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blackbishop
19-11-2019, 02:33 PM
Spare a thought for the organizers.

Immediately prior to the St George Australian Championships prize giving and “players of the year awards”, will be the presentation of the Koshnitsky Medal 2020.

One of the few means of recognising the work done over many years by chess organizers, the template for the award was establish by Garry Koshnitsky and his wife Evelyn. A good article concerning their contribution to chess was written by Robert Jamieson in 1999 at the time of Evelyn’s death, aged ninety-nine. http://www.chesskids.com.au/category/learn-chess/page/9/

Last years winner of the Koshnitsky Medal was Norbert Muller of WA for his years of work promoting junior chess and as an office bearer with the CAWA and Perth Chess Club. http://www.cawa.org.au/lifemembers.html#NorbertMuller

Without these people working for us, competitive chess would be an internet activity only.

blackbishop
28-11-2019, 08:45 AM
Correction to the Koshnitsky Medal Post

Gary Koshnitsky died in 1999. Robert Jamieson's article was written in 2014, on the death of Evelyn Koshnitsky.

ER
13-12-2019, 09:41 PM
@blackbishop

I think it would be more appropriate if the "2020 Awarded at Aust' Camps" line was
corrected to "2020 Awarded at Aust. Champs". Otherwise the connotations mat be leading to the wrong territory!
(as in Axiom's playground so to speak!)

blackbishop
31-12-2019, 10:31 AM
4007

blackbishop
31-12-2019, 12:49 PM
Permission to copy an article describing Norbert's achievements has not yet been given.

The article can be found on the net at: http://www.cawa.org.au/lifemembers.html#NorbertMuller

blackbishop
31-12-2019, 06:55 PM
https://graemeschess.com/graemes-profile-of-involvement-in-chess/

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 02:08 PM
Permission to copy an article describing Norbert's achievements has not yet been given.

The article can be found on the net at: http://www.cawa.org.au/lifemembers.html#NorbertMuller

Permission has been received from Mike McGregor of the CAWA to reproduce the article, however the web address
seems sufficient.

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 05:39 PM
4012

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 05:56 PM
https://knightsandbytes.com.au/our-team/

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 06:25 PM
http://www.ballaratchess.com/history/profiles.html#perrin

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 06:45 PM
http://www.chesscoaching.com.au/biography.html

blackbishop
01-01-2020, 11:08 PM
Dr Zworestine is the Chief Arbiter and an organizer of the 2020 Australian Chess Championships being held at the St George Leagues Club Sydney at the time of this post.
An International Arbiter is a hard won title awarded by FIDE. The arbiters are capable of ensuring that the rules and laws of chess are adhered to in major chess events.
He has acted in this capacity for many important events including other Australian senior and junior titles and the Doeberl Cup. He has been very active in junior chess as the president of both the NSW and the Australian Junior Chess Leagues.

Dr Zworestine at the Australian Schools Teams Chess Championships in Canberra Dec’ 2012.

You will need to scroll down five pages of the pdf document below.

https://actjcl.org.au/astc2012/downloads/2012_ASTC_Booklet.pdf

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 09:16 AM
Richard, a long-time NSW junior chess stalwart, was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the General Division (OAM) in the 2018 "Queen's Birthday" Honours list.

The citation reads simply "For service to chess."

Richard is the Treasurer, Primary Schools Coordinator, Secondary Schools Coordinator and Webmaster for the NSW Junior Chess League Incorporated. He has organized

and run many NSW junior, Australian junior and NSW school events He is the NSW Delegate to the ACF.


In the absence of a labelled photograph of Richard, the extent of the activities of Richard and the QJCL can be seen at:

http://www.nswjcl.org.au/

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 10:47 AM
NSWJCL Ratings Officer Allan Wright awarded the Koshnitsky Medal

The Australian Chess Federation today (13/1/2010) announced that the 2010 winner of the Koshnitsky Medal for services to Chess Administration is the NSWJCL Ratings Officer Allan Wright.
The medal, named after the famous Australian chess player and administrator, the late Gary Koshnitsky, has been awarded annually since 1982.

The citation for the award is as follows:

Allan Wright has been Ratings Officer for the NSW Junior Chess League since he was elected to its council in 1990. He has developed a rating system suited to the particular characteristics
of junior competitions (one challenge being to meaningfully rate the many players who play only a few games). The current ratings list contains over 7000 junior players, of which nearly 3000
are included in the list published in the NSWJCL’s quarterly magazine. Allan processes all the ratings himself and has to cope with thousands of inter-school match result cards, many of which
are incomplete, inconsistent or have players’ names misspelt, and require considerable detective work to decipher.

Allan’s other main role for the NSWJCL is running the league’s inter-schools competitions in the Hunter Region. He and his wife Dorothy have built up the main Primary Schools Competition i
n this region to over 100 teams from nearly 50 schools. The league’s Primary Schools One-Day tournaments have also been growing in popularity – the two Hunter Region tournaments in this
series now attract about 70 teams.

In addition Allan runs the Newcastle Junior Chess Club, which meets weekly. In the 1990s he used to travel to Sydney to help arbit at the NSWJCL’s school holiday tournaments, but now
concentrates on running holiday tournaments in Newcastle and helping with tournaments on the Central Coast.

Allan is the fourth NSWJCL office-bearer to be awarded the medal, after Margaret Cuckson (1995), Richard Gastineau-Hills (2001) and Charles Zworestine (2009).


from: https://www.nswjcl.org.au/News/news_archives_2010.htm

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 11:23 AM
https://www.tasmanianchessassociation.org/kevin-bonham

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 12:57 PM
Born in the wheat belt town of Narrogin WA 192 kilometres south east of Perth in 1950, Haydn passed away on the 28th of October 2013.

http://www.cawa.org.au/lifemembers.html#HaydnBarber

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 01:10 PM
Bob was born in Fremantle on 25 January 1931. Sadly, Bob Pilgrim passed away peacefully on the 16th of May 2019.

http://www.cawa.org.au/lifemembers.html#BobPilgrim

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 01:35 PM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Jamieson_(chess_player)

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 02:26 PM
Gerrit Hartland at the Box Hill Chess Club, Melbourne 2004

From-the-Box-Hill-Chess-Club-Archives


Gerrit Hartland’s career as an Architect is usually associated with creativity and he has certainly provided that to all aspects of the development of the Box Hill Chess Club. As Club Captain he has been responsible for the design of the calendar of events and further he has been Director of Play for events that are notable for adherence to good playing standards and prompt up-to-date cross-tables.

His contribution to chess administration involved a term as Australian Chess Federation President, for which he was awarded Honorary Life membership, and also as the organiser of the Australian Junior Championships. Gerrit is also an Honorary Life member of the Victorian Chess Association (which recently changed its name to CHESS Victoria). Further, he has performed the role of fund-raiser to assist juniors (who are Australian Titleholders) to travel to the World Junior Championships. These include Denis Bourmistrov, Michelle Lee, Ruperto Lugo, and Andjelija Zivanovic.

Gerrit has encouraged the Box Hill Chess Club to open two nights each week, to have formal junior coaching, to have monthly junior tournaments on Sundays, and to advertise our facilities through schools.

After his retirement from the architectural profession, Gerrit embarked on a learning curve to bring computerisation to the administration of our Club. Even with the advent of growth in membership to 160, and the sophistication of computer pairings, Gerrit has never wavered on the principle of recognizing the best performing players in all Divisions.

Recently, Gerrit has applied much energy to the Whitehorse Junior Chess Inc. (WHJ) which has been formed to promote the development of junior chess in the Box Hill district. Due to Gerrit’s relationship with the Whitehorse Council and local retailers a significant amount of sponsorship money has been attracted to the chess community. The WHJCL has also taken over the coffee club roster for our major events. Gerrit has thus engaged parents to become involved in Club activities and to have a say in directing any coffee club profits to junior development.

At a time when many other chess clubs are struggling to stay in existence Box Hill has enjoyed a golden period of growth. This is no doubt due to the voluntary contribution of people like Gerrit Hartland and his ability to motivate other volunteers to take on a vision of something new and see it through.

http://www.boxhillchess.org.au/e2002/news0203.pdf

http://www.gerrit-hartland.com/415033387

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 02:56 PM
Phil was born Nov-10-1927 and died Dec-05-2018, 91 years of age.

http://chessexpress.blogspot.com/2018/12/phil-viner-1927-2018.html

blackbishop
02-01-2020, 08:08 PM
4015

Vlad
02-01-2020, 10:42 PM
http://www.chesscoaching.com.au/biography.html

Who is this guy? Are you sure he was the 2015 Kosnitsky medalist??

Kevin Bonham
02-01-2020, 11:17 PM
Who is this guy? Are you sure he was the 2015 Kosnitsky medalist??

Leonid actually undersells himself in that bio when he writes "Appointed Vice-President of Australian Chess Federation 2013, 2015, 2017 & 2019". He was in fact elected - in one case even against opposition!

blackbishop
03-01-2020, 08:38 AM
From a post in Chess Chat by Denis Jessop 25-09-2008.

“A NEW ERA FOR AUSTRALIAN JUNIOR CHESS

Readers may be aware that recently an Australian junior chess league called AusJCL was formed. It is the culmination of an initiative by Jenni Oliver begun some while ago.
The aim is for it to administer junior chess at the national level by performing most of the junior chess functions currently with the ACF.

A short time ago the AusJCL applied to the ACF for recognition as an Associated Body representing junior chess at the national level and for authority to administer junior chess on behalf of the ACF.

On 17 September 2008 the ACF Council decided, in an e-mail vote, to approve both those things with effect from 1 November 2008.”

Jenni Oliver became the AusJCL Events Coordinator. Note that these achievements came after she won the Koshnitsky medal in 2006.


Junior Chess organizers are a modest lot. Its all about the kids, evidently. Right at the bottom of the last page of:

https://actjcl.org.au/actjcl/honour_roll.php


there is a brief reference to Jenni and Tony Oliver being life members of the ACTJCL and a mention of the fact that Jenni won the Koshnitsky Medal in 2006. The archives of the NSWJCL are full
of results of tournaments played but nothing about who organized and ran them. Jenni must have played a significant role in all that chess activity over many years.

blackbishop
03-01-2020, 11:39 AM
From: https://www.nswjcl.org.au/News/news_archives_2002.htm

“Schools Chess Challenge 2002

The Schools Chess Challenge was held on Sunday 22nd of September. There were a record 198 teams and 603 participants spread over the two tournaments. The number of schools was divided as such: Secondary 37, Primary 75, Total 112. It is now officially the biggest tournament ever held in NSW!!”


In one of the rare and possibly only mention of who actually ran a junior tournament described in the NSWJCL archives:

“Thanks must be given to the people who helped so hard throughout the day, whether they were arbiters, organisers, cooks, canteen helpers. Without them such an event would not be possible. They include Richard Gastineau-Hills, Margaret Cuckson, Marge Lip, Michael Lip, Allan Richards, Yvonne Chong, Veronica Klimenko, Brett Tindall, Justin Yancey, John Cronan, Jenny Cronan, Robert Song, Sonia Song, Mira Rej, Eva Rej.”


As with Jenni Oliver, I found it difficult to find information about Margaret, due to the completely inscrutable policy of junior chess organizers in putting information about the kids first and information about themselves approximately never. Clearly Margaret played a significant role in organizing the 2002 Schools Chess Challenge and many other junior chess activities.

Anything that people can add about Margaret or Jenni’s chess activities would be helpful.

blackbishop
03-01-2020, 02:52 PM
4018

Adamski
03-01-2020, 03:23 PM
That's a young looking Bill! But he was a worthy Koshnitsky Medal winner.

blackbishop
03-01-2020, 03:42 PM
4019


http://chessexpress.blogspot.com/2014/01/john-kable.html?m=0

blackbishop
04-01-2020, 02:03 PM
Any information, anecdotes , photographs etc concerning any of the past Koshnitsky medal winners would be a great help
in compiling this list.

Once the list is complete, any errors will be corrected and contributions made in this forum will
be included. The list can be re-ordered by the year of receipt of the medal and offered to the ACF or state chess associations
as an archive.

blackbishop
05-01-2020, 02:08 PM
At Norwood

Bill joined the Norwood Chess Club in 1970 and was Norwood Chess Club Secretary from 1971 – 1982 and delegate on SACA council for Norwood Chess Club 1971

With the SA Chess Association.

Bill was a member of SACA Tournament Committee from 1972 – 2017, SACA Secretary 1980 – 1982, President 1983 – 1984 and 2008 - 2009 and Tournament Secretary 1999 - 2017

At the Modbury Chess Club

Bill was Club President from 1986 – 1990 and Secretary 1991 – 2017. Bill has won the Club Championship on eight occasions. He is well-known in SA chess circles for his help
in organising and running various SACA tournaments, including the City of Adelaide Open and the South Australian championships, as well as competing in interstate and local events between 1972 – 2018.

