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Bill Forster
12-02-2019, 06:50 PM
I have been doing some maintenance work on the Peter Stuart NZ Games Database (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/history.html#database), (<-that's a link, my ageing eyes can barely perceive the colour difference) which is now looked after by NZCF.

I did a mechanical check for duplicate games, and came up with the following pair of games;

Gollogly, David A - Adams, Jonathan M, 1977-1978 NZ Premier Reserve 1977.12.31 Round 5, 1-0 in 30 moves
Gollogly, David A - Adams, David T, 1977-1978 NZ Premier Reserve 1978.01.02 Round 6, 1-0 in 30 moves

The interesting thing is, the moves of these two games are identical (quite a nice attacking win by White actually - I will paste the moves below).

Now that old NZ Chess Magazines are available to view online on the NZCF site I was able to check, and indeed Gollogly did beat each Adams in turn, in successive rounds (*** see mystery solved below ***)

But almost certainly (99.99999%) this unlikely set of circumstances (including overlapping Davids) prompted a clerical mistake in the database and one of the games has been lost.

I think one of the Adams players is a regular commenter here and I hope he will see this and shed some light. It would be too much to hope that the duplicate game is the David Adams game and Jonathan Adams can provide the actual score to his game! Maybe a 1% chance of that (*** once again, see mystery solved below ***).

I think I remember David Adams as a friendly young chap who was a contemporary of mine in Wellington schoolboy chess in the 1970s. I think he went to Tawa college, started a career in the Air Force, but died tragically young (of illness not accident). My confidence in my accuracy reduces as the previous sentence progresses. Perhaps someone here has some better recollection.

**** Mystery Solved ****

In the act of writing this up I realised I should look carefully at everything the Feb 1978 magazine had to say (not just the crosstable) and in fact the round 6 game David Adams v Gollogly (not Gollogly-Adams) is recorded, a win in 19 moves for Gollogly. I transcribed the game with a view to fixing the database and then checked the final position against the database (just on a whim) and found the game was already present! So the database had a D Adams-Gollogly game and a (wrong) Gollogly-D. Adams game on the same day with the same round number. The fix will be to simply delete the fallacious Gollogly - D Adams game.

I am going to go ahead and post this anyway, perhaps someone will find the whole story has some entertainment value.

Gollogly - J Adams 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.O-O O-O 9.Nb3 Be6 10.f4 Na5 11.f5 Bc4 12.Bd3 Bxd3 13.cxd3 a6 14.g4 Nxb3 15.axb3 Rc8 16.g5 Nd7 17.Qg4 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Ne5 19.Qh4 f6 20.d4 Rxc3 21.fxg6 hxg6 22.dxe5 Rxe3 23.gxf6 Qb6 24.Kh1 Qc6 25.fxe7 Rf7 26.Rxf7 Kxf7 27.Rf1+ Ke6 28.Qf6+ Kd7 29.e8=Q+ Kxe8 30.Qf8+ 1-0

D Adams - Gollogly 1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.Nf3 d5 5.exd5 exd5 6.d4 Nf6 7.Qe2+ Be7 8.Be3 O-O 9.O-O-O c4 10.h3 b5 11.Bd2 b4 12.Nb1 Ne4 13.Be1 Qa5 14.a3 c3 15.Qb5 bxa3 16.bxc3 a2 17.Qxa5 Nxa5 18.Kb2 axb1=Q+ 19.Kxb1 Nd6 0-1

ER
12-02-2019, 08:19 PM
Gollogly - J Adams

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.O-O O-O 9.Nb3 Be6 10.f4 Na5 11.f5 Bc4 12.Bd3 Bxd3 13.cxd3 a6 14.g4 Nxb3 15.axb3 Rc8 16.g5 Nd7 17.Qg4 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Ne5 19.Qh4 f6 20.d4 Rxc3 21.fxg6 hxg6 22.dxe5 Rxe3 23.gxf6 Qb6 24.Kh1 Qc6 25.fxe7 Rf7 26.Rxf7 Kxf7 27.Rf1+ Ke6 28.Qf6+ Kd7 29.e8=Q+ Kxe8 30.Qf8+ 1-0

ER
12-02-2019, 08:20 PM
D Adams - Gollogly

1.e4 c5 2.f4 e6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.Nf3 d5 5.exd5 exd5 6.d4 Nf6 7.Qe2+ Be7 8.Be3 O-O 9.O-O-O c4 10.h3 b5 11.Bd2 b4 12.Nb1 Ne4 13.Be1 Qa5 14.a3 c3 15.Qb5 bxa3 16.bxc3 a2 17.Qxa5 Nxa5 18.Kb2 axb1=Q+ 19.Kxb1 Nd6 0-1

Capablanca-Fan
14-02-2019, 03:06 AM
Yes, Jonathan Adams is happily still with us, even on this site, but David Adams died way too young of cancer in ~1988. We were in Wellington schoolpupils competitions together, although he was about 4 or 5 years older. He and his father came to visit and he left me some of his books. His father was understandably distraught when he explained the situation to my parents; I had no idea because David looked normal. He had served in the NZ Navy while getting a uni education, and was also a Dan-level (amateur) Go player.

Capablanca-Fan
14-02-2019, 03:10 AM
I have been doing some maintenance work on the Peter Stuart NZ Games Database (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/history.html#database), (← that’s a link, my ageing eyes can barely perceive the colour difference) which is now looked after by NZCF.
Yes, as people age, their lens becomes yellower, which cuts out more blue light. E.g. Designing For The Elderly: Ways Older People Use Digital Technology Differently (https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/02/designing-digital-technology-for-the-elderly/):


Color vision also declines with age, and we become worse at distinguishing between similar colors. In particular, shades of blue appear to be faded or desaturated.

The company I work for has needed to take care of such things with both our website and magazine.

CivicChessMan
17-02-2019, 10:34 PM
Does anyone know what became of David Gollogly? I extracted a top 50 list from 30 years ago and attempted to fill in players' statuses.


