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b1_
08-08-2005, 10:56 PM
How about we run a little exercise here.

Imagine you've been handed the task of training a young pimply faced teen who has been assessed as being the most naturally talented chess player in the history of the world! (they used this brain scanner thingy). Unfortunately, there is a catch, this teen cannot read more than 6 chess books. If he (or she) reads 7, his head explodes (it's an unfortunate genetic defect). You've been given the task of guiding him from ignorance to world domination...by recommending just six books.

Now, the higher powers at FIDE will be assessing the kid after he's read 2 books, then again after 4 books. Get him from easy beat, to competant, to master.

My try:

To get him out of his rabbit phase I'll recommend
Play Winning Chess - Seirawan
Winning Chess Tactics - Seirawan

(I think these are good for a beginner. Easy to understand and fun to read; not too overwhelming and complicated. )

Now to introduce him to some positional play and endgame study I'll try
How To Reassess Your Chess - Silman
Winning Chess Endings - Seirawan

(Personally I loved Winning Chess Strategies and would recommned, but I think Silman Reassess Your Chess has the same stuff with some extra stuff that's very important, his Silman Thinking Technique, and his combination indicator rules.)

My young apprentice must be kicking some ass by now. I'm damn sure that just two more books isn't going to get him over the line against Kasparov, but you can't get around that head exploding thing, so I'll try
Understanding Pawn Play - Marovic
Ideas Behind The Chess Openings - Reubin Fine

(now I would have recommneded My System by Nimzovitch and Art of Attack in Chess by Vladimir Vukovic, but I felt some concentrated opening theory and pawn theory was more important.)


Six months ago I started playing chess again and was desperately looking for some recommendations to get my chess skills back up in the quickest time possible. I couldn't find much but I did some research and bought a few books and can now recommend the above books to anyone who is in the same position I was.

Please help these poor rabbits out by adding you're own book study regime, but remember, it's only 6 or...pop.

Mischa
08-08-2005, 11:04 PM
Are your best friends 3 teenage bears?

Mischa
08-08-2005, 11:04 PM
Are you thinking what I'm thinking?

Rincewind
08-08-2005, 11:05 PM
Are you thinking what I'm thinking?

I think I am, b2

b1_
08-08-2005, 11:19 PM
Actually, you're the first to figure that out straight away. I do get some very strange guesses...but wait a minute, off topic you mofo's. Books. You know how kids are. 200 books to chess mastery is too overwhelming. Six'll do.

Davidflude
09-08-2005, 12:51 AM
Well I suggested one book to one of our Box Hill juniors and he was already working through it.

This book is top of my list.

1. "Fundamental Chess Endings" by Karsten Muller and Frank Lamprecht.

You only need to learn to play endings once and this book has a fantastic amount of material and is really interesting to read. I know one player who has boosted his Australian rating 200 points and claims it is due to this book.

2. "The Chess Struggle in Practice" by David Bronstein.

" This is the best tournament book ever written. Most writers have it in their best three chess books ever written. If you only own six chess books then you want to be able to play through the games again and again. It will improve your middle game out of sight.

3. "My Best Games of Chess 1924 - 1937 A Alekhine.

A collection of 120 games with tremendous annotations. Once more these games can be played through again and again.

4. "One hundred selected games" M M Botvinnik. Another collection of games
with splendid annotations.

5. "Aron Nimzovitsch: A Reappraisal" Raymond Keene. This book contains a
set of games which illustrate Nimzovich's middle game ideas in action. Many of the annotations are taken from Nimzovitsch's own writings and translated into English for the first time. I think that it was Bent Larssen who cast doubt upon the English translations of "My System" and "Praxis". This book is great because you can see Nimzovitch sometimes successfully and sometimes unsuccessfully using his middle game concepts.

6. A repertoire opening book. Opening books go out fashion so fast that playing boring old fashioned systems would be the way to go.

b1_
09-08-2005, 08:13 PM
Remember guys, you're training an absolute beginner. Meaning, he doesn't even know how to move the pieces yet. Starting him off with a 400 page book on the endgame probably won't work because he'll be moving his rooks diagonally (Btw David, I'd never heard of Fundamental Chess Endings but the reviews look good. Probably get that one).