He acted as Assistant Arbiter of national and international tournaments including:

Australian Championships 1980 & 2004
Australian Open 1987 & 1991
World Junior & Girls 1988.

It is not often that Australia hosts world chess championships. The World Junior took place in Adelaide with four players tying on nine points. Joel Lautier of France emerged victorious, slightly ahead of Vassily Ivanchuk, Grigory Yuryevich Serper and Boris Gelfand on tie-breaks. Zsuzsa Polgar competed. Alisa Galliamova of the Soviet Union won the under 20 Girls.

Bill was appointed FIDE Organizer 2012 and National Arbiter 2013

blackbishop
05-01-2020, 09:13 PM
https://www.tasmanianchessassociation.org/news-and-games/2017/2/16/neville-ledger-wins-the-koshnitsky-medal

MichaelBaron
05-01-2020, 11:53 PM
4019


http://chessexpress.blogspot.com/2014/01/john-kable.html?m=0

Unfortunately John passed away some years ago.

blackbishop
06-01-2020, 08:13 AM
Peter is the President of the Rooty Hill Chess Club which was established in 1973. He is an arbiter and organizer of an extensive program of tournaments held at the club.

The results of many of these tournaments are submitted to the ACF and also to FIDE so that players get both a national and a FIDE rating.

Peter has been a member of the New South Wales Chess Association Council, acting as Registrar for the association in 2009 and 2010.

Vlad
06-01-2020, 08:46 AM
Leonid actually undersells himself in that bio when he writes "Appointed Vice-President of Australian Chess Federation 2013, 2015, 2017 & 2019". He was in fact elected - in one case even against opposition!

My point was different. I do not know who is Leonard Sandler.

ER
06-01-2020, 10:36 AM
my point was different. I do not know who is leonard sandler.

:lol:

blackbishop
06-01-2020, 11:18 AM
The 2014 medal was awarded posthumously. It was accepted by his father Bruce and his brother Alex. The following is Alex Saint's dedication to his brother reposted from a Chess Chat thread.


If you want to really understand my dear brother you need to look back a decade ago when the Australian Chess Championships came to Adelaide. This was his finest hour. Andrew, the Wedding family and I were already involved in the University Open tournaments. After a few years, we made a bid for and were able to hold, with SACA, the Australian Chess Championships in Adelaide at the end of 2003 and start of 2004. We were all looking forward to this event, none more than Andrew. Others may look forward to going to an AFL grand final live watching their team, well this event was his grand final. As many know, Andrew loved to organise, he loved chess, and he loved to help people - and these three things came together in 2003. Robin Wedding and I were there as willing helpers but Andrew was the leading force. He was the driver, we were in the back seat. Without him, the event would not go down in many peoples eyes as one of the most memorable tournaments as stated by people including Grandmaster Ian Rogers.

It was Andrew who organised the most extravagant snack bar in the history of Australian chess!! He joked with me that we needed to 'go gourmet'. Well we certainly did! Most chess events supply foam cups, a big tin of Blend 43 coffee and a packet of out-of-date dry Arnotts biscuits. Well Andrew would have none of that. He arranged different coffee blends, herbal teas, fancy cordials, chocolate biscuits, a cheese platter, pate, dips, fruit, everything. I remember many people seeing it and saying, "wow". Andrew paid for stuff like the snack bar out of his own pocket - a lot of money for a uni student. He didn't want SACA to have to pay for that, which I think was a good thing for SACA! Why did he do it I hear you ask? He did it so you, the chess public could have a great time. The tournament was so well organised. Behind closed doors was someone who was living that tournament 100% from the moment he woke up to the moment he went to sleep for 14 days. It always brought a smile to his face to see so many people enjoying the tournament. This event wasn't an attempt to puff up Andrew's pride or stroke his ego. Andrew humbly and quietly sought to please all. Andrew even said, "we need to go to a special newsagent which has all the interstate newspapers". He thought it would be a nice thing to do for all the interstate players.

He spent two days in the Chemical Engineering department before the event designing a poster describing the chess event and its history. He organised for there to be a blind simul with GM Ian Rogers on Boxing Day, followed by other simuls and opportunities for chess players to play top players. He organised for top players to give lectures in a special room. He arranged for a BBQ dinner night ensuring there was enough food for everyone. He was always checking that people were enjoying themselves. On top of all of this, Andrew and Robin were writing the newsletter for the tournament. They had to create one each day. He and Robin put everything into that, as many do. It took hours. Andrew always made sure it was a good read. He had all games listed, annotations, chess puzzles, even a joke of the day. Andrew also had a wicked sense of humour, as many people know. I remember Robin, Andrew and I laughing about an argument that broke out on a chess chat forum. He decided to publish it and it brought a smile to many faces especially to those who live on chess chat.

Just to go back to the University Opens, I remember the attention to detail he had. He organised a Saturday night transfer tournament with prizes. He made sure with each University Open that there were prizes for players of all standards. We had $50 prizes for players with different ratings e.g. Under 1000, under 1200, etc. That was all Andrew. Yes he loved seeing top players come along and win, but he also loved the everyday people in chess too and wanted them to have something to aim for. The tournament started off being about 27 people and in its final year it had 99. Andrew being the perfectionist, jokingly of course, wished we had cracked triple figures!! The Saturday night dinner became one of the most enjoyable social events in the chess calendar. Alan Goldsmith noted in his weekly column, that the Saturday dinner event had such a friendly, warm atmosphere. The dinners reached the stage of having 4 bain-maries with many dishes to choose from. If it was up to me I would have given everyone a Chicken Parmi. All of this was because of Andrew. He even had Trevor Tao, a brilliant chess player and pianist, playing the piano at one stage. I remember Andrew getting a bit emotional when he saw Evelyn Koshnitsky (a SA chess stalwart) enjoying the company, the food and the classical music.

SACA ran team chess tournaments on Tuesday nights throughout the year. We had four teams from Uni and each year Andrew told me he thought the traditional chess team names were so boring! There were teams like 'Adelaide Red' or 'Norwood Blue'. Andrew thought it would be better to create some names to remember. So each semester had a theme. One time it was cheeses. He didn't pick Swiss or anything simple, instead he picked one called 'Queso Blanco'. Another time it was wine and he picked names like 'Merlot'. He and the whole team had a huge laugh when they'd announce which teams were on top and Bill (Anderson-Smith) would announce, "Norwood Blue is on top ahead by two points from Queso Blanco". I have never laughed so much and in the chess hall you're meant to be quiet!! I will always remember those days at Adelaide Uni as the greatest time in my life - I forget about us studying for our degrees there .

For the chess community, it would be nice for people to remember that Andrew was a State Junior Chess Champion. His biggest win was claiming the Under 18 Junior Title in what was thought to be one of the strongest fields for a long time. Andrew also performed extremely well in Istanbul and as we all know, he won the tournament on the weekend. As many have said though, he was also a gracious loser. Andrew was not about wins and losses though, which meant he truly had won in the game of life.

Rest in peace Andrew XXX.
(Andrew Saint: 26/12/1981 - 1/4/2013)

Kevin Bonham
06-01-2020, 01:55 PM
My point was different. I do not know who is Leonard Sandler.

I had not even noticed that misspelling in the title. I've corrected it.

blackbishop
07-01-2020, 08:15 AM
The Member of the Order of Australia (AM) awarded to Evelyn in 1990, is an appointment made for service in a particular locality or field of activity or to a particular group.

The British Empire Medal (BEM) awarded to Evelyn in 1980 is a British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service worthy of recognition by the crown.

Evelyn also won the Purdy medal for chess journalism in 1990.

Perhaps the best way to describe Evelyn’s contribution is through the words of the people who knew her and the people who are continuing the work she began.

An account of the lives of Gary and Evelyn is given in chapter ten of Bill Egan’s excellent Book on the Doeberl Cup, part of which is viewable online in Google Books. Copy and paste into a browser:

Google Books. The Doeberl Cup: Fifty Years of Australian Chess History.

The links below contains photographs and descriptions of the work of the Koshnitskys and of those people who continued that work.


https://koshnitskytrust.org/

https://digital.collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/nodes/view/2265

http://www.chessasiapacific.com/evelyn-koshnitsky-chess-festival-adeliade-12-16-july-2015/

http://www.chesskids.com.au/rjs-chess-puzzle-240/

blackbishop
08-01-2020, 08:44 AM
Attributes of the Successful Australian Chess Federation President


Must have the ability to multitask. Must be able to juggle at least 20 objects simultaneously and keep them in the air indefinitely.

Must have a good memory for names, faces and events.

The skin of the forearm is on average 1.3 mm thick. Skin thickness varies over the body. The skin thickness of the ACF president must be far greater than the average over all areas of the body.

Must realise that chess players are largely reluctant readers and therefore must exercise an extreme patience, explaining yet again what was already written in plain view.

Must realise that dispute is normal, has always been normal and is not going to improve as climate change increases average temperatures.

Must be at ease with a wide variety of people in a wide variety of situations; politicians, grandmasters, junior champions, grieving families, business leaders and chess players.

Must realise that reward is something you get in heaven and is therefore not of this Earth.



Gary Wastell has been ACF president for many years. During that time, he has demonstrated an abundance of all these necessary skills and attributes as a successful
Australian Chess Federation president.

blackbishop
08-01-2020, 11:04 AM
4026


When in 1987, the executive of the Chess Association of Queensland was moved, minus the office of the CAQ
Administrator, Clive Terry, to Rockhampton, Ian became the CAQ Secretary and continued as Assistant Secretary CAQ
from 1988 – 1989 and Membership Secretary 1990 – 1993. He continued his association with RCC being secretary of
the club in 1992 and 1993.

Ian, helped by his wife Barbara, performed a valuable service for the Queensland Chess Community during this time by
re-writing the CAQ constitution to allow for the incorporation of the CAQ to protect members against any future law suit.

Purdy Medal.

Ian produced “Queensland Chess”, a monthly publication featuring Queensland and national chess news starting in 1989.
This magazine was an essential means of communicating with the chess community bearing in mind that Dial Up Internet
was not generally available in Australia until around 1995. Smartphone? What is a Smartphone? Nearing the millennium,
the internet became a cheaper and more convenient method of communication and the magazine was discontinued.

Moving to Brisbane, Ian produced the Sunday Mail chess column from 1995 – 2009. The year 1995, was the centenary
of the CAQ. To mark this milestone, the booklet 'Queensland Chess Championship 1895 - 1995' by Ian Murray and
published by CAQ in 1995. This booklet gives accounts of the first Queensland Championship and the championsip one hundred
years on.

For his services to chess journalism, Ian was awarded the Purdy Medal in 1992.

In Brisbane, during difficult times for the CAQ, Ian continued as Membership Secretary/Minutes Secretary 1994 and 1995,
Minutes Secretary 1996, Secretary in 1997 and Secretary/Treasurer 1998 till 2007. He was awarded the Koshnitsky
Medal for Chess Administration in the year 2000.

blackbishop
08-01-2020, 03:01 PM
Keith’s name is associated with chess in the Central Coast region of New South Wales. He continues to be an organizer and
arbiter at the Central Coast Chess Club in Gosford and at the Ettalong Chess Club.

http://www.gosfordchess.com

http://gosfordchess.com/ettalong/index.html

Keith maintains both web sites.

He has been active in chess coaching at the primary school level on the Central Coast and has prepared instructional materials for use by other chess coaches.

Adamski
08-01-2020, 06:00 PM
4026


When in 1987, the executive of the Chess Association of Queensland was moved, minus the office of the CAQ
Administrator, Clive Terry, to Rockhampton, Ian became the CAQ Secretary and continued as Assistant Secretary CAQ
from 1988 – 1989 and Membership Secretary 1990 – 1993. He continued his association with RCC being secretary of
the club in 1992 and 1993.

Ian, helped by his wife Barbara, performed a valuable service for the Queensland Chess Community during this time by
re-writing the CAQ constitution to allow for the incorporation of the CAQ to protect members against any future law suit.

Purdy Medal.

Ian produced “Queensland Chess”, a monthly publication featuring Queensland and national chess news starting in 1989.
This magazine was an essential means of communicating with the chess community bearing in mind that Dial Up Internet
was not generally available in Australia until around 1995. Smartphone? What is a Smartphone? Nearing the millennium,
the internet became a cheaper and more convenient method of communication and the magazine was discontinued.

Moving to Brisbane, Ian produced the Sunday Mail chess column from 1995 – 2009. The year 1995, was the centenary
of the CAQ. To mark this milestone, the booklet 'Queensland Chess Championship 1895 - 1995' by Ian Murray and
published by CAQ in 1995. This booklet gives accounts of the first Queensland Championship and the championsip one hundred
years on.

For his services to chess journalism, Ian was awarded the Purdy Medal in 1992.

