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Kevin Bonham
12-09-2005, 06:06 PM
THREE IN A ROW FOR NIGEL FRAME

Reigning state champion Nigel Frame's excellent year continued when he won
the 2005 Hobart Weekender, his third Tasmanian weekender victory in a row. Frame
defeated two other outright contenders, Glen Gibbs and Peter Billam, in
rounds 4 and 5 to move to a one-point lead with two rounds to go. A round 6 loss to Kevin Bonham after misplacing his queen then left Frame tied with Bonham and surprise co-leader Russell Horton, but Frame easily beat Horton in the final round,
while Bonham settled for second when Billam (with a +/- position in a heavy piece ending but behind on the clock) offered him a draw.

There was a major upset (see below) in the first round when Graham Richards beat Kevin
Bonham, who walked into a queen sacrifice for mate next move. Another upset was Russell Horton's win
over Glen Gibbs in round 6. Russell (who won
the U1700 prize) also nearly beat Peter Billam, reaching the endgame a pawn
up but then getting outplayed by Billam's superior technique.

Those juniors playing (most Hobart juniors were competing in the Hobart
Junior Championships on the same weekend) frequently threatened to cause
upsets, but seldom converted. Apart from Alastair Dyer's two wins over
1500+ players (winning him the U1500 ratings prize), the only damage to the
adult ratings pool was Zachary Frame's draw against Milutin Ivkovic. After
a very poor Tasmanian Championship, Frame jnr played much better this
weekend and was rewarded with the U18 prize, while Vincent Horton (who was
incredibly unlucky not to beat John O'Mara when exchange up in the ending
with O'Mara's flag hanging) won the U12.

The G60 time limit again caused many dramatic time scrambles. Several players either entered pure pawn endings they should have avoided, or else misplayed those they had reached. Remarkably only three of the 77 games played were drawn.

6/7 Nigel Frame 1851
5.5 Kevin Bonham 1942
5 Peter Billam 1934, Russell Horton 1354, Ross George 1704
4 Glen Gibbs 1777, Michael Saunders UNR, Alastair Dyer 1313(J), John O'Mara
1532, Winand Frantzen 1263
3.5 Milutin Ivkovic 1545, Michael Schmidt 1550, Zachary Frame 735(J)
3 Graham Richards 1412, Janice Martin 1503 (F), Vincent Horton 734(J), Carey
Kuzmic 1532, Leo Minol 1202
2 Dylan Kuzmic UNR, Jackson Jolly 610(J)
1 Erin Frame 790 (FJ)
0 Nina Horton UNR (FJ)

Bonham - Richards 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Nd5 Ba5 5.Bc4 Nf6 6.00 00 7.d3 Nxd5 8.exd5 Ne7?! 9.Nxe5 d6 10.Nf3 h6 11.Qe2 Bd7 12.c3 b5 13.Bb3 Re8 14.Qc2 Bb6 15.c4 a6 16.Bf4?! Bg4 17.Nd2 Nf5 18.Qb1? Nd4 19.Bg3 Ne2+ 20.Kh1 Nxg3+ 21.fxg3 Re5 22.Bd1 Qg5 23.Ne4 Qh5 24.Bxg4 Qxg4 25.Rf4 Qg6 26.Qc2 Rae8 27.Raf1 Qh5 28.b3 Be3 {and now 29.g4! would have given White a very good position but the spectators were far more entertained by} 29.R4f3?? Qxh2+!! 01

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2005, 02:23 PM
One of many pawn ending disasters from the weekend.

George - Gibbs. Both players were in time trouble but Black's was significantly worse.

1.Kc4?? (Kd2 or Ke3 draw, everything else loses) 1...Kxf5 2.Kc5 Kf4 3.Kb6 Kxf3 4.Kxa6 g4! (I wonder if White did not realise that after taking the f-pawn Black would play this, which is faster than going after the h-pawn) 5.hxg4 (5.b5 gxh3 6.b6 h2 7.b7 h1=Q 8.b8=Q Qa1+ exchanging queens with Qb1+ next and winning.) 5...h3 6.b5 h2 7.b6 h1=Q 8.b7 and Black won by the standard method for winning with Q vs NP on the 7th.