To explain further, my recommendations were:

1. Play Winning Chess - Seirawan
2. Winning Chess Tactics - Seirawan

3. How To Reassess Your Chess - Silman
4. Winning Chess Endings - Seirawan

5.Understanding Pawn Play - Marovic
6.Ideas Behind The Chess Openings - Reubin Fine

They are to be read in that order by a newbie. The order is designed to get them interested (first two books have lots of diagrams, good commentry, not too many huge tangential variations), and skilled up by providing the most concentrated chess knowledge in as few a books as possible. I don't know anyone who looks forward to study. Tell someone that if they read these 200 chess books they too can be a master, they just won't bother. But tell them that all they need is 6 books it'll be a different story. I'm a firm believer that chess skill can be taught to the talentless, right up to pre-master, with not too much difficulty.

(Here's a story. I have a younger brother who was interested in chess but could never beat me. I could tell he liked chess but losing all the time was not appealing to him. I sent him an email that was not more than 10 lines long setting out the basic tactics, 3 opening principles, and some middlegame principles, and the very next game he almost beat me!)

I'm hoping this thread will help some people out. If you're a beginner, have a look at all the 1. and 2. books offered (the best will be those mentioned the most I'm guessing). If you've been playing for ages but never read any chess books I think the number 3. and 4. books will dramatically improve your play. If you're already good, the number 5. and 6. books will probably improve your play some more. Whatever your skill level is at start with the appropriate number.

Cheers

Spiny Norman
09-08-2005, 09:47 PM
For a total beginner I still think you can't go past Purdy's primer.

Two excellent books for kids/beginners once they've advanced to the stage where they understand how the pieces move and have played a few games:

- How To Beat Your Dad At Chess (50 checkmate patterns)
- 50 Tricky Chess Tactics For Kids (50 tactical patterns)

both of those by GM Murray Chandler. I have been spending a bit of time working with the latter and it has definitely been helpful to me. I imagine I will still be refreshing my memory with it in 10 years time!

Bereaved
10-08-2005, 12:16 AM
Would that be in the banned?

Mischa
10-08-2005, 12:39 AM
yes of course...

antichrist
10-08-2005, 01:42 AM
play me

in your profile you say that you are not a player and not interested in chess (or used to)

just bringing up out of interest

Davidflude
10-08-2005, 04:35 PM
" training a young pimply faced teen who has been assessed as being the most naturally talented chess player in the history of the world!"

Most naturally talented chess player in the history of the world" and does not even know the moves - this seems somewhat curious to me. Nevertheless if we are to start from an absolute beginner then what is needed is somewhat different.

One hassle is that some of the older books are only available in descriptive
notation. Our super talented youngster should have no problems with handling both notations.

So first we need a beginners book in algebraic notation. Several have already been suggested. I will not add another

Next two books that use descriptive although they may have been reprinted in algebraic notation.

"The guardian book of chess" covers a great deal very economically. Starting from how the pieces move to middle game ideas, a basic opening repertoire that is somewhat dated, some basic endings and a few puzzles and problems. All in all a very useful paper back which may still be in print. It is just the book to help the player rapidly improve.

"Laskers Manuel of Chess" Emmanuel Lasker. This book starts from how the pieces move and covers a mass of openings, middle game and endings concepts. The annotated illustrative games are superb. Our junior can return to this book again and again long after he is a strong player.

One of Silman's books dealing with selecting candidate moves. The concepts outlined are relevant for players of all strength. Silman's books are just the thing to turn to if you have a form slump. Using a systematic approach will help you fight your way out of it. (speaking from experience the first thing that goes wrong in a form slump is intuition, the second is confidence.)

"Pawn Power in Chess" Hans Kmoch. This book should be mandatory reading for all club chess players. Working through this book will improve your openings middle games and endings play. Whenever I see juniors playing there will be examples where they miss the centre and the fork trick, the night attack (your opponents pieces are fast asleep) and as for the sealing sweeping concept it might as well be hidden in hanger 51 it is so alien to them.

I have only made four suggestions.The last three will help any club player.

