advantage is significant and rather than seal the exchange of rooks, black chose to play.. 42...f4+ when there were a maximum of four white alternatives to study at home. 43.Kd3 Relatively best. Although it would seem that the realisation of the advantage should be easier with the rooks on the board, after the paradoxical 43...Rxb4!? White has no recapture that will lead to the activation of his bishop 44.axb4 Nc4 45.Ke2 e4 46.fxe4+ Kxe4-+ White is helpless against black's f-pawn. After the bishop sacrifices itself for the f-pawn, white's h-pawn will be indefensible. 47.Bf2 f3+ 48.Ke1 Kf4 49.Kd1 Nd6 50.Ke1 Ne4 51.Bd4 Kg3 52.Be5+ Kg2 53.Bd4 f2+?! [53...Nxc3! 54.Ba7 Nd5 55.c4 bxc4 56.Kd2 f2 57.Bxf2 Kxf2 58.Kc2 Ke2 59.Kc1 Kd3 was arguably quicker but black was perhaps too lazy to calculate this variation seeing as the win of white's bishop was winning with no difficulties] 54.Bxf2 Nxf2 55.Ke2 Kg3 56.Ke3 Nd1+ 57.Kd4 Kxh4 58.c4 bxc4 59.Kxc4 Kg3 60.Kd4 h4 61.c4 h3 62.c5 h2 63.c6 h1Q 64.Kc5 Qh8 65.c7 Qc8 66.Kb6 Nc3 Black mates shortly 0-1

Take care all and God Bless, Macavity

Bereaved
23-01-2007, 10:59 PM
Hello, everyone,

It seems that my idea of a thread for annotated games with heavy verbal commentary didn't take off last time, so will try again, and see if others want to participate, or even respond.

Event: ?
Site: ?
Date: ????.??.??
Round: ?
White: Fish
Black: Crying
Result: 1-0
ECO: A01
Annotator:
PlyCount: 37

1. b3 {A move that allows white to later choose where their other pieces are
to go with ease.} e5 {
Black takes the centre and now white will start to attack it.} 2. Bb2 {
White develops a piece and attacks the black centre.} Nc6 {Black brings out a
piece to defend the pawn on e5 so that they don't fall behind in development (
getting the pieces off the back line!)} 3. e3 {White clears the diagonal for
his other bishop. He will soon push a pawn forward to the 4th rank.} Nf6 {
Although Black has an extra piece developed, he will still have to clear the
lines for his Bishop on c8.} 4. Bb5 {The bishop attacks the knight on c6 and
when the knight is gone the pawn on e5 will be undefended.} d6 {Black defends
the pawn on e5 solidly with a pawn, but now the knight on c6 is completely
pinned to the black king.} 5. Ne2 {The knight clears the way for white to
castle and leaves the central pawns to advance as they choose.} Bd7 {Black prev
ents White doubling his pawns on c6 and c7. White continues with his
development with} 6. O-O {when he will be ready to strike at the white centre.
Black should concentrate on completing their development with a move of the
Bf8 and then castling. Instead Black plays} Qc8 $2 {Diagram # which makes it
harder to co-ordinate their pieces as they are not completing their
development and they are allowing their hopes of an attack to be based on
white making some weak moves in front of their king.} 7. d4 $5 {
Although this opens lines it actually wasn't as good as some other moves} ({
Instead} 7. f4 {snipes at the white centre more effectively as it doesn't
block the Bishop on b2} exf4 8. Bxf6 $5 gxf6 9. Nxf4 {
White has a big advantage in piece placement e.g.} a6 10. Be2 Bg7 $6 11. Nh5
Rg8 12. Nxg7+ Rxg7 13. Rxf6 $16) 7... exd4 {Black makes the best decision and
swaps their centre pawn. There would be too much pressure otherwise.} 8. exd4 {
Opening the e-file against the uncastled black king. Swapping knights and
bishops would release the pressure on the Black position too much.} d5 $5 {
A good move trying to allow for an active development of the Bishop on f8 at
the same time as blocking the line for the Bishop on b2. White now sets out to
bring it back to life byplaying} 9. c4 {Black holds the centre for now but who
knows what the future holds? Black should still be thinking about castling.} b6
$4 {A bizarre move! Black chronically weakens the position of their knight on
c6 for the sake of the d6 square for their bishop on f8. A high price to pay!}
10. Nbc3 {White has now completed their development and forced black to make a
decision about their centre; Black chooses to swap with} dxc4 {
White now has a choice of two recaptures.} 11. bxc4 {White takes with the pawn
to make his centre free to advance gaining time against the black knight and
other minor pieces.} a6 {Black finally kicks the Bishop on b5 but it is no
longer required to swap and can retreat with} 12. Ba4 Bd6 {Diagram # Black has
made all the prepartaions for castling but now white throws a spanner in the
works} 13. c5 $1 {White sacrifices a pawn to open lines towards the black king
and to take advantage of his strange piece development} bxc5 {
Black takes one pawn...} 14. dxc5 {only to have it replaced with another!} Be5
$5 {Black wisely declines the sacrifice as there would be a swift tearing
apart of the black position then.} ({If instead} 14... Bxc5 $2 {
then white comes crashing through} 15. Nd5 $5 Ne4 (15... Nxd5 16. Qxd5 Bd6 17.
Bxc6 Bxc6 18. Qxc6+ $18) 16. Qc2 $18) 15. f4 {Taking away the last square from
the Bishop on e5; now it must take the knight on c3} Bxc3 16. Nxc3 {
this clears the e-file. White will check on this line if Black doesn't castle.}
O-O 17. Nd5 $3 {Diagram # White now takes away all Black's hopes.} Ne4 $2 ({
If instead} 17... Qd8 $4 18. Bxc6 Bxc6 19. Nxf6+ $18) ({Or} 17... Nxd5 $8 18.
Qxd5 Rb8 19. Bc3 Rb5 20. Bxb5 axb5 21. Rad1 Nb8 22. Rfe1 Bg4 23. Qg5 f6 24. Re7
Rf7 25. Qd5 Qf8 26. Rxf7 Qxf7 27. Qd8+ Qf8 28. Qxf8+ Kxf8 29. Rd8+ Ke7 30. Rxb8
{White comes crashing through}) 18. Bxc6 $1 {winning everything} Bxc6 19. Ne7+
{And with this check removing the Black queen Black decided they had had
enough. What a crush!!!} (19. Ne7+ Kh8 20. Nxc8 Raxc8 $18) 1-0


Hope you enjoy,

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Basil
23-01-2007, 11:03 PM
I wasn't around back then. Unlucky me. I would have been dead grateful then, and I'm sure as hell going to enjoy going through these.

Q

Basil
23-01-2007, 11:19 PM
Malcolm I'm looking at your (meteoric) rating increase since 2000. In that time (when I started) my rating hasn't changed significantly. To what do you attribute this quite staggering increase at a relatively late age?

If you have the energy, I'm sure we'd all appreciate a fulsome answer - and perhaps even in a different thread.

Thanks

Bereaved
23-01-2007, 11:52 PM
Seeing as how this time I have received a response, I thought that I would post one more game; and will reply as suggested soon, Howard.



Event:
Site: ?
Date: 2001
Round: ?.2
White: Nother, A
Black: Macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: A70
WhiteElo: 1720
BlackElo: 1777
Annotator: Macavity
PlyCount: 66

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 {
I thought I may as well play this as I know few defences as well} 3. d5 e6 4.
Nc3 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 6. e4 g6 {After this white has many options of which 7.f4
and 8.Bb5+ is the most aggressive} 7. Bd3 {This modest plan of development
aims to consolidate white's position in the centre and maintain the knight on
f3 by means of a later h2-h3. That this does not happen in the game is a fact
that gave the game a different character, where it was as if white was playing
two different systems.} Bg7 {Developing first and foremost to allow castling
and also not determining the placing of the queenside pieces yet. Even so by
the means of the move 7...a6, black retains more options as if white persists
with the standard h2-h3 then black will achieve b7-b5 with equal chances;
otherwise black will be able to play Bg4 as in the game with suitable affect.}
8. Nf3 O-O {I thought of playing immediately} (8... Bg4 {
but couldn't remember the variations after} 9. Qb3 {although after} Bxf3 10.
Qxb7 Nbd7 11. gxf3 {white will suffer more from his deformed pawn structure
than black from his pawn minus. All the same a pawn is a pawn and this was the
final!}) 9. O-O ({White should play} 9. h3 {
to complete the desired formation; after this black has a free hand to play})
9... Bg4 {eliminating the f3 knight before it can come to c4 where it would
not only aid e4-e5 but also not hinder the ability of the f-pawn to aid this
move} 10. h3 {Too late she cried! The exchange this provokes, black would
probably make of his own free will at some stage} Bxf3 11. Qxf3 {White has his
two bishops and the ability after a redeployment of the queen to continue with
f2-f4 and e4-e5. This will take time though. Black has the ability now to
occupy d7 with either knight and of late I have been making the move} Nfd7 {
with the idea that should white attempt to exchange on e5 then the bishop can
recapture rather than the d-pawn. I feel that this type of change to the pawn
chain should favour white as his passed d-pawn will be a constant worry to
black. In addition the knight helps prevent a later e5 at the same time as
threatening to occupy this square, exchanging white's Bd3 as in the game.
Finally, the knight move prevents any pins on the h4-d8 diagonal.} 12. Bd2 {
completing development but not putting black to the question} ({better was} 12.
Qg3 {when black must give thought to the defence of his d-pawn}) 12... Ne5 13.
Qe2 ({After} 13. Qg3 {
black must exchange the d3 bishop immediately; in the game this is not the case
}) 13... Nxd3 {but he does so all the same} 14. Qxd3 {So through a sequence of
a few moves, two minor pieces have left the board. What can we say of the
resulting position? All black's minor pieces have clear lines of action, and
there is only one piece remaining that might wish to occupy d7, which is
sometimes a problem for black in other lines. I remember reading in Michael
Stean's Simple Chess that certain positions like this one had certain rules.
White should aim to prevent exchanges as his greater board room gave him more
room to manouevre. In contrast, black should aim to exchange 1-2 sets of minor
pieces when he will be well placed, whereas white may seem to be overextended.
I always try to keep this in mind when playing the Benoni.} Nd7 {completing
development; there is little point in plans with Na6-c7 as black is more
interested in d3 for his knight now} 15. f4 {preventing Nd7-e5 for the moment
and preparing to advance e4-e5 at a favourable moment. At this point, e4-e5 is
a long way off.} ({Not} 15. Nb5 {when after} a6 {white must retreat} 16. Nc3 ({
if} 16. Nxd6 $4 {then} Ne5 {wins a piece for little compensation}) {
black will then expand with} 16... b5 {when he has a fair amount of space on
the queenside and the opportunity to get more as he advances his pawns
attacking the white pieces}) 15... a6 {prepares a possible b7-b5 but also
stops white coming to b5 now that e5 is not available to the knight on d7. I
remember thinking that possibly white could expand with 16.f4-f5 but finally
decided that the added control I would have on the dark squares should
compensate for any white gains} 16. a4 {The standard response to Black's move,
preventing an immediate b7-b5. I had expected this and remembering other games
of this type, continued with} Rc8 {with plans to expand with c5-c4 and
Nd7-c5-d3. This sort of activity would have been much more difficult had white
retained his light square bishop.} 17. Kh1 {Obviously my opponent was worried
about checks on the g1-a7 diagonal as this was the only threat that the white
king was prone to on g1. I felt that this move was unnecessary.} ({For some reason I was concerned that my opponent would answer this move with 17.b2-b3; it
later turned out that my computer agreed with me offering the variation} 17. b3
Re8 18. Rae1 Qh4 19. Re2 {with approximate equality}) 17... Re8 $15 {centralising the rook, although it seems later that it would have been better left on f8}
18. Rae1 {
with the idea of e4-e5. to make e4-e5 work though, white must invest material}
c4 {attacking the white queen and preparing for the knight to come to d3} 19.
Qf3 {thinking of the f7 pawn amongst other squares on the f-file which my
opponent hoped to open} ({I was planning on answering} 19. Qe2 {with} f5 {
however my computer disagrees} ({It feels that} 19... Nc5 {is much better when
white enters similar variations to the game with a tempo less})) 19... Nc5 {
aimed at d3 and also played with only white's response as in the game in mind}
20. e5 {With thoughts of an open f-file, white advances e4-e5. Unlike many
Benoni's, the e-pawn does not gain time against a knight on f6 in this game.} (
{however} 20. f5 {was another move I considered, planning to prevent my
bishop's entombment by moving it with} Be5 {when after a sequence like} 21. Re2
Qe7 22. Bf4 Nd3 23. fxg6 fxg6 24. Bxe5 Nxe5 {we reach a position where the
black knight can move from e5 to d3 at will and no such situation exists for
white's knight on c3. The backward pawn on d6 seems to do a good job of
keeping the "advanced" white pawn e4 backward itself!}) 20... Nd3 {gaining time
attacking e5 and e1; by playing this first, black forces the later sacrifice}
21. Re2 dxe5 $5 (21... Nxb2 $6 {may win a pawn but the knight is a long way
from the game and gives white time to bring up his reserves}) 22. fxe5 {
may open the f-file but after} Nxe5 $17 {
black wins a pawn and white must continue with} 23. Rxe5 $6 {to win it back. i
was not worried about this move as I had calculated that all lines were at
least playable for me after this} Bxe5 $8 {to keep control of the back rank}
24. Qxf7+ Kh8 {Black's king turns out to be quite safe here; white's attack is
of an optical rather than an actual nature} 25. Qxb7 {I was sure that this was
how my opponent would continue, seeking immediate compensation for his
exchange in the form of an extra pawn or two. I was more concerned with 25.Bh6
and the denial of the f8 square to my rooks. However then I would have the
good move 25...Rc7 when his queen must retreat. Bad now would be 25...Ra8
seeking to hold on to the a-pawn when white would play 26.Rf7 when I would
have some problems with the defence of my h-pawn.} Rb8 {attack is the best
form of defence! Now if White seeks to maintain himself on the 7th rank, after
the capture of the b2-pawn, black's rook will be attacking the Bd2 when he is
well placed to prevent white developing activity as his queen can come to h4
in the event of Qa7 and Rf7 and otherwise the move Re7 or Rf8 puts an end to
all white's aspirations. After 26.Qf7, I was planning 26...Rf8 when we reach
an ending where the exchange is more important than the extra pawn} 26. Qxa6
Rxb2 $19 {
the white pieces lack co-ordination and black finishes his opponent off quickly
} 27. Be1 Qc8 $6 {missing the killer blow; I had seen this far when playing 22.
..Nxe5, but had originally planned Rf8 here, missing that after Qxc4 the Rf1
was defended and white now had definite compensation. White should take the
opportunity to swap queens now. After this he never gets another chance.
Instead of this move, had black played} (27... Qg5 $3 28. Rf2 Rxf2 29. Bxf2
Qc1+ 30. Bg1 Bd4 31. Ne2 Rxe2 {black wins the house and mate is not far away})
28. Qa5 $6 (28. Qa7 {has the advantage of allowing the queen other squares to
move to after the move i planned in the game, thinking only that after} Rb7 29.
Qa5 (29. Qf2 {is better}) 29... Rb3 {we would transpose to the game}) 28... Rb3
{with the idea of 29...Bc7, 30...Rxe1 and 31...Rxc3 winning a piece. however
instead of this} (28... Rf8 $1 {causes white to suffer horribly eg} 29. Rxf8+
Qxf8 30. Qa7 Qf4 31. Qg1 Rc2 32. d6 Bxc3 33. Bxc3+ Rxc3 34. d7 Rd3 35. Qa1+ Kg8
36. Qe1 Qd6 37. d8=Q+ Qxd8 {black will win in any manner he chooses}) 29. Bd2 {
blocking the threat of 29...Bc7; it has been a long time since we saw white do
anything like attacking though. This all proves that the sacrifice was
unjustified.} Rf8 {With the white queen isolated on a5, the exchange of rooks
is unattractive, yet this was a lesser evil. During the game, both my opponent
and I rejected this idea. I rejected it because I thought that he could not
afford to swap off such a key defensive piece. I thought initially to continue
after the (I thought forced) 30.Re1 with Bd4 when the white queen is in great
danger. The computer in its pragmatic view pointed out d5-d6, providing an
escape. I will say that before my opponent made his next move, I had seen 30...
Qf5. White has no reasonable defence now.} 30. Rd1 Qf5 {I considered that
there was no longer a defence but the computer pointed out 31.Qc5 to defuse
black's idea of Qf1+ intending Rxf1#. However the best that white can expect
from 31.Qc5 is a rook down ending.} 31. Ne2 {
allowing a crisp conclusion; for the only defence see the previous note} Rxh3+
$1 32. gxh3 Qxh3+ {at this point my opponent resigned. I included the
conclusion because I feel that I am justified in doing so in reward for my
play!} 33. Kg1 Qh2# 0-1



Take care and God Bless, Macavity

antichrist
24-01-2007, 10:59 AM
Hello Mr Blessing, as a rare praise from me somebody once said that the best chess books are those with the most writing in them (were referring to Seriwan I think) - and you are coming from that angle. Wish I had time to follow up and will try to later.

Blessing from A/C

Bereaved
31-01-2007, 03:20 PM
Hello everyone,

Here is another game:

Event: Friendly
Site: ?
Date: 1998
Round: ?
White: Macavity
Black: Another
Result: 1-0
ECO: E98
Annotator: Pyke
PlyCount: 79

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5
Ne7 9. Ne1 Ne8 10. Be3 f5 11. f3 fxe4 $146 (11... f4 12. Bf2 Nf6 {is a more normal continuation. Black will then strive to expand on the kingside with pawns
to g5, h5 and g4 while white will be busy on the queenside}) 12. fxe4 {
rather than 11.Nxe4 which does nothing to hinder the e7 knight's path to d4}
Rxf1+ 13. Bxf1 c5 $5 {played at a moment where it is inopportune for white to
capture the pawn en passant. Rather the position becomes one where the fixed
barrier in the centre favours white. He has more space to organize his pieces
and the freedom to expand on the queenside at will.} 14. Nd3 Nf6 15. Be2 Bd7 {
the start of an incorrect plan. In a position where most of black's pawns are
on dark squares, it is a good idea to retain the light square bishop in
preparation for white establishing an outpost in black's half of the board say
on e6 or c6. What becomes more apparent is that after the swap of black's
light square bishop, the white knights begin to display impunity} 16. a3 Qc8 17.
Qd2 Bg4 18. Rf1 Bxe2 19. Qxe2 Qg4 $6 {This however is going too far. While
white has been steadily activating his pieces and has been tightening his grip
on the position, black has been planning this manoeuvre which has prevented
her from making any attempt to activate the knight on e7. Indeed this problem
piece haunts black for the rest of the game.} 20. Qxg4 Nxg4 21. Bg5 Nc8 {
Unfortunately this is the only square for the black knight as defending the
knight with either the rook or the bishop costs dearly; e.g.} (21... Bf8 22. h3
{loses two pieces for a rook}) (21... Re8 22. h3 Nh6 23. Bxe7 Rxe7 24. Nb5 Nf7
25. Nxa7 Re8 26. Nb5 {when black has very little to show for the pawn she has
sacrificed. In particular it is worth noting the paucity of options for the
black minor pieces.}) 22. h3 Nh6 $6 (22... Bh6 {was better}) 23. Nb5 Nf7 24.
Be3 Nb6 $2 {# Allowing white a pretty move} 25. Rxf7 $5 Kxf7 26. Nxd6+ Ke7 27.
Bxc5 {Immediate compensation for the exchange can be found in white's extra
two centre pawns. In addition, the new freedom of white's minor pieces almost
pokes a finger at the sorry state of the black bishop on g7. Indeed it is hard
to suggest anything useful for black to do. White seems certain to collect the
b-pawn, advance his pawns and queen one of them for which black will have to
lose another piece. It is important to note that white is not thinking of any
forcing sequence but more of a gradual encroachment and constriction of the
black pieces' freedom.} Nd7 28. Nxb7+ Nxc5 29. Nbxc5 {Black's last useful
minor piece has been swapped off; the position has clarified. White's two
knight's dominate the board and have many luscious white outpost squares to
choose from. The agile bishop and the powerful rook are made to look awkward
as the knights dance back and forth, wreaking mayhem.} Rc8 30. Ne6 Bf6 (30...
Rxc4 {sacrificing the useless bishop and picking up white's centre pawns might
have been enough to hold the draw. But anything can happen still.}) 31. c5 a5
$6 {is perhaps a little cooperative. Even so, it is hard to suggest what black
might have done otherwise} 32. b4 axb4 33. axb4 Ra8 34. b5 Ra3 35. Nb4 Rb3 (
35... Bh4 {might still offer some swindling chances}) 36. Nc6+ Kd7 37. b6 Kc8 {
It's all over now. Black might be able to delay it but the pawns are going to
steam roll home and leave white a piece up ( or at least only one piece until
the second pawn is queened! )} 38. Nc7 Re3 39. Ne8 Bh8 40. Nd6+ {
the b-pawn is unstoppable} 1-0


Take care and God Bless, Macavity

PS Howard, will reply to the earlier request when I have time, but the short answer is God, my chess coach, Naum Kagan, and my family ( oh and a lot of hard work!! lol )

Basil
24-03-2007, 12:28 AM
PS Howard, will reply to the earlier request when I have time, but the short answer is God, my chess coach, Naum Kagan, and my family ( oh and a lot of hard work!! lol )

Thanks. Just nudging. It is (was) my birthday after all!