1 3016AM Small, Vernon A CA 2353 Wellington
2 3003SM Sutton, Richard J CI 2343 deceased
3 3383AM Ker, Anthony F CI 2321 active
4 3002AM Garbett, Paul A NS 2295 active
5 3178AM Nokes, Roger I NS 2293 Christchurcn
6 3459AM Dive, Russell J CI 2289 active
6 3001VM Sarapu, Ortvin AC 2289 deceased
8 3251AM Sarfati, Jonathan D WE 2285 USA
9 3206AM Watson, Bruce R NS 2272 active
10 3199UM Green, Peter R AC 2257
11 3007AM Green, Ewen M HP 2256 active
12 3416UM Levene, Mark 2246 London, UK
13 3231UM Aptekar, Lev CI 2243 Australia
14 3390UM Lloyd, Adrian J 2242
15 3025AM Carpinter, Anthony L NS 2239 active
16 3552JM Martin, Benjamin M S OT 2224 Aberdeen, UK
17 3174UM Beach, David H CI 2211
18 3314UM McLaren, Leonard J GA 2204 active
19 3088AM Smith, Robert W WT 2201 active
20 3616UM Hampl, Michael CI 2185
20 3176AM Love, Anthony J OT 2185 Dunedin
22 3292UM Gollogly, David A NS 2184
23 3163AM Clemance, Philip A CI 2176 deceased
24 3696AM Lukey, Stephen G CA 2174 active
24 3009AM Wansink, Robert OT 2174 Dunedin
26 3482AM Spain, Graeme A GA 2171 active
27 3011UM Leonhardt, Wolfgang NS 2153 Perth, AUS
28 3208UM Cordue, Patrick L CI 2148 Wellington
29 3005AM Stuart, Peter W NS 2137 deceased
30 3296UM Anderson, Bruce R CA 2131
31 3336UM Bates, Giles T H CA 2120
32 3460AM Dreyer, Martin P AC 2115 active
32 3026UM Whaley, Michael G NS 2115
34 3052UM Weir, Peter B NS 2109
35 3573UM Cooper, Paul R AC 2104
36 3041UM Metge, J Nigel AC 2100 active
37 3503UM Ker, Charles M PE 2096
38 3029UM Jackson, Jon R NE 2094
39 3151AM Freeman, Michael R NP 2090 active
40 3255AM Noble, Mark F PE 2089 active
41 3201AM Steadman, Michael V R CI 2082 active
42 3629AM Wilson, Mark C CA 2081
43 3148AM Dowden, R Anthony OT 2073 active
44 3603UM Reyn, Isidor 2061
44 3440UM Spencer-Smith, Gregory J OT 2061
46 3512UM Alexander, Ben J 2051
47 3010UM Hensman, Peter J 2050
48 3034UM Baker, Chris P CA 2048
49 3028SM Haase, Graham G OT 2044 deceased
50 3613UM Fitzpatrick, Simon P AC 2041


16 players are still active in New Zealand chess.

Bill Forster
19-02-2019, 01:23 PM
Does anyone know what became of David Gollogly?.

I have just finished some more work on the Peter Stuart database (same link as before), this time extending his NZ Championships cross tables to 2018 and 2019. I notice that David Gollogly was actually NZ Champion in 1983, winning in the Dunedin congress of that year (shared with Paul Garbett who Gollogly beat in their individual encounter).

In the NZ database, Gollogly only has 78 games, all between 1978 and 1984. He was getting good results and playing powerful chess (judging from a few random games I looked at - like the win v Garbett from the previous paragraph). So, it was rather a short "career" for a strong player.

It's a rather google-able name and a bit of internet snooping suggests that 1978-1984 were basically his university years and that he has gone on to a rather high powered and successful medical career that continues to this day. Possibly Dr David Gollogly is one of those rare individuals who had sufficient strength of character to permanently escape our addictive game!

CivicChessMan
21-02-2019, 11:34 AM
David Beach was another strong player from Civic Chess Club that I remember well but who has vanished into thin air.

Bill Forster
22-02-2019, 09:59 AM
David Beach was another strong player from Civic Chess Club that I remember well but who has vanished into thin air.

I remember there were fabulous interschool matches back in the day (mid 70s), held in the cavernous (probably if I went back it wouldn't be as impressive as my memory) basement of the old YWCA building at the top of Willis Street by the Civic Chess club. Run by a guy named Ted Stallknecht (??? or something like that ??? - maybe started with a G not an S. Don't know).

Onslow College had David Beach #1, Stuart Cordue #2, Patrick Cordue #3. All on your list earlier (Edited later: Actually Stuart Cordue isn't on the list - surprises me as he was the stronger older brother - but he might have given up earlier). Wainuiomata College had an obscure player named Murray Chandler on #1. I think I can recall their entire lineup the day we (Newlands College - minnows) took them on. Fomotor #2, Rolfe #3, Collins #4. Can't quite recall the forenames - even Mr Collins who I used to see around town for decades. I want to say Phil but I bet that's not right :- ) (Edited later: Peter Collins). It was a toss up between Wainui and Onslow, Wainui with their extreme strength on #1 backed up by very decent #2,#3 and #4 vs Onslow with better than decent #1 thru #3. The funny thing was, and I am 99% sure this isn't some kind of false memory, Newlands were blitzed on #2, #3 and #4 - but we actually drew on board #1. I lost to Rolfe. I think I played a Pirc or similar and he just steamrollered me with an early f4-f5 type typical Kingside attack. Meanwhile on board 1, Ross Powell (anyone remember him?) reached a symmetrical N+Ps v N+Ps ending v Chandler and safely drew.

Ross had an unhappy life and died a few years ago. Maybe this was one of the highlights of his life.

Stuart Cordue showed up at the Wellington Chess Club about 15 years ago with his son who he was trying to interest in the game. Then faded away again.