Rincewind
10-08-2005, 04:46 PM
Lasker's book was one of the first chess book I read and was quite insightful though somewhat dated I feel. Earlier than that I read Alexei Sokolski's Your First Move. This is a shorter book and probably even more suitable for an absolute beginner. Patriotically, I should also mention Purdy and Koshnitsky's Chess Made Easy. I have one printed in 1967 (17th ed) with a cover price of 25 cents! The first chess liturature to which I was exposed. Whilst short it covers the basics and is also suitable for the complete beginner.

b1_
13-08-2005, 07:16 PM
Most naturally talented chess player in the history of the world" and does not even know the moves - this seems somewhat curious to me.


That Brain Scanner Thingy is an amazing machine. Simply swiping the subjects head over the scanner beam it can tell how good at chess they might be. No need for them to know any chess. It uses some kind of reverse polarity beam that ionises brain particles. Quite remarkable ;).



One of Silman's books dealing with selecting candidate moves. The concepts outlined are relevant for players of all strength. Silman's books are just the thing to turn to if you have a form slump. Using a systematic approach will help you fight your way out of it. (speaking from experience the first thing that goes wrong in a form slump is intuition, the second is confidence.)


I agree. I believe you're talking about How To Reassess Your Chess here. Silman is great because he knows what the average player thinks, and so all the information in his books are targeted directly at that type of player, not above him.

The Silman Thinking Technique has really helped my play. It basically is method of assessing any chess position, and using that knowledge to devise a plan. How many times have you played a game where you make move decisions based on endless calculation, chess principles, the position of the planets etc, but with no plan in mind. Silman argues that you must have a plan to succeed. And you do not need to be a strong calculator to come up with a plan either. And not only does it improve your play, but it speeds up your moves aswell. The book is a gem. Highly recommend.



"Pawn Power in Chess" Hans Kmoch. This book should be mandatory reading for all club chess players. Working through this book will improve your openings middle games and endings play. Whenever I see juniors playing there will be examples where they miss the centre and the fork trick, the night attack (your opponents pieces are fast asleep) and as for the sealing sweeping concept it might as well be hidden in hanger 51 it is so alien to them.


Ahh. This book was the other pawn book I was considering in my list. I didn't pick it because I haven't read it yet, and it is said to be a difficult read at times. It was written in the 1940's but is the classic pawn book, the one all the masters have read. If I saw it on the shelf I would buy it.


Just a quick note if you are considering diving into any of the books mentioned here. Download Chessbase Light (free) and annotate each book in the program. It will allow you to get through each book faster because you will be able to jump back and forth between different variations and positions instantly, rather than having to reset positions on a chess board manually. It will also allow you to revisit the books later and not have to set up all the chess positions over again. You may not even have to annotate yourself because others have already done it for a number of books using Chessbase or in the standard .pgn format. These can be found here: http://www.uni-klu.ac.at/~gossimit/c/book.htm

Spiny Norman
12-01-2006, 11:12 AM
One of Silman's books dealing with selecting candidate moves. The concepts outlined are relevant for players of all strength. Silman's books are just the thing to turn to if you have a form slump. Using a systematic approach will help you fight your way out of it. (speaking from experience the first thing that goes wrong in a form slump is intuition, the second is confidence.)
I just purchased Silman's "The Amateur's Mind" and it has been a revelation ... and I am expecting a dramatic improvement in my positional play from here onwards. Can't wait to give some of his concepts a try out in some serious games. He makes positional play seem very accessible.

Davidflude
12-01-2006, 02:39 PM
I just purchased Silman's "The Amateur's Mind" and it has been a revelation ... and I am expecting a dramatic improvement in my positional play from here onwards. Can't wait to give some of his concepts a try out in some serious games. He makes positional play seem very accessible.

I am sure it will help. I have two Email game against strong players where I was able to resist the temptation to go king hunting in the King's Indian because it
was positionally not justified. No more the mindless king hunter.

bunta
13-01-2006, 02:22 PM
i got most of those books myself, what does "reassess you chess" teach?

trav
16-01-2006, 12:40 AM
Reassess your chess is a book on the Silman thinking technique, which involves determining the imbalances of a given position before making plans and moving pieces.