In Brisbane, during difficult times for the CAQ, Ian continued as Membership Secretary/Minutes Secretary 1994 and 1995,
Minutes Secretary 1996, Secretary in 1997 and Secretary/Treasurer 1998 till 2007. He was awarded the Koshnitsky
Medal for Chess Administration in the year 2000.
Good bio, but I think our Ian is�� a little older now than that photo! But good stuff putting all these bios here, including Rooty Hill President and my good friend, Peter Cassettari.

blackbishop
08-01-2020, 07:16 PM
Any information that you can add re Peter Cassettari's or any of the other KM winners, work in chess
would be helpful and could be incorporated later.

Adamski
08-01-2020, 07:54 PM
Any information that you can add re Peter Cassettari's or any of the other KM winners, work in chess
would be helpful and could be incorporated later.Your bio has all the key points. He reads some Chess Chat threads so may give some more info himself. I will add he is a championship standard cross country runner. Won titles.

blackbishop
09-01-2020, 12:57 PM
Edwin (Eddie) Malitis, Life Member of the Melbourne Chess Club, was another strong Latvian player who won the Melbourne Chess Club Championship.


He was President in 1972 and 1973. A firm but friendly and modest man, he is remembered for his tireless work as Treasurer for 47 years, a record that will certainly never be broken.

He insisted on proper financial management. He stayed with the Club in good times and in bad. An International Arbiter, he directed play in innumerable tournaments. He interested himself in literally all aspects of our activities.

A plaque put up in 1992, names him as one of the four pillars of the Club, but he might better be described as the keystone of its arch. He was awarded the Koshnitzky Medal in 1999. He died in 2007, and many of us gathered at his funeral.

As was said of a very famous man centuries ago, “If you seek his monument, look around you.” From: Robert Brooking, Play On! A Continuing History of Melbourne Chess Club

www.melbournechessclub.org/members/history/club-history

The Edwin Malitis Memorial Tournament is held each year at the Melbourne Chess Club.

Ian Murray
09-01-2020, 01:16 PM
Good bio, but I think our Ian is�� a little older now than that photo! ....

Not much - taken 2015 in Turkey

blackbishop
09-01-2020, 01:46 PM
Jacques Engelander, introduced something of a novelty to Australia.

The Novag Diablo chess computer was a reasonably strong competitor for its time.
Jacques sponsored various chess tournaments in Australia including the Ballarat Begonia Open for twelve years.

The support of sponsors over those years helped the Begonia Open survive.


https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/page/13007931

blackbishop
09-01-2020, 02:01 PM
More information needed on the chess activities of these
Koshnitsky Medallist Winners - Chess Administration

1987 Ian Laurie ............. Life member Chess Victoria
1990 Larry Ermacora..... Reported on the Chess Olympiad 2006
1992 John Maddix ........ Director of Play
1994 Bill Powell............. Sunshine Coast Chess
1996 Don Maciulaitis..... VCA Ratings Officer 1994

blackbishop
09-01-2020, 08:32 PM
Trevor was treasurer of the hyper active Box Hill Chess Club in 2007 while the President was the dynamic Gladys Liu.
He is treasurer of the club today and probably for every year in between as well as being treasurer of the Box Hill
Canterbury Junior Chess Club. He has been known to act as Deputy Chief Arbiter and Chief arbiter in tournaments at both clubs.

Trevor was treasurer of Chess Victoria in 2008 as far back as records, that I can find, go and is still treasurer today.
Treasurer is a hard position to fill in any voluntary organization and requires some special skills and knowledge.
It also implies a level of trust and respect by members of the organization for the person taking on the position.
Trevor was a worthy recipient of the 2012 medal.

blackbishop
10-01-2020, 10:20 AM
Larry was a well known personality in Australian chess circles. He was an administrator in both Western Australia and New South Wales.
Much of his contribution was made prior to the introduction of the internet in Australia so that much information about his contribution is missing.

Larry was a senior employee of Telecom. His employment facilitated Australia playing in two World Telechess Championships.

Australia Beats Russia 8 – 0

FM_Bill
08-03-2011, 09:39 PM Chess Chat.

“In 1977 we beat Guyana in the first round and then lost 2.5 - 5.5 to the USSR in the second. That's when Tal played Jamieson on board one.
The games were so slow many were adjudicated draws around move 25 or so. Chekhov-Prods was a played out draw. Travers lost. Guy West
lost on the junior board to Kasparov who then as the story goes, sat on Gulko's knee for the remainder of his game against Ian Rogers.

Then in 1990 we beat Singapore, Ireland and had to play the USSR in the semi-finals. (This time Khalifman was board 1.) We were losing about 2-6
but by the end of the match we realised they had made so many breaches of the rules - including taking an hour break for dinner when it was after
midnight in Sydney! - that we appealed and were awarded the match 8-0. By then East Germany (who had already won the final against the USSR)
were forced to replay it. However in the meantime, as Guy says, they ceased to exist, so we won the cup, handed to us by the USSR ambassador
at a ceremony in Sydney in 1991.”

This story was taken from; http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?12864-1979-World-Telex-Matches.



Larry edited the ACF Newsflash, a monthly publication in 1989. He was succeeded as editor by Robert Jamieson.

We next here of Larry as a journalist accredited by Olympiad Officials at the Turin Olympiad 2006. He sent back amusing accounts about everything
except the chess. They were published in the “Closet Grandmaster.”

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/larry-ermacoras-report.html

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/olympiad-round-4-results.html

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/ermacora-diary-round-9.html

blackbishop
10-01-2020, 02:40 PM
John is an organizer and director of play in the Mid North Coast region of NSW.

He is the New South Wales Junior Chess League’s competition organizer in the Coffs Harbour region, overseeing an extensive
interschool primary chess teams competition.

He has run chess classes at primary schools in the region, for example at Bishop Druitt College which in 2015 fielded two teams in A grade,
one team in B grade and two teams in C grade of the competition with great success.

The winners in local Championship divisions go on to compete in finals against other divisional winners in the zone, then the region, and
the regional champions then compete for a state title. John directed the teams competition for the Coffs Harbour zone.

John is also one of the organizers of activities at the Coffs Harbour Chess Club.

MichaelBaron
10-01-2020, 05:51 PM
Larry was a well known personality in Australian chess circles. He was an administrator in both Western Australia and New South Wales.
Much of his contribution was made prior to the introduction of the internet in Australia so that much information about his contribution is missing.

Larry was a senior employee of Telecom. His employment facilitated Australia playing in two World Telechess Championships.

Australia Beats Russia 8 – 0

FM_Bill
08-03-2011, 09:39 PM Chess Chat.

“In 1977 we beat Guyana in the first round and then lost 2.5 - 5.5 to the USSR in the second. That's when Tal played Jamieson on board one.
The games were so slow many were adjudicated draws around move 25 or so. Chekhov-Prods was a played out draw. Travers lost. Guy West
lost on the junior board to Kasparov who then as the story goes, sat on Gulko's knee for the remainder of his game against Ian Rogers.

Then in 1990 we beat Singapore, Ireland and had to play the USSR in the semi-finals. (This time Khalifman was board 1.) We were losing about 2-6
but by the end of the match we realised they had made so many breaches of the rules - including taking an hour break for dinner when it was after
midnight in Sydney! - that we appealed and were awarded the match 8-0. By then East Germany (who had already won the final against the USSR)
were forced to replay it. However in the meantime, as Guy says, they ceased to exist, so we won the cup, handed to us by the USSR ambassador
at a ceremony in Sydney in 1991.”

This story was taken from; http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?12864-1979-World-Telex-Matches.



Larry edited the ACF Newsflash, a monthly publication in 1989. He was succeeded as editor by Robert Jamieson.

We next here of Larry as a journalist accredited by Olympiad Officials at the Turin Olympiad 2006. He sent back amusing accounts about everything
except the chess. They were published in the “Closet Grandmaster.”

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/larry-ermacoras-report.html

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/olympiad-round-4-results.html

http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2006/05/ermacora-diary-round-9.html



Where is that Cup now?

blackbishop
10-01-2020, 08:34 PM
Your not after the Holy Grail again are you. No good will come of it.

blackbishop
10-01-2020, 08:39 PM
The old Ballarat Chess Club went into recess in 1962. Don Maciulaitis was one of a number of people who restarted the Ballarat Chess Club in 1964
and who played an important role in starting the Begonia Tournament in 1967. He left Ballarat for Melbourne a few years later to become one of the
stalwarts of the Melbourne chess scene, mostly as an administrator. He returned to Ballarat in 1971 and 1972 to act as tournament director for the Begonia.

2019 Begonia Open: https://www.ballaratchess.com/begonia/commonfiles/history.html

2020 Begonia Open: https://www.ballaratchess.com/begonia/2020/index.html

In 1973 Don founded the Dandenong Chess Club which flourishes to this day.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Community/Dandenong-Chess-Club-151714235538634/

An account of the history of the Dandenong club is given at: https://dandenong.starcommunity.com.au/news/2019-10-10/checking-out-chess/

He was in 1994, the Victorian Chess Association’s Ratings Officer and most likely held that, or other positions, with the VCA. The Victorian Open for 2003 was
run by the Dandenong Chess Club on behalf of Chess Victoria Inc. and with the assistance of the City of Greater Dandenong and Don Maciulaitis.

Don passed away in Melbourne in June 2014. Each year, the Dandenong Chess Club holds an open tournament in memory of their founder.

blackbishop
11-01-2020, 06:07 AM
Peter Parr in October 2011 from the same thread:


"1991. The Australian (USSR) Ambassador to Australia handed the trophy to Australian Foreign Minister Senator Gareth Evans at a ceremony in Sydney at Telecom. Melbourne and Sydney players and Captain attended and pictures taken etc. Australia have been World Champions for over 20 years. Where is the trophy you ask? Telecom had generously provided sponsorship for all tele-chess matches which were in fact very expensive. Larry Ermacora, a senior employee of Telecom had arranged the sponsorship over many years. The ACF, Larry etc. agreed with a director of Telecom at the presentation ceremony that Telecom would arrange to send the trophy round to its head offices in all states of Australia in their part of providing the services which made Australia Champions of the World. Ermacora later tried to locate the 20kg trophy at Telecom but despite numerous attempts and phone calls etc. 19 years ago it has not been found. The ACF would only have the photos left deep in their filing system next to their list of still unpublished (on their website) ACF Life Masters. I am still hopeful that one day the trophy may resurface from a dis-used vault formerly owned by Telecom."

Adamski
11-01-2020, 11:23 AM
So Australia are still the world champions! No-one has taken the trophy off them!

blackbishop
11-01-2020, 06:14 PM
Maybe we are still world champions but somebody has definitely pinched the trophy.

blackbishop
11-01-2020, 06:38 PM
Ian has been a Life Member of Chess Victoria for many years. When I met him some time around 1985,
he had produced a computer program used for rating games probably for the Victorian Chess Association.
I can't find any description of Ian's work for chess which must have been over many years and must have been
valuable to the chess community.

Any info' on Ian?

blackbishop
12-01-2020, 11:50 AM
The Suncoast Chess Club Inc, founded in 1987, has hosted open tournaments since 1990. In most years, two events were held and the names of all
winners are engraved on a gigantic rook trophy which was made by the Eumundi Woodcraft. The leading Australian players of the time attended as
well as overseas grand masters. It was a popular tournament that drew many participants from Brisbane and nationally.

In 1994, four open tournaments were conducted by the club. The respective winners were Ian Rogers, Tony Miles, Alex Wohl and Chris Tandy.
In 1999, the club had the honour of conducting the Australian Open Championships won by GM Vladim Milov of Switzerland, the Australian Open
Women’s Championship won by Arianne Caoili of the Philippines and the Australian Open Rapid and Lightning Tournaments both won by Joel Benjamin
of the USA.

As the President of the club up until 2010, Bill Powell provided the drive and organizational ability to pull off this impressive program. This drive is evident
from his award of “Volunteer of the Year” for Coolum in 2013.

“As chairman of the RSL Anzac Day committee, his dedication to raising community awareness, especially among the area's youth, of the sacrifices made
by our servicemen and women has seen the annual dawn service grow from around 500 to 5000.“

https://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/labours-of-love/1763636/

Bill was a man who got things done. He worked on the CAQ Council for a number of years, eventually becoming President of the association.

Up until 2016, the club continued to run open tournaments including, in 2011 and 2012, the successful Bill Powell Suncoast Open. These days,
the club concentrates more on local tournaments, junior and women’s chess development. Tony Powell has been Tournament Director and Vice President
of the club while Tulia Powell has organized the Sunshine Coast Women and Girls’ Chess Championships.

blackbishop
13-01-2020, 04:41 AM
In the Gail Young post, the FIDE Open tournament was held at the Lone Star Tavern at Mermaid Waters and not at the Hinterland Hotel Nerang.