I saw Patrick Cordue in a Doctor's waiting room in Kelburn just a couple of years ago. Disturbingly, his physical appearance hadn't much changed since I last saw him as a seventh former 40 odd years ago (I call this "the Anthony Ker syndrome"). Not only was he a much better chess player than me, he shaded me in maths and physics too - we both got a Junior Scholarship but he got better marks. Very annoying that the bastard is now blitzing me in the hairline and waistline stakes as well :-).

Adamski
22-02-2019, 10:36 PM
Gollogly - J Adams

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be2 Bg7 7.Be3 Nc6 8.O-O O-O 9.Nb3 Be6 10.f4 Na5 11.f5 Bc4 12.Bd3 Bxd3 13.cxd3 a6 14.g4 Nxb3 15.axb3 Rc8 16.g5 Nd7 17.Qg4 Bxc3 18.bxc3 Ne5 19.Qh4 f6 20.d4 Rxc3 21.fxg6 hxg6 22.dxe5 Rxe3 23.gxf6 Qb6 24.Kh1 Qc6 25.fxe7 Rf7 26.Rxf7 Kxf7 27.Rf1+ Ke6 28.Qf6+ Kd7 29.e8=Q+ Kxe8 30.Qf8+ 1-0

My memory of this game is simply that I was slaughtered! I gave up the Dragon soon after - too many losses! (Another Dragon I lost was against my current Rooty Hill clubmate, Gavin Marner, then also in Wellington.) I have that scoresheet somewhere - I will try to find it!

The whole Gollogly-Adams story was interesting.

Adamski
22-02-2019, 10:59 PM
Here are the moves.
I got some minor details wrong. I won this game (!), was White, and it wasn't a Dragon, it was a Morra Gambit as you can see. It was a fun game - Gavin was pretty young then. I played a lot of gambits in my younger days.

Anzac Weekender, Welington, NZ, 26/4/1984.
White: Adams, Jonathan
Black: Marner, Gavin.
Result: 1-0.
ECO B21.


1 e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 Bg4? 7. Bxf7+ Kd7 8. Qb3 Rb8 9. Bxg8 e6 10. h3 Rxg8 11. hxg4 Be7 12. Bf4 h6 13. 0-0-0 a6 14. Bxd6 Bxd6 15. e5 Nxe5 16. Nxe5+ Ke7 17. Rhe1 Re8 18. Nd5+ Kf8 19 Qf3+ Kg8 20. Qf7+ Kh7 21. Qg6+ Kg8 22. Nf7 Qc8+ 23. Kb1 exd5 24. Nxh6+ Kh8 25. Nf7+ Kg8 26. Rh1 1-0.

These days Gavin is in the top group of players at Rooty Hill and I of course am playing less as I am arbiting most of the time, and I am significantly lower rated than him. We have had the odd spot of reminiscing about our Welington chess days. Gavin also makes me often think of another strong Wellington player (and like me he played lots of gambits) - Peter Hawkes. This is because both Gavin and Peter are (or maybe just were in Peter's case) industrial chemists who work for companies making making laundry powder/ soap products.

Adamski
22-02-2019, 11:07 PM
Does anyone know what became of David Gollogly? I extracted a top 50 list from 30 years ago and attempted to fill in players' statuses.


1 3016AM Small, Vernon A CA 2353 Wellington
2 3003SM Sutton, Richard J CI 2343 deceased
3 3383AM Ker, Anthony F CI 2321 active
4 3002AM Garbett, Paul A NS 2295 active
5 3178AM Nokes, Roger I NS 2293 Christchurcn
6 3459AM Dive, Russell J CI 2289 active
6 3001VM Sarapu, Ortvin AC 2289 deceased
8 3251AM Sarfati, Jonathan D WE 2285 USA
9 3206AM Watson, Bruce R NS 2272 active
10 3199UM Green, Peter R AC 2257
11 3007AM Green, Ewen M HP 2256 active
12 3416UM Levene, Mark 2246 London, UK
13 3231UM Aptekar, Lev CI 2243 Australia
14 3390UM Lloyd, Adrian J 2242
15 3025AM Carpinter, Anthony L NS 2239 active
16 3552JM Martin, Benjamin M S OT 2224 Aberdeen, UK
17 3174UM Beach, David H CI 2211
18 3314UM McLaren, Leonard J GA 2204 active
19 3088AM Smith, Robert W WT 2201 active
20 3616UM Hampl, Michael CI 2185
20 3176AM Love, Anthony J OT 2185 Dunedin
22 3292UM Gollogly, David A NS 2184
23 3163AM Clemance, Philip A CI 2176 deceased
24 3696AM Lukey, Stephen G CA 2174 active
24 3009AM Wansink, Robert OT 2174 Dunedin
26 3482AM Spain, Graeme A GA 2171 active
27 3011UM Leonhardt, Wolfgang NS 2153 Perth, AUS
28 3208UM Cordue, Patrick L CI 2148 Wellington
29 3005AM Stuart, Peter W NS 2137 deceased
30 3296UM Anderson, Bruce R CA 2131
31 3336UM Bates, Giles T H CA 2120
32 3460AM Dreyer, Martin P AC 2115 active
32 3026UM Whaley, Michael G NS 2115
34 3052UM Weir, Peter B NS 2109
35 3573UM Cooper, Paul R AC 2104
36 3041UM Metge, J Nigel AC 2100 active
37 3503UM Ker, Charles M PE 2096
38 3029UM Jackson, Jon R NE 2094
39 3151AM Freeman, Michael R NP 2090 active
40 3255AM Noble, Mark F PE 2089 active
41 3201AM Steadman, Michael V R CI 2082 active
42 3629AM Wilson, Mark C CA 2081
43 3148AM Dowden, R Anthony OT 2073 active
44 3603UM Reyn, Isidor 2061
44 3440UM Spencer-Smith, Gregory J OT 2061
46 3512UM Alexander, Ben J 2051
47 3010UM Hensman, Peter J 2050
48 3034UM Baker, Chris P CA 2048
49 3028SM Haase, Graham G OT 2044 deceased
50 3613UM Fitzpatrick, Simon P AC 2041


16 players are still active in New Zealand chess.Also interesting. Lev Aptekar (now elderly) lives in Dee Why in the northern beaches of NSW where I used to live. I recall him as an excellent trainer - no surprise perhaps, given that he was Russian. I still own a good little book by him - The Labyrinth of Chess Attack (1980).