Most of the material in it is geared towards the middle game, however the concepts can be applied throughout. Also, there is some basic endgame material at the beginning.

I've read about half the book, and personally i find it too advanced to fully appreciate at the moment. I've decided to put it away and try to develop the tactical part of my game, and i intend to complete and re-read the book at a later stage.

In all, its a brilliant book, considered by many to be a modern classic, but intermediate/advanced players will probably get more out of it than beginning players.

Hope this helps.

Davidflude
16-01-2006, 09:05 AM
Get any book on tactics which cosists if nothing but diagrams with positions to solve. There are lots of these so look for

1) cheapness as long as you can read desciptive notation.

2) that the problems are all mixed up so that there are no clues given

3) that the diagrams are large and easy to read. Preferably if black is to move the black pieces should be at the bottom.

4) that there are lots and lots of diagrams.

look at them on the bus, tram or train and especially if you are a passenger in
a car tavelling to a tournament. Warning people look at you strangely if you look at them during quarter time or half time at the football.

Lucena
17-01-2006, 12:52 PM
Earlier than that I read Alexei Sokolski's Your First Move. This is a shorter book and probably even more suitable for an absolute beginner.

Hopefully it's not about 1.b4:whistle:.

Rincewind
17-01-2006, 12:55 PM
Hopefully it's not about 1.b4:whistle:.

No but there is a short chapter on openings and I think 1.b4 is mentioned. I'll check and report back.

Kevin Bonham
17-01-2006, 02:29 PM
No but there is a short chapter on openings and I think 1.b4 is mentioned. I'll check and report back.

My distant memory of the book is that 1.b4 is mentioned and given prominence somewhat out of proportion to its merit.

Rincewind
17-01-2006, 02:37 PM
My distant memory of the book is that 1.b4 is mentioned and given prominence somewhat out of proportion to its merit.

That it is mentioned at all would satisfy that criteria (given the size and target audience of the book).

eclectic
18-01-2006, 08:34 AM
and given prominence somewhat out of proportion to its merit.

doesn't that cover 90% of chess literature?

Ausknight
13-08-2007, 10:36 AM
How about we run a little exercise here.

Imagine you've been handed the task of training a young pimply faced teen who has been assessed as being the most naturally talented chess player in the history of the world! (they used this brain scanner thingy). Unfortunately, there is a catch, this teen cannot read more than 6 chess books. If he (or she) reads 7, his head explodes (it's an unfortunate genetic defect). You've been given the task of guiding him from ignorance to world domination...by recommending just six books.

Now, the higher powers at FIDE will be assessing the kid after he's read 2 books, then again after 4 books. Get him from easy beat, to competant, to master.

My try:

To get him out of his rabbit phase I'll recommend
Play Winning Chess - Seirawan
Winning Chess Tactics - Seirawan

(I think these are good for a beginner. Easy to understand and fun to read; not too overwhelming and complicated. )

Now to introduce him to some positional play and endgame study I'll try
How To Reassess Your Chess - Silman
Winning Chess Endings - Seirawan

(Personally I loved Winning Chess Strategies and would recommned, but I think Silman Reassess Your Chess has the same stuff with some extra stuff that's very important, his Silman Thinking Technique, and his combination indicator rules.)

My young apprentice must be kicking some ass by now. I'm damn sure that just two more books isn't going to get him over the line against Kasparov, but you can't get around that head exploding thing, so I'll try
Understanding Pawn Play - Marovic
Ideas Behind The Chess Openings - Reubin Fine

(now I would have recommneded My System by Nimzovitch and Art of Attack in Chess by Vladimir Vukovic, but I felt some concentrated opening theory and pawn theory was more important.)


Six months ago I started playing chess again and was desperately looking for some recommendations to get my chess skills back up in the quickest time possible. I couldn't find much but I did some research and bought a few books and can now recommend the above books to anyone who is in the same position I was.

Please help these poor rabbits out by adding you're own book study regime, but remember, it's only 6 or...pop.

Many thanks for these recommendations.