In the Ian Murray post, Ian was solely responsible for the work in rewriting the CAQ Constitution and obtaining the incorporation of the CAQ.

No doubt, there were errors of omission of significant achievements made by the medal winners due to the information not being available or not
being found. No attempt was made to access library archives. Hopefully, others may add information to this thread.

In pre internet days, news sheets and magazines were used to convey information. Some of these may still be available and could be scanned
and uploaded to a Dropbox so that they could be accessed by all, copyright permitting. Hopefully, Ian Murray will be encouraged to upload his
Queensland Chess magazine to the Cloud. There were many more publications worthy of preserving that might otherwise be lost.

blackbishop
13-01-2020, 07:17 PM
Mark Stokes, President of the Redcliffe Chess Club, has won the 2020 Koshnitsky Medal presented on the conclusion of the
2020 Australian Championships. Part of the submission made by Redcliffe CC to the ACF will be posted soon.

Ian Murray
13-01-2020, 08:04 PM
... In pre internet days, news sheets and magazines were used to convey information. Some of these may still be available and could be scanned and uploaded to a Dropbox so that they could be accessed by all, copyright permitting. Hopefully, Ian Murray will be encouraged to upload his Queensland Chess magazine to the Cloud. There were many more publications worthy of preserving that might otherwise be lost.

Using a flat-bed scanner is agonisingly slow, so I've ordered a high-speed book scanner (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/112962269153). CAQ secretary Mike D'Arcy is hot to trot, so there should soon be a CAQ archives web site making them all available.

Allan Fossey gets the credit (or it's all his fault :)). He started the ball rolling.

Desmond
13-01-2020, 09:25 PM
Mark Stokes, President of the Redcliffe Chess Club, has won the 2020 Koshnitsky Medal presented on the conclusion of the
2020 Australian Championships. Part of the submission made by Redcliffe CC to the ACF will be posted soon.

Congratulations Mark Stokes!

blackbishop
13-01-2020, 09:33 PM
Ian was joint winner of the Begonia Open in 1988 along with Guy West and Daryl Johansen.

He was, at one time, ACF Ratings Officer and took on the job of changing a manual method of
computing chess ratings to a computer based system.

He was the Membership Secretary of the Victorian Chess Association now Chess Victoria.
He is a Life Member of Chess Victoria.

Bill Gletsos
13-01-2020, 09:51 PM
He was, at one time, ACF Ratings Officer and took on the job of changing a manual method of
computing chess ratings to a computer based system.I don't see how that can be correct given that the ACF ratings had been calculated by a computer (mainframe) system (coded in Fortran) from at least 1970 by the first ACF National Ratings Officer Roger Cook. It was calculated on mainframe computers up until at least 1982 (in PL/I) after which it was done on IBM PC computers.

blackbishop
14-01-2020, 05:27 AM
I don't see how that can be correct given that the ACF ratings had been calculated by a computer (mainframe) system (coded in Fortran) from at least 1970 by the first ACF National Ratings Officer Roger Cook. It was calculated on mainframe computers up until at least 1982 (in PL/I) after which it was done on IBM PC computers.

All this being true, I guess that the best person to ask about Ian's contribution to the processing of chess ratings would be Ian Laurie.

ER
14-01-2020, 05:52 AM
All this being true, I guess that the best person to ask about Ian's contribution to the processing of chess ratings would be Ian Laurie.

Does that mean that the validity of your previous


... and took on the job of changing a manual method of
computing chess ratings to a computer based system.

might be questionable?

I don't want to sound inquisitive. but we're talking about important personalities of the Australian chess history here!

Cheers E.

blackbishop
14-01-2020, 08:30 AM
The purpose of these posts was to promote awareness of the Koshnitsky Medal and to give some recognition to some of the people that have worked hard
for Australian Chess over the years; not a scholarly effort, but better than just a name on a list.

In crediting one person with some input into a certain achievement, I am aware that other people may have also contributed to that achievement. It would be
nice if the state chess associations had better archives. The Chess Association of Western Australia has a great newsletter and website and gives extensive
coverage to the achievements of its life members.

I had hoped that, as Bill Gletsos and a few others have done, additional information and corrections to the posts would be made. These could be incorporated
in a future archive if anyone had a mind to create such an archive.

While I have stated that I accept Bill’s account of the origin of the ACF ratings system, I am not sure that the two accounts are incompatible. I see that you, ER,
live in Melbourne. Maybe you could try to contact Ian Laurie and get his version of events to post in this thread. Without further information, it is useless to
debate the issue.

I had not intended to make any further contributions to this thread after arranging for the Redcliffe Chess Club to post their submission for the 2020 winner.
I hope others may be able to add information to the thread.

blackbishop
14-01-2020, 04:18 PM
4036

Horace
14-01-2020, 04:26 PM
4037

Horace
14-01-2020, 04:27 PM
4038

Horace
14-01-2020, 04:28 PM
4039

Horace
14-01-2020, 04:31 PM
4040

Horace
14-01-2020, 04:42 PM
On behalf of all members of the Redcliffe Chess Club we wish to wholeheartedly congratulate Mark on this prestigious award. Such does him great credit - his contribution to our club, the Queensland and Australian chess scene is remarkable and truly reflects his significant contribution in promoting chess at all levels. His promotion of the game to juniors is one of his many loves in life, but he has always found time to assist anyone who calls on his considerable endeavours.
But behind every great man, there is often a better women. Mark's wife Patti has supported him throughout his chess playing career and especially during his administration roles. So to Patti - well done!!!!

Adamski
14-01-2020, 05:24 PM
Congrats, Mark Stokes! A worthy winner- as they all are.

blackbishop
16-01-2020, 10:07 AM
4044

ER
16-01-2020, 11:26 AM
Mr. Greenwood a real legend! the prestigious personification of NSWCA administration!

Adamski
16-01-2020, 04:44 PM
Mr. Greenwood a real legend! the prestigious personification of NSWCA administration!Yes, and a very nice guy too. I hope his health is good. He has been around the scene for a long time!

whatteaux
17-01-2020, 09:21 AM
Also, in the ACF rating system, Norm has played more rated games than anyone else. He is Australia's most active player (long term) by a wide margin.

blackbishop
17-01-2020, 12:16 PM
The ACF website does not list a Koshnitsky Medal winner for 1997. Any ideas?

http://auschess.org.au/honour-boards/

blackbishop
19-01-2020, 03:10 PM
4048

Ian acted as secretary to the Correspondence Chess League while living in Sydney from 1978 until 1982 when he moved to Rockhampton, Queensland.
From 1982 -1991 he was President/Secretary of the Rockhampton Chess Club. The RCC, a few years earlier had, following a suggestion by the then President,
Mike Wilkinson, experimented with STD chess matches. Trial matches were played with Townsville Chess Club to establish the feasibility of STD teams matches.
This later led to a National STD Teams Championship organized by the Townsville club and won by the Waverley Chess Club.

When in 1987, the executive of the Chess Association of Queensland was moved, minus the office of the CAQ Administrator, Clive Terry, to Rockhampton, Ian
became the CAQ Secretary and continued as Assistant Secretary CAQ from 1988 – 1989 and Membership Secretary 1990 – 1993. He continued his association with
RCC being secretary of the club in 1992 and 1993.

Ian performed a valuable service for the Queensland Chess Community during this time by re-writing the CAQ constitution to allow for the incorporation of the CAQ to
protect members against any future law suit.

Purdy Medal.

Ian produced “Queensland Chess”, a quarterly publication featuring Queensland and national chess news starting in 1987. This magazine was an essential means
of communicating with the chess community bearing in mind that Dial Up Internet was not generally available in Australia until around 1995. Smartphone? What is a Smartphone?
Nearing the millennium, the internet became a cheaper and more convenient method of communication and the magazine was discontinued.

Moving to Brisbane, Ian produced the Sunday Mail chess column from 1995 – 2009. The year 1995, was the centenary of the CAQ. To mark this milestone, the booklet
'Queensland Chess Championship 1895 - 1995' by Ian Murray was published by the CAQ in 1995. This booklet gives accounts of the first Queensland Championship
and the championship one hundred years on.

For his services to chess journalism, Ian was awarded the Purdy Medal in 1992.

Interschool Chess

Ian was active in organising interschool chess. In the mid-1990s the Queensland Junior Chess League, QJCL was running Brisbane junior and interschool chess.
Ian began expanding the network into regional Queensland, under the CAQ banner.

“I ran tournaments a couple of times a year in Bundaberg, Gladstone, Rocky, Mackay, Townsville and Cairns. In the early 2000s the program was merged with the Gardiner
Chess program on the Gold Coast, and Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Mt Isa, Longreach, Charleville and Roma were included to make it a statewide venture. Regional winners
qualified for the state finals, deciding the teams to represent Queensland in the national championships.“

The 2001 and 2007 the Australian Interschools Teams Championships were held in Brisbane. An account of the 2007 event is at: www.caq.org.au/astc/index.htm



In Brisbane, during difficult times for the CAQ, Ian continued as Membership Secretary, Secretary and Minutes Secretary between 1994 and 1995, Minutes Secretary 1996,
Secretary in 1997 and Secretary and Treasurer 1998 till 2007.

Dropbox

Lately, Ian has been working on a project to archive some of his publications by establishing a dropbox.com account to enable anyone to download his Centenary Booklet
and later, hopefully, his Queensland Chess magazine.

The dropbox location for the centenary booklet is -

https://www.dropbox.com/s/l476pmos8wqew5e/Qld%20Chps%201895%20-%201995.pdf?dl=0

blackbishop
19-01-2020, 03:24 PM
If you have better information about one of the Koshnitsky Medal winners than was provided
here, perhaps you would consider writing your own improved version and posting it here.

If you have additional information, but don't want to do a whole biography, please post the additional information on this thread.[/SIZE]

blackbishop
20-01-2020, 08:06 AM
Although Althe’s organizational abilities were limited, it is safe to say that he set up and packed up more chess sets and clocks than the entire cohort of Koshnitsky
medal winners, baring himself. He washed cups, emptied the urn and waste paper baskets, moved the desks and chairs then moved them back again.

Althe’s skill at chess varied from place to place and from time to time. Although the quality of his games was lacking, quantity was not. Again, he played more games
than all the other Koshnitsky Medallists combined.

It is safe to say that without him there would be no Koshnitsky medallists since, without him, no chess tournaments would have been held at all.

ER
20-01-2020, 08:40 AM
If you have better information about one of the Koshnitsky Medal winners than was provided
here, perhaps you would consider writing your own improved version and posting it here.

If you have additional information, but don't want to do a whole biography, please post the additional information on this thread.[/SIZE]

You are doing a great job, carry on thanks!

ER
20-01-2020, 08:44 AM
Although Althe’s organizational abilities were limited, it is safe to say that he set up and packed up more chess sets and clocks than the entire cohort of Koshnitsky
medal winners, baring himself. He washed cups, emptied the urn and waste paper baskets, moved the desks and chairs then moved them back again.

Althe’s skill at chess varied from place to place and from time to time. Although the quality of his games was lacking, quantity was not. Again, he played more games
than all the other Koshnitsky Medallists combined.

It is safe to say that without him there would be no Koshnitsky medallists since, without him, no chess tournaments would have been held at all.

You are the second person (that comes to mind) after Guy West's tribute to the unheralded, that publicly mentions and acknowledges all those who have and still do offer their services to chess voluntarily!

Adamski
20-01-2020, 05:44 PM
I too thank blackbiship for his excellent (and ever improving) bios in this thread.

jammo
20-01-2020, 06:04 PM
If you have better information about one of the Koshnitsky Medal winners than was provided
here, perhaps you would consider writing your own improved version and posting it here.

If you have additional information, but don't want to do a whole biography, please post the additional information on this thread.[/SIZE]

If you are seeking more information I have a vague recollection that someone named G.Wastell used to be involved with the ACF medals ... maybe he still is, although I don’t think he reads this forum. Perhaps he could help you.

Kevin Bonham
20-01-2020, 10:40 PM
If you are seeking more information I have a vague recollection that someone named G.Wastell used to be involved with the ACF medals ... maybe he still is, although I don’t think he reads this forum. Perhaps he could help you.

Gary is indeed still the ACF Medals Co-ordinator, as well as being ACF President.

blackbishop
21-01-2020, 08:36 AM
I have sort the guidance of the Allfather in the past. He did not mention having a thick file of submissions made on behalf of previous Koshnitsky Medal winners.

Perhaps the real problem is that Koshnitsky Medal winners are modest about their achievements.

Bill Gletsos
21-01-2020, 09:12 AM
I followed it up and for the record the Koshnitsky Medal was not awarded for 1997.

blackbishop
21-01-2020, 12:31 PM
Thank you for going to the trouble of checking that out.

blackbishop
28-01-2020, 05:34 AM
Something I overlooked, until Ian was drafted again this week.

