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arosar
31-03-2005, 07:56 AM
Just reading the CB news on Amber a few moments ago made me wonder. Has anyone here played blindfold? I reckon it'd be fun to have a mini tourn as part of a bigger event (say, Aus Open). It could be held during the trivia night and set at G15. Just for fun you know.

AR

Rincewind
31-03-2005, 08:16 AM
Just reading the CB news on Amber a few moments ago made me wonder. Has anyone here played blindfold? I reckon it'd be fun to have a mini tourn as part of a bigger event (say, Aus Open). It could be held during the trivia night and set at G15. Just for fun you know.

I occasionally tried to play games against people without a board (both playing blindfold and without a reference board) never very successful though.

But I've seen alexmdc playing blindfold on FICS.

1min_grandmaster
31-03-2005, 08:55 AM
I've played blindfold only twice (keeping me eyes closed throughout the whole game, so not even getting an empty board) but against novices, like with approximate ratings of 1000-1200 or something like that.

It is fun but I'm not sure I can do it in a 15min game and not make bad mistakes. I played without a clock, I reckon I took about 20 mins thinking time each game, and I played about 200-400 points lower than my real OTB strength. So playing blindold makes me play at about 1600-1800 (only my estimate). Basically I only miss a few small things, like an in-between move in a long combination.

I also had a look at the Amber reports on Chessbase and am surprised in one of the games a top GM hangs a queen (White playing Qg4 to exchange with the Black queen on h4 thinking there was a White pawn on h3 when it was instead on h2). I am also surprised in another incident a GM has a long think, then just before his time is about to run out, he plays a move, only to realise the computer rejects it as an illegal move, and so he frantically tries again but loses on time! But they do play a fairly quick time control, that makes it hard to remember the position.

arosar
31-03-2005, 12:52 PM
Blindfold is possible online? I will try that tonight on FICS.

Oi Jason, weren't you running FR at SydUni?

AR

pballard
31-03-2005, 01:58 PM
Just reading the CB news on Amber a few moments ago made me wonder. Has anyone here played blindfold? I reckon it'd be fun to have a mini tourn as part of a bigger event (say, Aus Open). It could be held during the trivia night and set at G15. Just for fun you know.

AR

I've played blindfold while driving a carload of chess players to Ballarat. Quite a fun way to pass the time.

My eyes were open, I might add. :)

It's an interesting novelty idea. The problem is, compared to anything with a board:
1. Each game needs an umpire
2. You need a slower time limit (and I think you'd need an increment, because you can only move so fast blindfold).

Rincewind
31-03-2005, 07:53 PM
Blindfold is possible online? I will try that tonight on FICS.

Check with amdc but I think you has a separate account set up for blindfold play. Then you can play against sighted opponents. They see the board and you don't is basically the way it works, I believe.

Spiny Norman
04-02-2006, 08:04 AM
Jonathan Sarfati is coming to Croydon Chess next Saturday to run a blindfold simul. Does anyone happen to know what the record is for simultaneous blindfold games for an Australian player?

Jon has played up to 12 simultaneous blindfold games. I am trying to work out whether he would be the Australian record holder ...

Vlad
04-02-2006, 09:39 AM
Jonathan Sarfati is coming to Croydon Chess next Saturday to run a blindfold simul. Does anyone happen to know what the record for simultaneous blindfold games for an Australian player?

Jon has played up to 12 simultaneous blindfold games. I am trying to work out whether he would be the Australian record holder ...

For Australia it could be the record. It is too far to be the world record though. After Alekhin had 30+ boards, there were a few more improvements but then people stopped trying to improve because it was found that it is incredibly dangerous for the health of a person who gives a simul. So I believe the last record 50+ was achieved by somebody who probably was only IM strength. The guy was diagnosed with incurable disease and was told that he has less than 1/2 a year. So, he decided to try. He lost huge number of kilos as a result. What was even more surprising his incurable disease got cured.

Nobody has tried to beat his record after that.