I'm pretty much a beginner and have only read the following book cover to cover :

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/0764550039.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

It was a decent primer and I did get the basics under the belt okay, although I am not at all competitive at the board at the moment, so I wanted to rapidly delve into the next step to improve my shockingly poor game.

Now whilst another starter book may not be everyone's recommendation, I don't feel I can go wrong with another view on the beginners introduction to the game so I'll definitely be interested in checking out these recommendations next.

I've also heard whispers about works by Purdy being highly recommendend for new players like myself, does anyone have a specific title I can refer to when I go down to the store next?

Bear in mind I'm an unranked beginner, so these book recommendations will be an interesting test as I plan on playing competitive level and getting a ranking (in fact, I'm playing my first Chess comp through my local club now - allegro).

Cheers and thanks for the recommendations. ;)

Basil
13-08-2007, 10:44 AM
in fact, I'm playing my first Chess comp through my local club now - allegro
Just be sure to enjoy the experience first and foremost.

Accept from the beginning that you're going to get trashed :eek: and then you can consider yourself well ensconced within a life-long association with pain, misery and self-flagellation.

Carry on! See you at the Champs.

Capablanca-Fan
13-08-2007, 11:01 AM
Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals would be a good starter. Reinfeld's 1001 Chess Sacrifices and Combinations is good tactical training. Chernev's The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played gives an insight into how the old masters played. David Flude's recommended game collections and tourney books are excellent after that.

Ausknight
13-08-2007, 11:35 AM
Just be sure to enjoy the experience first and foremost.

Accept from the beginning that you're going to get trashed :eek: and then you can consider yourself well ensconced within a life-long association with pain, misery and self-flagellation.

Carry on! See you at the Champs.

Absolutely. We're playing over 2 weeks and I'm already 0-5, including a loss to a young 7 year old with a spring in her step! :hmm:

I went and drowned my sorrows in a brew after the evening and starting to think about my errors. I was told my openings were pretty good for someone on my experience, but impatience and ignorance of some key fundamentals are really letting me down. :wall:

That said, I don't let it hold me back and I refocus and carry on!

I want to develop quickly and play a decent game and from what I've read in reviews, these books look pretty good. I'm looking at the right books and found that the SCA is actually only 10 minutes walk from where I currently live, so I might invest in a little 1 on 1 tution weekly as well.

The combination of reading and tuition, along with regular club/tournament play should see my game improve rapidly over the next 6-12 months.


Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals would be a good starter. Reinfeld's 1001 Chess Sacrifices and Combinations is good tactical training. Chernev's The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played gives an insight into how the old masters played. David Flude's recommended game collections and tourney books are excellent after that.

Cheers, I'll be sure to take a good look at these works as well.

Adamski
21-01-2008, 02:57 PM
That it is mentioned at all would satisfy that criteria (given the size and target audience of the book).

1. b4 is a perfectly reasonable first move. Especially to play against lower rated opponenets who often have never seen it before, but not exclusively so. Sokolsky, of course, analysed it extensively, and backed that up by playing it. ... I have even beaten higher ranked players with it (albeit sometimnes with a bit of luck, like the game v Gold that I posted (one place was Cricket thread!!!)):)

Also, a vote for both "b1" and David Flude's recommended books. I'm another Silman fan.

Not seen mention of Kotov (Think and Play like a GM) and Alex Dunne (How to Be a Candidate Master and a successor book at higher level). In Kotov's case maybe too advanced for the targeted talented junior, but Dunne is an excellent "guess the next move" type book. I'd include it in my 6.

Interesting thread, guys. Ta.

Vlad
15-03-2008, 11:05 PM
I find this thread very interesting; especially, given that I have been in the position of a coach of a little rabbit for the last 2.5 years. When we started, he was just 4.5. Now he is 7 and in my view has a playing strength around 1500 ACF. The biggest scalp he had so far was beating a 2100 player in blitz. The biggest result so far is the best result in the World Youth Championship among 6-year-olds.