Ian has been the ACF Olympiad Appeal Coordinator since 2008, when he introduced an appeal website with an online donation facility

blackbishop
01-02-2020, 08:03 PM
4068

Robert trod a similar path to Gary Koshnitsky in that he excelled as both a chess player and as a chess administrator.

Like Evelyn Koshnitsky, he won both the Koshnitsky Medal for chess administration and the Purdy Medal for chess journalism.
He edited the, “Chess Players Quarterly” from 1977 to 1981 and wrote “CJS Purdy- His Life, His games, His Writings” (1982)
as well as producing numerous state/club newsletters and tournament bulletins.

As an administrator, Robert was variously Australian Chess Federation President, Secretary and Treasurer and well as holding
numerous other positions with the Melbourne, Monash and Waverley chess clubs and the Victorian Junior Chess League.
Robert was made a Life Member of the ACF in 1999.

Robert has been active in chess coaching.

“The RJ Shield events are the longest running series of junior chess tournaments in Australia. They were first started by Hilda O'Callaghan
in 1994 and known simply as "Novice Tournaments". They were later named after legendary International Master and former Australian
Chess Champion, Robert Jamieson.

Robert is still involved with these events; if you start playing in RJ Shields you might just be lucky enough to meet him one day”

http://www.rjshield.com/

For more details about Robert, the Chess Champion see:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Jamieson_(chess_player)

blackbishop
03-02-2020, 10:36 AM
The single link in the Dr Zworestine post, "Dr Zworestine at the Australian Schools Teams Chess Championships in Canberra Dec’ 2012." is now flagged as a security risk by my Firefox Browser.
Best to avoid. It looks like the actjcl site may be compromised

ER
04-02-2020, 05:29 AM
The single link in the Dr Zworestine post, "Dr Zworestine at the Australian Schools Teams Chess Championships in Canberra Dec’ 2012." is now flagged as a security risk by my Firefox Browser.
Best to avoid. It looks like the actjcl site may be compromised

Looks quite ok by my browser (microsoft edge - reinforced). A great website too! Brings back a very interesting and productive era of Australian Chess!

blackbishop
04-02-2020, 06:20 AM
The problem with the actjcl website, which was due to, "expired SSL certificates" was promptly fixed by Shaun Press, Secretary of the ACTCA

blackbishop
04-02-2020, 06:48 AM
4069

No one labels their photographs these days.

ER
04-02-2020, 10:47 AM
4069

No one labels their photographs these days.

Indeed the pictured gentleman is Mr. Peter Cassettari!
Another snapshot of him (while jovially "lecturing" our very own Adamski :D during a RHCC event) here - (right on the picture):

4070

blackbishop
04-02-2020, 11:01 AM
Thank you ER

MichaelBaron
04-02-2020, 11:14 AM
4068
[SIZE=3]
Robert trod a similar path to Gary Koshnitsky in that he excelled as both a chess player and as a chess administrator.

Wow, took me a while to recognise the guy on the photo!

antichrist
04-02-2020, 09:56 PM
The 2014 medal was awarded posthumously. It was accepted by his father Bruce and his brother Alex. The following is Alex Saint's dedication to his brother reposted from a Chess Chat thread.

What a fantastic person and we can only hope that people are inspired to follow him. That is true wealth not money in the bank.

Kevin Bonham
05-02-2020, 10:23 AM
Moderation Notice

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blackbishop
05-02-2020, 10:58 AM
https://www.dropbox.com/s/lc934hueacq1umg/Koshnitsky%20Medallists.pdf?dl=0


Copy the link and paste it into a browser.

Kevin Bonham
05-02-2020, 11:07 AM
https://www.dropbox.com/s/lc934hueacq1umg/Koshnitsky%20Medallists.pdf?dl=0


Copy the link and post it into a browser.

Nice work to see them (us!) all profiled in order; thanks for your efforts on this.

ER
05-02-2020, 02:34 PM
Nice work to see them (us!) all profiled in order; thanks for your efforts on this.

I second this, blackbishop has endeavoured into a huge pool of historically important material to present us with a comprehensive list of great Australian chess personalities.
I am sure Frank would definitely publish this collection in the ACF news bulletin including bb's biographical notes as well as highlights of his chess career be it that of a player and/or an administrator.

StokesyRedcliff
05-02-2020, 06:36 PM
I third this! blackbishop has done an absolutely outstanding job putting together the stories and the achievements of all the Koshnitsky Medals in chronological order! He also wrote a citation to the ACF for one of these winners! 10 out of 10 to blackbishop and thank you for all your hard work on the biographies of all the Koshnitsky Medal winners!

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 10:17 AM
Q1: Which KM winner was rewarded with an Oscar?

Q2: What currently serving Federal parliamentarian was the president of a chess club?

Q3: Name the current holder of a state senior chess title who was born in 2012?

Metro
06-02-2020, 11:07 AM
Q1: Which KM winner was rewarded with an Oscar?

Is that Oscar the dog?

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 12:09 PM
You got it

ER
06-02-2020, 02:45 PM
Q2: What currently serving Federal parliamentarian was the president of a chess club?


None other than the honorable Gladys Liu - ex president of the Box Hill Chess Club mother of the multi title holder and chess Olympian Sally Liu!

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 03:44 PM
Right again. Robert Jamieson had a dog called Oscar. Gladys Liu. I did not know about Sally.

jammo
06-02-2020, 08:16 PM
Right again. Robert Jamieson had a dog called Oscar. Gladys Liu. I did not know about Sally.

4075

Bill Gletsos
06-02-2020, 09:06 PM
Q3: Name the current holder of a state senior chess title who was born in 2012?7 year old Elizabeth Williams who is the current QLD Women’s Champion.

ER
06-02-2020, 10:05 PM
7 year old Elizabeth Williams who is the current QLD Women’s Champion.

Take a bow Bill, all questions answered successfully, next quiz please BB!

ER
06-02-2020, 10:07 PM
Also, in the ACF rating system, Norm has played more rated games than anyone else. He is Australia's most active player (long term) by a wide margin.

Amazing record, thanks for sharing whatteaux!!!

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 10:34 PM
Q4. Who allegedly kept a legible ledger making him eligible for the KM. He was also treasurer of the Canterbury Junior Chess Club?

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 10:55 PM
Q5. What average is the skin thickness of the Allfather’s forearm, definitely above?

blackbishop
06-02-2020, 11:08 PM
Q6. How many Life Memberships does Norman Greenwood hold?

blackbishop
07-02-2020, 07:39 AM
Nice doggy picture Jammo!

blackbishop
07-02-2020, 08:11 AM
Q7. Associate the KM winner in the first list with the correct item in the second list.

Dr Kevin Bonham, Larry Ermacora, Leonard Sandler, Robert Jamieson, Keith Farrell Norbert Muller, William Anderson-Smith


The Holy Grail, Ettalong Chess Club, (Vassily Ivanchuk, Joel Lautier and Boris Gelfand,) Gastropod, Perth Chess Centre. Viner Medal, Tennis

antichrist
07-02-2020, 09:24 AM
Q7. Associate the KM winner in the first list with the correct item in the second list.

Dr Kevin Bonham, Larry Ermacora, Leonard Sandler, Robert Jamieson, Keith Farrell Norbert Muller, William Anderson-Smith


The Holy Grail, Ettalong Chess Club, (Vassily Ivanchuk, Joel Lautier and Boris Gelfand,) Gastropod, Perth Chess Centre. Viner Medal, Tennis
Jammu is a tennis player - a good balance to get chess players off their backside.

And for a place win Leonard Sandler may have played those 3 GMs chess

blackbishop
07-02-2020, 09:38 AM
Right about the tennis player being Robert Jamieson but I have a different answer for Ivanchuk etc

blackbishop
07-02-2020, 09:42 AM
Q9. Why don’t people who have extensive collections of past ACF and Chess Association magazines and news sheets scan them and make them available via Dropbox.com as Ian Murray intends to do with Queensland Chess?

antichrist
07-02-2020, 10:06 AM
Dr Kevin Bonham has a gastropod named after him

ER
07-02-2020, 10:41 AM
[…] Leonard Sandler, […] Leonid Sandler

ER
07-02-2020, 11:23 AM
Q9. Why don’t people who have extensive collections of past ACF and Chess Association magazines and news sheets scan them and make them available via Dropbox.com as Ian Murray intends to do with Queensland Chess?

we all have good intentions but some of us are really busy. I, personally, love reading past chess publications at the Vic State Library's Anderson Collection.
On the other hand nothing beats the reading library of the Chess Centre in Adelaide. I have copied (photographed actually) huge chunks of material there.
And in both places it's strictly reading only, you can't borrow stuff - same as in the State Library. You can order whatever you want and they 'll bring it for you!
Maybe when I stop travelling around the globe, which I don't foresee happening in the near future, I might spend more time in places like the above!

William AS
07-02-2020, 09:23 PM
Q7. Associate the KM winner in the first list with the correct item in the second list.

Dr Kevin Bonham, Larry Ermacora, Leonard Sandler, Robert Jamieson, Keith Farrell Norbert Muller, William Anderson-Smith


The Holy Grail, Ettalong Chess Club, (Vassily Ivanchuk, Joel Lautier and Boris Gelfand,) Gastropod, Perth Chess Centre. Viner Medal, Tennis

Hint: One of the KM winners listed has met Michael Adams, Vladimir Akopian, David Norwood & former World Women's Chess Champion Xie Jun.

ER
07-02-2020, 09:43 PM
Hint: One of the KM winners listed has met Michael Adams, Vladimir Akopian, David Norwood & former World Women's Chess Champion Xie Jun.

Let alone beating Levon Aronian (if I am not mistaken re KM winner)! :D

Frank
08-02-2020, 09:12 AM
Phil was born Nov-10-1927 and died Dec-05-2018, 91 years of age.

http://chessexpress.blogspot.com/2018/12/phil-viner-1927-2018.html

A longer obituary is included in the ACF Newsletter 31 January 2019 https://us12.campaign-archive.com/?u=9dbd09164491bd3b5116f2b71&id=6135bdb01b which quotes an account of his own life published 27 July 2013:

VALE PHILLIP JOHN VINER

10 November 1927 - 5 December 2018


The following notice appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on 12 December 2018.


VINER, Phillip John

10/11/1927-05/12/2018

Aged 91 years

Late of Wollstonecraft


Beloved brother of Margaret. Adored Uncle of Richard, Catherine and David. Loving great uncle of Hannah, Joshua, Rebeccah, Sophie, Sarah-Kate and Ben.

Forever in our hearts, he will be sadly missed.


Privately cremated.

Walter Carter Funerals


Although a family affair, Phil’s sister Margaret Snowden (one of five siblings) had informed Norman Greenwood of North’s CC that members of the extended chess family would be welcomed and a large gathering including ACF President Gary Wastell from Melbourne attended the memorial service held on Tuesday 18 December 2018 at the Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park in the Sydney suburb of Matraville where other members of the family had been interred .


James Boswell commenced his much-loved Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. with a statement of the problem:

To write the Life of him who excelled all mankind in writing the lives of others, and who, whether we consider his extraordinary endowments, or his various works, has been equalled by few in any age, is an arduous, and may be reckoned in me a presumptuous task. Had Dr. Johnson written his own Life, in conformity with the opinion which he has given, that every man's life may be best written by himself; had he employed in the preservation of his own history, that clearness of narration and elegance of language in which he has embalmed so many eminent persons, the world would probably have had the most perfect example of biography that was ever exhibited.


By an extraordinary stroke of good fortune, Phil had in his measured way done precisely that. Upon determining to retire from the Australian, his last column there after thirty years (in itself an outstanding achievement, for chess columns come and go) on the 27 July 2013 read as follows [with a minor omission]:



“The Australian’s first chess columnist was Bernie Johnson. I took over from him not long before his death in 1983. Now I have decided to retire and this is my last column. Some reminisces are in order.


“Chess has been in the family. My father, William Samuel Viner, when West Australian champion, re-established the dormant Australian championship in 1906 by defeating Victorian champion CGM Watson in a match at Perth. He defended his title successfully against LB Lancaster in 1912 and NSW champion Spencer Crakanthorp in 1913 in matches held at Bellingen, NSW.


“The Australian Chess Federation, founded in 1922, established a tournament for the national title. My father won its second event in 1924, and was placed equal second in his last tilt at the title in 1933. I was five years old at the time of his death. My father had shared the then common belief that chess shouldn’t be taught at an early age, as it would interfere with schooling and I learned the moves from an older brother. The first major chess event I witnessed was the 1945 Australian Championship in Sydney, and the first important tournament entered was the City of Sydney Championship in 1947.