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2005, 02:28 PM
Bonham - Nigel Frame

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Bd7 4.Bxd7+ Qxd7 5.0-0 Nf6 6.Re1 Nc6 7.d4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 g6 9.c3 Bg7 10.Bg5 0-0 11.Nd2 Nxd4 12.cxd4 Rac8 13.Nf3 Qb5 14.b3 e6 15.Rc1 d5 (I wasn't happy about my position as it seemed like I would be forced to make some kind of concession - IQP, B for N, strong Black N on e4, etc. After wasting several minutes tossing up these unappealling options I decided to just kick Black's queen to see if it went anywhere that made my decision easier.) 16.a4 Qd7 (...Rxc1 forcing 17.Bxc1 and then Black has ...Ne4 looks best here) 17.Ne5 Qe8? (losing a pawn) 18.Bxf6 Bxf6 19.exd5 Bxe5 20.Rxe5 Qd7 21.dxe6 Rxc1 22.Qxc1 fxe6 23.Qe3! Rf6 24.h3 Kf7 25.Rc5 b6 26.Rc4 Rf5? 27.Qc3 (27.g4 would have been even stronger) 27...Kf6?? 28.d5+ e5 29.Rc6+ Kg5 30.Qe3+ Rf4 31.g3 Qxd5 32.gxf4+ exf4 33.Qe7+ Kh6 34.Qh4+ Kg7 35.Rc7+ Kg8 36.Qxh7+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2005, 02:34 PM
First round skittles: George - Kuzmic, D.

1.e4 e5 2.Bc4 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.exd5 Nxd5 5.Nxe5 Qe7 6.0-0 Be6 7.Re1 c6 8.Bxd5 cxd5 9.d4 h6 10.Nc3 Qd6 11.Bf4 Qd8 12.Qh5 g6 13.Nxg6 Rg8 14.Rxe6+ fxe6 15.Ne5+ Ke7 16.Qf7+ Kd6 17.Nb5# 1-0

Ian_Rogers
13-09-2005, 09:42 PM
In George v Gibbs, I am sure that 1.f6 Kxf6 2.Ke4 doesn't lose - and at a quick look it seems it might be winning for White by a tempo.
Ian

Rhubarb
13-09-2005, 09:55 PM
In George v Gibbs, I am sure that 1.f6 Kxf6 2.Ke4 doesn't lose - and at a quick look it seems it might be winning for White by a tempo.
Ian
You sure you counted right, Ian? 1.f6 doesn't lose but it doesn't win either.

edit: I guess your first point stands, though. 1.f6 is White's best.

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 10:22 PM
You sure you counted right, Ian? 1.f6 doesn't lose but it doesn't win either.

edit: I guess your first point stands, though. 1.f6 is White's best.
Are you sure.

Maybe I am missing something but after 1.f6 Kxf6 2. Ke4 Ke6 3. Kd4 doesnt Kf5 just win in all variations.
e.g. 4. Ke3 Ke5 5. Ke2 Kd4 or 5. Kd3 Kf4 6. Ke2 Kg3 7. Ke3 Kxh3 8. Kf2 g4

3. Kd3 isnt any better .. 3. Kd3 Kd5 (Not Kf5) 4. Ke3 Ke5 as above

arosar
13-09-2005, 10:29 PM
Are you sure.

Maybe I am missing something but after 1.f6 Kxf6 2. Ke4 Ke6 3. Kd4 doesnt Kf5 just win in all variations.
e.g. 4. Ke3 Ke5 5. Ke2 Kd4 or 5. Kd3 Kf4 6. Ke2 Kg3 7. Ke3 Kxh3 8. Kf2 g4

3. Kd3 isnt any better .. 3. Kd3 Kd5 (Not Kf5) 4. Ke3 Ke5 as above

Instead of 3. Kd4 (or 3.Kd3), why not 3. f4?

AR

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 10:34 PM
Instead of 3. Kd4 (or 3.Kd3), why not 3. f4?After 3. f4 gxf4 4. Kxf4 Kd5 Black wins because after White captures the Black h pawn and moves to the g file and Black captures the white b pawn, Black queens first and covers the White queening square of h8.

Rhubarb
13-09-2005, 11:19 PM
Are you sure.