Bereaved
27-03-2007, 05:49 PM
Hello Howard,

I suggest that perhaps the most important things that I did to improve my playing strength ( being mindful that I had already been playing for about 8 years in 2000 ) was to critically analyse as many of my games as possible, seeking to falsify rather than approve of my moves. I also took a bit more of a psychological approach to the game, asking why was it that I wished to play, what did I hope to achieve, other questions of this sort.

I tried to stop playing what I call 'hope' chess; where an opponents response is hoped for rather than forced. I decided to read some more of the large library of dust catchers on my shelf, and I gave a renewed priority to my faith, which had been lacking in many ways at that time, or really since my childhood, in any meaningful way.

And I suppose you can ask for clarification on any of these points you like and in the meanwhile so as not to be off topic, here is another game:

Event: Internet Marriage open
Site: ?
Date: ????.??.??
Round: ?
White: Cerny, Leo
Black: Hesketh, Bruce
Result: 1-0
ECO: A45
Annotator: Pyke
PlyCount: 53

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 {This move introduces the Trompowsky opening, where white is
prepared to concede the two bishops in exchange for a superior pawn structure}
g6 $6 {This move does nothing to hinder white's plan. 2...Ne4 attacking the
bishop that has just moved to g5 is black's most dynamic option.} 3. Bxf6 exf6
{Let us review this position; white now has a bishop and knight against
black's two bishops. But what can we say of the future of black's bishops?
With the white pawn embedded on d4, the dark square bishop which has no rival
may not be able to develop effectively on the a1-h8 diagonal; the black light
square bishop will have to compete against his pawns, as the move ...f6-f5
almost certainly must be played to open the a1-h8 diagonal. White on the
other hand has several attractive options; he can place his pawns on e3,d4,c4
and g3, place his bishop on g2, his knights on c3 and e2 and undermine a black
pawn should it ever arrive on d5. White also should have no problems expanding
on the queenside with moves like pawns to a3 and b4 and rooks to d1 and c1
after the queen is deployed. A pleasant scenario for white.} 4. Nc3 $6 {
However this conflicts with a basic premise of a Q-pawn game; that one should
deploy one's b1-knight only after playing a pawn to c4; it might be playable
to make the move 4.Nc3 if one could follow up with pawn to e4 and maintain
that pawn on that square. But with two black f-pawns and a d-pawn to chip away
at e4 this is hardly likely to succeed. Even if white did not wish to contest
d5, then a knight deployment at d2 and pawn to c3 makes more sense now that
white is without his dark square bishop.} Bg7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nf3 (6. d5 $5 {
White might consider this move with a mind to inhibit black's queenside
development.}) 6... d5 7. Be2 c6 8. h3 {A good move stopping black swapping
his light-square bishop. In some cases it also gives an escape square to the
white king.} Re8 9. Qd2 {This is an example of what not to aim for from this
opening. Being unable to contest black's strongpoint on d5 or to achive pawn
to e4 leaves the white position terribly passive and almost completely without
counterplay. Black has a clear objective; manoeuvre a knight to e4. Even if
white resists taking the knight, he will find it almost impossible to evict
without creating a weak pawn on e3 and a weak square on g3.} Nd7 {
The knight begins its journey} 10. O-O f5 11. b4 {White does two things with
this move; he inhibits black from playing his pawn to ...c5 and paves the way
for attacking the pawn on c6. However I fear it is a case of too little, too
late.} Nf6 12. Rab1 {moving the rook off the long diagonal is not consistent
with white's last move; he should probably follow up with pawn to a4 in a
quest to open some lines on the queenside.} Ne4 13. Nxe4 fxe4 {From his miserable
opening position, black has achieved a great deal. He has straightened out
his doubled pawns, and now presents the white knight with an unenviable choice
of squares to choose from.} 14. Nh2 {An ugly looking move, but Leo must have
sensed that the task of reactivating his knight if he retreated it to e1 would
be quite difficult. At least on h2 the knight can dream of the path via f1 to
g3. What this will threaten in the black position is anyone's guess.} b5 {
Bruce continues his restrictionist policy and further limits white's options
just when it looked that white might be able to play a pawn to c4 after all.
This move recognises that if white were allowed to play c4, his chances of
resisting would be greatly increased. Undermining the pawn on b5 is of key
importance; however after...} 15. c3 {White is no closer to achieving the move
pawn to c4 than before and has perhaps wasted a vital tempo.Pushing the a-pawn
to a4 had to be examined.} h5 {The icing on the cake! Now white who is cramped,
passive and weak on the kingside, comes under an attack that his pieces are
poorly placed to fend off. In a quite understandable attempt at counterplay,
white lashes out with...} 16. g4 $2 {# an intuitive move to seize some space
on the kingside. Unfortunately, it is just bad. White horribly weakens the
pawns on his kingside and allows black many attacking opportunities.} hxg4 {
At the crucial moment black falters.} ({Critical is} 16... Qh4 $1 17. Kg2 f5 $1
18. gxh5 ({not} 18. gxf5 Bxf5 {when h3 is indefensible and white collapses}) (
18. Rh1 {May cover all the bases for the moment however after} fxg4 19. hxg4
Qg5 (19... hxg4 20. Nxg4 Qg5 21. Qd1 {is less incisive}) 20. a4 Rf8 21. Ra1 a6
22. axb5 cxb5 23. Qe1 Rb8 24. Bd1 Rb6 25. Ra5 Rbf6 26. Ra2 R6f7 {white has a
truly miserable position, when the question is not will the blow fall, but
where?}) (18. f3 {appears the most logical of the moves however if black
follows up with the correct sequence, we are left with a decidedly
unattractive position for white.} Bh6 19. Qe1 Qxe1 20. Rbxe1 a5 21. a3 {
the best out of several bad choices} Bxe3 22. gxf5 ({worse is} 22. Bxb5 cxb5
23. Rxe3 f4 24. Ree1 e3 25. Re2 axb4 26. axb4 {when all manner of endgames are
lost for white due to black's monstrous pawn on e3}) 22... axb4 23. axb4 Bxf5
24. Bxb5 Ra2+ 25. Kh1 Bxh3 26. Rxe3 cxb5 27. Rg1 Bf5 28. Rg2 Rea8 {and black's
extra pawn on the kingside in combination with his strong bishop, dominating
rooks and white's completely passive stance should make the win merely a
technical exercise.}) 18... f4 $3 {winning by force} 19. Bg4 {
the best defence; now events lead by force via} f3+ 20. Kh1 Bxg4 21. hxg4 Bf8
22. Rg1 Bd6 23. Rg3 gxh5 {to a position where white is completely paralysed
and has nothing constructive to do to free himself from the two deadly pins;
one on the b8-h2 diagonal and the other on the h-file. Black will almost
certainly increase the pressure until white's position screams, knowing that
at any point he can bale out with a clear win of the exchange.}) 17. Bxg4 f5
18. Bd1 Qg5+ (18... Qh4 {leads to the clear win of a pawn as 19.Kg2 transposes
to the previous note. Comparatively best for white is 19.f4 striving to block
out black's bishops and somehow make a draw.}) 19. Kh1 Bh6 $4 ({
This is black's last chance to play} 19... Qh4 {
in an attacking manner of play; after} 20. Rg1 Kf7 21. a4 Qxh3 22. axb5 Rh8 23.
f4 cxb5 {black is calling all the shots. The text, in contrast, allows all the
pieces in the white camp to display all of a sudden an alarming amount of
activity}) 20. Rg1 $16 Qf6 (20... Qh4 {is no longer an attacking move, but the
only way to hold together a position being torn apart on the rebound}) 21. Bh5
Qf8 ({Of course not} 21... g5 $4 22. Bxe8 {
when white is a whole rook to the good}) 22. Rxg6+ Kh7 23. Rbg1 (23. Rxc6 {
nets another pawn safely; however a set of rooks is likely to come off the
board. Instead, white plays for an attack}) 23... Re6 24. Rg8 $2 {in his haste
for victory, white overplays his hand. More circumspect would be to play the
rook on g6 back down the file, maintaining the pressure on black's position.
However after} Qe7 $4 {
black returns the favour at the crucial moment. By continuing with} (24... Qxg8
25. Rxg8 Kxg8 $11 {black would have every right to count on a draw with
white's queen and remaining pieces not being especially able to exploit
black's small material inferiority and backward development. Now things get
ugly!}) 25. Qe2 f4 $4 {Effectively resigning. Black could battle on with other
moves but now Leo brings the game to a crisp conclusion.} 26. Qg4 Rf6 27. Rh8+
1-0

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

PS game seems to not work, perhaps print it out and play through it that way? otherwise any mod is welcome to fix it

Basil
27-03-2007, 06:04 PM
1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 { This move introduces the Trompowsky opening, where white is
prepared to concede the two bishops in exchange for a superior pawn structure }
g6 { This move does nothing to hinder white's plan. 2...Ne4 attacking the
bishop that has just moved to g5 is black's most dynamic option. } 3. Bxf6 exf6
{ Let us review this position; white now has a bishop and knight against
black's two bishops. But what can we say of the future of black's bishops? With
the white pawn embedded on d4, the dark square bishop which has no rival may
not be able to develop effectively on the a1-h8 diagonal; the black light
square bishop will have to compete against his pawns, as the move ...f6-f5
almost certainly must be played to open the a1-h8 diagonal. White on the other
hand has several attractive options; he can place his pawns on e3,d4,c4 and g3,
place his bishop on g2, his knights on c3 and e2 and undermine a black pawn
should it ever arrive on d5. White also should have no problems expanding on
the queenside with moves like pawns to a3 and b4 and rooks to d1 and c1 after
the queen is deployed. A pleasant scenario for white. } 4. Nc3 { However this
conflicts with a basic premise of a Q-pawn game; that one should deploy one's
b1-knight only after playing a pawn to c4; it might be playable to make the
move 4.Nc3 if one could follow up with pawn to e4 and maintain that pawn on
that square. But with two black f-pawns and a d-pawn to chip away at e4 this is
hardly likely to succeed. Even if white did not wish to contest d5, then a
knight deployment at d2 and pawn to c3 makes more sense now that white is
without his dark square bishop. } Bg7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nf3 d5 7. Be2 c6 8. h3 { A
good move stopping black swapping his light-square bishop. In some cases it
also gives an escape square to the white king. } Re8 9. Qd2 { This is an
example of what not to aim for from this opening. Being unable to contest
black's strongpoint on d5 or to achive pawn to e4 leaves the white position
terribly passive and almost completely without counterplay. Black has a clear
objective; manoeuvre a knight to e4. Even if white resists taking the knight,
he will find it almost impossible to evict without creating a weak pawn on e3
and a weak square on g3. } Nd7 { The knight begins its journey } 10. O-O f5 11.
b4 { White does two things with this move; he inhibits black from playing his
pawn to ...c5 and paves the way for attacking the pawn on c6. However I fear it
is a case of too little, too late. } Nf6 12. Rab1 { moving the rook off the
long diagonal is not consistent with white's last move; he should probably
follow up with pawn to a4 in a quest to open some lines on the queenside. } Ne4
13. Nxe4 fxe4 { From his miserable opening position, black has achieved a
great deal. He has straightened out his doubled pawns, and now presents the
white knight with an unenviable choice of squares to choose from. } 14. Nh2 {
An ugly looking move, but Leo must have sensed that the task of reactivating
his knight if he retreated it to e1 would be quite difficult. At least on h2
the knight can dream of the path via f1 to g3. What this will threaten in the
black position is anyone's guess. } b5 { Bruce continues his restrictionist
policy and further limits white's options just when it looked that white might
be able to play a pawn to c4 after all. This move recognises that if white were
allowed to play c4, his chances of resisting would be greatly increased.
Undermining the pawn on b5 is of key importance; however after... } 15. c3 {
White is no closer to achieving the move pawn to c4 than before and has perhaps
wasted a vital tempo.Pushing the a-pawn to a4 had to be examined. } h5 { The
icing on the cake! Now white who is cramped, passive and weak on the kingside,
comes under an attack that his pieces are poorly placed to fend off. In a quite
understandable attempt at counterplay, white lashes out with... } 16. g4 { #
an intuitive move to seize some space on the kingside. Unfortunately, it is
just bad. White horribly weakens the pawns on his kingside and allows black
many attacking opportunities. } hxg4 { At the crucial moment black falters. }
17. Bxg4 f5 18. Bd1 Qg5+ 19. Kh1 Bh6 20. Rg1 Qf6 21. Bh5 Qf8 22. Rxg6+ Kh7 23.
Rbg1 Re6 24. Rg8 { in his haste for victory, white overplays his hand. More
circumspect would be to play the rook on g6 back down the file, maintaining the
pressure on black's position. However after } Qe7 { black returns the favour at
the crucial moment. By continuing with } 25. Qe2 f4 { Effectively resigning.
Black could battle on with other moves but now Leo brings the game to a crisp
conclusion. } 26. Qg4 Rf6 27. Rh8+

Basil
27-03-2007, 06:13 PM
Thanks mac

I appreciate the time taken to reply. Cameron Bailey gave a series of lectures at the Brisbane Club in 2005. I was reviewing his supporting lecture papers just the other day.

When he and I started playing (when I joined the club in 2001 ish) our ratings were quite similar, although he was the stronger player. There is now 400 ratings points between us.

It is interesteing to me that in his lectures, he talked about avoiding 'hope chess'. Now while I have had external factors which have no doubt prevented me from developing my chess, I do think knocking this 'hope chess' thing on the head may be a thing of value for aspiring improvers.

As to the other two points 'falsifying' moves (mathematical and logical deduction) and 'your faith', it is interesting to see the two juxtaposed.

Thanks again - especially for The Tromp!

Bereaved
01-04-2007, 02:39 AM
Event: Australian championship reserves
Site: ?
Date: 2002.01.07
Round: 9.10
White: Pyke, Malcolm
Black: Anderson, Alistair
Result: 1-0
ECO: D16
WhiteElo: 1846
BlackElo: 1925
Annotator: Pyke,M
PlyCount: 65
WhiteTeam: Pyke M