“My best results in Australia: That would be my two wins of the NSW State Championship, equal third placing in the 1964 Australian Championship at Hobart, and the win of Canberra’s Doeberl Cup in 1977. I was a team member when Australia made its debut at the Chess Olympiad at Tel Aviv in 1964, also at its second appearance in 1968.


“Clubs: Club chess and to a lesser extent correspondence chess has been an integral part of my life. In interclub competitions, I first represented Farrer Club (which met at lunch hours in the Department of Agriculture building), then the Maroubra Club, the Chatswood Club, the Maroczy Club and finally the Chatswood/Norths Club.


“Since my retirement as senior lands officer with the Department of Lands, I’ve played in many overseas open senior championships. Also, I have been active in the sphere of chess administration, first as treasurer of the NSW Chess Association, afterwards of the ACF, where I was also secretary and later president of the ACF. Finally, following in Garry Koshnitsky’s footsteps, I was appointed the ACF’s permanent delegate to the International Chess Federation, a post relinquished two years ago.


“Most memorable game: There comes to mind my draw with Russian Grandmaster Yuri Averbakh, playing hors de concours in the 1960 Australian championship in Adelaide. [Game follows -ed.]


[B]Viner, Phillip John - Averbakh, Yuri
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4d6 5.Nge2 O-O 6.Ng3 c5 7.d5 e5 8.Be2 Ne8 9.O-O Qh4 10.Be3 Bh6 11.Qd2 Bf4 12.Bd3 Nd7 13.Nce2 g5 14.f3 Ndf6 15.Rf2 Nh5 16.Nf1 Bxe3 17.Nxe3 Nf4 18.Ng3 Ng7 19.Ngf5 Nxf5 20.exf5 Qh5 21.Bf1 f6 22.g3 Nh3+ 23.Bxh3 Qxh3 24.Qd3 Bd7 25.Qf1 Qxf1+ 26.Rfxf1 h5 27.a4 a5 28.b3 Kf7 29.Rae1 Rae8 30.Kg2 Rg8 31.h3 e4 32.f4 Rg7 33.fxg5 Rxg53 4.g41/2-½



“Highest title: International master in the sphere of correspondence chess, achieved in a CJS Purdy Memorial Tournament after his death in 1979.


“Awards: Honorary life membership of the ACF and NSW Chess Association; Gary Koshnitsky medal for chess administration and CJS Purdy medal for chess journalism. Multiple winner of NSW Country Championship and Australian Seniors Championship.


This brief sketch of a rich life is perhaps typical of the man. Careful in detail and eschewing any form of self-aggrandisement, yet all the facts are there. I imagine that the scholarly Bill Egan, in writing his extended biographical sketch at page 73-75 of his monumental 2012 work The Doeberl Cup, would have consulted Phil himself.


Bob Meadley has trawled through back issues of Cecil Purdy’s Chess World for mentions of Phil’s games:


“The first game noted in Chess World was December 1956 p.280-a loss to Poder. He was ==4th in the NSW Championship 1957. His best performance was 2nd place to Steiner in the next NSW Ch'ship and was able to play in the Australian Championship. He won his first round game against Pikler and finished =11th. He played in 1960 finishing 10th. Geus wrote on p.212 October 1960 that Viner 'was good positionally but weak in tactical play". To prove his point he defeated Phil in an 'immortal' in the 1961 ch'ship p.175 He was ==12th in Perth 1962, he lost to Phillips in the Sydney vs Auckland match. He played Board 2. (Game p.151 September 1962). A nice win over Fuller p.183, 1963 NSW Championship =6th. In 1964 he won 2 games against Hay and Fell. Purdy said "Viner is noted for the relentless way in which he evaluates slight positional advantages. Not for him are the bludgeoning attacks of Hamilton or Hay! Rather he prefers the persistent pressure of a boa constrictor-the Petrosian approach. He was =3rd at Hobart. Other games are 1966 Cook p.66 draw in 59 & Flatow p.18 draw in 80.”


Phil had played correspondence chess since the early fifties (not just when his work with the Department of Lands transferred him away from Sydney to the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area in the early sixties). Shaun Press, President of the CCLA, writes:


“He was a Life Member of the CCLA, and became an IM in 1983, scoring his second (and final norm) in the Cecil Purdy Memorial Tournament. He drew with former CC World Champion Vladimir Zagorovsky in that event (game included).”

Zagarovsky was made famous to a generation of Sydney chess players through a move-a-week account of a game with the late John Kellner which he published in his then Sunday column.


Zagorovsky, Prof Vladimir Pavl - Viner, Phillip John

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Bd6 7.0-0 0-0 8.c4 c6 9.Qc2 f5 10.Nc3 Na6 11.Qb3 Kh8 12.cxd5 cxd5 13.Nxd5 Be6 14.Qxb7 Nac5 15.dxc5 Nxc5 16.Bg5 Bxd5 17.Qb4 Qc7 18.Be2 Nb3 19.Qb5 Bxf3 20.axb3 Rab8 21.Qc4 Bxe2 22.Qxe2 Rxb3 23.g3 f4 24.Bxf4 Bxf4 25.gxf4 h6 26.Ra4 Rxf4 27.Rxf4 Qxf4 28.Rd1 Rb6 29.f3 Qf5 30.Kh1 Re6 31.Rd8+ Kh7 32.Qd3 Qxd3 33.Rxd3 Re1+ 34.Kg2 Re2+ 35.Kg3 Rxb2 36.Ra3 Rb7 37.Ra6 Kg8 38.Kg4 Kf8 39.f4 Ke8 40.f5 Rf7 41.h4 Kd8 42.Kh5 ½-½


Phil glosses over his retirement years when he played in many overseas tournaments. His friend Bob Krstic of Melbourne fills in the gap:


“I have known of Phil since the sixties. I had seen his best games in the Chess World but never actually played him until this century, at a couple of tournaments, when ACF still fostered a national senior championship. We were acquaintances, and occasional opponents, rather than friends.


“This all changed in 2004. We spent almost two weeks together on the Isle of Man; Phil was our (Australian) team captain in the World First Senior Teams Championships in Port Erin. I enjoyed watching his games; he was a deceptively dangerous player who surprised opponents with unexpected attacks in seemingly equal and passive positions. He was an excellent team captain - we would gather each morning to review games of our prospective opponents and plan our strategy. He had a genuine love for the game and an unrelenting interest and desire to excel. He held nothing back in his willingness to share his knowledge with the rest of the team. I cannot remember our ultimate result but we did win the special “Friendliest Team” prize - a reflection of Phil and his attitude during his whole career.


“Phil was also a regular Australian representative in the annual World Senior Championships. I was unaware of these until our time on the Isle of Man; his enthusiasm for these was catching and was the main cause for me to start playing in them. I don't know how many (this year will be the 29th) he actually played in - at least half a dozen before Arvier in 2006 (Arvier was the first one I played in), and another 3 or 4 after that. He stopped playing sometime in 2009-10, mainly due to ill health.


“His absence at these tournaments was most certainly noted almost every year that I have intermittently played. Phil was a delightful companion and I will miss his good humour, his optimism and his always present smile. Most of all I will miss his conversation and his devotion to the greatest of games.”


He was internationalist by instinct and never confined himself to the local scene, making up one part of Australia’s triumvirate of permanent delegates to FIDE: Koshnitsky, Viner and the present incumbent Kevin Bonham, all with long and diligent service to a universal brotherhood of chess players.


Brian Jones noted that Phil was one of those honoured by the Asian Chess Federation’s First Annual Asian Excellence Awards on 4 June 2014 with a Meritorious Service Award (awardees included Miyoko Watai, longest serving President of the Japan Chess Association, Hossein Gholi Saloor of Iran, Emad Ghalayini of Palestine, Mohammed Murad Suker of Lebanon, IM Manuel Aaron of India and Phil Viner of Australia, all over sixty years of age) for an exemplary record as chess leaders or arbiters.


In his elegant funeral eulogy, nephew David Snowden said:

“Phil was a gentle giant who was quiet, unassuming, highly intelligent and generous. He lived his life following his greatest passion. Never marrying or having children to distract him, chess became his home and great love. He was one of the lucky ones in life though, to find their passion and be able to follow it through to the very end."

“He embraced and mastered a variety of technologies and constantly had his iPhone or IPad close to hand, which few 91-year-olds could do. He was into the initial massive laser discs, CDs, DVDs, Blue ray discs and high definition smart TVs – even the most tech-savvy teen struggles with that nowadays. This went hand in hand with his passion for movies, which created a newer family tradition involving the watching of a movie after a wonderful meal at family gatherings, including birthdays and celebrations.”


That he was made a life member of all the important institutions in his life shows a man imbued with an avocation for service by which he enriched the lives of others: Norths Chess Club, the New South Wales Chess Association, the Australian Chess Federation and the Correspondence Chess League of Australia.


Phil marked my own life as a constant. I first visited a formal chess club (Maroubra CC) outside of school during my Leaving Certificate year in 1956, catching the tram (I think) to Maroubra Public School where I saw this tall gangling man hunched over a school desk but sitting on the desk itself, already known to me through the pages of Chess World as a son of the famed WS Viner. I last saw him more than six decades later when I gave him a lift back from Frank Hutching’s funeral at North Ryde in January 2018 to his apartment in Shirley Road, Wollstonecraft where we had in years long past shared ACF Council meetings, near my own first married home in nearby Milray Avenue. I had gone through half a dozen residences since then but he had not.

In a City of Sydney Championship once and to my eternal amazement, he as the superior player graciously proposed the draw [K & P v. K & P] and for that act of generosity, I will remember him always - a gentle man and a worthy chess player.

FL

blackbishop
08-02-2020, 09:29 AM
we all have good intentions but some of us are really busy. I, personally, love reading past chess publications at the Vic State Library's Anderson Collection.
On the other hand nothing beats the reading library of the Chess Centre in Adelaide. I have copied (photographed actually) huge chunks of material there.
And in both places it's strictly reading only, you can't borrow stuff - same as in the State Library. You can order whatever you want and they 'll bring it for you!
Maybe when I stop travelling around the globe, which I don't foresee happening in the near future, I might spend more time in places like the above!

Q 10. Is the rumour, coming from deep within the bowels of the ACF, that you have been short listed for the position of Australian Chess Federation Archivist ( Publications ) true?

I support your nomination. You are living in Melbourne and are already familiar with the Anderson Collection. Overseas travel
seems more and more questionable due to the spread of the Coronavirus. You are going to be looking for something to do.

The ACF already has a magnificent collection of historical games that can be downloaded. Your work in converting some of the
ACF or State Chess Association publications to electronic form would make them available for everyone to enjoy.

blackbishop
08-02-2020, 11:17 AM
[QUOTE=Frank;461345]A longer obituary is included in the ACF Newsletter 31 January 2019 https://us12.campaign-archive.com/?u=9dbd09164491bd3b5116f2b71&id=6135bdb01b which quotes an account of his own life published 27 July 2013:

VALE PHILLIP JOHN VINER

10 November 1927 - 5 December 2018



Thank you for that reference Frank. I will update the article on Phillip and try reposting the Dropbox.com link.

antichrist
08-02-2020, 12:13 PM
Q 10. Is the rumour, coming from deep within the bowels of the ACF, that you have been short listed for the position of Australian Chess Federation Archivist ( Publications ) true?

I support your nomination. You are living in Melbourne and are already familiar with the Anderson Collection. Overseas travel
seems more and more questionable due to the spread of the Coronavirus. You are going to be looking for something to do.

The ACF already has a magnificent collection of historical games that can be downloaded. Your work in converting some of the
ACF or State Chess Association publications to electronic form would make them available for everyone to enjoy.

I will happily donate a flat bed scanner, a gift never used. Maybe 8 years old.

ER
08-02-2020, 01:28 PM
Q 10. Is the rumour, coming from deep within the bowels of the ACF,

I hope it's only a case of a mild bowel obstruction :D


that you have been short listed for the position of Australian Chess Federation Archivist ( Publications ) true?

false


I support your nomination.

Thanks but no thanks! :D


You are living in Melbourne and are already familiar with the Anderson Collection.

That's correct!

Overseas travel seems more and more questionable due to the spread of the Coronavirus. You are going to be looking for something to do.

Sorry to disappoint you but I do arrange my traveling schedule at least 4-5 months before the actual departure. (*)

4082

Also add this in between now and then

4081]


The ACF already has a magnificent collection of historical games that can be downloaded. Your work in converting some of the
ACF or State Chess Association publications to electronic form would make them available for everyone to enjoy.

Thanks for your altruism and kindness, I shall consider upon my return to Melburnian normality whatever that is!

(*) (BTW take all the crap you read in the relevant virus thread with a grain of salt - there was a demonstration in Sydney today with people demanding freedom of movement - I hate demonstrations)!