PHAT
04-02-2006, 05:08 PM
Jonathan Sarfati is coming to Croydon Chess next Saturday to run a blindfold simul. Does anyone happen to know what the record is for simultaneous blindfold games for an Australian player?

Jon has played up to 12 simultaneous blindfold games. I am trying to work out whether he would be the Australian record holder ...

He uses prayer to cheat with God as his second.;)

qpawn
04-02-2006, 05:33 PM
I am convinced that there are some people who cannot play blindfold or simultaneous. I am one of them.

I might get over 2000 ELO someday from playing Fritz unleashed. But even then the first sentence will apply. I tried playing 2 people at once at a club. [ not blindfold] I got a headache. :D

Spiny Norman
04-02-2006, 06:22 PM
I can only manage 10-15 moves into a game before I get lost ... :doh: ... and no smart comments about "How far do you get blindfolded?" please!

qpawn
04-02-2006, 06:29 PM
In my view the best ever blindfold chess player was the 19th century master Harry Pillsbury. He played many people blindfold while reciting hands of whist.

Spiny Norman
04-02-2006, 06:49 PM
For anyone down in Melbourne who is interested in attending next Saturday, here's the brochure. Feel free to print out a few copies and put out at your local club ... the more at the event the merrier!

Bill Gletsos
07-02-2006, 02:26 PM
Jonathan Sarfati is coming to Croydon Chess next Saturday to run a blindfold simul. Does anyone happen to know what the record is for simultaneous blindfold games for an Australian player?

Jon has played up to 12 simultaneous blindfold games. I am trying to work out whether he would be the Australian record holder ...No it isnt a record.

John Kellner has the Australian blindfold record of 17, established at Warbuton in 1973.

Spiny Norman
07-02-2006, 02:31 PM
No it isnt a record.
John Kellner has the Australian blindfold record of 17, established at Warbuton in 1973.
Thanks for that info Bill ... that's an impressive effort! Is that the Warburton that is just east of Melbourne, or somewhere else?

Bereaved
08-02-2006, 12:18 AM
Hello, everyone,

I have played blindfold but only against opponents who can see the board. I would not like to think of playing more than one at once though!!

I have some of these games recorded though, (not by me, and not seen by me(the scoresheet) until after the game), and can post them if anyone wants to see them.

Probably my best effort was an unfinished game played between my home and the Melbourne CBD on a train ( about 1 hour ) against someone 1670 to my then 18 something and being an exchange, and I think a pawn up by the time we reached the city. However this one was not recorded alas. Others were though.

Take care and God Bless, Macavity

fletch
10-02-2006, 04:20 PM
did he win all 17 otherwise it would not mean much would it.

pax
10-02-2006, 04:25 PM
did he win all 17 otherwise it would not mean much would it.

If he completed all 17 it would be pretty amazing, even if he lost every one.

Vlad
10-02-2006, 05:08 PM
If he completed all 17 it would be pretty amazing, even if he lost every one.

That one is trivial - e4 and for any reply - resign.

Usually there is some criterion - you have to score say at least 50%, otherwise it is meaningless.

Alan Shore
10-02-2006, 05:17 PM
That one is trivial - e4 and for any reply - resign.

Usually there is some criterion - you have to score say at least 50%, otherwise it is meaningless.

I gathered he meant completed without resigning... and without being a smartass and trying to lose.

Capablanca-Fan
05-04-2007, 11:51 AM
did he win all 17 otherwise it would not mean much would it.
for sure. 11/11, say, is not necessarily worse than 7/17. It would also depend on the standard of opposition. That's why I think that Pillsbury was the best of all blindfold players, because he played blindfold simuls against candidates for the master title, which was a lot harder to obtain back then. And according to Edward Lasker who saw both him and Alekhin, Pillsbury's recall was flawless and the performance was more impressive even though Alekhin had greater numbers.