CivicChessMan
23-02-2019, 09:07 AM
I remember Ross Powell. My records show his last rated games were in 1993 when he played for Wellington in the Interclub B grade. Partrick Cordue had a 2148 rating but from what year is unknown to me, at least earlier than 1985. Stuart Cordue showed up at the Upper Hutt Rapid in 2002 and scored a creditable 4/6 in the A grade. That was that.

Adamski
23-02-2019, 11:01 AM
And i remember CCM and have several scoresheets of games we played! All 3 results.

Bill Forster
23-02-2019, 02:20 PM
And i remember CCM and have several scoresheets of games we played! All 3 results.

I wasted ten minutes of my life (that I'm never getting back) trying to figure out who the hell CCM is. It's Civic Chess Man (Rowan Wood). I don't know why you guys insist on these dopey usernames when everybody know who you are anyway:)

I don't have many scoresheets from that era and my memories are that Rowan pretty much had my number. I think in a typical game I'd succumb to Rowan's superior skill in rook endings. However I'm not sure Rowan gets much good training in Oslo, whereas the Wellington Chess Club is superb (my personal theory - it's the best chess club in Australasia - name another club where four 2300 FIDE players front up every week). So these days I'd fancy my chances :)

CivicChessMan
23-02-2019, 11:28 PM
Actually, it took a long time before anyone figured that out. A bit of harmless fun. I play at a small club, Jessheim, which is about 35km from Oslo. Oslo has some ridiculously strong clubs so perhaps I should start playing at one of these to get ready for you Bill.

braindied
24-02-2019, 11:56 AM
Does anyone know what became of David Gollogly? I extracted a top 50 list from 30 years ago and attempted to fill in players' statuses.


1 3016AM Small, Vernon A CA 2353 Wellington
2 3003SM Sutton, Richard J CI 2343 deceased
3 3383AM Ker, Anthony F CI 2321 active
4 3002AM Garbett, Paul A NS 2295 active
5 3178AM Nokes, Roger I NS 2293 Christchurcn
6 3459AM Dive, Russell J CI 2289 active
6 3001VM Sarapu, Ortvin AC 2289 deceased
8 3251AM Sarfati, Jonathan D WE 2285 USA
9 3206AM Watson, Bruce R NS 2272 active
10 3199UM Green, Peter R AC 2257
11 3007AM Green, Ewen M HP 2256 active
12 3416UM Levene, Mark 2246 London, UK
13 3231UM Aptekar, Lev CI 2243 Australia
14 3390UM Lloyd, Adrian J 2242
15 3025AM Carpinter, Anthony L NS 2239 active
16 3552JM Martin, Benjamin M S OT 2224 Aberdeen, UK
17 3174UM Beach, David H CI 2211
18 3314UM McLaren, Leonard J GA 2204 active
19 3088AM Smith, Robert W WT 2201 active
20 3616UM Hampl, Michael CI 2185
20 3176AM Love, Anthony J OT 2185 Dunedin
22 3292UM Gollogly, David A NS 2184
23 3163AM Clemance, Philip A CI 2176 deceased
24 3696AM Lukey, Stephen G CA 2174 active
24 3009AM Wansink, Robert OT 2174 Dunedin
26 3482AM Spain, Graeme A GA 2171 active
27 3011UM Leonhardt, Wolfgang NS 2153 Perth, AUS
28 3208UM Cordue, Patrick L CI 2148 Wellington
29 3005AM Stuart, Peter W NS 2137 deceased
30 3296UM Anderson, Bruce R CA 2131
31 3336UM Bates, Giles T H CA 2120
32 3460AM Dreyer, Martin P AC 2115 active
32 3026UM Whaley, Michael G NS 2115
34 3052UM Weir, Peter B NS 2109
35 3573UM Cooper, Paul R AC 2104
36 3041UM Metge, J Nigel AC 2100 active
37 3503UM Ker, Charles M PE 2096
38 3029UM Jackson, Jon R NE 2094
39 3151AM Freeman, Michael R NP 2090 active
40 3255AM Noble, Mark F PE 2089 active
41 3201AM Steadman, Michael V R CI 2082 active
42 3629AM Wilson, Mark C CA 2081
43 3148AM Dowden, R Anthony OT 2073 active
44 3603UM Reyn, Isidor 2061
44 3440UM Spencer-Smith, Gregory J OT 2061
46 3512UM Alexander, Ben J 2051
47 3010UM Hensman, Peter J 2050
48 3034UM Baker, Chris P CA 2048
49 3028SM Haase, Graham G OT 2044 deceased
50 3613UM Fitzpatrick, Simon P AC 2041


16 players are still active in New Zealand chess.


Adrian Lloyd is probably still in Sydney. HE did play chess there.
Bruce Anderson is in Christchurch and still an active bridge player - at which he has also excelled and represented NZ (as have the two Ker brothers).
Michael Whaley is on the North Shore, and still playing correspondence chess
Jon R Jackson is a judge in NZ of the Environment Court. Was based in Nelson but now Christchurch.
Michael Freeman (me) is hardly active except in correspondence chess, and located in Darwin, Aus.
Ben Alexander is in Sydney as an Investment Manager.

braindied
24-02-2019, 12:18 PM
I have just finished some more work on the Peter Stuart database (same link as before), this time extending his NZ Championships cross tables to 2018 and 2019. I notice that David Gollogly was actually NZ Champion in 1983, winning in the Dunedin congress of that year (shared with Paul Garbett who Gollogly beat in their individual encounter).