Bill Gletsos
08-02-2020, 01:36 PM
Since no one else has bothered with most of these:

Q4. Who allegedly kept a legible ledger making him eligible for the KM. He was also treasurer of the Canterbury Junior Chess Club? Trevor Stanning


Q5. What average is the skin thickness of the Allfather’s forearm, definitely above?1.3 mm


Q6. How many Life Memberships does Norman Greenwood hold?Four.


Q7. Associate the KM winner in the first list with the correct item in the second list.

Dr Kevin Bonham, Larry Ermacora, Leonard Sandler, Robert Jamieson, Keith Farrell Norbert Muller, William Anderson-Smith


The Holy Grail, Ettalong Chess Club, (Vassily Ivanchuk, Joel Lautier and Boris Gelfand,) Gastropod, Perth Chess Centre. Viner Medal, TennisDr. Kevin Bonham - Gastropod
Larry Ermacora - The Holy Grail
Leonid Sandler - Viner Medal
Robert Jamieson - Tennis
Keith Farrell - Ettalong Chess Club
Norbert Muller - Perth Chess Centre
William Anderson-Smith - (Vassily Ivanchuk, Joel Lautier and Boris Gelfand)

blackbishop
08-02-2020, 02:42 PM
100% correct for Bill Gletsos, illustrating multiple reasons why he is the President of the New South Wales Chess Association and the rest of us are not.

blackbishop
08-02-2020, 02:52 PM
ER Nominee for ACF Archivist (Publications) : "Thanks for your altruism and kindness, I shall consider upon my return to Melburnian normality whatever that is! "

Its a long flight to London. Why not take the scanner with you and scan a few chess magazines to kill some time?

Patrick Byrom
08-02-2020, 02:58 PM
Q9. Why don’t people who have extensive collections of past ACF and Chess Association magazines and news sheets scan them and make them available via Dropbox.com as Ian Murray intends to do with Queensland Chess?Because it's an enormous amount of work, and very few people are interested in the magazines now :(

Seriously though, several years ago I scanned about two dozen issues of the old CAQ Update magazine, so that I could throw out the original hardcopies. It was hard work, even though that magazine is quite small.

But there is a collection of Chess in Australia and other magazines at the Brisbane Club, and also a scanner, if anyone wants to volunteer.

Capablanca-Fan
09-02-2020, 09:27 AM
This was done for the quarterly New Zealand Chess (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag.html) from the 1970s to 2010s, and its predecessors (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag-older.html).

antichrist
09-02-2020, 09:49 AM
As an aside I presume illustrative games are the best to concentrate on to improve one's game? But Australian authors we should not ignore.

blackbishop
09-02-2020, 10:05 AM
What an amazing collection of New Zealand chess magazines online going back to 1938.

blackbishop
09-02-2020, 10:50 AM
4083

blackbishop
09-02-2020, 05:21 PM
The Dropbox link is on page 7 of this thread. Thanks to Frank Low, the ACF Newsletter Editor,
the downloadable KM file now has Phil Viner's last chess column from The Australian newspaper in July, 2013.
The pdf file is around 1.5 megabytes long and is searchable.

blackbishop
10-02-2020, 07:55 AM
There is an interesting account of “Gregory Koshnitsky” in the August 1938 edition of the NZ Chess Gazette together with a “brilliant” game he played against A G Shoebridge. The article was taken from the Australasian Chess Magazine.

https://www.newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag-older.html





From the Chess Chat Thread, Australian Chess Magazines

Bill Gletsos, April 2004.

From Jan 1922 until Dec 1928 there was the Austral Chess and Draughts Newspaper published by James Prowse.

Purdy started the Australasian Chess Review in July 1929.
The name changed in July 1944 to Check!.
The name changed again in 1946 to Chess World and this was published until Dec 1967.

The Chess Bulletin was published from around March 1948 up until Dec 1965.
It originally started off as a NSW bulletin and was the official organ of the NSWCA but in Sept 1965 it also became the official organ of the VCA (Victorian Chess Association). It became Chess In Australia in 1966.

Chess in Australia started in January 1966 and was published until June 1983 by Bernie Johnson.
Peter Parr took over the publishing in July 1983 and continued publishing CIA until Jan/Feb 1992 when the name changed to Australian Chess Magazine. I believe this was because Parr had not registered the name or had allowed it to lapse and Brian Jones registered it, thus preventing Parr from continuing to use it.

Australian Chess Magazine continued up until the Dec 1997/Jan1998 issue.

antichrist
10-02-2020, 11:49 AM
If correct re Brian Jones taking over the name of Peter Parr's Chess In Australia it was a winning and cheeky move right on flag fall. Brian could have chosen another name considering Peter's contribution to Australian chess and the small world of Australian chess.

Bill Gletsos
10-02-2020, 05:00 PM
If correct re Brian Jones taking over the name of Peter Parr's Chess In Australia it was a winning and cheeky move right on flag fall. Brian could have chosen another name considering Peter's contribution to Australian chess and the small world of Australian chess.What do you mean if correct.
It is correct. It was registered by Brian in early December 1991.
The part I don't know is if it was because Parr had not registered the name or had allowed it to lapse.

blackbishop
10-02-2020, 07:36 PM
In New Zealand, the amazing collection of online chess magazines seems to have resulted from a great deal of work being done by a few individuals
then the NZCA finding a home for it on their website and progressively adding to it. Perhaps that is what has happened in Australia with the excellent collection
of downloadable chess games on the ACF website.

There are a number of State Chess Association, ACF and Junior Chess newsletters and magazines, some remnants of which are online, that would be worthy
of preservation as well as the more familiar national magazines. These were once the main means of communicating information before the arrival of the internet.

Maybe individuals, like Patrick Byrom, still have their own collections of some of these magazines. Perhaps some of these magazines and newsletters only exist in the Anderson Collection or similar.

Would it be possible, as a first step, for the ACF or a State Association to open a sort of Domesday Book where people could list what literature they possess and
perhaps also how much of it they would be able to scan if any? That would, if given enough of a push, give some idea of what literature was available outside of the libraries.

There seems to be little chance that the library collections will ever be digitized.

jammo
10-02-2020, 08:34 PM
In New Zealand, the amazing collection of online chess magazines seems to have resulted from a great deal of work being done by a few individuals
then the NZCA finding a home for it on their website and progressively adding to it. Perhaps that is what has happened in Australia with the excellent collection
of downloadable chess games on the ACF website.

There are a number of State Chess Association, ACF and Junior Chess newsletters and magazines, some remnants of which are online, that would be worthy
of preservation as well as the more familiar national magazines. These were once the main means of communicating information before the arrival of the internet.

Maybe individuals, like Patrick Byrom, still have their own collections of some of these magazines. Perhaps some of these magazines and newsletters only exist in the Anderson Collection or similar.

Would it be possible, as a first step, for the ACF or a State Association to open a sort of Domesday Book where people could list what literature they possess and
perhaps also how much of it they would be able to scan if any? That would, if given enough of a push, give some idea of what literature was available outside of the libraries.

There seems to be little chance that the library collections will ever be digitized.

I’d be happy to make a list of what chess literature I possess. Come back in a couple of decades and I should have the list finished. But you want the ACF to create space on it’s website for this material ..... that may take a little longer.

blackbishop
10-02-2020, 08:56 PM
The files could be stored in the cloud.

blackbishop
10-02-2020, 09:10 PM
List a few mòre difficult to obtain publications only.

blackbishop
10-02-2020, 09:31 PM
OR: Scan Day at Jammo's place. BYO Scanner. Entry by gold coin to pay for the electricity.

antichrist
10-02-2020, 11:22 PM
OR: Scan Day at Jammo's place. BYO Scanner. Entry by gold coin to pay for the electricity.

Booked for tennis Grand Slam final day, take over the TV room with Oscar demoted to the doghouse. Lindt chocolates provided for smoko. And chess set but no score cards.

blackbishop
11-02-2020, 06:01 AM
Don’t forget your scanner, cable, laptop , wireless mouse and flash drive. A less expensive brand of chocolates would be acceptable but thanks for offering.

blackbishop
11-02-2020, 10:48 AM
Maybe the ACF could invest in a high speed scanner as Ian Murray has done,

See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFQQ1a_KY-Y

ER
11-02-2020, 11:11 AM
Maybe the ACF could invest in a high speed scanner as Ian Murray has done,

See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFQQ1a_KY-Y

This is a good cause, I am more than willing to participate in a fund collection campaign to finance this. Cheers! ER

Frank
11-02-2020, 03:56 PM
A later account of Denis Jessop #8 is in an obituary (https://us12.campaign-archive.com/?u=9dbd09164491bd3b5116f2b71&id=6a2cc5c2d1) published in the ACF Newsletter for 31 May 2019.

It contains a photo (https://brianropephotography.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/small-10-dennis-jessop.jpg) of Denis by a local camera club member.

blackbishop
11-02-2020, 06:59 PM
The post for the highly regarded and respected Denis Jessop has been updated thanks again to the ACF newsletter editor Frank Low.

The link is on page 7 of this thread.

Copy the link and paste into a browser. If it does not download directly, find the download button. Save the file.

jammo
11-02-2020, 10:02 PM
Maybe the ACF could invest in a high speed scanner as Ian Murray has done,

See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFQQ1a_KY-Y

I know how to handle annoying people like you who actually want the ACF to do something.
First line of defence “It’s not in the budget and we can’t afford it.”
Second line of defence “Great idea but alas unless someone comes forward to do the work we have no-one to implement your idea.”
As a last resort, if anyone complains too much, simply suggest that perhaps they are the ideal person to implement their new idea - that usually shuts them up.

However if someone comes forward and agrees to fund the project, do the work scanning, and uploading the output onto the ACF’s website I’m sure that the ACF would support this proposal. That however raises the secondary problem as to whether or not anyone could find the ACF’s website using a search engine ..... good luck with that.

In case you hadn’t guessed I’m a big fan of “Yes Minister.”

Kevin Bonham
11-02-2020, 11:27 PM
I have commented on the ACF Website searchability matter on the ACF website thread.

There is to be no further discussion of ACF website issues on this thread unless strictly and directly relevant. Ditto for general ACF issues/complaints. Any discussion of this ruling is to occur in the Help and Feedback section only. Any comment regarding this ruling and posted to this thread will at minimum be deleted.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 10:41 AM
There seems to be two types of fast scanners. The quite expensive ones require you to cut the magazine so that individual pages can be placed in a document feeder.
Both sides of the document are scanned simultaneously. The less expensive ones simply take a photograph of the magazine rather than scan it. They seem to come with
optical character recognition software which, I guess, would allow searching of the final document if it actually works.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 10:50 AM
1. We consult with Ian Murray and get his view on the scanner that he has bought.

2. We raise money to buy a scanner. About $150 for the photo scanner.

3. Jammo agrees to scan as many of the magazines that he edited as he can before exploding.

( Jammo seems to have a vast collection of magazines and he seems to be the one that complains the most.)


4. We deliver the scanner to Jammo.


Everybody happy? All good?

ER
12-02-2020, 11:06 AM
1. ...

2. We raise money to buy a scanner. About $150 for the photo scanner. ...



If/when this plan is materialized, I would contribute the $150.00 needed for the photo scanner.
Just e-mail me bank account No. when ready. Cheers, E.

antichrist
12-02-2020, 11:36 AM
As already stated I have an unused flat scanner just gathering dust if needed.

And ER donation can go to our inaugural Byron Bay tournament as already pledged. As with all tournaments I organise I don't pay rent or any fees so 100% fees goes to prizes.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 12:17 PM
Because of the potentially large amount of material to be scanned, a reasonably fast method of scanning would be needed..
What sort of scanner are you offering?

antichrist
12-02-2020, 03:06 PM
Because of the potentially large amount of material to be scanned, a reasonably fast method of scanning would be needed..
What sort of scanner are you offering?

Had to rescue it from the basement.

Canoscan LiDE 600F Serial number KBXA03034
Canon5v 500mA FC3-4-01617 DB03 Class B digital Can copy, photo/film & email. Also mentions pdf
Made in Vietnam

I see it is still everywhere on websites for the drivers etc. I don't know if needs as it has never being turned on. There are still on sale for $125. There is a chance that I could land another one if required but not sure.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 04:11 PM
I also have a Canoscan, although probably of an older vintage than yours. My Canon printer also scans pretty well.
They would all be of use if a mass scanning party was organised. Scan Day at Jammo's place.

The other approach might be to buy a faster scanner and bequeath it to someone who had the time and the magazines to use it.

ER
12-02-2020, 05:45 PM
There's a reference to my name on post #162. It regards a sensitive financial matter of a rather personal nature. I do not wish to discuss it here
and as such contributing to an off topic situation. so I am taking it to the off topic thread.