The_Soviet
16-05-2007, 09:48 AM
I think blindfold chess is quite good for you. I am only rated 1415 (Or maybe it went up recently), but I have beaten an IM in a tournament in Sweden and a polish master also. I can play one blindfold game without a problem unless I am overly distressed over something(s).

Bereaved
17-05-2007, 02:54 AM
Hi everyone,

Here is a blindfold game that I played at a friend's party recently. It took about an hour, I think, and there was one two minute break owing to nature.

I consider it a shockingly poor game in my now sober state, and the things I did overlook surprise me at times.

My opponent is not a club player though my host was. She is however a netball player and that is my friend( the host) 's other interest

anyway here it is:

Event: Party Tricks
Site: ?
Date: 2007.05.05
Round: ?
White: Jules
Black: Macavity
Result: 0-1
ECO: C00
BlackElo: 2136
PlyCount: 100
SourceDate: 2007.01.03

1. e4 e6 2. g4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Bg2 c6 5. Nc3 Bd6 6. Qe2+ Qe7 7. Qxe7+ Nxe7
8. Nf3 Bxg4 9. O-O Na6 10. d3 Nc7 11. Re1 O-O-O 12. Ng5 Rdf8 13. h3 Bd7 14. Be3
Kb8 15. a3 h6 16. Nf3 g5 17. Nd4 c5 18. Nde2 d4 19. Bd2 (19. Ne4 {Was clearly
better, and more disturbingly I hadn't seen it; my position is still better,
but not good to miss things}) 19... dxc3 20. Bxc3 Rhg8 21. Ba5 b6 22. Bd2 f5
23. Bf3 Ng6 24. Bh5 Nh4 25. c4 f4 26. b4 Bxh3 27. b5 {I said what you are
giving me a free pawn? I had forgotton about 25.c4 it seems...} Nxb5 28. cxb5 {
oops; funny thing is, at this point I had forgotten about my earlier d5-d4xe3
winning a piece and was consoling myself that I had three pawns for thepiece}
Bd7 29. a4 g4 30. Kf1 Rg5 31. Bxg4 Rxg4 32. Nc3 f3 33. Ne4 Bf4 34. Bxf4+ Rgxf4
35. a5 Bh3+ 36. Kg1 Rg4+ 37. Ng3 Rxg3+ 38. fxg3 f2+ 39. Kh2 fxe1=Q 40. Rxe1
Nf3+ 41. Kxh3 Nxe1 42. a6 Nxd3 43. g4 Nf2+ 44. Kh4 Nxg4 45. Kxg4 c4 46. Kh5 c3
47. Kg6 c2 48. Kxh6 c1=Q+ 49. Kh7 Qg1 50. Kh6 Rh8# 0-1



Take care and God Bless, Macavity

WhiteElephant
17-05-2007, 10:00 AM
I consider it a shockingly poor game in my now sober state, and the things I did overlook surprise me at times.



That's being pretty tough on yourself, I think that apart from Nxb5 you played very well.

I am assuming your opponent wasn't blindfolded?

Capablanca-Fan
20-05-2007, 01:06 PM
That's being pretty tough on yourself, I think that apart from Nxb5 you played very well.
Agreed. Pawns seem easiest to slip from "view".

In simuls, sometimes you can get ahead of yourself in forced sequence because you've visualized it moves ahead. E.g. you plan NxBf6 Qxf6, Bg5; but on returning to that board, you call out Bg5, forgetting that you haven't actually made the exchange first. Or the reverse can happen when you try to play the starting moves of the sequence again.


I am assuming your opponent wasn't blindfolded?
That's what he said a few posts earlier.

Igor_Goldenberg
21-05-2007, 01:19 PM
I remember playing two blindfold games more then 10 year ago againt young juniors that won some under-10 or like tournament.

I found it quite difficult to remember the exact position for both games. One game at a time I practised on quite a few occasion without many difficulties (the level of play droppes about 400 points though).