Regarding the 6 books approach, I have to admit that he has not read a single chess book yet. More to the point, myself, a 2300+ player, has not read a single chess book from the beginning to the end. Yes, I read some bits and pieces but I would not think they had any serious effect on my development. Anyway, the main point I am trying to make is that reading books for most of the players is not the most efficient way of improvement. If you want to improve you have to a) play and b) do exercises. Also it could be a good idea to have analysis of your games with somebody significantly higher rated, but I guess not everybody can afford it.

Now I just list what I think is the more efficient way of improvement from being an absolute beginner to an average club player.

1) Computer programs Fritz & Chester 1-3. If you have a kid and think about how to start, this is the best way. I do not want to say more than that. This stage could be finished in the first 6 months.

2) Computer program Chess Tactics for Beginners by Convekta contains around 1300 exercises. We spent about 18 months here. It was not as much fun as the previous stage. It really was a lot of hard work but it really did pay out. The best result in the World Youth was achieved mostly because of the work on these exercises.

3) Computer Program Chess School for Beginners by Convekta is a very good complement to the first 2 stages. I found this program only recently, so we did not use it. Instead we used http://www.chesskids.com/kidzone/gymnas.htm, which is a free internet resource. The best way to explain a little kid how to play simple endings is to get him to play against a program. The Chess School for Beginners has an option of constructing your own position and playing against a computer.

4) Computer program Chess Tactics for Intermediate Players by Convekta contains around 1200 exercises. It is exactly the same material as in the Manual of Chess Combinations by Sergey Ivashchenko. It is a direct continuation of stage 2. We started this book about 6 months ago. We just finished stages 6 and 7, that is we finished the first 400 exercises. BTW, the author claims finishing stages 6 and 7 corresponds to 1800 rating (obviously he is not talking about ACF rating :)).

5) Book by Yuri Averbakh “Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge”. It is just about 100 pages. All what one needs to know about endings up to around 1600 ACF. Most of the staff was already familiar to us from previous stages. However, it is quite nice to have a systematic book that contains everything that is essential to know about the endings. We got this book about 2 weeks ago. At this stage we finished about 50 pages; it will probably take us another month to finish the whole book.

6) Computer Program Advanced Chess School by Convekta is a continuation to the program in the third stage. It is a little bit about everything. Authors claim that when you finish the program you will play at least 1600 ACF. The exersises they have are quite demanding.

Intuition
28-03-2008, 06:02 PM
What are the best tactics books? I like ones like Leins 'sharpen your tactics' and Reinfields '1001 sacs and combos' that have only diagrams with no hints (reinfields 1001 tells you the theme which i dont like).. does anyone know of similar or great tactics books with heaps of puzzles?

Basil
28-03-2008, 07:07 PM
Reinfields '1001 sacs and combos' that have only diagrams with no hints (reinfields 1001 tells you the theme which i dont like)..
Agreed. Hints defeat the entire purpose (or the best part of it). Noobs to the game may be under the false impression that they are learning at a greater rate than they actually are by scoring a higher puzzle solve rate than they otherwise might OTB.

billross
21-04-2008, 07:38 PM
books using Chessbase or in the standard .pgn format. These can be found here: http://www.uni-klu.ac.at/~gossimit/c/book.htm

This website seems to have disappeared - anyone know if it moved??

Tony Dowden
24-04-2008, 09:41 PM
Hi all,

I've enjoyed reading through this saga. (Strange guests and all). While I'm kind of thinking what the blue-and-white-striped b1 is thinking ;) I think that Jono and Davidflude have points that can't be ignored - remember the aim is to get our boy to master strength, not 1700 strength.

I think that categories of books (and software - as I'm planning to cheat a little) are more improtant than particular titles.

My picks are:

1. A book on the basics. Silman's 'Reassess your chess'. Or older books like Capa's 'Fundamentals' or one of Pachman's more comprehensive titles (the latter are probably better than Silman's but not so accessable).

2. Any reasonably well annotated 'best games' collection. I'd plump for 'The Mammoth Book Of The World's Greatest Chess Games' by Burgess, Nunn and Emms rather than collections of Alekhine's, Botvinnik's, Fischer's or Kasparov's games - we want our hero to have a well-rounded education.

3. Any decent tactics software package - as long as its as least as good as CT ART 3.0 (which I whole-heartedly recommend by the way - its helped me get worse more slowly if you see what I mean!)