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 {As expected, Alistair again chooses the Slav which had
featured in our previous game at the Dandenong Autumn Open 2001.} 3. Nf3 Nf6 4.
Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bg4 {
Here Alistair deviates from our previous game where he had played} (5... Bf5 {
when after} 6. Ne5 e6 7. f3 Nbd7 8. Nxc4 Bb4 9. e4 Nxe4 10. fxe4 Qh4+ 11. Kd2
Bxe4 12. Qe1 Qg4 13. Qe2 Qg6 14. Qxe4 Qxe4 15. Nd6+ Bxd6 16. Nxe4 Be7 {
the two pawns were not sufficient compensation for the piece.}) 6. Ne5 {
I played this without too much thought as the gain of tempo on the bishop
should make this at least equal. In addition I am one step closer torecovering
my pawn. All this aside, I had not given particular consideration to this
position in my preparation, being more concerned with D17.} Bh5 7. f3 Nfd7 {
Black takes drastic measures to counteract the threat of e2-e4 and the
sidelining of the Bh5. As well as the obvious idea of exchanging one of
white's developed pieces at the same time as furthering his own development,
Black aims} 8. Nxc4 {To play the sharp} e5 {Diagram # An equalizing move based
on two ideas; the opening of the position for the black kingside pieces and an
attempt to take advantage of the slow white plan of f2-f3, which renders him
vulnerable to tactical tricks on the h4 square.} 9. e4 {Although both} (9. Ne4
Bb4+ 10. Bd2 Qe7 11. Bxb4 Qxb4+ 12. Qd2 Qxd2+ 13. Kxd2 exd4 14. Ned6+ Ke7 15.
Nf5+ Kf6 16. Nxd4 Rd8 17. e4 Nc5 18. Kc3 Rxd4 19. Kxd4 Nb3+ 20. Kc3 Nxa1 21.
Be2 $14 {as in Kramnik-Damljanovic, Moscow Olympiad 1994}) ({and} 9. g3 Qe7 10.
Bh3 Bg6 11. O-O exd4 12. Qxd4 Nc5 13. Rd1 Nb3 14. Qf4 Qf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 16. Bc8
$5 $14 {analysis by Rogers, are fine for white; however}) (9. dxe5 $4 {
is a complete lemon, losing a piece after} Qh4+ 10. g3 Qxc4) 9... exd4 $6 {
although this has been played before it is thought to give black a difficult
game.} (9... Qh4+ 10. g3 Qf6 11. dxe5 Qxf3 12. Nd6+ Kd8 (12... Bxd6 $2 13. Qxd6
Qxh1 14. Bg5 f6 15. exf6 gxf6 16. Qe6+ Kd8 17. Bxf6+ Nxf6 18. Qxf6+ Kc7 19.
Qe5+ $18 {I.Sokolov}) (12... Ke7 $6 13. Bf4 Qxd1+ 14. Nxd1 Bf3 15. Rg1 h6 $6
16. Ne3 Bh5 17. Nef5+ Kd8 18. g4 $16 {Kremeneckij-Janovskij, Moscow 1988}) 13.
Qxf3 (13. Bf4 $5 Qxd1+ (13... Qxh1 14. Qxh5 $40) 14. Nxd1 Bxd6 15. exd6 Bf3 16.
Rg1 Bxe4 17. Nc3 $44 {Hertneck}) 13... Bxf3 14. Nxf7+ Ke8 15. e6 (15. Nxh8 Bxh1
(15... Nxe5 $1 16. Bf4 Nbd7 $13 {Shirov}) 16. e6 Nc5 17. Be3 Bf3 (17... Nxe4
18. Bd3 $36) (17... Nxe6 18. Bc4 $36) 18. Nf7 (18. Bh3 $5 Nba6 19. Nf7 Nb4 20.
Kf2 $14 {Grabarczyk-Sapis, Polish championships 1993}) 18... Bg4 19. Bf4 (19.
Ng5 $5 h6 20. h3 Bh5 (20... hxg5 21. hxg4 Nxe6 22. Bc4 Bc5 23. Bxe6 Bxe3 24.
Bc8 $16) (20... Bxe6 21. Nxe6 Nxe6 22. Bc4 $14 {^^}) 21. g4 Bg6 22. Nf3 $14 {
I.Sokolov}) 19... Nba6 20. Nd6+ Bxd6 21. Bxd6 Rd8 22. e5 Nb4 23. Nb5 Ncd3+ 24.
Kd2 cxb5 25. Bxd3 Nxd3 26. Kxd3 Bxe6 27. axb5 Ra8 28. Kd4 Kd7 29. b6 a6 30. Rf1
Rc8 31. Bc7 Kc6 32. Rd1 Kd7 33. Kc5+ Ke7 34. Rd4 Bf5 35. g4 Be6 36. h4 Rg8 37.
Bd6+ Ke8 38. g5 Rh8 39. Rf4 Kd7 40. Bf8 Rg8 41. Rd4+ Ke8 42. Kd6 Bh3 43. Be7
Kf7 44. e6+ Kg6 45. Kd7 h5 46. Bd6 {
1-0 I.Sokolov-Lautier, Belgrade 1991 - 53/361}) 15... Nc5 16. Bc4 Bxh1 17. Nxh8
Bxe4 18. Bg5 Bf5 19. O-O-O Be7 20. Bxe7 Kxe7 21. Rf1 {
(Shirov-P.Nikolic, Wijk aan Zee 1993 - 56/424)} Bxe6 22. Bxe6 Kxe6 23. Rf8 a5
24. h4 $1 -- 25. h5 $140 $44 {Shirov}) 10. Qxd4 {The natural move; what else
would one do? The main difficulty for black is the development of his kingside.
While the white queen is aimed at g7, it is difficult to develop the Bf8. In a
radical attempt to solve this problem, black plays} Qf6 $6 {however although
this solves the immediate problem of the Bf8, it fails to address the long
term difficulty of the Bh5 which requires the move f7-f6 or the pawn break
f7-f5 to be played to avoid being inactive. While the queens were on the board,
the chance of creating the circumstances that would be favourable for such a
break would be more likely. Now however the simplified nature of the position
tilts the balance in white's favour.} ({not} 10... c5 $4 {
when the obvious response} 11. Qd5 {wins quite simply eg} Nf6 12. Qxb7 Nbd7 13.
Nb5 Rb8 14. Nc7+ Ke7 15. Qc6 $18) ({instead by first playing} 10... Qh4+ {
black creates a weakness in the white kingside. However after the sequence} 11.
g3 Qf6 12. Qxf6 Nxf6 {white can defend by attacking and play} 13. g4 $5 ({not}
13. Bg2 $11 {when black should equalise}) {taking advantage of the small
number of squares available to the Bh5 and forcing} 13... Bg6 {. After} 14. h4
h6 15. Be3 Bb4 16. Rd1 O-O 17. g5 hxg5 18. hxg5 $18 {white's development
advantage and kingside space make the black game almost unplayable}) 11. Qxf6
$5 {A surprising decision as white has more space and should keep pieces on
the board. However this emphasises the sad position of the Bh5, which will
require extensive manouevring to activate.} Nxf6 ({Not} 11... gxf6 $2 {
when white achieves all his aims and still retains two bishops}) 12. Bg5 $5 {
played with the idea of doubling black's pawns or at the least simplifying to
a position where the sad position of black's bishop on h5 becomes emphasisied.}
Bb4 $6 {An unfortunate choice; after this I was free to double Black's pawns} (
{Instead, black had to try} 12... Nbd7 {when after} 13. Bxf6 Nxf6 14. O-O-O Be7
15. Nd6+ Bxd6 16. Rxd6 {his Bh5 is still sidelined but he should be able to
develop effectively, either through 0-0 or Ke7.}) ({Not however} 12... Be7 $2 {
when} 13. Bxf6 {either saddles black with doubled pawns, or wins a pawn. e.g.}
gxf6 (13... Bxf6 14. Nd6+ Kd8 15. Nxb7+ $16) 14. O-O-O $14) 13. Bxf6 {
doubling black's pawns and perhaps rendering the Bh5 inactive for the rest of
the game. It also defends the Nc3 for onemove} gxf6 {Diagram # The Bh5 now has
a distinctly unpleasant choice of trying to get back into play via ...f6-f5,
as the path via f7 is permanently blocked unless he sacrifices a pawn. The Bh5
plays a very small role in the rest of the game.} 14. O-O-O $14 {After this,
black is posed with a difficult decision. After 0-0, he will be hard pressed
to bring his Bh5 back into the game as white can play a combination of g2-g4
and h2-h4-h5 and shut it down forever seemingly.} Ke7 {Given that black's only
pawn break to free the Bh5 is f6-f5, the opening of the e-file will give him a
vulnerable king for little gain. Rather black should prefer some combination
of Nd7 and 0-0-0.} ({The move} 14... Bxc3 $6 {
is certainly no salvation as after} 15. bxc3 {the white king is in no danger
whereas black will be hard pressed to hold white out of his many weak squares,
the key ones being d6 and f5.} (15. Nd6+ $5 {
can be thrown in as an intermediate move; black however cannot stop this.})) ({
perhaps better was} 14... Nd7 {
although white can then successfully entomb the Bh5 via} 15. h4 h6 16. g4 Bg6
17. h5 Bh7 $16 {when it is not clear how it will ever get back into the game})
15. Na2 {White avoids the exchange of his knight and begins to take control of
d6. The inactive nature of the black rooks is sad to see.} Bc5 $8 (15... a5 $2
16. Nb6 Ra7 17. Nxb4 axb4 18. h4 h6 19. g4 Bg6 20. h5 Bh7) (15... Na6 $6 16.
Ne3) 16. b4 {This move finally seizes control of the d6 square as the Bc5 can
no longer hold it in it's gaze. The opening of the white king position is
simply not significant as the only black piece that could take any interest in
his position is the Bc5 due to the invalid status of the Bh5. Also now the
position of the black queenside pawns is quite unenviable.} Bb6 {
there was only this move and} (16... Bf2 {
is not discernibly better even though it was out of range of the Nc4.}) 17. Nd6
{So now the b7 pawn is indefensible, as well as the check at f5; all the same
Black should have taken the opportunity to bring his rook to d8 in an attempt
to simplify. In that case, although I win a pawn it may be necessary to race
my pawn to a6 to secure my far flung knight.} Be3+ {this intermediate check in
fact only worsens the black game as he has now aligned his pieces such that
Nf5+ wins a piece. Instead} ({e.g.} 17... Rd8 18. Nxb7 Rxd1+ 19. Kxd1 Nd7 20.
h4 Rb8 21. Ba6 h6 22. g4 Bg6 23. h5 Bh7 $18 {
the bishop on h7 seems to continue to haunt black in most variations.}) 18. Kc2
$16 {moving out of check but maintaining the guard of the Rd1} Bg6 {Although th
is threatens ...f6-f5 freeing the bishop on g6, I realised that the opening of
the e-file would merely expose the black king to attack. That being the case,
I had no problems with my next.} 19. Nxb7 $18 {
Diagram # Not fearing ghosts! As previously mentioned when black plays} f5 {
there is no longer any need to try and maintain the pawn on e4 as after} 20.
exf5 {and the forced recapture} Bxf5+ {giving check to the white king, I am
able to bring my last minor piece into the game with a double gain of time as
not only is the bishop developed but also the path for the Rh1 is cleared to
e1} 21. Bd3 {Diagram # with the Bf5 already attacked and a rook ready to pin
the other one to the Ke7, black chooses to maintain them both on the board and
play} Be6 {which although placing the Na2 under surveillance, does nothing to
hinder white's plan of bringing a rook to the e-file, hence} 22. Rhe1 {
half pinning the Be3 and the Be6 to the Ke7. All the white pieces are in the
game and it is not surprising that something soon gives given that three black
pieces have yet to move.} Bh6 {To some extent an unfortunate decision; the
weak squares on the black queenside should not have been abandoned. In
addition, something that I thought quite strange was that I was the one with
the extra pawn, yet Black had double the pawn islands.} 23. Bc4 {I decided that
I would use my bishop to reinforce the attack on the Be6 as my two knights
both had the potential to be monsters whereas the Bh6 was a model of
inactivity. Also by this move the line for the Rd1 was also opened. The final
factor was that although Nb7-c5xe6 was possible, the chance of opposite colour
bishops being a factor I thought was worth avoiding.} Nd7 {although this
prevents Nc5, the fact that it has taken until move 23 to develop the last
black minor piece and link the rooks means that it is a case of too little,
too late.} 24. Nd6 {although the primary threat of this move is to play the
knight to f5 forking the king and bishop, the one forced reply was overlooked
by black as after} Bf4 {Diagram # although this bishop appears to perform a
good task, forking the knight and h-pawn, white is able to execute his other
threat.} ({the only way to hold out any longer was} 24... Kf6 {however after}
25. Nxf7 Bxc4 26. Nxh6 Bd5 {the end will not be far away} (26... Kg5 27. Rxd7
Kxh6 {is no better})) 25. Nxf7 {removing the defence of the Bf7 at the same
time as attacking the Rh8. Black no longer has a way to avoid losing a piece,
a clear indication that Black's strategy has failed. It is particularly
noteworthy that he still has not moved the rooks from their starting squares.}
Kxf7 {
black may as well capture as he at least removes one of the unruly steeds!} 26.
Bxe6+ (26. Rxd7+ {was the other option} Ke8 27. Bxe6) 26... Kg6 {
no better or worse than the alternatives} 27. Bxd7 {
Clearing the e6 square for a rook; it also prevents black trying to swap rooks}
Bxh2 28. Re6+ ({I think that} 28. Bxc6 $6 {is not to be praised as after} Rac8
{I am forced to play a defensive move or two when I would rather be trying to
wrap the game up quickly.}) 28... Kg5 {this is a bit much! Coming out in the
open to be a fighting piece is one of the king's roles in an endgame; walking
into a mating net is not!} 29. Rxc6 {played not in a materialistic fashion but
rather to eliminate the guard of the d5 square so that the Rd1 can help drive
the king further afield.} Rhd8 {
at last a rook moves, but I believe there is no escape now.} 30. Rd5+ {
now the king will never get back to his home territory} Kf4 {
I had begun to think at this stage that we were in some sort of helpmate} 31.
Rc4+ Ke3 $4 {Now the mate is forced} (31... Kg3 {
was the last chance to hold out. However after} 32. Rg4+ Kf2 33. Rd2+ Kg1 34.
Nc3 Be5 35. Ne2+ Kf1 36. Rh4 Rac8+ 37. Kd1 Kxg2 38. Nd4+ Kg1 39. Bxc8 Rxd4 40.
Rhxd4 Bxd4 41. Rxd4 {it is curtains anyway}) 32. Re4+ Kf2 33. Rd2+ {after 33...
Kf2-f1 (33...Kf2-g3 34.Re4-g4#; 33...Kf2-g1 34.Re4-e1#) 34.Bd7-b5+ Rd8-d3
(delaying the inevitable) 35.Bb5xd3+ Kf1-g1 36.Re4-e1# it is mate anyway.
Black's game fell apart at the seams after the exchange on f6 when he never
managed to get off the back foot. Indeed, he never even managed to complete
development! White consistently placed his pieces in the centre and even when
black finally managed to free the light square bishop he merely aided white in
his quest to exploit the precarious position of the black king in the centre,
which had nowhere to hide.} 1-0



Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Bereaved
05-05-2007, 01:20 AM
Event: Frankston Chess Club Championship
Site: ?
Date: 2002.11.07
Round: 4.1
White: Pyke, Malcolm
Black: Lushaj, Tahir
Result: 1-0
ECO: A40
WhiteElo: 1876
BlackElo: 1831
Annotator: Pyke,M
PlyCount: 63

1. d4 e6 2. g3 c5 3. Nf3 Qb6 {
a committal move as the Bc8 has trouble getting out now} 4. c3 {
maintaining a white pawn on d4} Nf6 5. Bg2 {
White continues to prepare for castling} cxd4 6. cxd4 {recapturing this way
makes sense; to now capture with the knight is not sensible as then the
earlier c2-c3 does not make sense} Bb4+ 7. Nc3 {
If White had blocked on d2, his pieces are much less co-ordinated} Ne4 {
building pressure on c3} 8. Qc2 ({I was loathe to play} 8. Bd2 {
as it seems a bit passive}) 8... d5 {
guarding the knight and maintaining a foothold in White's half of the board} 9.
O-O {breaking the pin on the Nc3 and asking Black about their intentions} Bxc3
(9... Nxc3 {makes much less sense as after} 10. bxc3 {
Black will have to waste time relocating the Bb4 in the near future}) 10. bxc3
O-O {Black also gets castled and prepares for later development of his pieces}
11. c4 {It is better to exchange the c3 pawn this way as then White is not
tied to defending it; this move also seeks to open lines for the white bishop
pair} Nc6 {with a double attack on d4} 12. Be3 {Not exactly ideal, but better
than moving the pawn to e3 to support it, or moving the Rf1-d1 when there are
obscure threats to f2 possible} Bd7 {clearing the square c8 for the Rooks to
arrive there on the soon to be open file} 13. cxd5 {If white does not wish to
play this, they could perhaps consider advancing with c4-c5, but this exchange
does not hurt white and does open further lines and avoid any later problems
down the c-file} exd5 14. Ne5 {
gaining time and opening more lines by attacking the undefended Bd7} Nxe5 15.
dxe5 Qe6 {a cunning idea offering white a pawn} (15... d4 16. Bxd4 Qxd4 17.
Qxe4 {leaves white a safe pawn up}) 16. Bd4 {
white declines winning a pawn on e4} (16. Bxe4 $6 dxe4 17. Qxe4 Bc6 18. Qf4 {
leaves white a pawn ahead, but the threats to his king on the weakened white
squares mean that he has no real advantage}) 16... Rac8 17. Qb2 {the white piece
s all seem to coordinate well, here directed against b7, and potentially g7,
should lines open up} b6 {keeping the b-pawn safe by moving it} 18. a4 {
White plans to rid himself of his a-pawn by exchanging it off, and opening the
a-file before any concrete measures are started against the Black king} Nc5 {
This move might be an excellent one, should Black be able to place this knight
on e6, and stabilise the position, alas for Black, this does not come to pass}
19. a5 {continuing the plan of exchanging the a-pawn} Rfd8 {
It is a very good idea to place the rooks in the centre in most positions} 20.
axb6 axb6 21. Ra7 {The white rook arrives on the 7th rank and begins to make
threats across the board} Be8 {Diagram # Black moves the bishop to a safer
square, and clears his Rd8 to defend d5.} 22. f4 {White begins a wholesale
attack to open lines towards the Black king; in this action, the unfortunate
position of the Black queen allows the white pawns to gain time as they
advance} g6 {Black seeks to stop the pawns, and may even have thought that
they had done so, however...} 23. f5 {this move is based on the fact that the
black queen is really restricted on moves, and should black capture he will
run into shocking problems after Bh3} Qc6 (23... gxf5 $2 24. Bh3 {
and black's king position looks terminal}) 24. e6 {White is successful in
opening the diagonal of his queen and dark square bishop; good advice for
Black is hard to give} Ra8 {A case of too little too late, the black king
begins to experience extreme difficulties} 25. exf7+ Bxf7 26. Rxf7 $5 {
a terrible shame that instead of this, white did not play} (26. Bh8 $3 {
when there are no good moves left, black would be forced to jettison their
queen to avoid mate for a while, but probably not for long ie} d4 27. Bxc6 Rxa7
28. Qxb6 Rf8 29. Qxa7 Kxh8 30. fxg6 hxg6 31. Rxf7 Rxf7 32. Qxf7 Ne6 33. Bd5 d3
34. Bxe6 dxe2 35. Qg8#) 26... Kxf7 27. fxg6+ {
it is all fun and games for white now} Kg8 {
other moves do not promise much either} (27... Kxg6 28. Qc2+ Kh6 29. h4 Ne6 30.
Qd2+ Kg6 31. g4 h5 32. Qd3+ Kh6 33. Rf6+ Kg7 34. Qg6+ Kh8 35. Rxe6#) (27... Ke7
$142 28. gxh7 Rf8 29. Rxf8 Rxf8 30. Bg7 Rd8 31. Qe5+ Qe6 32. Bf6+ Kf7 33. Qxe6+
Nxe6 34. Bxd8 Kg7 35. Bxb6 Nf8 36. Bd4+ Kxh7 37. Bxd5 $18) (27... Ke8 28. gxh7
Ke7 29. Bf6+ Kd7 30. Bxd8 Rxd8 31. Qg7+ Kc8 32. Rf8 Ne6 33. Rxd8+ Nxd8 34. Bh3+
Kb8 35. h8=Q Qc5+ 36. Kg2 Qc7 37. Qgg8 Ka7 38. Qxd8 Qxd8 39. Qxd8 Ka6 40. Qxd5
b5 41. Bd7 b4 42. Qb5+ Ka7 43. Bc8 Ka8 44. Qb7#) (27... Ke6 28. Bh3+ Ke7 29.
Bf6+ Ke8 30. g7 Ne6 31. g8=Q+ Kd7 32. Qxh7+ Kc8 33. Bxe6+ Rd7 34. Bxd7+ Qxd7
35. Rc1+ Kb7 36. Qxd7+ Kb8 37. Be5#) 28. gxh7+ Kxh7 29. Qc2+ {
all roads lead to checkmate now} Qg6 (29... Kh6 30. Qd2+ Kg6 31. h4 Rd7 32.
Qg5+ Kh7 33. Rf7+ Rxf7 34. Qh5+ Qh6 35. Qxf7+ Qg7 36. Qxg7#) (29... Nd3 30.
Rf7+ Kg8 31. Rg7+ Kf8 32. Qxc6 Ra1+ 33. Bxa1 Nc5 34. Qf6+ Ke8 35. Qe7#) (29...
Ne4 30. Qxc6 Ra7 31. Bxe4+ dxe4 32. Qxe4+ Kh6 33. Rf6+ Kg7 34. Qg6+ Kh8 35.
Rf8#) (29... Kg8 30. Qf5 Ra7 31. Qg5+ Kh7 32. Rf7+ Rxf7 33. Qh5+ Qh6 34. Qxf7+
Qg7 35. Qxg7#) 30. Rf7+ Kh6 31. Qd2+ (31. Be3+ Kh5 32. Bf3+ Qg4 33. Rh7#) 31...
Qg5 32. Rf6+ {and Black runs up the white flag as there is no way to stop mate}
(32. Rf6+ Kh7 33. Qxg5 Ra1+ 34. Bxa1 b5 35. Rf7#) 1-0

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Desmond
06-05-2007, 08:42 AM
Nice attack Macavity.

Bereaved
22-05-2007, 01:59 AM
Event: Frankston Blitz
Site: ?
Date: 2005.06.10
Round: 4.1
White: Another
Black: Macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: B50
WhiteElo: 1709
BlackElo: 1988
PlyCount: 42

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. c3 {
a slower approach, attempting to set up a two pawn centre quickly} Nf6 4. h3 {
setting a cunning trap} Nc6 ({certainly not} 4... Nxe4 $4 {
which loses a piece immediately to} 5. Qa4+) 5. d3 {the main line in this
position involves a pawn sacrifice or so via an immediate d4} g6 {
still a very natural way to develop as White is not challenging a lot} 6. Be3 {
White seems to indicate that they are planning to castle long, and does not
appear to be in any hurry to getcastled} Bg7 {
Black continues to develop and prepares to castle as soon as possible} 7. Qd2 {
This moves seems a little wonky, it is difficult to see how the Nb1 enters the
game now, if it goes to a3, it will have to make at least one more move to
have much influence on the game.} b6 {allowing for the Bc8 to move to b7, or
a6, both quite active squares, it also guards the c5 pawn for a second time} 8.
Be2 {White finally prepares for castling} d5 {rather than let White settle in
comfortably, Black immediately challenges the most advanced white pawn, and
tries to open the position, as Black is better developed, at this point, hence
not allowing white time to catch up by making them make decisions before they
are ready} 9. exd5 (9. e5 {this was almost certainly better, and may have in
fact been a little awkward for black, but nothing out of the ordinary. It
would however, have made greater sense of white's preceding moves}) 9... Nxd5 {
Black's knight is splendidly posted at d5, and now persuades white to engage
on exchanging the dark squarebishops} 10. Bh6 {This is a second move for this
piece, and a third soon to follow means that white is falling behind in a big
way in development} O-O {there is no point in capturing on h6, as then black
cannot achieve castling easily} 11. Bxg7 Kxg7 {all that remains now is for
Black to bring his Bc8 into the game, and he will be fully developed, White is
at least one move further behind, which shows that they have lost at least one
move as they were the side with the first move} 12. d4 {White seeks to clear
up the centre, by advancing this pawn and making Black make some decisions too}
cxd4 {otherwise white would exchange on c5 wrecking Black's pawn structure} 13.
Nxd4 {asking Black whether they would like to exchange on d4 is easy to answer}
Bb7 {further development, and not aiding white with any ideas they may have
had in centralising their queen} 14. Nxc6 {this is yet another white piece
which seems to have moved several times only to exchange itself off, when it
does so, it is like all the moves it has used disappear} Bxc6 15. Na3 {
finally bringing out this piece, but what it has to do here, we don't know} Qc7
{The black queen clears the way for the rooks to arrive on d8 and c8, and
provides a guard for the Bc6, whilst also looking towards the dark squares
near white's king such as f4} 16. Bf3 {
yet another move by an already developed piece, and easily answered} Rad8 {
this rook was chosen because now there is no chance of it going missing via
the Bf3 getting through toit} 17. O-O {
finally castling, but now the black pieces flood into the white position} Nf4 {
with a discovered attack on the Qd2} 18. Qe3 {
trying to guard the Bf3, and so keep the pawns intact around their king} Rd3 {
intensifying the pressure and taking away almost all the useful squares from
white's queen} 19. Qe1 {Diagram #} (19. Qc1 {
was the only other option, but meets the same fate} Rxf3) 19... Rxf3 {
the rook sacrifices itself, but the weakened white king is going to be mated;
the remaining black pieces are more useful in close proximity to the king in
this sort of a position to givecheckmate} 20. gxf3 Bxf3 {
the threats to the white king are too strong now, and the game ends quickly}
21. Nc4 {nothing helps any more} (21. Kh2 Ne2#) (21. Qe6 fxe6 22. Rfe1 Nxh3+
23. Kf1 Qh2 24. Rxe6 Qxf2#) 21... Nxh3# 0-1



Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Basil
22-05-2007, 02:16 AM
An instructional pleasure. Thanks mac.

alien chess
23-05-2007, 09:37 AM
There are some annotated games (http://www.chesschitchat.com/annotated-games) on the linked site. :P

Bereaved
27-05-2007, 07:53 PM
Hello everyone,

another game from the house of Mac

Event: Dandenong Grades
Site: ?
Date: 2006.??.??
Round: ?
White: Machell, Don
Black: Lojanica, Milenko
Result: 0-1
ECO: B02
WhiteElo: 1900
BlackElo: 2000
PlyCount: 32
SourceDate: 2007.01.03

1. e4 d5 {a quite confrontational approach; Black does not give white time to
settle in as they bring out their pieces but puts the question to the e4 pawn
straight away.} 2. exd5 (2. Nc3 {
is sometimes played, the game goes something like} d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 Nf6 5.
Bc4 c5 6. d3 {with interesting play}) (2. e5 {
is a bit of a dud, although gaining space, after} c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 {Black is benef
ited by being able to develop their Bc8 easily, and to pressure the white
pieces guarding white's centre}) 2... Nf6 {Black attempts to recapture the
pawn with his knight rather than bring out his queen too early} (2... Qxd5 3.
Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bf5 6. Ne5 c6 {is not an uncommon line, black has to
be sure that their queen doesn't get trapped in the open}) 3. Bb5+ {
a less common continuation, but quite good} Bd7 {blocking the check and
putting the question to the Bb5, Black sometimes blocks with Nbd7 also} 4. Bc4
{holding on to the pawn} Bg4 {attacking the white queen and hoping to gain time
} 5. Nf3 {
developing normally rather than going to huge lengths to keep the pawn} (5. f3
{is a more serious attempt to keep the pawn on d5, but the move chosen is a
better developing move}) 5... Nxd5 {Black recovers the pawn} 6. Nc3 {White seek
s to persuade Black to exchange the Nd5 on c3, this would help White more than
black} e6 {
Instead Black shores up the knight and opens the way for the Bf8 to develop} 7.
O-O {White castles and appears to have an at least equal game} Be7 {
Black continues to develop and prepares castling} 8. Re1 {
Diagram # White sets a cunning trap...} O-O {which black chooses to ignore!!
Black reasons that the time taken for white to spring his trap is time taken
to not develop} 9. Nxd5 exd5 10. Bxd5 {This is the point of white's idea
behind 8.Re1; they capture the d5 pawn as the black queen cannot recapture and
defend e7. The problem really lies in the fact that Black is gaining a lot of
free developing moves, and white is still really undeveloped on the queenside}
Qxd5 11. Rxe7 Nc6 {Black concentrates on getting all their pieces out as quick
as possible, offering another pawn, which white declines wisely, otherwise the
development advantage is growing too massive} 12. Re3 {
Moves to help support the Nf3, which is pinned to the Qd1} Nd4 {and in turn
brings still further pressure to the Nf3, which is not helped much in the
defence of it's king by the still undeveloped White queenside} 13. d3 {
White finally makes measures to develop his queenside opening a path for theBc1
} Rae8 {the final black piece is brought into play, and white's position is
now under tremendous pressure} 14. c4 {an emotional decision to try and drive
away the Black queen, but it finds another active square after} Qh5 {
maintaining it's role in pressuring the Nf3} 15. Rxe8 {in bad positions, poor
decisions are made easily, this one really does not help white's cause, and
things now go from bad to worse} Rxe8 {so basically, it is now 4 black pieces
in the game versus 2 white pieces, and the position majorly favours black, in
fact there is really nothing good for white to do, the move he chose is as
good as resigning} 16. Qa4 Nxf3+ {Black mates after 17.gxf3 Re1+ 18.Kg2 Qh3#}
0-1


Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Basil
27-05-2007, 08:22 PM
A Scandinavian miniature! Now why can't white play like that when I play!? Black's decisions to remain active were instructional. Thanks.