Maybe I am missing something but after 1.f6 Kxf6 2. Ke4 Ke6 3. Kd4 doesnt Kf5 just win in all variations.
e.g. 4. Ke3 Ke5 5. Ke2 Kd4 or 5. Kd3 Kf4 6. Ke2 Kg3 7. Ke3 Kxh3 8. Kf2 g4

3. Kd3 isnt any better .. 3. Kd3 Kd5 (Not Kf5) 4. Ke3 Ke5 as aboveBill, can I stand by my point that 1.f6 neither wins nor loses. ;)

After 1...Kxf6, 2.Kd2! takes distant corresponding squares and draws.

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 11:30 PM
Bill, can I stand by my point that 1.f6 neither wins nor loses. ;)

After 1...Kxf6, 2.Kd2! takes distant corresponding squares and draws.Doesnt 2.. Ke6 then win, because after 3. Kd3 then Kd5 and if 3. Ke3 then Ke5. If 3. Ke2 Kf5 4. Ke1 Ke5 (distant opposition) 5. Kf1 (or Ke2) Kd4

Rhubarb
13-09-2005, 11:33 PM
Doesnt 2.. Ke6 then win, because after 3. Kd3 then Kd5 and if 3. Ke3 then Ke5. If 3. Ke2 Kf5 4. Ke1 Ke5 (distant opposition) 5. Kf1 (or Ke2) Kd4
I can see you're not going to be dissuaded by misapplied bullshit such as corresponding squares, Bill!

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 11:34 PM
I can see you're not going to be dissuaded by misapplied bullshit such as corresponding squares, Bill! :P ;)

It is an interesting position and I think just goes to show how easy it is to turn a draw into a loss.

e.g AR's post #8 seems reasonable until you realise that whichever pawn be it Blacks a or Whites h queens first, wins.

It is also often easier to play them from the sidelines than across the board.

arosar
13-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Last post before bed.

After 1.f6 Kf6, then why not 2. Kd4 ?

AR

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 11:48 PM
Last post before bed.

After 1.f6 Kf6, then why not 2. Kd4 ?That just outright loses to 2...Kf5.

If 3. Ke3 then Ke5 and you are into an above line winning for Black.
If 3. Kc5 the Kf4 just leads to the line as shown in the actual game.

Rhubarb
13-09-2005, 11:50 PM
:P ;)

It is an interesting position and I think just goes to show how easy it is to turn a draw into a loss.

e.g AR's post #8 seems reasonable until you realise that whichever pawn be it Blacks a or Whites h queens first, wins.Well, of course. I wanted to be the first smartarse to point out that Ian had miscounted that line (no doubt off the top of his head). I didn't realise that it naturally led to all the other conclusions. 1.f6 is no more a mistake than 1.Kc4 (as played and a maybe a little undeservedly given ?? by Kevin), as 1.Kd2 or 1.Ke3.

All positions are winning for Black. He just has to take distant opposition.

Bereaved
13-09-2005, 11:54 PM
The G60 time limit again caused many dramatic time scrambles. - Kevin Bonham

Hi Kevin,

Does Tasmania run mostly classical time controls or mostly Fischer in tournaments. I'm interested as it seems that the majority of Victorian clubs that I am involved with have almost all left 40/xx, 20/xx behind and now play incremental time controlled games. we also have few guillotine events other than rapid or lightning type events

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

Bill Gletsos
13-09-2005, 11:55 PM
Well, of course. I wanted to be the first smartarse to point out that Ian had miscounted that line (no doubt off the top of his head). I didn't realise that it naturally led to all the other conclusions. 1.f6 is no more a mistake than 1.Kc4 (as played and undeservedly given ??), as 1.Kd2 or 1.Ke3.

All positions are winning for Black. He just has to take distant opposition.You must be getting tired Greg.

1.Kd2 is a draw as far as i can tell because White can then carry out your previous logic of blocking an eventual Black Kf4 by Kf2 or a Ke5 by Ke3.

1. Ke3 seems to hold the draw for a similar reason.

Rhubarb
14-09-2005, 12:08 AM
You must be getting tired Greg.

1.Kd2 is a draw as far as i can tell because White can then carry out your previous logic of blocking an eventual Black Kf4 by Kf2 or a Ke5 by Ke3.