4. Endings book 1: Essential knowledge type. Two or three excellent ones in circulation

5. Endings book/software - drill type. Ditto.

6. Did I forget something? Oh yes, openings. Well, all you need is a playable middlegame, so nearly anything will do. Actually, it would be better to understand the openings, so I'll suggest 'Understanding the Chess Openings' by Sam Collins. But in fairness to Yasser Seirawan - and the American market out there - he does a great job at explaining nearly any aspect of chess; so if he's written a one-volume openings book I'm sure it would suffice.

Two final comments:

If you're addicted to buying endless openings books try 'How to Build Your Chess Opening Repertoire' by Giddens. This might just change your life :eek:

I went from being about 2000 (and in real danger of slipping down to 1800ish for the rest of my days) in my mid-thirties to 2150 by about 40 (or so) by studying the middle game. As simple as that! Honestly that's all I did - I haven't had time for anything else. Later on I dusted off a few old openings but I forget the theory in no time :wall: I'm a professional educator so trust me on my next comment: you MUST extend youself if you want to improve. Chess is a fiendishly difficult game (in case you didn't know). I rewired whole networks of brain cells with a few of Dvoretsky's books (painful but gainful). Yermo's 'Road to chess improvement' was good too - and entertaining to boot. Other decent books include up to a dozen of Gambit publications on the middle game. That'll do for now ;)

Garrett
25-04-2008, 11:49 AM
good post Tony.

Cheers
Garrett.

Tony Dowden
03-05-2008, 05:14 PM
good post Tony.

Cheers
Garrett.

Thanks Garrett - but what has happened to the discussion? Did I kill it???

Garrett
04-05-2008, 06:44 PM
Just by accident Tony.

You didn't mention whether you believe in the bible.

You didn't mention whether you are are left or right wing.

You didn't mention bare feet.

You didn't mention whether or not you liked the Tromp.

That'll pretty much f*** any thread around here.

Thanks anyway.

Cheers
Garrett.

Tony Dowden
07-05-2008, 05:00 PM
Just by accident Tony.

You didn't mention whether you believe in the bible.

You didn't mention whether you are are left or right wing.

You didn't mention bare feet.

You didn't mention whether or not you liked the Tromp.

That'll pretty much f*** any thread around here.

Thanks anyway.

Cheers
Garrett.

:D that's one point of view Garrett!

I think I'll continue to be abstemious, thanks ;)

gm_afiq
16-07-2008, 04:01 PM
I've a lot of chess books..150...My suggestion is read one by one...
separate your book in categories like this:

1) Opening
2) MiddleGame
3) Endgame
4) Strategy & Tactics
5) General

Art Of Attack In Chess_Vladimir Vukovic
Attack And Defence_Mark Drovertsky & A.Yusupov
Better Chess For Average Players_Tim Harding
Can You Be A Tactical Chess Genius_James Plaskett
Chess By Yourself_Reinfeld
Chess For Amateurs - How To Improve Your Game_Fred Reinfeld
Chess Strategy For The Tournament Player_L Alburt & Sam Palatnik
Chess Training For Budding Champions_Jesper Hall
Chess Training Guide For Teachers & Parents_Susan Polgar
Complete Chess Strategy 2_Principles Of Pawn Play & The Center_L Pachman
Comprehensive Chess Course - Vol 2_Lev Alburt
Comprehensive Chess Course Vol 1_Roman Pelts & Lev Alburt
Excelling At Chess_Jacob Aagaard
Excelling At Positional Chess_Jacob Aagaard
Gary Kasparov’s Gambit – Guide To Chess_EArts
Good Move Guide_Bent Larsen
How To Become A Deadly Chess Tactician_David LeMoir
Inside The Chess Mind_Jacob Aagaard
Instructive Positions From Master Chess_J Mieses
Judgement And Planning In Chess_Dr. Max Euwe
Kasparov Teaches Chess_Gary Kasparov
Lasker’s Manual Of Chess_Emanuel Lasker
Learn From Your Chess Mistakes_Chris Baker
Logical Chess, Move By Move_Irving Chernev
Mastering Chess Tactics_Neil McDonald
Modern Chess Strategy_L.Pachman
Modern Ideas In Chess_Richard Reti
My Systems_Aron Nimzowitsch
Pawn Structure Chess_Andrew Soltis
Planning In Chess_Janos Flesch
Play Like A Grandmaster_A. Kotov
Play The Open Games As Black_John Emms
Russian Chess_Bruce Pandolfini
Samurai Chess_M J Gelb & R Keene
School Of Chess Excellence 2 – Tactical Play_Mark Dvoretsky
Secrets Of Practical Chess_John Nunn
Simple Chess_John Emms
Strategic Play_Mark Dvoretsky
Strategy & Tactics In Chess_Dr Max Euwe
Tactical Chess Exchanges_Gennady Nesis
Tactical Combinations_Michele Deiana
Teach Yourself Better Chess_Bill Hartston
Technique For The Tournament Player_Mark Dvoretsky & Arthur Yusupov
Test And Improve Your Chess_Lev Alburt
The Art Of Positional Play_Samuel Reshevsky
The Development Of Chess Style_Max Euwe & John Nunn
The Reassess Your Chess Workbook_Jeremy Silman
The Winning Way_ Bruce Pandolfini
Train Like A Grandmaster_Alexander Kotov
Typical Mistakes_Neil Mcdonald
Understanding Chess Move By Move_John Nunn
Understanding Pawn Play In Chess_Drazen Marovic
Winning Chess Brilliancies_Yasser Seirawan
Winning Chess Tactics_I A Horowitz
Winning Pawn Structures_A.Baburin

TQ

Saragossa
26-11-2008, 08:53 PM
If he was a chess genius and it just has to be books I have an idea that may just make him the greatest player using only six books.

Step one. Get him something simplistic like a handbook that just explains how the pieces move.

Step two. Print off millions upon millions of modern master games and staple them together force them to go over it again and again and again (but as he is the worlds greatest chess player it seems that he may have a photographic memory).

Step three. Get van perlo's endgame tactics

Step four. Get Dvoretsky's endgame manual

Step five. reasses your chess

I am completely with the idea of understanding master games after you can do that then you can implement their ideas on your games.

Step 6. Now re look over the master games And find what more you pick up.

Nicholas D-C
23-04-2009, 11:13 AM
Ok, assuming the player doesn't have to learn how to play chess:

1. How to Reassess your Chess by Jeremy Silman (strategy and planning)
2. Sharpen your Chess Tactics in Seven Days by Gary Lane (tactics)
3. The Art of the Middle Game by Alexander Kotov and Paul Keres (middlegame)
4. Attack with Mikhail Tal by Mikhail Tal (tactics and attack)
5. Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual by Mark Dvoretsky (Endgame)
6. Dvoretsky's Analytical Manual by Mark Dvoretsky (Calculation)

This should provide the player with everything they need to know.

Sheroff
15-05-2009, 01:00 PM
Some excellent suggestions by all here! It's an interesting thing for any player to look back over the years and pick out which chess books have influenced their play most, in a positive direction. I have always preferred game collections over 'play and win' or specific opening books (and I have also tended to read far too few endgame books, which is why it remains the weakest part of my game), but I got great benefit from a 3-part collection of Keres games as a teenager, tremendous improvement from reading Chernev's 'Most Instructive Chess Games ever playerd', and can credit 'The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal' with the important realisation that even the strongest of players can succumb to tactical bamboozlement, unbridled aggression and obscure atticking concepts. But like just about everybody else, I grew up with Reinfeld in his various forms.

I agree with the complimentary comments on books by Seirawan and Silman - these are books that don't teach you so much what to play, as how to think in chess. IM John Donaldson is also an excellent chess author.

Of course the finest games collection book for Aussies (blatant plug warning alert!!) is Australian Chess Brilliancies: Creating Attacking Chess from Down Under", which is coming out on Wednesday, May 20 (so my printer promises), and will provide sufficient inspiration for any aspiring junior, jaded senior, or Nezhmedtinov wannabe (like me...)

I'll post the ordering information here on Chess Chat once they're in my hands.

Kevin Casey