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doc
11-01-2005, 05:15 PM
hey guys, now were all old enough to talk about some serious issues. i have heard on the grape vine that some younger players have been exposed to some bad role models, and that some chess players within our community are in fact taking up substances that perhaps they shouldnt. has anyone noticed anything?

Megaman
16-01-2005, 09:11 PM
I don't know any chess players that take illicit substances recreationally, I'm not saying it doesn't happen though. As long as they're not "under the influence" while playing(as with any sport) I think chess players can do whatever the hell they want to in their private lives.

AlexDavies
22-01-2005, 02:05 PM
http://www.boards2go.com/boards/board.cgi?action=read&id=1106076910&user=ottawachessclub

firegoat7
22-01-2005, 10:34 PM
Hi Alex,

This is David, How have you been?

Your post was a classic, brings back memories of GS and a fridge!

Cheers FG7

AlexDavies
26-01-2005, 01:43 PM
I wasn't at the weekender in question, since I had to look after my daughter (who is 18 months old).

Even though I've been a bit busy, I've joined a club so I can play on Thursday nights and Sunday arvos and done quite well (except at active chess - I used to be OK at allegro or slower, so I must be getting old).

I'll probably be visiting Australia before my daughter turns 2 (because the fare is free for her), but unfortunately I may not be able to play in a rated event this time.

My CFC information (the most recent event should be 4.5/5, but my win against Patterson is missing) : http://www.chess.ca/memberinfo.asp?CFCN=110120

Ian Rout
26-01-2005, 02:53 PM
Assuming it's an accurate description I'd suggest about five years. A life ban would be a little harsh for a single incident (assuming there are no priors) but it's certainly something that other players should not have to put up with.

Some of the Canadian posters suggested that the arbiters were at fault for allowing the player in the hall at all but I don't see how this is going to work if a player is not otherwise misbehaving - making a noise, annoying people etc. Most players can perform at some level under a certain amount of intoxication and it's a tough call for the arbiters to work out when somebody is a danger to themselves or others before they do anything. On that logic somebody who looks to be in a bad mood should be expelled because they might start a fight.

Alan Shore
27-01-2005, 01:21 PM
Assuming it's an accurate description I'd suggest about five years. A life ban would be a little harsh for a single incident (assuming there are no priors) but it's certainly something that other players should not have to put up with.

Some of the Canadian posters suggested that the arbiters were at fault for allowing the player in the hall at all but I don't see how this is going to work if a player is not otherwise misbehaving - making a noise, annoying people etc. Most players can perform at some level under a certain amount of intoxication and it's a tough call for the arbiters to work out when somebody is a danger to themselves or others before they do anything. On that logic somebody who looks to be in a bad mood should be expelled because they might start a fight.

Didn't you read the rest? All he got was a letter of warning!


After it was all said and done the EOCA board voted in favor, as action toward IM Schleifer, of a Letter of Warning. That's it, that's all...

IM Schleifer, as far as the EOCA is concerned, can play where ever and when ever he so chooses! Hopefully I'll see him playing in my Ontario Open

That's a little lenient.. I'd be quite pissed with that decision, so to speak.

Ian Rout
27-01-2005, 07:04 PM
Didn't you read the rest? All he got was a letter of warning!

Yes I saw it but I wasn't sure if it was correct, or even, given it's almost congratulatory tone, a parody or joke of some sort.

Of course it's possible that the description given was not fully accurate, but given that it was then I'll stick with my earlier sentence.

We don't get many Canadians here but on the occasions they appear perhaps it might be wise to breathalyse them.