In the NZ database, Gollogly only has 78 games, all between 1978 and 1984. He was getting good results and playing powerful chess (judging from a few random games I looked at - like the win v Garbett from the previous paragraph). So, it was rather a short "career" for a strong player.

It's a rather google-able name and a bit of internet snooping suggests that 1978-1984 were basically his university years and that he has gone on to a rather high powered and successful medical career that continues to this day. Possibly Dr David Gollogly is one of those rare individuals who had sufficient strength of character to permanently escape our addictive game!


I recall losing horribly in the 1982 Premier Reserve to David in round 10 whilst jointly leading the event. He won that Reserve with Bernard Carpinter, and went on to win the NZ title the next year in the days when the NZ Championship was a closed round robin and very hard to gain entry.

Other names that stand out from that 1982 PR - Noble, Bill Lynn, father and son Van Dijk, two Ker's, Dreyer, the Hopewell twins, Gavin Ion (now CEO of Waikato District Council), and large Wanganui group.
That year also featured a NZ Women's Championship with a few familiar names.

Thanks to the great efforts of Bill it is now possible to re-read about those events from old NZ Chess magazines on the NZ Chess Federation website.

Adamski
24-02-2019, 01:23 PM
I wasted ten minutes of my life (that I'm never getting back) trying to figure out who the hell CCM is. It's Civic Chess Man (Rowan Wood). I don't know why you guys insist on these dopey usernames when everybody know who you are anyway:)

I don't have many scoresheets from that era and my memories are that Rowan pretty much had my number. I think in a typical game I'd succumb to Rowan's superior skill in rook endings. However I'm not sure Rowan gets much good training in Oslo, whereas the Wellington Chess Club is superb (my personal theory - it's the best chess club in Australasia - name another club where four 2300 FIDE players front up every week). So these days I'd fancy my chances :)Bill. please feel free to add Adams-Marner above to Peter Stuart's (RIP) database. I am still looking for another Welington game of similar vintage that we played and he won where I played the Dragon.
Yes, I worked out that CCM was Rowan a whiie ago. We were at Civic together. I thought it was not up to me to reveal his identity if he wanted to keep it (sort of) secret!
Do you know what became of Peter Hawkes?

Bill Forster
24-02-2019, 03:28 PM
I play at a small club, Jessheim, which is about 35km from Oslo. Oslo has some ridiculously strong clubs so perhaps I should start playing at one of these to get ready for you Bill.

This is clearly code for "I am secretly training with Magnus in preparation for a triumphant return to Wellington Chess. First order of business: Sending Bill back to the B Grade where he belongs!" :)

By the way Rowan, I think given your username (sorry "dopey usernames" might have been a bit judgemental: ) you should be talking up the Wellington Chess Club not me. After all, the Wellington Chess Club *is* basically the Civic Chess Club. When the actual Wellington Chess Club died in the 1990s, the Civic Chess Club was effectively renamed (although for good form this was presented as a merger). When I rejoined the Civic Chess Club in 2001 this confused me a lot - "Why are some people (not all) calling the club the Wellington Chess Club?" After a while everyone got used to the new name, and here we are.


Yes, I worked out that CCM was Rowan a whiie ago. We were at Civic together. I thought it was not up to me to reveal his identity if he wanted to keep it (sort of) secret!
Do you know what became of Peter Hawkes?

I should have made it clearer that the 10 minutes I am never getting back was spent working out who you meant with CCM. I was looking through all the players that had come up in the thread looking for a real name with those initials. There was none and eventually I twigged that you were abbreviating Civic Chess Man. I had no qualms about identifying that as Rowan, as it has happened many times previously, I certainly didn't need to spend time working *that* out.

Sorry I missed Peter Hawkes I think. My time in Wellington Chess fits into three stages, 1970s interschool chess (already mentioned) when I also played at the short lived North Wellington Club in Khandallah/Johnsonville. That was started by a strong player named Skipworth I think, Skip something anyway. It was a bit boring for him, there was no-one in the new club to challenge him. Not sure what became of him, he might have returned to the UK, something like that. Then 1982-87 or so at the Civic chess club once I came back from University in Christchurch. I then decided chess was a stupid game because you reached a level and then couldn't get past that and the reasons why others were stronger weren't apparent or explainable - even by the stronger players. So then a long period of only occasional lurking. Then All-in to chess again since 2001. Sorry Jonathan, I don't think I overlapped with you at all.

Rowan, do you have anything in your records for the other three Wainuiomata College players I mentioned earlier? Fomotor, Rolfe, and Peter Collins? Of these I am only confident that Peter Collins graduated to club chess. In 2019 I am determined to get all your records (or at least all your tournament results) on to the NZCF site, I wanted to do it in 2018 but progress was slower than I'd like. I've got rid of the NZ Chess Magazine (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag-2010s.html) <--link but want to make the NZ Chess Bulletin (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/interactive/2019-02.html) <--link a thing this year. Also I have to maintain The Wellington Chess Club (http://nzchessmag.com/wellingtonchessclub/Home.html) <--link and my Chess GUI, Tarrasch (http://triplehappy.com/Home.html) <--link . Not to mention the main NZCF (http://www.newzealandchess.co.nz/) <--link site. No rest for the wicked. Still can barely see the link colour, and this time it's during daylight.

braindied
24-02-2019, 04:47 PM
Bill. please feel free to add Adams-Marner above to Peter Stuart's (RIP) database. I am still looking for another Welington game of similar vintage that we played and he won where I played the Dragon.
Yes, I worked out that CCM was Rowan a whiie ago. We were at Civic together. I thought it was not up to me to reveal his identity if he wanted to keep it (sort of) secret!
Do you know what became of Peter Hawkes?

http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Salient41081978-t1-body-d24.html contains a reference to Peter - and maybe a lost game for Bill?

Peter was still playing in 1996:

The 103rd consecutive New Zealand Chess Congress was held at the Wellington
Airport Hotel, Wellington, 28 December to 11 January 1996.