Capablanca-Fan
21-05-2007, 02:30 PM
One of 9 blindfold simul games in the UK http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450856. Misplayed the endgame somewhat, because some pawns faded from memory but it ended OK. An easier game was http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450857.

One of six at the Redlands chess club http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450860

The one of six that went wrong at the Croydon Chess club http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450851 After a powerful K-side initiative, the Q-side slipped out of view. 29 b4 would have prevented all counterplay; as it was, his Q won on the Q-side almost single-handedly. One that went right was http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450849 -- I didn't 'see' that my Pd5 was en prise, but it turned out to be quite strong. Then there is the atrocious resistance in http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1450852

Capablanca-Fan
21-05-2007, 02:39 PM
Ewen Green is probably Australasia's best blindfold simul player. He played 18 blindfold games simultaneously in Auckland. I saw him playing blindfold lightning against the (sighted) winner of the schoolpupils' champs, one-on-one. Green's speed of recall and accuracy was impressive, and he won convincingly.

Capablanca-Fan
10-01-2009, 01:44 PM
John Kellner has the Australian blindfold record of 17, established at Warbuton in 1973.
What about this claim (http://www.chesschat.org/showpost.php?p=225484&postcount=27):

At SACA we have a picture of G Koshnitsky playing 27 boards simultaneously blindfolded — he ended up losing on two with two draws I believe it was.

useless patzer
23-03-2009, 01:00 PM
Just out of curiosity, what would be the best approach to playing against a strong player who is giving a blindfold exhibition? I would have thought that the way to go would be to complicate as much as possible, but I would like to hear from people who have participated in these sorts of games too...

Basil
23-03-2009, 01:21 PM
Well poking his eyes out won't help.

Kaitlin
23-03-2009, 03:40 PM
Ive played blinker chess :D:




Well poking his eyes out won't help.

Thats how you make a Venetian Blind if they were Venetian :doh: ouch

Sheroff
24-03-2009, 08:54 AM
Back in my wayward youth I experimented with Blindfold Chess, and once took on four opponents at once in Key West, Florida (about 1974!!). It gave me headaches, so I gave it up. The concentration needed is phenomenal, and it was quite a strain. I agree that if you were going to run a tournament that long time controls plus an umpire are a must - there's always an argument about whether a piece is on this square or that one, or whether somebody made a particular move before etc.

As for Harry Nelson Pillsbury, he was indeed probably the best blindfold player ever. He is also perhaps the most underrated chess player in history. He was quite a bit stronger than his brief career indicated.

Cheers, Kevin Casey

Patrick Byrom
11-02-2017, 03:45 PM
US GM breaks Najdorf’s blindfold record of 45 games at São Paulo in 1947 (https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/feb/10/timor-gareyev-48-chess-games-blindfolded-riding-exercise-bike-leonard-barden) - while cycling (!):

The world record for blindfold chess has been broken by Timur Gareyev, a 28-year-old US grandmaster. He played 48 games simultaneously in Las Vegas in December, scoring 80%, wearing an actual blindfold and taking 23 hours, all the while on an exercise bike on which he rode the equivalent of 50 miles.

ER
11-02-2017, 05:29 PM
Are these records fair dinkum? How come I can't find Najdorf's record in the Guinness book of records? they reckon he had access to scoresheets during the games and his "world record" was never recognized (*) whereas Lang's was.

Maybe Capablanca-Fan a proved excellent blindfold player himself is the only reliable source here in this forum to answer these questions!

(*) another big question in regards to Miguel's achievement is the number of player - participants in each game - one playing the opening, another the mid game and yet another the ending! So potentially a 15 game blindfold simul could involve 45 players!

Kevin Bonham
11-02-2017, 05:52 PM
How come I can't find Najdorf's record in the Guinness book of records?

The Guinness book of records has been frequently delinquent when it comes to chess as noted by Edward Winter here:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/guinness.html

The 2014 edition acknowledge Najdorf but the 2017 edition (which covers chess well compared to past editions) appears to have acknowledged Marc Lang beating Najdorf's record in 2011, though there is some potential for dispute about Lang's method in which he could see the opponent's last move on a screen.