ER
27-05-2007, 08:38 PM
another game from the house of Mac



A fine move by move annotation and a very useful example, thanks Malcolm!
Cheers and good luck!

MichaelBaron
27-05-2007, 09:25 PM
There are some annotated games (http://www.chesschitchat.com/annotated-games) on the linked site. :P

It was good to see Andersen-Kizeritsky and Cassidy-Boyd games next to one another ;) .


I should publish annotations to Karpov- Kasparov and N.Szuveges-Baron games next to one another :eek: .

PLs forgive me, i had a drink and in a "teasing mood" right now

Bereaved
01-06-2007, 02:52 AM
Hello everyone,

So no one seems to post annotated games but me, well I guess no one else has anything to share. I have plenty to give so let's continue

Event: played on Earth
Site: ?
Date: 2002
Round: 2.7
White: Macavity
Black: Else, Someone
Result: 1-0
ECO: D15
WhiteElo: 1867
BlackElo: 1560
PlyCount: 45
SourceDate: tonight

1.d4 d5 {both sides move out their queen pawns to get a share of the centre; this often makes pushing the king pawns forward a problem and leads to a slightly more closed game} 2. c4 {this move introduces the Queen's Gambit, where white offers a pawn that black is advised to either take and give back or to defend via} c6 {leaving the Bc8 free to move or} (2... e6 { planning to 0-0 quickly}) 3. Nf3 {white develops their pieces to natural squares to help control the centre} Nf6 {as does black; we can see how the square e5 is now well controlled by white and e4 by black.} 4. Nc3 {White brings out the pieces they are confident of first, and this is a very natural square for the Nb1, from where it shows the maximum interest in the centre} Bf5 {this move is a little wonky, as it leaves the black queenside a bit vulnerable to early queen moves} 5.cxd5 {white seeks to clarify the position in the centre of the pawns, in preparation for his
next move} Nxd5 {again, not exactly what the doctor ordered, this move seems to not quite fit in with Black's move 2...c6 which was supposed to be supporting the d-pawn and so now the pawn on c6 looks a bit silly} 6. Qb3 {White immediately latches onto the weak point on b7, which black's early development of the Bc8 left vulnerable} ({ideas such as} 6. Nd2 $5 {to force through e4 are worth considering ie} Bg6 7. e4 Nxc3 8. bxc3 e6 $14 {and white has a large centre and some useful open lines such as the b-file}) 6... Nb6 {To move this piece yet again to defend against the attack on b7 suggests to me that Black is having to adopt fairly makeshift measures to keep their position viable and we have yet to reach move 10!! This suggests that Black has made a definite error in their opening moves} 7. e4 {expanding and gaining space against the Bf5 and securing a large centre for white for the long term} Bg6 {and so Black's bishop must move again, leaving white with another move to do something for free} 8. Be3 {white brings out the Bc1 to support the d4 pawn allowing for either 0-0-0 or for the Nf3 to move if it chooses} e6 {Diagram # so the same number of moves so far, and yet white has two more pieces in the game, and black's cramped position makes it difficult to develop easily with good effect} 9. Ne5 {White's move is not strictly necessary but does allow for the Bg6 to be exchanged in some lines damaging Black's pawn position} Qc8 $6 {very unusual!! the queen has managed by this move to bolster up the squares b7 and e6, but it is still on the back line and it is still not really in the game. It is also no longer defending the Nb6 which will have significance in some circumstances} ({better was} 9... Bd6 { just continuing developing. After something like} 10. Nxg6 hxg6 11. a4 $14 {Black has a not unplayable position}) 10. h4 {A sharp move intending to further harass the Bg6, which is seriously running out of squares} f6 {providing an escape for the bishop and challenging the Ne5} ({if instead black tries} 10... Bh5 {to save the Bishop, then white continues to attack it with} 11.g4 {and even though lines such as this lead to doubled pawns on two different files for white, this includes an extra pawn, and good control of many central squares} f6 12.gxh5 fxe5 13. dxe5) 11. h5 {trying to take the bishop in the most favourable way} Bf7 $6 {Most of Black's other responses ( shown below ) allow for white to retain a quite comfortable game at the least} (11...Bxe4 $5 12. Nxe4 fxe5 13. dxe5 Nd5 14. Rd1 Nd7 15. h6 $5 (15. Nd6+ $6 Bxd6 16. exd6 O-O 17. h6 g6 18. Be2 N7f6 19. Bc5) 15... g6 16.f4 Nxe3 17. Qxe3 Bb4+ 18. Ke2 $16) (11... Bxh5 12.Rxh5 fxe5 13. Rxe5 Kf7 14.Na4 Na6 15. Bxa6 bxa6 16. Nc5 Bxc5 17. dxc5 Nd5 18. exd5 exd5 19.Bd4 Re8 20.Rxe8 Qxe8+ 21. Kf1 Qd7 22. Re1 Kg8 $18) (11... fxe5 12. hxg6 exd4 13. Rxh7 dxe3
14. Rxh8 exf2+ 15. Kxf2 Qd7 16. g3 Qe7 17. Bh3 e5 18. Rf1 N8d7 19. Bxd7+ Nxd7 20. Qxb7 Rb8 21.Qxa7 Qc5+ 22. Qxc5 Nxc5 23. Kg1 Ne6 24. Rf2 Kd7 25. a4 Kc7 26.Kf1 Kb6 27. Rf5 Bd6 28.Rxb8+ Bxb8 29. Rf7 Bd6 30. Ke2 Ka5 31. Kd3 Kb4 32. Rb7+ Ka5 33. Kc4 Nc7 34. b4+ Ka6 35. Rb8 Ne6 36.Rh8 Kb7 37. a5 Ka6 38. b5+ cxb5+ 39. Nxb5 Bf8 40. Rh5 Nd4 41. Nxd4 exd4 42. Kxd4 Bb4 43.Kd5 Kb7 44. Rh7 Bc3 45.e5 Ka6 46. Rxg7 Be1 47. g4 Bd2 48. Rh7 Kxa5 49. g7 Ka4 50. g8=Q Ka3 51. Qc8 Kb3 52. Rb7+ Bb4 53. Qc4+ Kb2 54. Rxb4+ Ka1 55. Qa6#) 12. Nxf7 {much better than retreating and forcing Black to lose the right to castle after recapturing by} Kxf7 {Black's position does not inspire confidence, what few pieces are developed appear poorly placed} 13. a4 {as on the kingside white harassed the Bg6, so on the queenside he now turns his attention to the Nb6, which is also without a lot to do, or many places to go} N6d7 {Black moves the Nb6 without waiting to be attacked and sets up a horror traffic jam of his pieces on the queenside. Seeing as such things as a cramped position don't last forever, White chooses to open lines towards Black's king to make the most of his development advantage} ({a sample line showing the difficulties that black is presented with anyway} 13... Bd6 14. a5 N6d7 15. Bc4 Re8 16. h6 g6 17. e5 Bc7 18. Ne4 Na6 19. exf6 Nxf6 20. Ng5+ Kg8 21. Bxe6+ Rxe6 22. Nxe6 Nd5 23. Nxc7 Qxc7 24. O-O Re8 25.Rae1 $18) 14. d5 {leaving Black with not many good choices} (14. a5 Bd6 15. d5 exd5 16. exd5 cxd5 17. Qxd5+ Ke7 18. Rd1 Be5 19. Bc4 Re8 20. Nb5 Kd8 21. Be2 Qc6 22. O-O a6 23. Nd6 Bxd6 24.Qxd6 Qxd6 25. Rxd6 Ke7 26. Rfd1 Ne5 27. Bc5 Kf7 28. Rb6 Ra7 29. Rb4 b6 30. Rxb6 Rc7 31. Bd6 Rc2 32. Bxa6 Nxa6 33. Rxa6 Rxb2 34.Ra7+ Ke6 35. Rxg7 Rd8 36. Re7+ Kf5 37. f3 Rg8 38. g4+ Kf4 39. Rf7 Kxf3 40.Rxf6+ Ke2 41. Bxe5 Rb5 42. Rff1 Rxg4+ 43. Kh2 Rxa5 44. Rde1+ Kd2 45. Kh3 Raa4 46. Rd1+ Kc2 47. Rd7 Rh4+ 48. Kg3 Rxh5 49. Rf2+ Kb3 50. Rb7+ Kc4 51. Rf4+ Kd3 52. Rxa4 Rxe5 53. Rxh7) 14... Nc5 $6 {well, what a hoppy beast this knight is!! this is move number five for this knight, which helps white to make a simple decision} (14... exd5 15. exd5 Ke8 16. h6 gxh6 17. Rd1 Nc5 18. Qc4 cxd5 19. Qxd5 $18) 15. Bxc5 {this bishop is only moving for the second time to take this knight, and even though black develops the yet unmoved Bf8 to recapture, it still represents a clear gain of two tempi for White, and that is even more significant owing to the development of the two sides pieces} Bxc5 16.dxe6+ {Black is in big trouble now} Ke7 {forced as the other option} (16...Qxe6 $4 {ends the game abruptly, as white simply plays} 17. Bc4 {and the Black Queen is lost, and the game shortly thereafter}) 17. Bc4 {it is worth guarding this pawn as it exerts a powerful cramp on the black position, and allows for all sorts of tactics to spring up whilst it still survives} ({ideas such as} 17. Rd1 Rd8 18. Rxd8 Kxd8 19. Bc4 Qc7 20. O-O Kc8 21. Be2 g6 22. Bg4 Be7 23. Qc4 {leave white well and truly in charge, but do seem to swap more pieces which may help Black in surviving}) 17... Na6 {trying desperately to develop even to a strange square rather than not move at all} (17... Rd8 $142 $16 {is better, stopping white's planned next move}) 18.O-O-O {that this leaves behind the f2 pawn is really unimportant as the fact that Rd7+ is now threatened and the lack of defence that the black king has means no one would be game to take such a poisoned pawn.} (18. Rd1 Bd6 19. Bxa6 bxa6 20. Qc4 Rb8 21. e5 fxe5 22. Qh4+ Kxe6 23.Qg4+ Kf7 24. Qxc8 Rhxc8 25. Rxd6 Rxb2 26. Rd7+ Ke6 27. Rxg7 Rcb8 $18) 18... Bd6 {trying to keep the white rook out of the black position at all cost} 19. e5 $1 {white jettisons the e4 pawn, and clears the way for the Nc3 to move forward} fxe5 {Diagram #} (19... Bxe5 $8 {The computer likes this better, but it seems to me that it is just another way to lose} 20. Rd7+ Ke8 21. Qa3 c5 22. Bb5 Kf8 23. e7+ Kf7 24. Qb3+ c4 25. Bxc4+ Ke8 26. Rd8+ Kxe7 27. Rxc8 Rhxc8 $18 { and white is clearly winning anyway, but black is not mated at least, I suppose}) 20. Rxd6 {this highlights how simple the side who has pieces in play can invest small amounts of material to get at the king. Indeed with black's two rooks yet to make a move, it hardly seems like white is down on material at all. It is all downhill for black now} Kxd6 21. Rd1+ { the remaining white rook develops with check, and the end is not far away now} Ke7 (21... Kc5 22. Ne4#) 22. Rd7+ {so a white rook finally reaches d7, and we see the game end in a couple of moves after} Kf6 ({
Black's absolutely last chance was to take the rook with} 22... Qxd7 $8 {but really it is not likely that Black would survive in the long run} 23. exd7 Nc5 24. Qa3 b6 25. Ne4 Kxd7 26. Nxc5+ bxc5 27. Qxc5 g6 28. Qxe5 {with the black king in the middle, and white picking off the weak pawns at will, this is already close to over}) ({if instead} 22... Ke8 {then cute finishes like this can occur} 23. Ne4 Qb8 24. Qxb7 Qxb7 25. Nd6+ Kf8 26. e7#) (22... Kf8 {requires white to see the switch back idea of} 23. Qd1 {planning to arrive on either d6 or f3} Ke8 24. Ne4 Qc7 25. Nd6+ Qxd6 26.Qxd6 Rf8 27. Qe7#) 23. Ne4+ {black resigns because after his only legal move 23...Kf5 then white simply plays 24.Qf3# and the game is over} 1-0



Take care and God Bless, Macavity

PS please note, game will not load for me, not my fault, sort it out whoever...please [fixed - I think - KB]

Basil
01-06-2007, 03:11 AM
PS please note, game will not load for me, not my fault, sort it out whoever...
Won't load for me either.

Kevin Bonham
04-06-2007, 12:04 AM
PS please note, game will not load for me, not my fault, sort it out whoever...please

For info of others using the viewer, the problems were:

(i) copy and paste had line breaks in it - need to remove line breaks, if necessary by pressing backspace at the start of each line (and then add space where needed, which sometimes isn't necessary).

(ii) numbers after moves which in some cases confused the viewer, eg the $3 $18 stuff that sometimes comes after moves copied from engine analysis.

Bereaved
29-06-2007, 01:35 AM
another game, ho hum....lol

Event: ?
Site: ?
Date: ????.??.??
Round: ?
White: NNJ
Black: NNR
Result: 0-1
ECO: A80
Annotator: Malcolm Pyke:[/b] ]
PlyCount: 22

{White plays the game in a careless way and black makes him pay!} 1. d4 {
A good opening move allowing white to have a good grip on the centre.} f5 {
Black plays a pawn that is not a central pawn but controls the centre square e4.
} 2. Bf4 {White brings out another piece to attack the square e5. He also has
realised that the pawn on e2 cannot come to e4 straight away and so he must
first move it to e3 then to e4. For that reason also he brings out the Bc1 so
that it is not blocked in behind the pawns.} Nf6 {Black's knight adds another
guard to the square e4. We can see that white is playing a dark square
strategy and black a light square strategy.} 3. Nd2 {White develops another
piece and also begins to contest the square e4. The choice of d2 for the Nb1
means that the pawn on c2 is not blocked.} e6 {Black opens his position to let
his Bf8 move off the back line. The only problem piece is the Bc8 which has
many pawns in the way of its development.} 4. e3 {Now that the bishop has
moved to f4, white can move the pawn to e3 to allow the Bf1 to develop. White
will probably castle kingside because his queen is hard to find a safe square
for early in the game.} Be7 {Black continues his development and puts his
bishop on a natural square, which is the only good one for it at the moment.}
5. Bd3 {White develops his bishop to an active square where it is attacking e4.
As black cannot be sure where to put his queenside pieces yet instead he} O-O {
Diagram # with which he actually prevents white from playing e3-e4 for the
moment. White should probably play something like 6.Ng1-f3 but has not seen
black's trick.} 6. e4 $2 {Although this is a move that white tries to make in
these types of positions, here there is a problem with it. After} fxe4 {
the line from the black rook on f8 to the white bishop on f4 is cleared of
pawns. Because of this, white cannot capture on e4 with either the bishop or
the knight or he will lose this bishop.} 7. Be2 {White retreats his bishop and
should be able to complete his development but he has lost a pawn. Black now
turns to the problem of his Bc8 and plays} b6 {when the Bc8 can help to defend
the pawn on e4 from b7. White wants to regain the square f3 for his Ng1, and
tries by pushing his pawn to f3 with} 8. f3 $2 {which unfortunately does not
allow the bishop on f4 to retreat to many squares when it is attacked, due to
the knight being on d2} Nd5 {This attacks the bishop twice, once by the knight
attacking it directly and once by the rook having the line between it and the
bishop being cleared.} 9. g3 {
#Although this only seems to lose a pawn, it is really much worse.} Rxf4 10.
gxf4 {the third mistake spells the end. Black finishes with style.} Bh4+ 11.
Kf1 {the only move for the white king} Ne3# {even if this was not checkmate,
the fork of the king and queen would be winning for black.} 0-1

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Basil
29-06-2007, 01:46 AM
A rare occasion where the annotating takes longer than the game :eek:

Bereaved
29-06-2007, 01:15 PM
Hello Everyone,

I feel that no one else wishes to post games here, but notice that other games of this nature appear on the site elsewhere, perhaps links to them, or relocating of those games may be appropriate?

In any case, here is another game

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: ?
Date: 1997.07.01
Round: 3.3
White:A.N.Other
Black: Macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: A44
Annotator: Macavity
PlyCount: 82

1. d4 c5 2. d5 e5 3. e4 d6 4. c4 {the centre has ceased to be a weapon and is
now a target for attack. Both sides plan the advance of their b and f pawns to
open lines for their pieces.} g6 5. Ne2 {
more flexible than 5.Nf3 when the passage of the f-pawn is seriously impeded.}
Bg7 6. Ng3 {this however is not the main idea behind the move Ne2. Generally
as Black will castle on the kingside, white is aiming for the advance f4.
However should black capture on f4, white must be ready to recapture with his
g-pawn. Because of this the move g3 is indicated now or later.} Ne7 7. Bd3 {
white's strategy clarifies; he aims to prevent ...f7-f5} O-O 8. Nc3 Na6 9. Bd2
Nc7 10. Qc1 {Diagram # such liberties although quite playable in blocked
positions should be weighed up carefully. The dark square bishop is a much
better piece in the white camp than in the black camp. Perhaps white is too
dogmatic in playing to exchange a piece that may become active later, but only
if white cooperates. The slight weakening of black's protection is not
significant at this stage.} a6 11. Bh6 Bd7 12. Bxg7 Kxg7 13. a4 b6 14. h4 h5 {
owing to the unusual placing of the black knight on e7, black decides to keep
the h-file closed. Opened, it could present quite a threat to him.} 15. Qg5 Rh8
16. O-O-O Rb8 {Black makes the final preparations for b6-b5, and for the
meanwhile, the knight on g3 has halted white's attack on the kingside. In a
bid to liven up proceedings, white continues} 17. Nf5+ $5 Nxf5 18. Qxd8 $2
Rbxd8 19. exf5 gxf5 {Diagram # the endgame has arrived with black having an
extra doubled pawn. Black's pawns although deformed form a compact mass, quite
capable of seizing space in the centre of the board and driving the white
pieces back from their active squares.} 20. f3 Rb8 {black resumes his plan to
play ...b5; he should not cease this plan simply because he is a pawn up.
Rather the opening of a front against the white king, making his residence
draughty, will help distract white from being too nasty to the black king.} 21.
g3 Kf6 $5 {
the king plays an active role in the endgame; you do otherwise at your peril}
22. g4 $6 {white attempts to open more lines to the black king; however he is
quite capable of taking care of himself! In addition he also has the knight
and bishop close at hand in case of difficulties.} fxg4 23. fxg4 Bxg4 24. Ne4+
Ke7 25. Rdf1 f5 26. Ng5 e4 {White is presented with an unenviable choice;
should his bishop retreat, he is left with nothing to show for all his attack.
In a speculative manner he donates a piece to the black cause in the name of
some nuisance checks.} 27. Bxe4 fxe4 28. Rf7+ Kd8 29. Nxe4 Ne8 30. Rhf1 b5 {
Diagram # Black has rebuffed the white attack and now launches a counter
offensive.} 31. axb5 axb5 32. b3 bxc4 33. bxc4 Be2 {with impunity, black
begins to harvest the ripe white pawns. White meanwhile can only look on.} 34.
R1f4 Bxc4 35. Rf8 Rxf8 36. Rxf8 Ke7 {the king responds to his release with
alacrity. He kicks the white rook back before putting it in a fatal pin. Other
retreats lose the d-pawn.} 37. Rf5 Bd3 {
Diagram # now white loses material by force.} 38. Rf4 Rb4 {
out of one pin into another!} 39. Kd2 Bxe4 40. Ke3 Bxd5 41. Rf5 Bf7 {with virtually no pieces left to lose, white decides to keep his king horizontal to save
him getting knocked over. White resigns} 0-1

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Capablanca-Fan
29-06-2007, 01:47 PM
Nother,A (1600) - Macavity (1660) [A46]
Melbourne Chess Club Open Melbourne (4.12), 30.10.2000
[Macavity]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 c5 4.e3 Qb6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Rb1 cxd4 7.Qxd4 Bc5 8.Qa4 Bb4 9.Nd2 0-0 10.Be2 Qc5

What about the simple ...d5? Not only does it control the centre and open up the QB, but it takes away squares from both enemy Ns.