Championship
------------

The Championship event was expected to be a contest between Russell Dive
(returned from Europe with his IM title and a 2430 rating), Anthony Ker,
and Paul Garbett -- in the event, Dive had to share the title with Martin
Dreyer and Bob Smith. Russell ruefully noted that having White against the
bottom two qualifiers virtually gave him 6 Blacks and 3 Whites for the
tournament!
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total
1. Dreyer, Martin x = = = 1 = 1 = = = 1 1 7.5
2. Dive, Russell = x = = = 1 = = = 1 1 1 7.5
3. Smith, Robert = = x = = = = 1 = 1 1 1 7.5
4. Ker, Anthony = = = x 0 1 = = 1 1 1 = 7
5. Sinclair, Mark 0 = = 1 x 0 = = = = 1 1 6
6. Garbett, Paul = 0 = 0 1 x 0 = 1 = 1 1 6
7. Stuart, Peter 0 = = = = 1 x = = = 0 = 5
8. Wastney, Scott = = 0 = = = = x 0 = = 1 5
9. Sarfati, Jonathan = = = 0 = 0 = 1 x 0 = 1 5
10. Love, Antony = 0 0 0 = = = = 1 x = = 4.5
11. Tuffery, Paul 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 = = = x 1 3.5
12. Coates, Simon 0 0 0 = 0 0 = 0 0 = 0 = 1.5

Reserve

The Reserve Championship was a close contest between the top three players.
Going in to the last round, Nigel Metge and Peter Hawkes were tied on 7.5,
with Matthew Barlow a half point back; Metge won quickly, but Hawkes was
lucky to draw with Arthur Pomeroy and was caught by Barlow.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total
1. Metge, Nigel x 1 1 1 0 1 = = 1 = 1 1 8.5
2. Hawkes, Peter 0 x = = 1 1 1 = 1 1 = 1 8
3. Barlow, Matthew 0 = x = 1 1 = 1 = 1 1 1 8
4. Pomeroy, Arthur 0 = = x 1 = = = = = = 1 6
5. Guthrie, David 1 0 0 0 x = = = = = 1 1 5.5
6. Steadman, Michael 0 0 0 = = x 1 1 1 = 1 0 5.5
7. Cooper, David = 0 = = = 0 x 1 0 = = 1 5
8. Mastilovich, Rajko = = 0 = = 0 0 x 1 = 1 = 5
9. van der Hoorn, M 0 0 = = = 0 1 0 x 1 0 1 4.5
10. Marner, Gavin = 0 0 = = = = = 0 x 0 = 3.5
11. Turner, Michael 0 = 0 = 0 0 = 0 1 1 x 0 3.5
12. Post, Martin 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 = 1 = 3

The success of the Metge family was continued by Nigel's son Russell Metge
winning the Major Open with 9/11.

CivicChessMan
25-02-2019, 01:21 AM
Rowan, do you have anything in your records for the other three Wainuiomata College players I mentioned earlier? Fomotor, Rolfe, and Peter Collins? Of these I am only confident that Peter Collins graduated to club chess.

Correct, Peter Collins is the only one of the three who played club chess. He played at a couple of Mark Noble run clubs: Harbour and Petone. Last active in 1992. In that year, Mark Noble, Charles Ker, Phil Monrad, Gavin Marner, Peter Collins, Paul Connor and Richard Glover were members of Petone.

Capablanca-Fan
25-02-2019, 08:48 AM
Meanwhile on board 1, Ross Powell (anyone remember him?) reached a symmetrical N+Ps v N+Ps ending v Chandler and safely drew.

Ross had an unhappy life and died a few years ago. Maybe this was one of the highlights of his life.
Definitely remember him. A tragedy that he died quite young not long ago. When we were both at Victoria Uni, we traded logic lessons by him for chess lessons by me for about a year at lunchtimes. Around that time, he played for the Wellington Chess Club.

Bill Forster
26-02-2019, 01:54 PM
Following up various "matters arising" from this thread, I have gone ahead and modified the NZ Games Database (on the NZCF site) with the following changes.

1) The fallacious Gollogly - D Adams game has been removed (of course Gollogly - J Adams and D Adams - Gollogly are retained).
2) I've added the game Jensen-Oliver from the 1978 Wellington Easter tournament, found by Michael Freeman and linked to earlier in the thread

http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Salient41081978-t1-body-d24.html contains a reference to Peter - and maybe a lost game for Bill?
The reference to Peter Hawkes is that he won the chess quiz competition for the previous issue.
3) As requested I've added the game J Adams - Marner from a 1984 Anzac Weekender.

Bill. please feel free to add Adams-Marner above to Peter Stuart's (RIP) database. I am still looking for another Welington game of similar vintage that we played and he won where I played the Dragon.

Notes:

Here is my transcription of the Jensen-Oliver game (Round 1, Wellington Easter Open 1978.03.22)

[Event "Wellington Easter Open"]
[Site "Wellington"]
[Date "1978.03.22"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Jensen, Kai J"]
[Black "Oliver, D."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A28"]

{The Civic Chess Club ran a tournament over the long Easter weekend which drew
entries from as far afield as Auckland and Christchurch. Murray Chandler,
Wellington's youthful International Master was expected to be difficult to beat
and he proved the pundits right by conceding only one draw to finish 1.5 points
clear of the rest of the field. Hamiltonian Kai Jensen who represented New
Zealand at the World Junior tournament in Austria last year looked as if he
could be a largish stumbling block in Murray's path but had a disappointing
tournament. He did however have a good win in the first round.} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3
Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e4 Bc5 5. Nxe5 {A small combination with the aim of securing
an advantage in the centre.} 5... Nxe5 6. d4 Bb4 7. dxe5 Nxe4 8. Qd4 Nxc3 $2 {
} (8... f5 {maintaining a presence in the centre was better} ) 9. bxc3 Be7 10.
Qg4 g6 ( {The alternative to this weakening move was the commital} 10... Kf8)
11. Bh6 d6 12. Qg3 b6 $2 {More weak squares.} 13. Be2 Be6 14. Bf3 Rb8 15. O-O
{Black can only watch enviously} 15... Bh4 16. Bc6+ Bd7 17. Bxd7+ Kxd7 18. Qg4+
Kc6 19. Qf3+ Kd7 20. exd6 cxd6 21. Rad1 Re8 22. Rxd6+ $1 Kxd6 23. Qd5+ Kc7 24.
Bf4+ {Source: Salient (Victoria University of Wellington Student Association
Newspaper) April 17 1978 Page 20 - Annotator David Beach. Thanks to Michael
Freeman for unearthing this from the NZETC (NZ Electronic Text Collection)
archives} 1-0