Patrick Byrom
11-02-2017, 10:59 PM
The Leonard Barden article I linked to also discusses some of the previous blindfold simul records. Note that Barden was born in 1929, so he would have personal knowledge of the Najdorf record (he started playing during WWII) - I don't think Capablanca-Fan is quite that old.

ER
11-02-2017, 11:34 PM
Being contemporary means nothing. George Koltanowski was also a contemporary of Najdorf and absolutely rubbishes Najdorf's claim.

https://www.chess.com/article/view/history-of-blindfold-chess

In the latest issue of New in Chess, where I took my information, the new world blindfold champion (his record hasn't yet been recognised) claims and I quote ' ... the Guinness Book of World Records (who by the way, don't acknowledge Miguel Najdorf's record, because he allegedly had access to the scoresheets - most experts don't share this view ...'

I trust Capablanca - Fan's opinion because he is an expert on the subject, you are not!

Another question I would like to ask Capa-Fan is under what criteria can world records like the present one set in Las Vegas, be judged and approved since

a) there aren't set rules and regulations for the conditions under which they are held and

b) FIDE has nothing to do with them!

Patrick Byrom
11-02-2017, 11:58 PM
Being contemporary means nothing. George Koltanowski was also a contemporary of Najdorf and absolutely rubbishes Najdorf's claim. https://www.chess.com/article/view/history-of-blindfold-chess
Which Barden discusses in the article I quoted:

George Koltanowski had played 34 games at Edinburgh in 1937 against weaker opposition than Najdorf and there was bad blood between them. Koltanowski, a Belgian-born American, claimed Najdorf had access to opponents’ score sheets and he managed to keep his own total in the Guinness records book. Eventually participants at São Paulo, led by the grandmaster referee Erich Eliskases, upheld Najdorf.



I trust Capablanca - Fan's opinion because he is an expert on the subject, you are not!And I trust Barden who has been writing a chess column for over 60 years!

ER
12-02-2017, 12:09 AM
And I trust Barden who has been writing a chess column for over 60 years!

may I remind you that the topic of this thread is blindfold chess? How many blindfold simuls has Barden ever given?

Patrick Byrom
12-02-2017, 12:35 AM
may I remind you that the topic of this thread is blindfold chess? How many blindfold simuls has Barden ever given?I don't know, but giving a blindfold simul doesn't make you an expert on the history of blindfold simuls. Barden has had extensive involvement in chess on many levels for many decades - not just as a columnist or player - so I regard him as a reliable source of information.

Although this website (http://www.blindfoldchess.net/) is probably the best resource.

ER
12-02-2017, 12:49 AM
I don't know, but giving a blindfold simul doesn't make you an expert on the history of blindfold simuls. Barden has had extensive involvement in chess on many levels for many decades - not just as a columnist or player - so I regard him as a reliable source of information.

Although this website (http://www.blindfoldchess.net/) is probably the best resource.

Giving a blindfold simul??? well different people, different opinions. Keep yours I keep mine!

Capablanca-Fan
12-02-2017, 02:35 PM
Hard to know about some of those records. Pillsbury, Alekhine, and Réti were genuinely fantastic blindfold players and OTB players. Kolty was most famous for feats of blindfold chess. More recently, Tony Miles excelled. The new blindfold players Marc Lang and Timur Gareyev seem especially gifted. And of course, the genius Carlsen played smaller simuls but his blindfold simul blitz is most impressive.

I have played as many or more blindfold simul games than many of those on the site PB mentioned, even the Australian page (http://www.blindfoldchess.net/blog/2009/10/two_australians_and_a_german_absent_from_our_book_ but_worthy_of_mention/). The site also omits Ewen Green, the record holder for New Zealand, IIRC 18 games, and was also skilled at blindfold lightning. Sarapu in his youth was probably even stronger both in terms of number of players and speed of play.