Patrick Byrom
12-02-2020, 06:12 PM
Canon multi-function printers (with built-in scanner) are about $50 brand new, so arranging a few of these shouldn't be a problem. But, based on my experience scanning only a very small 'magazine' with one of them, you would need several people to get the job done in a reasonable amount of time. The scanning is fast enough - it's turning the pages that is time-consuming.

I would definitely recommend a scanner with a document feeder if it's going to be a one person job, although they are much more expensive. An optical character reader would be a definite bonus, as it would make the files searchable. Without it, all you've got are pictures which can't be searched.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 06:34 PM
This is a good cause, I am more than willing to participate in a fund collection campaign to finance this. Cheers! ER

Thank you for your generous offer. I would also be prepared to pay something towards a capable scanner
provided it resides with someone who has access to worthwhile literature and is prepared to put some time into scanning.

blackbishop
12-02-2020, 06:56 PM
Canon multi-function printers (with built-in scanner) are about $50 brand new, so arranging a few of these shouldn't be a problem. But, based on my experience scanning only a very small 'magazine' with one of them, you would need several people to get the job done in a reasonable amount of time. The scanning is fast enough - it's turning the pages that is time-consuming.

I would definitely recommend a scanner with a document feeder if it's going to be a one person job, although they are much more expensive. An optical character reader would be a definite bonus, as it would make the files searchable. Without it, all you've got are pictures which can't be searched.

I have an ancient scanner and two Canon printers. As you say, it probably would not be difficult to get a team of people together with scanners and laptops if we had something to scan. Perhaps we wait and see if Ian Murray can handle all the scanning associated with Queensland Chess. If he needs any help, perhaps we could arrange a "Jammo scan day".

antichrist
13-02-2020, 06:57 PM
I would be checking the quality, speed and reliability of something costing just $50.

Desmond
13-02-2020, 08:53 PM
You could just use an app on your smart phone (https://www.androidauthority.com/best-document-scanner-apps-777240/), go for one with OCR for the character recognition. Maybe not quite as good as a dedicated scanner, but much quicker to do.

Patrick Byrom
14-02-2020, 11:31 AM
I would be checking the quality, speed and reliability of something costing just $50.The multi-function one I bought has worked fine for about a decade - although I don't do a lot of scanning.

blackbishop
14-02-2020, 02:13 PM
I connected both of my Canon printers to my old Desktop using Ubuntu 18.04, a free open source operating system with additional software available for downloading.
I used "Simple Scan" and "gscan2pdf" to operate the two printer scanners simultaneously. The gscan2pdf has optical character recognition so you could scan say twenty
pages of a magazine then run gscan to produce a searchable pdf.

blackbishop
15-02-2020, 09:01 AM
Are there any copyright problems with scanning, Australian Chess Magazine, Chess in Australia, Chess World etc magazines?

Patrick Byrom
15-02-2020, 12:52 PM
Are there any copyright problems with scanning, Australian Chess Magazine, Chess in Australia, Chess World etc magazines?I imagine that Chess in Australia is still technically under copyright, but since it is no longer being sold, I can't see why anyone would enforce it. There are a lot of magazines on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/) that can be downloaded even though they would presumably be under copyright.

blackbishop
15-02-2020, 05:14 PM
Apparently copyright holds until 70 years after the author's death. C J S Purdy died in November 1979.

blackbishop
09-05-2020, 09:33 AM
There is a possibility that the downloadable Koshnitsky Medallist file, extolling the virtues of
our past Koshnitsky Medal Winners, could find a more permanent home at the State Library of Victoria as a downloadable electronic document. Not much of our chess history is downloadable at present.

The SLV requires that to accept the Koshnitsky file as an electronic document, all of the many links to other websites in the file need to be expunged. This will require some rewriting. They also require that a title page be written. The title page, they say, should include - title, author, publisher (either yourself or the Australian Chess Federation?), place of publication (eg. the ACF head office location - only needs to be the city/suburb) and a publication date (year).

Hopefully, the ACF will “own” the electronic document and agree to be publisher and author.

The rewriting does present an opportunity for chess players to provide further information and photographs to be included in the document. In particular, more information and photographs need to be found regarding the achievements of:

Ian Laurie, Margaret Cuckson, Don Maciulitis, Gary Wastell, John Maddix, Bill Gletsos, Jenni Oliver, Peter Cassettari and others.

I will provide a link to the amended document on Chess Chat so that any errors, omissions etc can be pointed out prior to sending it to the SLV.

blackbishop
13-05-2020, 11:07 AM
During the 1970’s, an inter secondary schools teams chess competition was running in Brisbane with eighteen teams participating in 1972, according to Mark Stokes, current CAQ President, who played for Saint Patrick's College, Shorncliffe.

There was no inter primary school teams competition running in Brisbane at that time and little, if any, inter school chess activity on the Gold Coast. Wendy Terry had been running the Rookies Chess Club in Wynnum for many years. She also founded the Queensland Women's Chess League and the Queensland Veterans and Disabled Championships. Gail Young, another Koshnitsky Medal winner, has continued Wendy’s work. CAQ’s State Directors of Coaching had conducted some chess coaching in schools while the CAQ ran junior championships.

Paul Chalupa and Magne Forfang initiated a primary schools teams competition in Brisbane probably around 1988. That competition was likely well received so that, on the departure of Magne and later Paul, some parents got together and formed the Queensland Junior Chess League (QJCL ) to maintain and extend the primary schools competition. Connie Pizzato and later Kerry Corker were two of the main figures in the QJCL.

By the mid-1990s, the QJCL was running Brisbane junior and inter school chess. Kerry Corker and some others, had seen the potential of chess coaching especially with primary school students and were successfully engaged in private tutoring. A number of junior chess clubs were formed. It involved a lot of preparation and a lot of travelling but resulted in some notable successes for Queensland Junior Chess teams.

blackbishop
13-05-2020, 11:11 AM
The above is some of the background to the remarkable achievements of Graeme and Wendy Gardiner who transformed chess coaching and inter school teams chess events in the state while enriching the chess calendar for all. They succeeded in what seemed to us to be a very difficult task at the time, putting chess organisation on a business footing.

Graeme was a Development Officer at Somerset College, Mudgeeraba. Initially he formed a chess club at the school then he established an inter-school chess competition on the Gold Coast involving six schools. In 1993, Graeme and local chess players formed the Gold Coast Chess Club. Soon the first Gold Coast Open was held. According to Graeme, “Early organisers of the first Gold Coast Open which was held in the library at Somerset College included Jeff and Elizabeth Carmichael, as well as Bruce Harris and David Esmonde." Australia’s first Grand master, Ian Rogers was invited to play and to coach the juniors.

In 1994, helped by members of the Gold Coast Chess Club, Graeme ran the Australian Junior Championships at Somerset College. The following year, players from the QJCL, Wendy Terry’s junior club and Somerset College competed in the Australian Juniors in Canberra. In 1997, Graeme, following a suggestion by Ralph Kajet, organised the inaugural Australian Schools Teams Finals weekend which took place at Sydney Grammar School in 1998. Prior to this, some states had held their own school’s teams championships but no national event was held.

Initially, the tournament had two divisions – Primary and Secondary Open teams from each state. In 1999, in order to encourage girls in chess and to allow single sex girls’ schools to compete, two further divisions were added – Primary Girls and Secondary Girls. Each state is divided into regions. Regional competitions are held to determine the champion schools for the region. The regional winners in the four divisions then meet in state finals and the state final winners compete at the national finals. In Queensland in 2019 for example, there around twelve zones based in regional Queensland with another nine located in Northern NSW and South East Queensland (Brisbane and Gold Coast). The Queensland Inter-School Chess Championships are coordinated by Gardiner Chess on behalf of the Chess Association of Queensland (CAQ) under a licensing agreement running from 2018 to 2022.

Graeme was elected President of the Australian Chess Federation (ACF) and held that position from 1999 – 2003. As Oceania Zone President, Graeme organised three zone tournaments. The inaugural Oceania Chess Championship conducted on the Gold Coast in 1999 was won by Vladimir Feldman. In May 2000, an additional Oceania Zonal Chess Championship was held and won by Alex Wohl. In that year, the ACF had to contend with a legal stoush concerning a dispute over player selection for the Australian Chess Olympiad team. Later Graeme acted as Oceania's official delegate at the 2000 Chess Olympiad in Istanbul. In 2001, Mikhail Gluzman and Mark Chapman shared first place in the Oceania Zonal with a score of 7/9, but the former won a rapid chess play-off match and the title.

In 2001 Graeme and wife Wendy, who worked at the University of Queensland in Parasitology and later in Tropical Health, decided to launch into uncharted waters by starting up a chess business. Graeme resigned his position at Somerset College while maintaining a close relationship with the college in matters of chess.

They planned a chess program and built a Chess Centre in scenic bush land at Mudgeeraba on the Gold Coast. The Centre contained coaching areas, a chess book and equipment shop, a cafe, internet facilities, a library, a spacious tournament hall equipped with monitors and technology for broadcasting live games online and an office from which a large chess in schools programs, devised by Graeme, was run. The centre opened for business in early 2003.

Meanwhile, Ian Murray had moved from Rockhampton to Brisbane in 1995 and began expanding the junior chess network into regional Queensland, under the CAQ banner.

“I ran tournaments a couple of times a year in Bundaberg, Gladstone, Rocky, Mackay, Townsville and Cairns. In the early 2000’s the program was merged with the Gardiner Chess program on the Gold Coast, and Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Mt Isa, Longreach, Charleville and Roma were included to make it a statewide venture. Regional winners qualified for the state finals, deciding the teams to represent Queensland in the national championships.”

Gardiner Chess found itself growing, with CAQ assistance, a state wide network of primary and secondary school chess competitions, both teams events and junior championships. They also ran many open chess tournaments. The Gold Coast Open has over the past twenty-eight years, established itself as Queensland’s most prestigious chess tournament. Grandmaster Ian Rogers, won the Premier event on eight occasions and, on retirement as a player, he has conducted games commentaries and junior coaching classes as part of the tournament program. Recently Premier, Major and Minor division have been introduced to allow participation by all levels of players.

Graeme and Wendy ran the chess centre and their ‘chess in schools’ business from the chess centre until the sale of the Chess Centre in 2011. From 2011 to 2015, they ran the business successfully from an office in Mudgeeraba. The business was sold at the end of 2015 to two senior staff members, Andrew Fitzpatrick and Justine Jule. They now provide quality coaching to approximately 100 schools in South-East Queensland. There are around 3,000 kids from all over Queensland and Northern NSW that play in these inter school competitions each term. They have successfully expanded the business and run major tournaments to become an essential part of the Queensland and Australian Chess scene.

Graeme Gardiner, now retired, has recently completed his Masters Research degree at the University of Southern Queensland in the field of chess and education. Graeme presented papers at the Chess in Schools conference in Aberdeen in 2017, and the London Chess Conference in 2018.

He keeps fit by cycling and does some paid and some voluntary work at Somerset College.

Shaun94
25-05-2020, 11:55 AM
Graeme and Wendy are pioneers of chess in Queensland and Australia. I had the pleasure of growing up playing in Gardiner Chess events and being fortunate enough to be a part of Gardiner Chess coaching and inter-school chess tournaments. The positive impact it left on my lift is evident and I now work full time as a chess coach and tournament organiser/arbiter.

People like Graeme and Wendy have had impacts on thousands of children many more than I think they realise and has provided opportunity for chess to be a part of life in many schools throughout Queensland.

blackbishop
28-08-2020, 01:31 PM
Spring is upon us, in Brisbane at least. In Spring, a young man’s fancy lightly turns to that person worthy of nomination for next year’s Koshnitsky Medal. Nomination generally close in mid November while medals are awarded at the Australian Championships in January.

All is in the hands of Caissa and the Australian Chess Federation, including whether or not there will be a national championship and whether or not medals will be awarded next year. Still, the work you do in nominating and preparing a submission on behalf of your worthy candidate won’t be wasted.

Past winners of the Koshnitsky Medal have included club and junior chess organizers, club and chess association office holders, including Treasurers, Arbiters and Tournament Organizers. The winner will have done a lot of valuable work for Chess over many years. Nor perhaps, is your choice of candidate confined to that noisy minority group, The Living.

The ACF Medals & Awards Convenor is Gary Wastell. Submissions are sent to him and he forwards them on to a selection panel. Submissions can come from Associations, Clubs or from individuals.

medals_awards_convenor@auschess.org.au

The work of the previous winners of the Koshnitsky Medal can be viewed or downloaded from the Dropbox account below.



https://www.dropbox.com/s/lc934hueacq1umg/Koshnitsky%20Medallists.pdf?dl=0

blackbishop
02-02-2021, 06:37 PM
David Ellis of Western Australia won the 2021 Koshnitsky Medal for Chess Administration.

4768


The Dropbox link to the updated file of all Koshnitsky Medal winners is below:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/iq4i878xhymdzu9/Koshnitsky%20Medal.pdf?dl=0