This exercise was made interesting (in the Chinese curse "may you live in interesting times" sense) by the absence of the move pair 20. exd6 cxd6 in the Salient article. The article also showed 21. Rae1 which was an odd move in terms of logic and in terms of the follow up 22. Rxd6+! Then Black's next moves Kxd6 and Kc7 seemed in the first case strange and in the second case illegal given a Black pawn on c7. How 24.Bf4 is check was also odd given a White pawn on e5. But inserting the sensible move pair 20. exd6 cxd6, along with replacing the odd Rae1 with the logical Rad1 (which also makes Rxd6+ a legal move) solves all the mysteries and creates a very plausible game with a nice sacrificial finish (given appropriate exclamation) which made it publication worthy. A bit of digging around for similar columns suggests the annotator and the author of the (short lived) Salient chess column was David Beach, who has of course popped up multiple times in this thread. I attended Vic myself a year later in 1979 for Engineering Intermediate, and unfortunately the chess column was certainly dead by then.

Another point of interest is the unfortunate first round loser of this game, one "Oliver, D". The tournament report that appeared in the August 1978 issue of NZ Chess (see the NZCF site) shows this person was a Civic Club member at the time, and came second to last (it was a rather strong tournament). The tournament report includes five games, that Peter dutifully transcribed for the Database. It seems the Database was constructed mainly that way (Peter's README file reinforces that impression). A monumental amount of transcription work by Peter, the NZ chess community will be forever in his debt. So now there are six games from the tournament in the database. One of the existing five games also featured D Oliver, and until today was the only game he had in the database. His representation doubled today. I mention this mainly because the other game was against Capablanca Fan himself.

[Event "Wellington Easter Open"]
[Site "Wellington"]
[Date "1978.03.23"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Sarfati, Jonathan D"]
[Black "Oliver, D."]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5
Be6 9. c3 Bc5 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Bc2 Nxf2 12. Rxf2 f6 13. exf6 Bxf2+ 14. Kxf2
Qxf6 15. Kg1 Rae8 16. Bd3 Bg4 17. h3 Ne5 18. Be2 Bh5 19. a4 Nxf3+ 20. Nxf3 c6
21. axb5 axb5 22. Ra7 Bxf3 23. Bxf3 Qe5 24. Bd2 Qg3 25. Qf1 Rf6 26. Qf2 Qg6 27.
Be3 Ref8 28. Kh2 Qf5 29. Bd4 Rg6 30. Qe3 Qc2 31. b4 Qf5 32. Qe5 Qxe5+ 33. Bxe5
Re8 34. Bd4 Rd8 35. Bh5 Rg5 36. g4 g6 37. Bf6 Rxh5 38. gxh5 Re8 39. Rg7+ Kf8
40. Rxh7 1-0

A final couple of notes (it seems that Chess Database scholarship can be all consuming - just one or two games can absorb vast amounts of time and effort and there are millions of games out there). I have gone ahead and put Adams-Marner into the database. But I am a little concerned that the date given was actually a Thursday, given that the tournament was supposed to be an "Anzac Weekender". Anzac day in 1984 fell on a Wednesday (the day before the game), immediately after Easter, and so there was a Wellington Easter weekender a few days before this Thursday date. I think Anzac days did used to be "weekendized" in New Zealand, there are some "ANZAC weekender" type tournaments in the database, though not in 1984 until now.

I have only just noted that bringing the Peter Stuart database from Chessbase to PGN format with my (old) Chessbase V9 has resulted in thousands of games having bogus WhiteTeamCountry and BlackTeamCountry tags. For example Sarfati-Oliver above is bizarrely allegedly an Australia v Papua New Guinuea game! I put this down to a ChessBase bug, I think it is continuing on the tags with their existing values to games that don't have (and actually shouldn't have) the tags. Something else I'll have to fix in due course!

Adamski
26-02-2019, 08:09 PM
Thanks for all the work, Bill. It could be that that Wellington Anzac weekender was a Thursday to Saturday one. Hard to be certain now.

Capablanca-Fan
27-02-2019, 05:12 AM
Another point of interest is the unfortunate first round loser of this game, one "Oliver, D". The tournament report that appeared in the August 1978 issue of NZ Chess (see the NZCF site) shows this person was a Civic Club member at the time, and came second to last (it was a rather strong tournament). The tournament report includes five games, that Peter dutifully transcribed for the Database. It seems the Database was constructed mainly that way (Peter's README file reinforces that impression). A monumental amount of transcription work by Peter, the NZ chess community will be forever in his debt. So now there are six games from the tournament in the database. One of the existing five games also featured D Oliver, and until today was the only game he had in the database. His representation doubled today. I mention this mainly because the other game was against Capablanca Fan himself.