11.Qb3 Bxc3 12.Qxc3 Qxc3 13.bxc3 A position has arisen that will be decided by two factors. Either the power of white's two bishops will be triumphant or the weakened pawn structure will be exploited by black

Or White's B on d6 and the rest of the dark square grip will throttle Black to death ...


13...Nd5 14.Bd6 Re8 15.Rb3 Nc6 16.e4

16. c4 then c5, Nc4 and maybe Nb6.

Basil
29-06-2007, 04:08 PM
Hi Mac

I continue to appreciate your thread. Others do as well, I'm sure, but social skills are not primary attribute of chess players/ BBers.

Carry on!

Trent Parker
29-06-2007, 09:08 PM
OK Mac I'll put up one of mine.

Heres a relative patzer's mind at work:


Lau,J - Parker,T [A40]
NSW Open U1600 (4), 10.06.2007

1.e4 Nc6 2.d4 e5 3.d5 Nce7 4.c4 Ng6 5.Be3 [This in hindsight seems to be a good move when played this early. I generally want to double whites c pawns if the knight wants to come to c3. But as I found out later this move allows him to push to c5 before i can fix his pawns by b6 and d6.] 5...Nf6 6.Nc3 Bb4 7.Bd3 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 d6 9.c5 Ng4 I thought I was winning a pawn here but i wasnt... 10.Bb5+ Bd7 11.Bxd7+ Qxd7 12.Qd2 Nxe3 13.Qxe3 Nf4 14.Qf3 0-0 15.cxd6 There goes the doubled pawns. Time for an endgame slugfest. 15...cxd6 16.Ne2 Nxe2 17.Qxe2 Rac8 18.Rc1 Rc5 19.0-0 Rfc8 20.Qb2 b6 21.Rfd1 f5 22.exf5 Qxf5 23.Qd2 Qg4 threatening Rxc3 24.f3 Qa4 still threatening 25.Rc2 And a draw was offered here. However I saw the endgame after my combination as winning for me! 25...Rxc3 26.Rxc3 Rxc3 27.Qxc3 Qxd1+ 28.Kf2 To take the d pawn or not to take d pawn is the question. I decided rather to give the pawn back and go into a winning pawn endgame where white cannot infiltrate blacks position and whilst white captures blacks d4 pawn Black flanks up the f file . 28...Qd4+ [28...Qxd5 29.Qc8+ Kf7 30.Qc7+ Kf6 31.Qxa7 Qd4+ and whites Queen could cause trouble.....] 29.Qxd4 exd4 30.Ke2 Kf7 31.Kd3 Kf6 32.Kxd4 Kf5 33.g3 g5 34.a4 a6 35.h3 h5 36.Kd3 Ke5 37.Kc4 h4 38.gxh4 gxh4 39.Kd3 Kf4 40.Ke2 b5 41.axb5 axb5 0-1

Phil Bourke
29-06-2007, 09:45 PM
Here is a patzer's relative's opinion :) Nice game, especially liked the resisting temptation part, Qd4+. Exchanging Queens may not be the most exciting way to win, but sure looks the safest.

Trent Parker
03-07-2007, 07:17 PM
Ok lets do another



Parker,T - Willis,P [D24]
NSW OPEN U1600 (1), 09.06.2007
[Trent Parker]

I believe i have only played Phil Willis once before in the 2007 City Of Sydney U1700 Tournament. I had the adrenaline pumping for that tournament and feeling like a bull in a china shop. Wanting to Destroy my opponents king. In that game Phil had his chances to nullify my Blackmar Diemar Gambit's attacking chances but played an inaccurate move and it was sac to mate time. In this game I was in a calmer frame of mind. I decided to show that i play positionally as well as tactically 1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 dxc4 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 0-0 7.Bxc4 Bd7 8.0-0 Nc6 This seems to be a docile variation against the Queens Gambit..... 9.Rc1 a6 10.Qc2 Na5 11.Bd3 h6 Do I take or retreat? I noticed that If I take it takes the defender off of the b4 square and i'll get a tempo on the Queenside 12.Bxf6 Bxf6 13.b4 Nc6 14.a3 a5 15.b5 Na7 [15...Ne7 16.Ne4 c6 17.Nxf6+ gxf6 18.bxc6 bxc6±] 16.a4 b6 [16...c6 17.bxc6 Bxc6 looks ok. Perhaps with the idea of Bxf3 then Nc6] 17.Ne4 Be7 18.Qxc7 Bb4 19.Ne5 Qxc7 20.Rxc7 Be8 Locks in the Rook But Bc8 is no better 21.Rfc1 [I considered 21.Nd7 But after 21...Bxd7 22.Rxd7 Rfd8 23.Rc7 Rdc8 24.Rfc1 I think black has a slightly better position than in the game continuation. ] 21...f5 22.Ng3 Bd6 23.R7c2 Rd8 24.Bc4 Time to pressurise the weak pawn. 24...Bf7 [24...Bd7 25.Nxd7 Rxd7 26.Bxe6+] 25.Nxf7 Kxf7 [25...Rxf7 26.Bxe6] 26.Nxf5 Ba3 27.Rd1 Kf6 28.Ng3 Nc8 29.Nh5+ Kf7 [29...Ke7 30.Nxg7] 30.Nf4 Rfe8 Hey Yeah I'm two pawns up yeah i'll exchange 31.Bxe6+ Rxe6 32.Nxe6 Kxe6 33.Rc6+ Kd7 Lets get these pawns rolling on 34.f3 Re8 35.e4 Bb2 36.Kf2 Lets centralise the King.... 36...Ba3 37.Rd2 Bd6 38.Rdc2 Lets double the rooks again. The bishop cannot take on h2 due to g3! 38...Bxh2 39.g3 Bxg3+ 40.Kxg3 Rf8 41.Rc7+ and White resigns because of 41...Kd6 [41...Ke6 42.R2c6+ Nd6 43.e5 Kf5 (43...Kd5 44.Rxd6#) 44.Rxd6;
41...Kd8 42.Rxc8+ Ke7 43.R2c7+ Ke6 44.Rxf8] 42.R2c6# 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
04-07-2007, 07:14 PM
Parker,T - Willis,P [D24]
NSW OPEN U1600 (1), 09.06.2007
[Trent Parker]

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 dxc4 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 0-0 7.Bxc4 Bd7 8.0-0 Nc6 This seems to be a docile variation against the Queens Gambit.....

Uncritically obeying the beginner's rule of "develop all your pieces" is a sure recipe for a rotten game. It's usually poor to block the c-pawn in Q-side openings, and the B's position is not improved by moving it to c7. White should consider e4 now (and even on move 5 or 6).


9.Rc1 a6 10.Qc2 Na5 11.Bd3 h6 Do I take or retreat? I noticed that If I take it takes the defender off of the b4 square and i'll get a tempo on the Queenside

The B should not have been exchanged, because this is a permanent loss of the B-pair for a transitory gain on the Q-side. Indeed, this "gain" seems to be a loss, because it disturbs a N that was already poorly placed, and also leaves a target. Overall, White's advantage seems reduced by this transaction.


12.Bxf6 Bxf6 13.b4 Nc6 14.a3 a5 15.b5 Na7 16.a4 b6 [16...c6 17.bxc6 Bxc6 looks ok. Perhaps with the idea of Bxf3 then Nc6] 17.Ne4 Be7 18.Qxc7 Bb4 19.Ne5 Qxc7 20.Rxc7 Be8 Locks in the Rook But Bc8 is no better 21.Rfc1 22.Ng3 Bd6 23.R7c2 Rd8 24.Bc4 Bf7 25.Nxf7 Kxf7 26.Nxf5 Ba3 27.Rd1 Kf6 28.Ng3 Nc8 29.Nh5+ Kf7 30.Nf4 Rfe8 Hey Yeah I'm two pawns up yeah i'll exchange

Normally I would advise against giving up two good minors for a R and a weak P, but here you basically gain three connected passed pawns which seem unstoppable.

sonyrobocup
05-07-2007, 12:42 AM
The B should not have been exchanged, because this is a permanent loss of the B-pair for a transitory gain on the Q-side. Indeed, this "gain" seems to be a loss, because it disturbs a N that was already poorly placed, and also leaves a target. Overall, White's advantage seems reduced by this transaction.


Bxf6 was very strong. Moving the bishop allow c5 which would free black's position. Two bishop is not always an advantage.

Capablanca-Fan
05-07-2007, 12:53 AM
Bxf6 was very strong. Moving the bishop allow c5 which would free black's position.
I don't object to allowing illusory freeing moves—they can save me lots of time. 12.Bh4 c5? 13. dxc5 Bxc5 13. Bxf6 forces the horrible ... gxf6 because ...Qxf6 allows Ne4.


Two bishop is not always an advantage.
No, and I don't know anyone who claims that it is. As I said, White still has the advantage after 12. Bxf6 Bxf6, but 13. Ne4 was much better than the game, attacking the c-pawn and also planning Nc5.

Igor_Goldenberg
05-07-2007, 09:57 AM
14...a5 is a mistake, 16...b6 is a bigger (probably decisive) mistake.
Personally I like 12.Bxf6, would probably play it myself.

Capablanca-Fan
05-07-2007, 12:01 PM
I must admit, I am liking 12.Bxf6 — but with 13.Ne4 — more and more.

Trent Parker
08-07-2007, 02:39 AM
thanks for the commentary guys!! Greatly appreciated. Like another:

The endgame in this game i have shown elsewhere on another thread.



Parker,T - Koutnik,M [A04]
NSW OPEN U1600 (5), 10.06.2007
[Trent Parker]

1.Nf3 d6 2.c4 c5 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.e4 Bd7 6.Be2 g6 7.0-0 Bg7 8.Be3 Nf6 9.Nc3 0-0 10.Rc1 Qc8 11.b3 Ng4 I might have to read up more on this opening. I decided to swap off my dark squared coloured bishop as i wanted to play f3 anyway and this would get rid of the bad bishop.... 12.Bxg4 Bxg4 13.f3 Bd7 14.Nd5 Threatening to take the knight on c6 and then take on e7 14...Bxd4 15.Bxd4 Qd8 16.f4 Perhaps I should have pulled the bishop to c3 or b2. I was having a crazy moment thinking how an opposite colour endgame is generally drawn...... tool 16...Nxd4 17.Qxd4 Bc6 18.f5 Bxd5 19.exd5 [19.cxd5 Qb6 20.Rfd1 Qxd4+ 21.Rxd4 And i'll double up my rooks] 19...Qb6 20.Qxb6 [20.c5 dxc5 21.Qxc5 Qxc5+ 22.Rxc5 Rfc8 23.Rxc8+ Rxc8 24.fxg6 hxg6÷] 20...axb6 21.a4 Rac8 22.Rce1 Rc7 23.Re3 Kg7 24.Rxe7 [24.fxg6 fxg6 25.Rxf8 Kxf8 26.Re6 Looks better for white to me] 24...Rxe7 25.f6+ Kg8 26.fxe7 Re8 27.Re1 Kg7 I missed this move. I analysed this position when My rook took on e7. Silly me thought he'd have to push the F pawn..... [27...f5 28.Re6 Kf7 29.Rxd6 Rxe7 30.Rxb6 Re2 31.Rxb7++-] 28.Kf2 Kf6 29.Kf3 Rxe7 30.Rxe7 Kxe7 31.Kf4 h6 32.h4 [32.g4 Kf6 (32...f5 33.gxf5 gxf5 34.Kxf5 Kf7 35.h4+-) 33.h4 g5+ 34.hxg5+ hxg5+ 35.Ke4 Kg6 36.b4 f6 37.a5 bxa5 38.bxa5 Kg7 39.Kf5 Kf7 40.Ke4 Ke7 41.Kd4 Kf7 42.Kc3 Ke7 43.Kb4 f5 44.gxf5 g4 45.f6+ Kxf6 46.c5 dxc5+ 47.Kxc5 g3 48.d6 g2 49.d7 g1Q+ 50.Kb5 Qd1 51.Kb6 Ke7-+] 32...f5 33.h5 Kf6 [33...gxh5 34.Kxf5 Kf7 35.g3 Kg7 36.Ke6 Kg6 37.Kxd6 Kg5 38.Kc7 Kg4 39.d6 Kxg3 40.d7+-;
33...g5+ 34.Kxf5 Kf7 35.g4 Kg7 36.Ke6 Kh7 37.Kxd6+-] 34.hxg6 [34.g4 fxg4 35.Kxg4 g5 36.b4 Ke5-+] 34...Kxg6 35.g3 h5 36.b4 Kf6 37.a5 bxa5 38.bxa5 Kg6 39.Kf3 Kg5 40.Kf2 Kf6 [40...Kg4?? 41.c5 dxc5 (41...h4 42.gxh4 Kxh4 43.c6 bxc6 44.dxc6+-; 41...f4 42.gxf4 Kxf4 43.c6 Ke5 44.c7 Kxd5 45.c8Q+-) 42.d6 c4 43.d7 c3 44.d8Q;
40...f4 41.gxf4+ Kxf4 42.c5 Ke5 43.c6 Kxd5 44.c7+-] 41.Kf3 Ke5 42.Ke3 Kf6= A draw was offered and I declined saying "umm This move might lose me the game but i'm going to try it anyway! 43.Kd4 Ke7 44.Ke3 Draw Agreed[44.c5?? f4 45.gxf4 h4 46.c6 bxc6 47.dxc6 Kd8 48.Kd5 h3 49.Kxd6 h2 50.c7+ Kc8 51.Kc6 h1Q+ 52.Kb6 Qb7+-+] ½-½

Bereaved
08-07-2007, 02:44 AM
Hi everyone,

I can't leave a chess nut boasting in an open Foyer like this by himself!! lol

Event: Thessaloniki olw
Site: ?
Date: 1984.??.??
Round: 1
White: Tse Yue Ning
Black: Sathe, B.
Result: 0-1
ECO: C50
PlyCount: 38
EventDate: 1984.??.??

1. e4 e5 {both sides move out a centre pawn and prepare to develop their pieces
} 2. Nf3 {the white knight attacks the black pawn and} Nc6 {
black brings out a knight to defend it.} 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. h3
O-O {# Black and white have both developed their pieces and castled kingside.
However white has used a move to stop a black piece from coming to g4 by
playing h2-h3. Black has developed an extra piece.} 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 Be6 {
Black develops his bishop and now only has to move his queen to connect his
rooks.} 9. Bxe6 fxe6 {after this swap, black has a half open f-file with his
rook aimed through the knight at the f2 square.} 10. Nc3 Qe8 11. Bxf6 Rxf6 {
# Black has an easy plan to follow. He will put his two rooks on the f-file.
His queen can also find a good square on the kingside. Black's pawn on e6 does
a good job at holding back the white knight on c3. White must be sorry for
having swapped his bishop for black's knight.} 12. Nh4 Qf7 13. Qd2 Rf8 {
four black pieces attacking f2 and only three white pieces defending.Something
bad is going to happen to white if he loses this pawn so he defends it again.}
14. Nd1 Qh5 15. Nf3 $6 {#} Rxf3 $1 {
Black takes the last white defender on the kingside. Now black wins easily.}
16. gxf3 Qxh3 17. c3 Rxf3 18. d4 Qg4+ 19. Kh1 Rh3# 0-1

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Capablanca-Fan
08-07-2007, 10:26 AM
Parker,T - Koutnik,M [A04]
NSW OPEN U1600 (5), 10.06.2007
[Jono]

1.Nf3 d6 2.c4 c5 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.e4 Bd7 6.Be2 g6 7.0-0 Bg7 8.Be3 Nf6 9.Nc3 0-0 10.Rc1 Qc8 [this is poor, on the same file as White's R. White should now play f3 to restrict Black's pieces in the spirit of the Maroczy Bind. Later, Nd5 is very strong, because an exchange can often be met by cxd5 uncovering the R against the Q] 11.b3 Ng4 12.Bxg4 Bxg4 13.f3 Bd7 14.Nd5 Bxd4 15.Bxd4 Qd8 16.f4 [T: Perhaps I should have pulled the bishop to c3 or b2. I was having a crazy moment thinking how an opposite colour endgame is generally drawn...... tool. J: Yes, a better sort of crazy moment would be thinking of how opposite-coloured Bs help an attack greatly. Black has no cover for the horrid dark-square weakenesses around his K, with no opponent for your B. It was a shame to give that up] 16...Nxd4 17.Qxd4 Bc6 18.f5 Bxd5 19.exd5 Qb6 20.Qxb6 axb6 21.a4 Rac8 22.Rce1 Rc7 23.Re3 Kg7? 24.Rxe7! [Well played. Black's last was a blunder, but I think he is in a bad way anyway. White keeps Black tied down to the e-pawn, and marches the K over to b5] 24...Rxe7 25.f6+ Kg8 26.fxe7 Re8 27.Re1 [27.Rf6! Rxe7 28.Rxd6 and wins another P on the Q-side] 27 ... Kg7 28.Kf2 Kf6 29.Kf3 Rxe7 30.Rxe7 Kxe7 31.Kf4 h6 32.h4 f5 33.h5 Kf6 34.hxg6 Kxg6 35.g3 h5 36.b4 Kf6 37.a5 bxa5 38.bxa5 Kg6 39.Kf3 Kg5 40.Kf2 Kf6 41.Kf3 Ke5 42.Ke3 Kf6= 43.Kd4 Ke7 44.Ke3 Draw Agreed ½-½

Zwischenzug
09-07-2007, 01:20 AM
Hi everyone, been having great practice games online. Here is one of them:

[Event "Rated game, 20m + 1s"]
[Site "Main Playing Hall"]
[Date "2007.07.08"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Zwichenzug"]
[Black "Yando"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A22"]
[WhiteElo "1593"]
[BlackElo "1620"]
[Annotator "Zwischenzug"]
[PlyCount "55"]
[EventDate "2007.07.08"]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e5 3.e4 Bc5 4.Nf3 O-O 5.d4 exd4 6.Nxd4 Bxd4 7.Qxd4 {It seemed a bit unprincipled giving a bishop for a knight.} Nc6 8.Qd2 {Planning on b3 and fianchettoing my dark squared bishop.} d6 9.f3 Be6 10.Be2 {Be3 would have been more correct as I want my bishop on c2.} Qd7 11.O-O h6 12.a3 {Playing this early because of an annoying Nb4 move I faced in a previous game.} Rad8 13.b3 a6 14.Bb2 b6 15.Bd3 Ne7 16.Bc2 {Made a mistake of playing Bb1 in an earlier game which I lost because it took a while to activate my a-rook. I won't make that mistake again.} c5 {A major positional mistake, permanently weakens the d pawn and I would just pile up on it with heavy pieces. The correct plan is c6 (to stop the knight coming to d5) and the pawn break d5.}
17.Qe3 Qc6 18.Rfd1 Rd7 19.Rd2 Rfd8 20.Rad1 Kh8 {There seemed to be no
clear way to attack the d-pawn, so I played Nd5 expecting black to exchange
which he did. At best I could bring the queen into the attack of the d pawn
but Black's knights are well positioned to defend the d pawn.} 21.Nd5 Bxd5 {exd5 shuts the queen off from the king-side and my bishops are pointing to the king-side, hence my play should be on the king-side.} 22.exd5 Qc7 23.Re2 Re8 24.Qf4 {Thinking of 25.Bxf6 gxf6 26.Qxf6. I changed my mind as I already
played Re2 preparing a battery on the e file.} Qd8 25.Rde1 Ng6 {Qd2 seemed
passive and would have just resulted in meaningless exchanges on the e file. I
realized that I should LET black take my queen. If black doesn't take my queen, it would only lead to exchanges.} 26.Bxf6 Nxf4 27.Rxe8+ Qxe8 28.Rxe8# 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
09-07-2007, 09:17 AM
Hi everyone, been having great practice games online. Here is one of them:

[Event "Rated game, 20m + 1s"]
[Site "Main Playing Hall"]
[Date "2007.07.08"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Zwichenzug"]

[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A22"]
[WhiteElo "1593"]
[BlackElo "1620"]
[Annotator "Zwischenzug"]
[PlyCount "55"]
[EventDate "2007.07.08"]

Comments in game notes (bold).

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e5 3.e4 Bc5 4.Nf3 O-O 5.d4 exd4 6.Nxd4 Bxd4 7.Qxd4 {It seemed a bit unprincipled giving a bishop for a knight. [B]J: this was poor. All the same, 5.d4 was too early, because 6...Nxe4 7.Nxe4 Re8 would blow up White's centre before he has castled} Nc6 8.Qd2 {Planning on b3 and fianchettoing my dark squared bishop. J: That is the ideal place for it.} d6 9.f3 Be6 10.Be2 {Be3 would have been more correct as I want my bishop on c2. J: Bd3 is presumably what you meant} Qd7 11.O-O h6 12.a3 {Playing this early because of an annoying Nb4 move I faced in a previous game.} Rad8 13.b3 a6 14.Bb2 b6 15.Bd3 Ne7 16.Bc2 {Made a mistake of playing Bb1 in an earlier game which I lost because it took a while to activate my a-rook. I won't make that mistake again. J: good stuff!} c5 {A major positional mistake, permanently weakens the d pawn and I would just pile up on it with heavy pieces. The correct plan is c6 (to stop the knight coming to d5) and the pawn break d5. J: Black's passivity combined with surrendering the B pair has left him with a bad game. This alternate plan would open up your B pair, even if he could achieve d5.}
17.Qe3 Qc6 18.Rfd1 Rd7 19.Rd2 Rfd8 20.Rad1 Kh8 {There seemed to be no
clear way to attack the d-pawn, so I played Nd5 expecting black to exchange
which he did. At best I could bring the queen into the attack of the d pawn
but Black's knights are well positioned to defend the d pawn. J: It was excellent} 21.Nd5 Bxd5 {exd5 shuts the queen off from the king-side and my bishops are pointing to the king-side, hence my play should be on the king-side.} 22.exd5 Qc7 23.Re2 {J: why not simply 23. Bxf6 gxf6, Qxh6+} Re8 24.Qf4 {Thinking of 25.Bxf6 gxf6 26.Qxf6. I changed my mind as I already
played Re2 preparing a battery on the e file.} Qd8 25.Rde1 Ng6 {Qd2 seemed
passive and would have just resulted in meaningless exchanges on the e file. I
realized that I should LET black take my queen. If black doesn't take my queen, it would only lead to exchanges. J: that was right.} 26.Bxf6 Nxf4 27.Rxe8+ Qxe8 28.Rxe8# 1-0

Zwischenzug
09-07-2007, 02:34 PM
Thanks for the comments Jono.