1. Ke3 seems to hold the draw for a similar reason.
You're sure it's not you who's getting tired, Bill? After Kf2 Kf4; ...Kf5! Black will take distant opposition (Ke1 Ke5!; Ke2 Ke6!)

Bill Gletsos
14-09-2005, 12:13 AM
You're sure it's not you who's getting tired, Bill? After Kf2 Kf4; ...Kf5! Black will take distant opposition (Ke1 Ke5!; Ke2 Ke6!)
Dont think so. ;)

After 1. Kd2 Kxf5 2.Ke2 Kf4 3.Kf2 Kf5 white holds the draw with 4. Ke2 as Black can make no progress as it is White who can maintain the opposition.

Rhubarb
14-09-2005, 12:16 AM
Dont think so. ;)

After 1. Kd2 Kxf5 2.Ke2 Kf4 3.Kf2 Kf5 white holds the draw with 4. Ke2 as Black can make no progress as it is White who can maintain the opposition.4...Ke6! (distant opposition). C'mon Bill, you gave a favour b4, you can pull out at any time.

Bill Gletsos
14-09-2005, 12:18 AM
4...Ke6! (distant opposition). C'mon Bill, you gave a favour b4, you can pull out at any time.After 4.. Ke6. I'm fairly certain 5. Kd2 holds as White can stay on the 2nd rank whilst Black is on the 6th. If Black moves to the 5th it is White who can then block his advance.
The only trick is if Black goes 5... Kd6 White must play 6. Ke2 to hold.

Rhubarb
14-09-2005, 12:37 AM
After 4.. Ke6. I'm fairly certain 5. Kd2 holds as White can stay on the 2nd rank whilst Black is on the 6th. If Black moves to the 5th it is White who can then block his advance.
The only trick is if Black goes 5... Kd6 White must play 6. Ke2 to hold.Okay I didn't see 6.Ke2! That seems to hold. So readjust everything I said accordingly. My apologies to all concerned. Good night.

antichrist
14-09-2005, 12:39 AM
Bill - my hero - no respect for authority unless it is earnt

Bill Gletsos
14-09-2005, 12:41 AM
Okay I didn't see 6.Ke2! That seems to hold. So readjust everything I said accordingly. My apologies to all concerned. Good night.Actually Greg it was you who put me on to it when you earlier mentioned that White's King has to be on f2 if Black gets his King to f4. As such 6. Ke2 is the only way to do this.

Ian_Rogers
14-09-2005, 09:20 AM
Greg is right - I miscounted the f4 variation. I can't fault Bill's analysis - in the original White seems to have three drawing moves but the move played isn't one of them.
Ian

Rhubarb
14-09-2005, 10:44 AM
Greg is right - I miscounted the f4 variation. I can't fault Bill's analysis - in the original White seems to have three drawing moves but the move played isn't one of them.
IanYes, well I wish I had just shut the hell up after that first comment. That's a first-class goosemaster norm, missing 6.Ke2, if I do so nominate myself.

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2005, 02:08 PM
Re the ending - watching the game I thought 1.f6 won but then when I got home I was surprised to find it at best drew and appeared to lose (along similar lines to those stated above - the a1/h8 diagonal issue that means that even getting the pawn to h7 is not enough because of Qh8 is instructive). Checked it on Fritz which came up as lost in every variation. Generally I computer-check any analysis before I post it anywhere, even here, so is anyone still claiming that there are more than 2 drawing moves, and if so what is the extra one?


Hi Kevin,

Does Tasmania run mostly classical time controls or mostly Fischer in tournaments. I'm interested as it seems that the majority of Victorian clubs that I am involved with have almost all left 40/xx, 20/xx behind and now play incremental time controlled games. we also have few guillotine events other than rapid or lightning type events

Still mostly guillotines (G90 for vaguely serious events and G60 for minor weekenders) due to paucity of digital clocks and travel time for players in the dispersed Tasmanian chess population. As clubs build up more DGTs I think this will start changing soon. Some clubs use the classical-style 40/90+30 time limit.

There was only one 10.2 claim and it was a really strange incident. Discussion in Arbiter's Corner.