Zwischenzug
09-07-2007, 05:10 PM
I'm trying to make analyzing my games a habit. Here is another:

[Event "Rated game, 20m + 1s"]
[Site "Main Playing Hall"]
[Date "2007.07.09"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Boru"]
[Black "Zwichenzug"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A49"]
[BlackElo "1539"]
[Annotator "Zwischenzug"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[EventDate "2007.07.09"]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.c3 d6 5.O-O O-O 6.d4 {Not the usual King's Indian type position. Decided to try playing positionally as I tend to be a bit weaker in games that are "out of book".} c6 7. Bg5 Nbd7 8. Nbd2 b5 9. Nh4 Bb7 10.Ne4 Qc7 {Necessary to protect the weak bishop should I choose to push my b pawn. Rab8 an equally valid way to protect it.} 11.Qd3 e6 {Trying to control the center more, but must beware of the weakened d pawn.} 12.Qf3 Nxe4 13.Qxe4 Rab8 {The bishop needs an extra defender if I want to attack the queen with c5.} 14.Bh3 c5 15.Qe3 Rfe8 {I was worried of 16.Bxe6 fxe6 17.Qxe6+, penetrating my position. The plus side of the move is that it prevents the possible trade of dark squared bishops which I wasn't thinking of at the time.} 16.Bh6 Bh8 17.dxc5 Nxc5 {I wanted to activate my knight, dxc5 weakens my central control a bit. White's pieces looks misplaced.} 18.Rad1 Bd5 19.b3 Ne4 {Threatening Nxc3 or Bxc3 but must beware of the pinning move Rc1. If white let me just take the pawn it would have been better then the actual game continuation, either way white would have lost a pawn.} 20.c4 bxc4 21.bxc4 Qxc4 22.Qxa7 Qxa2 {I was materialistic this time and gave white the opportunity to trade queens, which he should have. If the queens are off the game would be more unclear at least} 23.Qd7 {Qe3 was the right move. Qd7 seemed pointless.} Qxe2 {I'm threatening 24...Nxf2 and if 25.Rxf2 then 25...Qxd1+.} 24.Be3 Red8 {I wanted to activate my rooks but of course my rooks can't make the queen leave my camp.} 25.Qc7 Rbc8 26.Qb6 Be5 {Activating my bishop and checking if there are good sacrifices on the king position.} 27.Bd4 {I didn't see my idea of Ng5 threatening Nxh3+ threatening mate. But white can easily stop that by playing Bb2 and trading bishops. White should have just played Bb2 instead of Bd4 to challenge my nice light squared bishop.} Nd2 {I played this move expecting white to be materialistic and try to keep the rook.} 28.Rfe1 Nf3+ 29.Nxf3 Qxf3 30.Kf1 Rb8 {I wanted to play Rc2 right away but that would hang my other rook and I didn't dare sacrifice my other rook.} 31.Re3 {Blunder, trying to trade queens but leaving his rook hanging. Better probably was 31.Qa7 and the b rook can't enter white's position and the other rook is tried to defend the b rook.} Qxd1+ {Boru resigns} 0-1

sonyrobocup
13-07-2007, 08:41 PM
I don't have an annotated game. In this game I was playing black, up against someone almost 1000 points ACF higher than me. My ACF is around 1000, but I outplayed him positionally. My opponent said he didn't understand why he was losing. He claimed that I had a backward d pawn, open king-side and open d file for his rook. He thought he was winning during the game, and I was lucky to beat him.

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 g6 3. h3 Bg7 4. Nf3 b6 5. e3 Bb7 6. Nbd2 d6 7. c3 c5 8. Qa4+
Nbd7 9. dxc5 bxc5 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Nb6 12. Qc2 Nfd5 13. Bg3 e6 14. Ne4 Nc8
15. Rad1 f5 16. Neg5 Qf6 17. h4 h6 18. Nh3 Kh8 19. Qa4 Ncb6 20. Qb3 {0:23} Bc6
21. Rd2 c4 $1 22. Qa3 e5 23. Rc1 Rac8 24. b3 Ba8 25. Qb2 f4 26. exf4 exf4 27.
Bh2 cxb3 28. Nd4 bxa2 29. Bg4 0-1 *

Capablanca-Fan
13-07-2007, 11:57 PM
I don't have an annotated game. In this game I was playing black, up against someone almost 1000 points ACF higher than me. My ACF is around 1000, but I outplayed him positionally. My opponent said he didn't understand why he was losing. He claimed that I had a backward d pawn, open king-side and open d file for his rook. He thought he was winning during the game, and I was lucky to beat him.

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 g6 3. h3 Bg7 4. Nf3 b6 5. e3 Bb7 6. Nbd2 d6 7. c3 c5 8. Qa4+
Nbd7 9. dxc5 bxc5 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Nb6 12. Qc2 Nfd5 13. Bg3 e6 14. Ne4 Nc8
15. Rad1 f5 16. Neg5 Qf6 17. h4 h6 18. Nh3 Kh8 19. Qa4 Ncb6 20. Qb3 {0:23} Bc6
21. Rd2 c4 $1 22. Qa3 e5 23. Rc1 Rac8 24. b3 Ba8 25. Qb2 f4 26. exf4 exf4 27.
Bh2 cxb3 28. Nd4 bxa2 29. Bg4 0-1 *

Was this a win on time? Black certainly is not playing like a 1000-rated player, and White didn't impress me as ~2000. Black played better throughout.

Bereaved
04-08-2007, 06:36 PM
Hello everyone,

Here is another of the fine products available at the House of Mac, purveyors of High Quality Annotated Games for more than a Decade now. Enquiries welcome

Event: ?
Site: ?
Date: ????.??.??
Round: ?
White: Jaguar
Black: Sausage
Result: 1-0
ECO: B01
Annotator: Macavity
PlyCount: 25
SourceDate: 2007.01.03

1. e4 {as always a central pawn move allows white to control some of the centre and prepare to develop their pieces, particularly their white square
bishop and their queen.} d5 {a very confrontational response from Black, which challenges white's centre before he can get comfortable.} 2. exd5 {the usual response is this capture, other options where the pawn is guarded are not really the critical test.} Qxd5 {the oldest response in this opening, but the queen's early development can cause later loss of time, as it gets chased around the board.} (2... Nf6 {is a modern move which can involve a pawn sacrifice by Black, but aims to recapture with the knight on d5 and keep the queen safe and not exposed.}) 3. Nc3 {Straight forward development which has the bonus of attacking the Black queen at the same time, and it must move to be safe.} Qa5 { the queen is safe here for the meanwhile, but it is imperative that Black allows it to remain safe by providing it to escape when and if required.} 4. d4 {White opens a path for their other Bishop and takes an interest in the dark squares in the centre} Nf6 {A very reasonable move, allowing the knight to control some important central squares, and also clearing the back line for later castling.} 5. Nf3 {White also makes the development of his pieces a focus, and this move allows him to exert good control of e5 which both the d4 pawn and the knight now aim at.} Bf5 {there seems to be nothing wrong with this move, but unless Black is planning on castling queenside, they should be making a priority of developing their kingside so they can castle} 6. Ne5 { This second move of white's knight is designed to try and harass the Qa5 and the Bf5, both of which are a little loose in their positions. Black's next move does not seem to take this fact into account.} e6 {A very careless move. It seems that Black has decided that they can simply develop as they will and all will be fine. This seems to be a problem that many people, including myself, have at times; a lack of concern for what the opponent is doing. Here Black seems to have forgotten about his queen being in the open.} (6... c6 {is miles better. Now the Black queen is in no danger and is quite able to play an active and safe part from c7 or even can retreat all the way to d8 if it has to. It is the fact that this provides safety whereas the move chosen does not that is important though.}) 7. g4 {A sharp move highlighting that the Bf5 is precariously placed, and has few new squares to choose from. Concrete play such as this, moving pawns to biff pieces must be backed up by more than a feeling of wanting to kick a piece, but that to do so is also a good idea.} Be4 {a tricky move ( Black seems to be playing plenty of those!!) based on the fact that the Nc3 is pinned to the king by the Qa5. It does attack the Rh1, but it also allows white to break the pin almost straight away too. the Bf5 should have gone to g6 in all likelihood.} 8. Nc4 { so the Black queen is attacked again, and must move.} Qa6 {this square is dangerously lined up with the Bf1, which may have many possibilities of uncovering attack on the black queen, which still does not have heaps of
squares to choose from.} 9. Nxe4 {better to take this bishop than move the Rh1, which might almost justify Black's play.} Nxe4 {recapturing is the only sensible choice.} 10. Qf3 {developing with tempo and presenting black with an awkward choice about how to safeguard the knight, which does not seem to have a lot of good moves.} Nd6 {This move leads to vast difficulties for Black, and should have been avoided. Now the Bf1 comes into play with extreme effect.} 11. Nxd6+ {discovering an attack on the Qa6 and as it is check forcing the queen to capture to save itself.} Qxd6 12.Qxb7 {attacking the Ra8 is strong and will undoubtedly cause black to lose at least a couple of pawns and have a miserable position.....or Black can choose to play what they did in the game and simplify matters extremely!} Qc6 {a horrific blunder, Black tries to save the rook directly, rather than get into the awkward position in the next note by swapping queens. The game ends immediately now.} (12... Qb4+ 13. Qxb4 Bxb4+ 14. c3 Bd6 15. Bg2 c6 16. b4 Kd8
17. b5 Re8 18. Be3 a6 19. b6 {looks horrible for black but was better than the game.}) (12... Qd5 {is another tricky attempt that does not work as after} 13. Bg2 {they will lose the Ra8 anyway.}) 13. Bb5 {there are no kind blandishments for Black here; their position is completely lost, their queen is about to drop off, and there is not a lot of point in continuing so they resigned.} 1-0

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Basil
04-08-2007, 06:43 PM
Thanks Mac (again)

Trent Parker
09-08-2007, 06:48 PM
A diamond in the rough of the ANU

Parker,T - Marks,J [A04]
ANU OPEN U1600, 2007


1.Nf3 This move allows white to adapt to the system that black wants to play. If 1...d5 is played i'll play 2.d4 and transpose into a Queens Gambit. if 2....c5 is played i'll play c4 and try for either a maroczy or a english.Other moves have other replies as well. 1...d6 I wasnt sure what black was going to do with this move. Was he going to play a delayed Sicilian or was he going to play a Kings Indian type setup..... 2.c4 I decide to build my centre 2...g6 So It now looks like a Kings Indian Setup will be adopted. Time to put my KID Formation into work..... 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 Puts a bind on the d5 square which in this variation is not needed as black has already played d6. If Black plays the Knight out first e4 is effective in stopping black going for a Grunfeld position. 4...e6 This seems to me as a bit of a passive move and blocks the diagonal for the Queens Bishop. It also weakens the dark squares if the g7 Bishop is removed. 5.d4 I keep bulding my centre. 5...Bd7 Continues blacks development but where is it going? 6.Be2 My standard KID development. I just thought I'd go ahead with development to places which could attack Kingside or Q side at a moments notice 6...Nc6 Was tempted to push the d pawn but I think black could have an alright game after Bxc3+ followed by Black castling Q side 7.0-0 Decided to castle. going the safer option IMHO [7.d5 Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Ne5 9.0-0 Nf6 10.Qc2 Qe7 11.Nd4 0-0-0 12.Rb1] 7...b6 What the??? Whats this all about? I do not know.... 8.Be3 Continuing development. Might play Qd2 to prepare the Bh6 infiltration 8...Nge7 9.Rc1 Still Contemplating a d5 push in conjunction with a3 b4 9...0-0 still cannot clearly see what blacks plan will be expansion King side or Qside? 10.a3 My short term plans are to expand Q side and play for space on the Q side 10...f5 A ha! the plot thickens! He wants to play on the F file. What are his threats? f4.If he takes e4 I'm happy with the positioning of my knights and might play d5 to follow. Lets parry f4 11.Qd2 Kills two birds with one stone. Defends f4 and threatens Bh6 attempting to make the black squares weaker. 11...f4 An interesting but i feel dubious pawn sacrifice. Does black have enough activity to sac this pawn? 12.Bxf4 [best apu impersionation] tank you very much please come again![/best apu impersonation] 12...e5 Ok so there are going to be more open lines coming soon..... 13.dxe5 Of course i'm not going to return the pawn...:D 13...dxe5 I gotta move my Bishop anyway. 14.Bh6 This is the bishops intended destination but it probably wasnt the best place for it. Perhaps g5 was better. 14...Bg4 Do I want to swap Q's..... No I feel there could be some good tactics for me in this position..... 15.Nd5 My intentions are to still play on the Queenside and along the C file if the knights are exchanged. 15...Bxf3 16.Bxf3 Nd4 All of a sudden I thought I had blown it. My opponent has tactics everywhere but funnily enough one little adjustment to my bishop parrys them all! 17.Bg5 NO no no Nb3 you say? Its refuted by Nxe7+! Oooh What about Rxf3/ See game continuation! 17...Rxf3 I now win material through [17...Nb3 18.Nxe7+ Kh8 19.Qxd8 Raxd8 20.Rc3 Nd4 21.Bg4 And White has a better game] 18.Nxe7+ So we are now equal on material and Black is in check. 18...Kf7 He cannot got to h8 or f8 as Nxg6+ wins the Q. But black is no where near out of the woods yet. No comes my masterpiece move. 19.Nc6 As Homer Simpson would say.... Sacrelicious!! I'm giving myself a !! for that move. Blacks position now falls apart. The Black Q must move or she dies, If the Q moves I take the Knight and black loses the rook. 19...Nxc6 An interesting reply. going down the piece for two pawns..... suppose its better than going down a rook..... 20.Bxd8 Rxd8 21.Qxd8 I decided it was worth my while to get rid of the major pieces of my opponent 21...Nxd8 22.gxf3 So I'm up two exchanges plus a pawn which is doubled up. I thought it might be a little difficult with two minor pieces. Thought. Ok If I can take control of an Open file I can Infiltrate blacks position. 22...Ne6 No second guess as to where that knight is going! I'm not going to be able to have the d file easily. 23.b4 I'll try to open up this C file 23...Nd4 threatens Ne2+ 24.Kg2 This assists me in getting my King activated anyhow. 24...g5 Binds the f4 square. 25.c5 Trying to open up the C file then realised: 25...b5 Making an attempt to start blocking everything up. 26.Ra1 Ok lets try opening the A file 26...Ke6 Centralisation of the king 27.Rfd1 Hey Hey Hey I got a new plan! I'm going to rush my king up to g4 then Sac my rook for the knight and then win the passed pawn By playing my Rook in front of the pawn, king to f5 and then pawn to e5 But That K looks too close for the moment...... 27...Kd7 Oooh Where's he going? Stay away mate! Your helping me win! 28.Kg3 Kc6 [28...Ke6 29.Kg4 h6 30.Rxd4 exd4 31.Rd1 c6 32.f4 gxf4 33.Kxf4 a6 34.Rg1 Be5+ 35.Kf3 Bxh2 36.Rg6+] 29.Kg4 h6 30.Rxd4 exd4 31.Rd1 Kd7 32.Kf5 c6 33.e5 1-0

Bereaved
02-09-2007, 12:15 AM
Hello everyone,

Something to sleep on.


Event: Earth
Site: ?
Date: 2007
Round: 4.2
White: Another
Black: Macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: C02
WhiteElo:
BlackElo: 2137
PlyCount: 116
SourceDate:

1. e4 e6 {the longer I play the French, the more I like it!} 2. d4 d5 3. e5 {The advance variation has been the grounds for a few games between White and I now, with him winning each time, though not without a struggle} c5 4. c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 {John Watson in his book, Play the French, recommends this as a flexible approach, as} (5... Qb6 {can leave the queen misplaced at times in some continuations}) 6. a3 {with plans of immediate expansion on the queenside, taking the play to Black on their home ground so to speak} f6 {this move undermining the head of the pawn chain rather than the base has become quite topical.} ({The move} 6... c4 {was considered the main line for many years, with the idea of holding white's threatened pawn charge on the queenside at bay. It does however prevent Black developing active play in that section of the board, whereas white can still open lines via b2-b3.}) (6... a5 {was an attempt to prevent the expansion via b4 forcefully, but does not appeal to me.}) (6... Nge7 { immediately is also possible with standard ideas after} 7. b4 cxd4 8. cxd4 Nf5 {of pressuring d4. A useful type of structure for all French players of either colour to be familiar with}) 7. Bd3 {Considered the most accurate, to try and target the slight loosening of the Black kingside, and of course planning to castle as soon as possible} (7. b4 {is the most direct follow up of white's 6th move. However as both of these moves are pawn moves, Black can use their time to develop quickly and try and dismantle the white centre immediately.ie} fxe5 8. b5 (8. dxe5 {a position which is very nice to play as black. All our pieces are easy to find good homes for} Qc7 9. Bf4 Nge7 10. Bd3 g6 11. Qd2 Bg7 12. O-O O-O 13. Bg3 cxb4 14. cxb4 Nf5 (14... Rxf3 $1 {is also very strong}) 15.Re1 Nxg3 16. hxg3 Rxf3 17. gxf3 Bxe5 18. Ra2 Nd4 19. Qe3 Rf8 {0-1 Castaneda - Morales, Guaymallen 2001}) 8... Nxd4 9. cxd4 exd4 {when Black as three pawns for the piece, a very large mass of pawns in the centre and an easy to play game}) 7... Qc7 {
Black also makes plans to castle, but on the queenside.} (7... fxe5 {is more common}) 8. O-O O-O-O (8... fxe5 9. Nxe5 Nxe5 10. Bf4 {wins a pawn after} Qb6 {but seems really risky to me, I preferred castling by far}) 9. Re1 {this move brings White's rook to support the pawn on e5 and looks very natural. It also poses me an awkward question about how to continue my development.} Nge7 {with this move I offer White a pawn, but at the cost of giving me a big centre,and of exchanging all of his central pawns} 10. b4 {White seeks to clear away the queenside rather than grab the c5 pawn. There is a slight technical hitch.... Black's response. What would have happened if he took it?} ({Well, I felt that after} 10. exf6 {White has to exchange here first if he wants to win a pawn, see below} gxf6 11.dxc5 e5 {that I had good compensation for the pawn. I have the centre, I have an open g-file, I have the ability to bring my Bd7 into the game in the near future with possibly very good effect, and the white c5 pawn actually hinders the path of the white pieces towards the black king to some extent}) (10. dxc5 {is really not the right thing either; after} Nxe5 11. Nxe5 fxe5 {Black can feel very happy with this form of trade, ending up with an extra centre pawn and threats to advance his centre.}) 10... c4 {after this, Black has managed to stop the opening of lines on the queenside for a long time; the base of the pawns that need to be attacked has shifted to a7 and b7, which are much further away. Also the idea mentioned earlier of b2-b3 is not possible now, and that makes White's task much harder in an opposite side castling position, where time is a very important component.} 11. Bc2 {the bishop moves away and still eyes the squares on Black's kingside, whilst possibly having chances to move to a4 on the other side of the board} Ng6 {I moved my knight to clear the way to develop my Bf8 to enter the game. I saw no reason to exchange pawns on e5, as the Nf3 might arrive on g5 at some point and be a nuisance} 12. a4 {
White continues with his queenside expansion, but there are at least three
white pieces, the Bc1, Nb1, and Ra1 which have not had a go yet. To be fair,
the Ra1 is quite likely to be developed on its initial square should the position open up on the queenside.} Be7 {Black is now fully developed and can quickly seek to begin opening lines on the kingside for his rooks and other pieces} (12... fxe5 {is a real lemon} 13. b5 {the only move, driving away the Nc6} Na5 14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Bf4 {and Black is suffering}) 13. g3 {White begins a plan to place his bishop on f4, aimed at the Black queen on c7. To do this, he must drive away the Ng6, and to drive away the Ng6, he must shove it away with pawns. He could take it with Bxg6, but that would both open the h-file and allow a move such as g6-g5 to drive away the bishop when it arrives. The dilemma with this plan is that it involves disturbing the pawns shielding the White king, and as such may not have been the best choice. I had earlier wondered at ideas by White of b4-b5 and Bc1-a3 to exchange dark square bishops. This form of plan may have had better chances of success. Having said all of that, I now made preparations for the pawn advance which was due to arrive. I also did not want to dissuade White from playing the pawn advance and so chose moves to encourage him} Rdf8 {taking away the last square from my Ng6 and seeking to ensure that the move h2-h4 was played at the least} 14. h4 Rf7 {played to create an escape square for my knight from h4-h5; I failed to see that fxe5 was possible} ({After} 14... fxe5 {white at best has to play} 15. Bxg6 (15. h5 {I thought that this was winning a piece, but the devil machine showed me I was wrong, oh well} exd4 16. cxd4 Rxf3 17. Qxf3 Nxd4 18. Qd1 Nxc2 19. Qxc2 Ne5) (15. b5 Na5 16. Bxg6 hxg6 17. Nxe5 {transposes}) 15... hxg6 16. b5 Na5 17. Nxe5 {is the same thing})
15. h5 {well Back I go I guess} Nf8 16. Bf4 {so White has managed to play his long awaited bishop move, and now threatens to uncover an attack on my queen. The whole reason I was so happy to go into this position is that now I gain the opportunity to force open some lines, albeit at the cost of some material.} g5 17. hxg6 {this seems the only truly sensible option. If the bishop retreats} (17. Be3 g4 (17... fxe5 18. b5 exd4 19. cxd4 (19. bxc6 dxe3 20. cxd7+ Nxd7 21. Rxe3 Rhf8 { looks messy but a lot of fun for me and probably better for me too}) 19... Nb4 20. Ne5 Nxc2 21. Nxf7 Nxe1 22. Nxh8 Nd3 {is an interesting number of knight hops for both of us in a row, and I like my knight ending up on d3, it looks good there!}) 18. exf6 gxf3 19. fxe7 Nxe7 {is about equal, but the lines have been opened, and my king looks the safer of the two}) (17. exf6 {is bad} gxf4 18. fxe7 fxg3 19. exf8=Q+ Rhxf8 {and the white king's days are numbered}) ( 17. b5 gxf4 18. bxc6 Bxc6 19. gxf4 {also leaves the white king's house with too many holes in the roof, and a number of rooks about to fall on his head}) 17... Nxg6 ({the simple} 17... hxg6 18. b5 Nd8 19. exf6 Bd6 20. Be5 Rfh7 {may have been better, but less interesting!}) 18. Bxg6 (18. exf6 Nxf4 19. fxe7 Rg8 {does not look like where white is planning to be}) (18. b5 {as an intermezzo may have been the ticket and seem to force me to play} Ncxe5 {which may not be so bad, as White still has some concerns of his own, as this again sees lots of lines opening towards hisking} 19. Bxg6 hxg6 20. dxe5 g5 21. Be3 fxe5 22. Na3 {and the open h-file and the loose white king position may still be of quite some concern for White}) 18... hxg6 {this enables White to win the pawn on f6 but once again, I was trying to open lines} 19. exf6 {uncovering an attack on my queen and attacking the Be7} Bd6 20. Be5 {by this move White seeks to hold onto the pawn on f6 and it is a passed pawn and it is an extra pawn, but he still has not brought his Nb1 and Ra1 into the game and until he does, those pieces are not really able to be counted as on the board almost} Rh5 {
a move designed to goad White into playing g4, and further weaken his king} 21. g4 {and he plays it all the same, and I was quite happy to see it too!} Rxe5 {so what will happen, I lose an exchange but I gain...} 22. dxe5 Nxe5 ({
I would have loved to lead with this} 22... Bxe5 {if White was forced to now play} 23. Nxe5 (23. b5 {but this is what he would play, and I am in a bad way, well ok at least not as good as the game, and even messier still})) 23. Nxe5 {I thought that this was forced, and wished I could have kept the knight but this seemed to work out ok anyway} Bxe5 { so I have two bishops, a fairly strong centre, A SAFE king and pressure on the weak white pawns on the kingside. Also this sequence involving the exchange sacrifice has seen almost all of White's developed pieces to that point leave the board, and now he must develop his queenside to get more pieces in the game to play with. In that time, I hope to mount an attack on his king} 24. g5 {this is very understandable to me, to retain the pawn, but it is yet again another non developing move.} Rh7 {to try and do some shifty things down the h-file which I was a bit focused on I admit, but this lets some of my advantage slide. The main shifty thing was ideas of Bxc3, and then Qh2+, which in itself was nothing much....yet} (24... Bh2+ 25. Kf1 Qf4 26. Qd2 Qf5 27. Qd4 Bf4 {is a line that I wish I had seen at the board; White would need very good advice here to hold on. the threats to my king are of no real difficulty, because it is only one queen making them}) 25. Qf3 {now White is making some strong noises of his own concerning promotion on f8, and I must pay attention to it} Bf4 {Clogging the f-file and thinking of how I am going to achieve e5} 26. Na3 {The knight finally pops out its head, and what's more is trying to get my best
girl....we can't allow that!} a6 {anti Horse attacks Girl treatment} 27. Nc2 {
The knight still seeks a concrete role in the game, and heads to the centre}
Qd6 {My queen does a much better job at supporting the central pawns from here....and it is also covering f8 which means...no promotion threat for now at
least} 28. Ne3 {White can't sensibly try and guard g5, so just keeps trying to
get his knight into the game in a concrete fashion} (28. Qg4 {to try and guard the pawn is a madness. White would be suffering shockingly after} e5 29. Qd1 Bxg5 30. Ne3 e4 {and maybe there is no hope left}) (28. Qg2 {aligning the queen in front of the king is also remarkably unwise and is to be avoided as} Rh5 {seems to be close to terminal}) 28... Bxg5 {this not only nets this pawn, but makes the f6 pawn incredibly hard to hold in the long run} 29. Ng4 {the knight takes over sentry duty of the f6 pawn} Bf4 {the bishop resumes its role as a blocker on the f-file, and also guards e5, just in case White has plans of his knight living there} 30. Rad1 {White had such a dilemma here; he needed the Ra1 to play an active part in the game, yet it was guarding the a4 pawn. He chooses to jettison the pawn in an attempt to gain some activity, which is quite understandable, but that is my second pawn for the exchange, and we have previously said, it is unlikely that anyone would issue a life insurance policy to the f6 pawn, so that may be a case of baby makes three soon.} ({it is possible that even at this late stage, attempts could be made by White to open lines on the queenside via} 30. b5 {yet after} e5 31. Rad1 {and} e4 {I do not know that it is much improvement but perhaps it is some, as I must be cautious about ideas involving Rxe4 owing to the pin down the d-file against my queen at some point}) 30... Bxa4 {delicious!} 31. Rd4 { a natural reply to attack something whilst moving out of range} g5 {my pieces are more heavily secured in White's position after almost every move, and this move presents great new dilemmas, as now my queen is not tied to the defence of the Bf4.} 32. Kf1 {For many moves, my bishop has threatened to go to h2 with check, and White finally chooses to avoid it permanently by moving his king} Bc6 {this looks worse than what it is for White, but I completely understand that not only was his position difficult, but he was also horribly short of time, couldn't have had much more that 2 minutes and maybe less, so moves are very hard to come by when you have no time, and I think he almost went over the edge in a few of the subsequent moves.} (32... Bc2 { was better, but I didn't see it, I was still fixated on playing e5}) 33. f7 {one of the time trouble moves, played so that White could get his knight to e5} Rxf7 34. Ne5 Rf5 {seemingly the best square, forcing White to make a decision about the knight.} 35. Nxc6 Qxc6 {definitely not bad, but nowhere near as good as} ( 35... bxc6 {when another pawn now supports d5, and e5 is going to be ugly. Believe it or not, I rejected this because I was concerned about my king being exposed....not quite sure how that was going to happen now...}) 36. Qh5 { White threatens to develop activity with his queen, and maybe pinch a pawn if he can} Qd7 {trying to play as cautiously as possible to ensure that I didn't bugger it up....you do remember I had lost a few French games to White before, like all of them. As such some of my moves around here are rubbish, probably no more than I deserve for going passive} 37. Qg6 Be5 {a questionable move} 38. Rdd1 (38. Qxf5 {may have been a great chance to show some resistance} exf5 39. Rxe5 f4 40. Rexd5 Qh3+ 41. Kg1 Qxc3 42. Rc5+ Kb8 43. Rcxc4 {must still be better for me, but should not allow such things, especially when it was not necessary}) 38... Kc7 {here again I talked myself out of taking on c3, which
is the best move, and instead chose to play another insipid waiting move in
White's time trouble} 39. Re3 {preparing to double on the file and guarding c3} Bf6 {shielding my pawn still} 40. Qg8 {White showed great persistence in this position, trying his utmost to complicate the position} Kd6 {really substandard, there were more better moves to play than I can poke a stick at.} 41. Rde1 {a reprieve, a move such as} (41. Qf8+ {could have been most troublesome}) 41...e5 {Now Black's house seems to be in order again.... but} 42. Qb8+ { should have been answered by not the inane} Qc7 ({but instead} 42... Kc6 {which again believe it or not I rejected because it allowed White to give back an exchange on e5; how greedy am I? especially given that after what I played, White had a perpetual in all likelihood}) 43. Qf8+ { so now I have to get out of these checks} Qe7 44. Qc8 {threatening my Rook and Qc5+, oh joy ( grumble, grumble)} Qd7 {after 45.Qb8+, I would have moved to c6 this time, but after} 45. Qc5+ Ke6 {White unfortunately is almost out of a good checking pattern for perpetual} 46. Qf8 {after this there were probably lots of very reasonable moves, but I felt so much happier after playing} e4 {freeing my pieces from guarding the pawn while it had been on e5; funny how it is a pretty ordinary move?, but it seems that White thought it good too, and things don't seem to get much better for him from this last chance missed} 47. Qb8 Bd8 {with ideas of Qc7 forcing off the queens and of Bb6 attacking f2} 48. Qh2 {The queen escapes from exchange} Qf7 {the pressure on f2 begins to grow} 49. Qh3 {pinning the rook, but undefending f2} Kd6 {stepping out of the pin straight away} 50. R3e2 {bolstering the defences, but now that White is strictly defending, and not also seeking to counterattack, the game is basically over} Bb6 {a third attacker aims itself at f2} 51. Qg3+ { defending and checking my king, which moves further to safety} Kc6 52. Kg2 { a truly unfortunate move from which it is highly unlikely that there is to be a chance to recover. This move deprives White's queen of any other safe square to guard f2 from, and after} Rf3 {it has to leave off from guarding it} 53. Qxg5 (53. b5+ {is an amazing resources which saves White's rook as after I take} axb5 {we get a very similar variation to the game with the difference that he will have perpetual check} 54. Qxg5 Rxf2+ 55. Rxf2 Qxf2+ 56. Kh3 {as the game, but if I now take the rook} Qxe1 { then I cannot escape from the checks} ({it is fair enough to note that if I don't take the rook, and swap the queen's instead, the game is over anyway}
56... Qf3+) 57. Qf6+ Kc7 58. Qf4+) 53... Rxf2+ 54. Rxf2 Qxf2+ 55. Kh3 { and I suddenly became nervous....} Qxe1 56. Qg6+ {because I got this far in the variation, and was thinking now how to get out of all the checks....hmmm ....I know I'll play} Kc7 {and hide on a7, because my initial thought was} ({if I play} 56... Kb5 {there won't be any checks.....until it dawned on me that there would be a checkmate....D'oh!!} 57. Qe8#) 57. Qf7+ Kb8 58. Qxd5 Qxc3+ {there is nothing to say any more} 0-1


Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Igor_Goldenberg
02-09-2007, 08:45 PM
Very interesting game. I remember that after 21.g4 both players seemed to be happy with the position... until black's reply.
With the hindsight, I'd say 21.Qe2 seems good for white. Also g4 becomes a threat again.

Davidflude
03-09-2007, 06:36 PM
French player's beware. Sveshnikov's two volumes on the Advance French are coming soon in English. He makes the claim that any one who studies his two volumes will improve their results against the French by 200 ELO.

His results against the French are rather good. Hopefully this will offset the results of thoise players of the French who have studied Watson's exellent book in its various editions.

I still think that white players underrate the French at their peril.

Kevin Bonham
03-09-2007, 06:50 PM
His results against the French are rather good. Hopefully this will offset the results of thoise players of the French who have studied Watson's exellent book in its various editions.

...until such time as Watson refutes or routes around most of Sveshnikov's lines in his next edition? :eek:

Davidflude
03-09-2007, 11:02 PM
...until such time as Watson refutes or routes around most of Sveshnikov's lines in his next edition? :eek:

Yes that is one of the good things about Watson's opening books. If a line has problems he sets out to find a solution, he does not fudge. However Svev apparently is very strong on ideas and examples and things like that. I suspect that his book might be of use to French players for gaining greater insight into how the defence works.

He did this very well in his book on the Benoni.

I always go to Jeremy Silman's web site and read Watson's reviews before buying any chess books.

DeepNf3
28-09-2007, 11:03 AM
Hi! guys, I am a master level chess player rated above 2150 FIDE some years ago, I was searching the internet for some commented chess games and somehow I got to this thread, I love the way you have been commenting games and sharing opionions on the game and so on, a couple of chess players and myselve are putting a club together at chess.com site the club is called "the chess hustler" we have chess related forums, foto albums of famous chess players etc, it is a free chess playing website, and we even have the feature which let's you post games with comments just like you do in this site, I would like to invite you to join chess.com and particularly our "the chess hustler club" inside chess.com, I would love to have you in our club doing exactely what you do here comenting games etc, would be very nice for other club members to be able to play through your commented games, I will give you the URL for the club so that once you register to chess.com you will be able to find us in the site

http://www.chess.com/groups/view/the-chess-hustler

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2007, 01:49 PM
Hi! guys, I am a master level chess player rated above 2150 FIDE some years ago,

Actually a master level player will typically peak at >2300 at some stage of their career (since 2300 gets you an FM title by rating). If you want to impress people with your supposed playing strength it would be best if you told us your name, or at least posted some original analysis of your own here or on your site.

Bereaved
10-10-2007, 12:51 AM
Hello everyone,

A nice greedy game which is punished

Event: Correspondance
Site: ?
Date: 1968.??.??
Round: ?
White: Schlosser
Black: Katchev
Result: 1-0
ECO: B27
Annotator: Pyke,M
PlyCount: 37
EventDate: 2002.03.12

1. e4 {White develops his pawn to allow his Queen on d1 and Bishop on f1 to enter the game.} c5 {Black allows his Queen to develop and starts to attack a central square.} 2.Nf3 {white brings out his knight to help him to push his other centre pawn} b6 {Although this allows black to bring out his bishop on the long diagonal from h1 to a8, he should probably prefer to bring out his Nb8 to the c6 square. This would help to challenge the centre.} 3. d4 {White immediately clears the way for his second bishop to develop from its starting square and also threatens to advance his pawn further to d5 if he is not stopped. Black takes the d-pawn to stop this happening.} cxd4 4. Nxd4 {White takes with the knight because his queen would be in danger out in the open so early in the game.} Bb7 {Black has prepared this square for his bishop so he may as well use it. At the same time he attacks white's e4-pawn.} 5. Nc3 {White defends his pawn at the same time as developing a piece. Black should be thinking about getting out his pieces from the back line. Instead he plays} a6 {which does stop white coming to b5 but that is a big price to pay for a whole move in the opening of a game.} ({Instead of this, a move like} 5... e6 {allows Black to get his pieces into the game and begin to attack the white pieces and pawns.}) {After the move black played, white moves out his bishop with} 6. Bc4 { an interesting move because it is meant to tempt Black to go after white's e-pawn. However if black is to win this pawn, he will be very far behind in getting his pieces out. Always remember, it is better to have the same number of pieces and have more of yours in the game already than to be 2 or 3 pawns up but about to lose your queen or be checkmated because all your pieces haven't moved yet! Just watch how White teases black to waste time...} b5 { with this move, Black makes it possible to win the White e-pawn. All the same, Black would be better off trying to catch up and get the rest of his pieces off the back line so that he is better placed to challenge white in the centre. He should still play 7...e6} 7. Bb3 {The bishop stays on the a2-g8 diagonal from where it attacks the pawn on f7, which is the weakest point in Black's position at the start of the game. Black now chooses to continue trying to win a pawn. Black should have realised that the pawn may be the soul of chess, but that without the king the game is over.} b4 {Black attacks the knight which is the only defender of the e4-pawn. Once the knight moves away ( it will not let a pawn take it! ), black can take the pawn he has been after so badly that he has moved only one piece from the back line and has instead made 6(!) pawn moves. We will see whether Black survives to enjoy it!} ({It was still not too late for black to try and catch up getting his pieces out with} 7... e6 {when the threat of bringing out more pieces and only then pinching the e4-pawn might persuade white to take the time to defend it.}) 8.Na4 {the White knight escapes from the Black pawn on b4 to a square where it does not block the other White pieces.} Bxe4 {Black has no other choice than to take the e4-pawn now that he has gone to so much trouble to drive away its defenders.} 9. Nc5 {White suggests to Black that seeing he enjoyed taking the e4-pawn pawn so much, perhaps he would like another! Although Black can take the g2-pawn safely, he must be immediately willing to give back some material if he is to survive the White attack.} Bxg2 {Again, Black takes an undefended pawn. This time, White gains an open line for his rook to come into the game and prepare to execute the black king stuck in the centre.} 10. Rg1 {The rook attacks the bishop and threatens to blow it off the board. Black should have realized that he was in some trouble here and attempted to start a counter attack. His greedy response was always going to lose.} Bc6 {Black must have thought that he had managed to get away with pinching the 2 pawns virtually scot free. Black must have thought that even though he was behind on getting his pieces out, he would manage to catch up soon....Black was sooo wrong!!!} ({There was no longer any choice but to play} 10... e6 {when due to the attack on the White knight on c5, Black should hold the balance. Although White can take the bishop on g2 with} 11. Rxg2 {after} Bxc5 {Black gets the piece back straight away and brings a piece off the back line. White is still in the lead in getting his pieces out and by playing} 12. Qf3 {Attacking the rook on a8 and pawn on f7 with his queen, at the same time as attacking the pawn on g7 with his rook, White forces Black to take the knight on d4} Bxd4 ({If he tries to save his rook disaster awaits eg} 12... Ra7 13. Rxg7 Nf6 14. Be3 Bf8 15. Rg3 Rc7 16. O-O-O {after this Black may be a pawn up but his king will never get a chance to castle, while the White king is very safe and all the White pieces will be doing their best to drive the Black king out into the open when he will surely perish.}) 13. Qxa8) 11. Bxf7+ {The White bishop lays down its life to drive the black king out from where he hides and stop him from castling forever! Black has no choice but to capture with} Kxf7 {hoping against hope that he might still escape. It is too late because the vicious attack continues with} 12. Rxg7+ {taking away the last pawn that Black could hope to use as a shield to hide behind. Remember that the only reason White is able to be so attacking is because even after sacrificing 2 pieces, he still has an extra piece in the attack, and the white queen is itching to join in on the fun!!} Kxg7 {Black can no longer stop checkmate, only delay it. By playing this Black gives White the opportunity to go wrong.} ({If instead} 12... Bxg7 {The end for Black comes swiftly after either} 13. Qh5+ Kf6 ({or} 13... Kf8 14.Nce6+ dxe6 15. Nxe6#) 14. Qf5#) (12... Ke8 {If the Black king retreats in the hope of hiding, the game ends immediately}13. Qh5#) ({finally if the Black king comes forward boldly, then after} 12...Kf6 13. Qg4 h6 (13... Ke5 14. Rg5+ Kd6 15. Qg3+ e5 16. Qxe5#) 14. Qf5+ Kxg7 15.Nde6+ dxe6 16. Nxe6# {he is soon checkmated}) 13. Qg4+ {Notice how when the White queen checks the many Black pieces around the Black king are helpless to come to his aid.} Kf7 14. Qh5+ {The White pieces give the Black king not a moments peace. White makes sure that on each move he stops Black bringing any pieces into the game to protect him.} Kg7 ({Bringing the king into the open does not help after} 14... Kf6 15. Qf5+ Kg7 16.Nde6+ dxe6 17. Nxe6#) 15. Nf5+ (15. Nce6+ {Although this wins the Black queen and is still winning the game, it is much slower, even though it might be more fun!!} dxe6 16. Nxe6+ Kf6 17. Nxd8 Bh6 18. Qf7+ Ke5 19. Qe6+ Kd4 20. Bxh6 Nxh6 21. Qe3+ Kc4 22. Ne6 Kb5 (22... Kd5 23. Rd1+ Kc4 24. Qc5#) (22... Bb5 23. Qc5# (23. Qd4#)) (22... Nd7 23. Qd3#) 23. a4+ Ka5 (23... bxa3 24. Qc5+ Ka4 25. b3#) 24. Qc5+ (24. Qe5+ Bb5 (24... Kb6 25. Qc7#) 25. Qc7#) 24... Bb5 25. axb5# (25. Qc7# {All the same Black gets mated in the end})) 15... Kf6 16. Bg5+ { So long as the Black king is prevented from hiding, he will perish in the open. White really only needs his queen and either a bishop or a knight to win when the king is so dangerously placed.} Ke5 {the Black king hopes that the white pieces will get in each others way in their attempt to catch him.} ({Taking the knight with} 16... Kxf5 {actually ends the game one move quicker after} 17. Bh4+ Kf4 18. Bg3#) 17. Bf4+ {The Black king is not given a moments rest. You might like to go through all the different wins to see the many different patterns that the white pieces make as they surround the king.} Kxf4 { It no longer makes a difference} (17... Kd5 18. Ne3+ (18. Nd6+ Kd4 19. Be3#) ( 18. Nd6+ e5 19. Qxe5#) 18... Kd4 19. O-O-O# (19. Qe5#) (19. Rd1#)) (17... Kf6
18. Nh6 Bxh6 (18... Nxh6 19. Be5#) (18... Bg7 19. Ng4# (19. Be5#) (19. Qf5#) (19. Qf7#) (19. Qg5#)) (18... Kg7 19. Qf7# (19. Qg5#)) (18... e5 19. Qf7# (19.Qg5#)) (18... Qc7 19. Qf7# (19. Qg5#)) 19. Be5# {All checkmate!}) 18. Nd4 {White now threatens to checkmate Black in three different ways. As Black can only stop two of them, the game is over.} (18. Ng3 {The pathways to victory are many} Be4 (18... Bg7 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2#) (19. Nd3#) ) (18... Nf6 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2#) (19. Nd3#)) (18... e5 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2#) (19. Nd3#)) (18... Bh6 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2#) (19. Nd3#)) (18... Qc7 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2# ) (19. Nd3#)) (18... Qa5 19. Qf5# (19. Ne2#) (19. Nd3# {Again all Checkmate!})) 19. Ne2#) 18... Bb5 19. Qf5# {At last the Black king perishes, and we can see that aside from the White rook on a1, White has brought every piece into the game. Yet in the same number of moves, Black has made many pawn moves, developed one bishop and had his king chased all over the board!! In fact 6(!!!) of the Black pieces have played no part in the game and may as well have never been put on the board. Remember this lesson well; unless you get your pieces into the game, they may as well be still in the box! Notice how once White started to attack the Black king, he gave him no moment to rest and just kept driving him further and further away from any piece that could help him. Once the Black king was stranded beyond rescue, White put him to death.}1-0


A whole lot of checkmates, just because they were there to be shown

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

MichaelBaron
10-10-2007, 01:09 AM
I particularly enjoyed annotations to move 1.:lol: Now i understand why e4 is stronger than d4 :)

Bereaved
10-10-2007, 01:10 AM
Very funny Michael, lol it was for my students,

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

PS what about an annotated game from you?

Bereaved
08-12-2007, 03:35 PM
Hello everyone,

Here is another game as there are no new posts except in non chess

Event: Triberg
Site: ?
Date: 1934.??.??
Round: ?
White: Boguljubow, Efim
Black: Muller, G.
Result: 1-0
ECO: C68
Annotator: Pyke,M
PlyCount: 37

1. e4 e5 {Both White and Black move out their centre pawn to get their pieces off the back line.} 2. Nf3 {White brings out his knight to attack the black pawn} Nc6 {Black brings out his knight to defend his pawn on e5} 3.Bb5 {White brings out his bishop to attack the black knight} a6 {Black forces white to make a decision about his bishop on b5} 4. Bxc6 {White chooses to swap his bishop and doubles the black pawns on the c-file}dxc6 {Black takes back with his d-pawn so he can develop his bishop and so he doesn't lose a pawn} 5. Nc3 {White develops his queen's knight} ({because if he plays} 5. Nxe5 {black can play the move} Qd4 {with a double attack winning back his pawn}) 5... Bc5 {Black defends his pawn with a tactic; if white hadn't played} 6. d3 {but instead played} (6. Nxe5 {then after} Bxf2+ 7. Kxf2 Qd4+ 8. Ke1 Qxe5 {black wins back his pawn and stops white castling}) 6... Qe7 {
Black develops his queen and defends his e-pawn.} 7. Be3 {White tries to persuade black to swap bishops} Nf6 {Black prefers to develop his pieces and let white swap bishops if he wants to}8. Bxc5 {which he does} Qxc5 9. Qd2 {White keeps open the option of castling either side. After he castles, white will be fully developed} Bg4 {Black attacks white's knight, hoping to double the white pawns. White responds by playing} 10. d4 {when if black swaps pawns, white can recapture with his knight on f3} Qb4 {Black sacrifices a pawn so he can castle queenside and gain time in the race to get his forces into the game} 11. Nxe5 {white takes this way because after} (11. dxe5 Nxe4 {wins back black's pawn and gives him a very good game}) 11... O-O-O 12. O-O {Rather than try and hold on to his extra pawn, white castles and prepares to attack the black king on the otherside} Rxd4 {Black takes back his pawn and attacks the white queen} 13. Qe3 {White moves his queen so it still attacks the black rook and also allows him to think of taking either the bishop on g4 or the pawn on f7} Be6 {Black retreats his bishop and defends his f7 pawn in one move but white reacts violently with} 14. Nd5 {attacking black's queen and creating many threats. If black had not played} Qc5 {but instead taken the knight with#} (14... cxd5 {then white can play} 15. c3 {
when the black rook is lost}) ({Also after black takes the knight with his knight with} 14... Nxd5 {then after} 15. exd5 Rxd5 16. Qa7 Rxe5 17. Qa8+ Kd7 18. Qxh8 {White again wins a rook for a bishop}) 15. Qxd4 { A brilliant move! black has nothing better than to take it with} Qxd4 {when the white knights perform magic!! Just watch!} 16. Ne7+ Kb8 17. N7xc6+ { The knight sacrifices itself with a purpose} bxc6 18. Nxc6+ {this is the point! this fork of the Black king and queen is deadly} Kb7 19.Nxd4 {White has won back the queen and has both an extra exchange and two extra pawns. Rather than play on with no hope of winning, black chooses this moment to pack up his toys and go home; he resigns} 1-0

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

DeepNf3
20-12-2007, 01:18 AM
Actually a master level player will typically peak at >2300 at some stage of their career (since 2300 gets you an FM title by rating). If you want to impress people with your supposed playing strength it would be best if you told us your name, or at least posted some original analysis of your own here or on your site.


what about if I told you that I could walk on water and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend but I am giving you a signed paper stating tha you could use the pool in my house whenever you feel like it anyways?


or


what about if I told you that I am just the homeless guy on the corner and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend since I was only telling you about that car that was about to run you over?


or



what about if I told you that for as much as you know about me I could be Kasparov trying not to tell you that it is me trying to improve your chess for free?


or


what about if I told you that I was just letting you know about a nice online chess club and I didn't really tell you anything specific about my chess live?



Note: I am not trying to impress anybody guy, my mom didn't name me DeepNf3 when I was born neither she gave me 2150+ FIDE or even much higher as my last name!

Basil
20-12-2007, 11:23 AM
what about if I told you ...
or

what about if I told you ...
or

what about if I told you ...
or

what about if I told you ...

What if I told you that you were a rank amateur dribbler? Please don't leave. There's too much more fun to be had before you get burped outta here. Are you related to Andy Toh?

Kevin Bonham
20-12-2007, 06:45 PM
what about if I told you that I could walk on water and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend but I am giving you a signed paper stating tha you could use the pool in my house whenever you feel like it anyways?

or

what about if I told you that I am just the homeless guy on the corner and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend since I was only telling you about that car that was about to run you over?

or

what about if I told you that for as much as you know about me I could be Kasparov trying not to tell you that it is me trying to improve your chess for free?

or

what about if I told you that I was just letting you know about a nice online chess club and I didn't really tell you anything specific about my chess live?


In the third case I wouldn't believe you, in the fourth case I wouldn't agree, and in the first two cases I wouldn't care.

lochness88
22-12-2007, 09:26 AM
I can back up DeepNF3 as i am part of his chess hustler group and he is a really strong player and a nice guy. Don't mean to ruffle anyones feathers.

Bereaved
25-12-2007, 11:23 PM
A game for the season

Event:
Site: ?
Date: 2002.10.31
Round: 3.1
White: another
Black: macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: A45
WhiteElo: 1635
BlackElo: 1876
Annotator:
PlyCount: 62

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 $5 {Interesting for the sake of not even thinking that this is what my opponent would play} e6 {normally I would play} (2... Ne4 3. Bf4 {and then} c5 {with good play. But rather than going down a main line, I sought to test whether my opponent was aiming for pressure against Nf6 or an exchange.}) 3. e3 {my opponent declines to set up a big centre with} (3. e4 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 {when black needs 3-4 tempi to consolidate.}) 3... c5 {
attacking the centre} 4. Bd3 {routine and stereotypical development is to be
avoided at all costs, and this move does nothing great for white's position
and in fact costs a pawn} Qb6 {Tarrasch said that one should aim for a good
position rather than winning material in the opening. However to not play this
justifies white's errors.} 5. Bxf6 {White chooses to seek compensation in
deforming the black kingside pawns. However the black king need not hurry to
castle as white would need to expose their own position to open lines, and
possibly invest a piece.} gxf6 6. dxc5 {white has already conceded a lot of
central control and this further reduces his influence in this area of the
board.} ({Perhaps it may have been worth playing instead} 6. Qc1 {when after}cxd4 7. exd4 Qxd4 {white has the option of} 8. Ne2 {and in general a greater likelihood of finding a sensible set up, and also has two open files for the rooks to occupy.}) {In addition, after} 6... Qxb2 {not only does black come away an extra pawn, but he also makes the kingside the only sensible option for white to castle. Obviously in such a scenario a general kingside pawn advance by white might only succeed in placing his own king in jeopardy while black may either sit tight in the centre, or bailout to the queenside or even still castle kingside.} 7. Nd2 {the only sensible option} Bxc5 {the bishop
develops with tempi, and black is now only one tempo down on development ( Bc8 ) but may lose more time relocating his Bc5 and queen to more suitable squares.} 8. Ngf3 {white directs all their energies, quite wisely, to getting castled as unless they can make a claim for better development and maybe harrass black and hinder his development, they will have no compensation for the pawn} f5 {played with the curiously apt, tit for tat idea of Qg7 and Rg8 and utilising the file that white has so kindly opened for him.} 9. O-O {white blithely castles into black's threatened attack but what else was he to do? If we constantly seek to do nothing for ourselves we may be playing very prophylacticly, but may do so at the risk of not doing anything at all!! White's decision is arguably correct} Nc6 $6 {not actually dubious but inaccurate and inopportune. Having made preparations for activity against the white king on the kingside, there was nothing to hinder black beginning with say} (9... Qg7 {and then Rg8 in short order afterwards almost insuring that white will play g3 at some point when the isolated black h-pawn will play a useful role as a lever against the white kingside, threatening to open the h-file with potentially devastating effect.}) 10. Nb3 {cutting the black queen off along the b-file, hitting the Bc5, and seeking to prevent the aforementioned manoevre to the g file. A quite useful move.} Be7 $6 { they say mistakes usually come in pairs. Better for black was the move} (10... Bb6 {maintaining black's influence over d4 and preventing the following manoevre. The move was played with the thought of securing the h pawns advance to h4, by guarding h4. It did not take into account white's next move, which is both natural and strong.}) 11. Nfd4 {This multi purpose move requires accurate defence from black as the threat of Nb5, Qd2 and Rfb1 and various other kinds of exploiting black's unmoved king and backward development mean that perhaps inaccurate play may lead to white either gaining an attack or forcing black onto the back foot. But as the somewhat pithy comment goes, an extra pawn is worth a bit of trouble.} Nxd4 {seldom do I play so many unforced and inaccurate moves in a row. Black should consider} (11... Bf6) ({and} 11... a6 {though both balance on a knife edge}) 12. Nxd4 {one mistake deserves another! White persists with ideas of winning the exchange via Nb5-c7+.Although this prevents the Qg7 idea, far more accurate was} (12. exd4 {when the opening of the e file for the white rooks against the black king and many and varied new attempts to forcibly detain or remove! the black queen owing to the establishment of the pawn on d4 while maintaining the Nb3 blocking the b file would have given white excellent compensation and real hope of actually gaining an advantage.} Qc3 {seems best to ensure my queen gets away}) 12... a6 {produced after considerable thought. I had initially considered a general withdrawal. Moves such as} (12... Qb6 {and}) (12... Bf6 {had been my initial plan. However both of these moves allow ideas involving Rb1 to be with tempo and neither prevents Nb5. The thought of being further kicked around didn't feel super fun- but what choice did I have?}) 13. Qf3 {The white queen seeks concretely to hinder the black queenside developing any time soon, as well as connecting the rooks and bringing another piece in range of a potential piece sacrifice on f5 to open lines.} Qc3 {with the white queen bearing down on the b7 pawn and the Ra8 behind it, black feels it appropriate to redeploy the queen to prevent any sort of sacrifice on b7 however unsound particularly in view of white's threat to play Rab1 with tempo.} 14. Rab1 {threatening an almost certainly unsound exchange sacrifice on b7. Even so, White will gain the a and b pawns making his a pawn passed and black's king would have to castle kingside if at all. This seems unnecessary to enter into hence black played} Qc7 {where it is also well placed to provide lateral support to e7 and f7 should white seek to open lines forcibly. I also considered} (14... d5 {but felt that it would be unwise as it might encourage white to sacrifice on f5}) 15. Qg3 $2 {Even though this move surrenders no material, to offer a queen exchange when one's opponent's king is uneasy and vulnerable, not to mention already being a pawn down and facing two bishops, seems an extraordinarily bad piece of judgement, The chances that white can now engineer any kind of attack of a perilous nature to the black king is highly unlikely, and the fact that the black king is in the centre may prove an asset. In addition the nimble knight may prove an empty threat without the queen to combine with it. Even the restraint of the black queenside and its development is almost completely removed.} Qxg3 {
made in a second, as it cannot hurt me in any way, as the above note highlights} 16. hxg3 {positionally best, though perhaps the illogical} (16. fxg3 {was required should white aim to exert even the vaguest form of pressure on
the black f5 and f7 pawns and the king behind them. After 16. hxg3, black has
many plans and the g3 pawn may act as a hook for black to dissolve his
isolated h pawn, and potentially, even in this queenless position, attack down
the h-file. However instead after}) 16... Bf6 {black plays in a prophylactic
fashion to restrain white from opening the position with e3-e4 without
retreating his knight or playing c2-c3 which may in turn come under fire when
black gets a rook to c8.} 17. f4 {a move made in great haste and little
forethought, Having already been restrained from an immediate e3-e4, white
renders it extremely unlikely that the move will ever be achieved. With great
joy, black plays the space gaining} d5 {when the white kingside pawns are
immobilised and in fact, white's whole position begins to go critical.} 18. c4
{had white not played this now or prefaced by} (18. a4) {it is possible that
black may have rendered the c and a- pawns permanently backwards by b7-b5} 18... dxc4 {and now the position begins to open up for the black bishops} 19. Bxc4 {needs no comment} b5 {with absolutely no fear of any sacrifice on b5, and seeking to determine where white will retreat the bishop before committing to anything concrete such as isolating the d-pawn followed by Bd5 and an advance of the queenside pawns in slow motion.} 20. Be2 {played in the belief that it was impossible for Black to prevent 21.Bf3 because black's next move was considered unplayable} Bb7 {if you want to make a certain move and your opponent is certain you can't, you don't have to believe them! Here all that was required was to see was that the pin could be broken with tempo} 21. a4 {were this to be sound, Black could have played Bd7 last move to prevent it. Although the b-pawn can't move....the bishop is more mobile} Be4 {hitting the Rb1 and unpinning the b pawn} 22. Rb4 {this move makes things worse. perhaps white was better off playing} (22. Ra1 {as then my planned response} b4 {at least keeps more material on the board. Best of all was}) (22. Bf3 {a clever counter pin; still much better for black, but better for white to try something than go down without a fight}) {after 22.Rb4, white must simplify to keep being only one pawn down.} 22... Be7 {How agile the black bishops seem compared to the white minor pieces. This kick on the Rb4 temporarily wins a second pawn.} 23. Rb2 {there was nowhere better to go} bxa4 {setting white great dilemmas. The passed pawn on a4 seems very difficult to restrain.} 24. Rb6 {winning the a6 pawn but also swapping rooks, reducing his defensive chances} a3{white will have a lot more trouble with this pawn as he only has a light square bishop and the a3 pawn only has to pass one more light square} 25. Rxa6 ({Not} 25. Bxa6 {as after} Bc5 26. Bb5+ Kf8 27. Ra6 Rxa6 28. Bxa6 {I am a couple of tempi up on the game and my king is still centralised}) 25...O-O {very delayed castling, but with good effect. New reinforcements come to hand in the form of the Rh8} 26. Ra1 {not the ideal blockader, but there were not many choices for white} Rxa6 {clearing the board of excess material} 27. Bxa6 Ra8 {perhaps trying to infiltrate via the b-file was more worthwhile, as this only serves to ensure that white moves the Ba6 to a less exposed square. Still there is nothing wrong with this move and the rook adds a lot of force to the a-pawn going forward.} 28. Bc4 {keeping an eye on a2, and hoping!} Bf6 {
white is bound hand and foot} 29. Be2 {as good or as bad as anything else} Ra4 {the idea behind this move is what transpires in the game. Alternatively} (29... a2 {also wins but was a bit hurried in some ways}) 30. Kf2 $2 {it is hard to give white good advice but} (30. Kf1 a2 31. Bd1 Ra3 32. Kf2 Bb1
33. Ke2 Kg7 34. Kd2 Rd3+ 35. Ke2 Rxd4 36. exd4 Bxd4 37. Rxa2 Bxa2) (30. Kf1 {had to be tried. Then after} a2 31. Bd1 Ra3 32. Kf2 Bb1 {white is in zugzwang eg} 33. Ke2 Kg7 {and white is without a good move} 34. Kf3 (34. Kf2 Rd3) (34. Kd2 Rd3+ 35. Kc1 (35. Ke2 Rxd4) 35... Rxe3) 34... Bxd4) 30... Rxd4 {simplifying and winning a piece} 31. Rxa3 Rd2 { winning another pawn, the game is over} (31... Rd2 32. Kf1 Bxg2+ 33. Kxg2 Rxe2+) 0-1

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

MichaelBaron
26-12-2007, 01:22 AM
what about if I told you that I could walk on water and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend but I am giving you a signed paper stating tha you could use the pool in my house whenever you feel like it anyways?


or


what about if I told you that I am just the homeless guy on the corner and that I don't mind if you don't want to be my friend since I was only telling you about that car that was about to run you over?


or



what about if I told you that for as much as you know about me I could be Kasparov trying not to tell you that it is me trying to improve your chess for free?


or


what about if I told you that I was just letting you know about a nice online chess club and I didn't really tell you anything specific about my chess live?



Note: I am not trying to impress anybody guy, my mom didn't name me DeepNf3 when I was born neither she gave me 2150+ FIDE or even much higher as my last name!

ROFL :D

Kevin Bonham
26-12-2007, 07:13 PM
I can back up DeepNF3 as i am part of his chess hustler group and he is a really strong player and a nice guy. Don't mean to ruffle anyones feathers.

Sure, this may all be the case but he shouldn't present himself as master-level unless he is, and if he is, he should provide proof. The internet is awash with people claiming to be masters and stronger who are not ... and we have a few real masters here, and stronger ...

Basil
26-12-2007, 07:20 PM
I can back up DeepNF3 as i am part of his chess hustler group and he is a really strong player and a nice guy. Don't mean to ruffle anyones feathers.
Sure. But generally Strines and Gunners don't like a whole heap of dribbling. Your mate started a with a veritable swimming pool. For next time:

- don't mix own sales message with a throw away 'hey I've been watching you - you're gorgeous'. Lame.
- next forget the what-if mysterioso act

both smack of high-school dribblo. As Kevin said, we have sufficient of the real thing here without dribble and mystery. So perhaps say, "Hey, I'm Fred and this is my chess site."

Capablanca-Fan
26-12-2007, 11:42 PM
I can back up DeepNF3 as i am part of his chess hustler group and he is a really strong player and a nice guy.
His niceness was not in question. But "really strong" is somewhat meaningless, because we must ask, "compared to whom?" There needs to be someone there of known rating so there is a calibration point.

Capablanca-Fan
27-12-2007, 12:01 AM
However Svev apparently is very strong on ideas and examples and things like that. I suspect that his book might be of use to French players for gaining greater insight into how the defence works.
Sveshnikov is an interesting character. I saw this first hand when I attended a chess seminar in the Soviet Union in 1988 as the only ever Kiwi representative where he was one of the lecturers. He explained how his rigid but deep opening repertoire came from certain principles. White should aim for 1. centre 2. development 3. safety but Black should aim for 1. centre 2. safety 3. development. So 1.d4 d5 was safer for Black than 1. e4 e5 because his P was protected, so less effective for White.

In line with 1. centre, he advocated 4-pawns attack v Alekhine and Panov attack v CaroľKan. Against the Sicilian, White should fight for d4 and e5 since he already has e4 and d5. So 2. Nc3 is passive, and not as good as c3 (his pet) or f4. 2. Nf3 and 3. d4 also fights for the dark central squares but gives up a centre P.

Strangely enough, he mentioned only 3. Nc3 v the French, and claimed it was better than 3. Nd2 because it fights for control of the centre, and the latter should be met by the central blow 3... c5. He made an unfortunate argument from authority when he said that his point was supported by Karpov's switch to 3. Nc3, but then Karpov also switched from 1.e4 to 1. d4.

He thought a perfectly played game should end in a draw but with White having something like K+P or K+N v K or some other such "advantage".

I managed to beat him while taking a board in a simul against about 10.

Adamski
01-01-2008, 11:46 AM
He will always be remembered for his Sicilian line. Watch out folks! I still play it from time to time!! Interesting comments on him Jono - I recall your Russian trip.
Happy new year all. Time I signed off for today...