[Event "Wellington Easter Open"]
[Site "Wellington"]
[Date "1978.03.23"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Sarfati, Jonathan D"]
[Black "Oliver, D."]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5
Be6 9. c3 Bc5 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Bc2 Nxf2 12. Rxf2 f6 13. exf6 Bxf2+ 14. Kxf2
Qxf6 15. Kg1 Rae8 16. Bd3 Bg4 17. h3 Ne5 18. Be2 Bh5 19. a4 Nxf3+ 20. Nxf3 c6
21. axb5 axb5 22. Ra7 Bxf3 23. Bxf3 Qe5 24. Bd2 Qg3 25. Qf1 Rf6 26. Qf2 Qg6 27.
Be3 Ref8 28. Kh2 Qf5 29. Bd4 Rg6 30. Qe3 Qc2 31. b4 Qf5 32. Qe5 Qxe5+ 33. Bxe5
Re8 34. Bd4 Rd8 35. Bh5 Rg5 36. g4 g6 37. Bf6 Rxh5 38. gxh5 Re8 39. Rg7+ Kf8
40. Rxh7 1-0

A final couple of notes (it seems that Chess Database scholarship can be all consuming - just one or two games can absorb vast amounts of time and effort and there are millions of games out there). I have gone ahead and put Adams-Marner into the database. But I am a little concerned that the date given was actually a Thursday, given that the tournament was supposed to be an "Anzac Weekender". Anzac day in 1984 fell on a Wednesday (the day before the game), immediately after Easter, and so there was a Wellington Easter weekender a few days before this Thursday date. I think Anzac days did used to be "weekendized" in New Zealand, there are some "ANZAC weekender" type tournaments in the database, though not in 1984 until now.

I have only just noted that bringing the Peter Stuart database from Chessbase to PGN format with my (old) Chessbase V9 has resulted in thousands of games having bogus WhiteTeamCountry and BlackTeamCountry tags. For example Sarfati-Oliver above is bizarrely allegedly an Australia v Papua New Guinuea game! I put this down to a ChessBase bug, I think it is continuing on the tags with their existing values to games that don't have (and actually shouldn't have) the tags. Something else I'll have to fix in due course!
Oliver, D. = Dave Oliver. I remember him playing a few games with him when I was 12 and 13; he was a tall, ginger-haired, friendly man at the time. I had lost to him previously when he assayed the Dilworth Attack, but was better prepared for this game.

The report of this tournament was published in NZ Chess Aug 1978, pp. 84–86, now available online (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/pdfs/1978-08.pdf).

Bill Forster
27-02-2019, 02:12 PM
I am struggling to completely wrap this up and move on!

Firstly, in the Jensen-Oliver game I noticed that the missing move pair I detected (exd6,cxd6; neatly eliminating both the white e5 pawn and black c7 pawn that otherwise make the score illegal [and illogical]) is implied somewhat by the move numbers in the Salient source material. So we have 20 Rad1 Re8 but then a jump to 22 Rxd6+! This strongly implies that exd6,cxd6 is the missing move 21, not move 20 (before Rae1 Re8) as I originally had it. With the benefit of hindsight, this also seems slightly (significantly?) more natural from a chess perspective. So I have changed the game to reflect this;

[Event "Wellington Easter Open"]
[Site "Wellington"]
[Date "1978.03.22"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Jensen, Kai J"]
[Black "Oliver, Dave"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A28"]

{The Civic Chess Club ran a tournament over the long Easter weekend which drew
entries from as far afield as Auckland and Christchurch. Murray Chandler,
Wellington's youthful International Master was expected to be difficult to beat
and he proved the pundits right by conceding only one draw to finish 1.5 points
clear of the rest of the field. Hamiltonian Kai Jensen who represented New
Zealand at the World Junior tournament in Austria last year looked as if he
could be a largish stumbling block in Murray's path but had a disappointing
tournament. He did however have a good win in the first round.} 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3
Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e4 Bc5 5. Nxe5 {A small combination with the aim of securing
an advantage in the centre.} 5... Nxe5 6. d4 Bb4 7. dxe5 Nxe4 8. Qd4 Nxc3 $2 {
} (8... f5 {maintaining a presence in the centre was better} ) 9. bxc3 Be7 10.
Qg4 g6 ( {The alternative to this weakening move was the commital} 10... Kf8)
11. Bh6 d6 12. Qg3 b6 $2 {More weak squares.} 13. Be2 Be6 14. Bf3 Rb8 15. O-O
{Black can only watch enviously} 15... Bh4 16. Bc6+ Bd7 17. Bxd7+ Kxd7 18. Qg4+
Kc6 19. Qf3+ Kd7 20. Rad1 Re8 21. exd6 cxd6 22. Rxd6+ $1 Kxd6 23. Qd5+ Kc7 24.
Bf4+ {Source: Salient (Victoria University of Wellington Student Association
Newspaper) April 17 1978 Page 20 - Annotator David Beach. Thanks to Michael
Freeman for unearthing this from the NZETC (NZ Electronic Text Collection)
archives} 1-0


Oliver, D. = Dave Oliver. I remember him playing a few games with him when I was 12 and 13; he was a tall, ginger-haired, friendly man at the time. I had lost to him previously when he assayed the Dilworth Attack, but was better prepared for this game.[/URL].

I have changed both the Oliver, D games to Oliver, Dave. Why not. It's a pity we don't have a win (or at least a draw) for him. From the two games it looks like he was a decent player, good enough to provide worthy resistance to the masters Jensen and Sarfati as they produced exemplary wins, but perhaps not good enough to ever be even a minor master himself. Hmmm, territory that is uncomfortably close to home.:) At least I have a few nice wins in the NZ database.

Bill Forster
27-02-2019, 02:18 PM
It could be that that Wellington Anzac weekender was a Thursday to Saturday one. Hard to be certain now.

I suppose the public holiday moved to the Friday, then maybe a tournament that went Thursday evening through the long weekend. My discomfort came in part from the traditional Wellington weekender being the Easter tournament which in this particular year fell on the previous weekend. So two open tournaments in Wellington in consecutive [long] weekends? I suppose it's possible, and in the absence of any further information I guess we'll run with that.

Capablanca-Fan
02-03-2019, 12:49 AM
I am struggling to completely wrap this up and move on!
Thank you for the information about the schoolpupil chess scene in Wellington in the few years before I started playing. A lot of those names bring back memories.

Tony Dowden
02-03-2019, 11:56 AM
...


1 3016AM Small, Vernon A CA 2353 Wellington
2 3003SM Sutton, Richard J CI 2343 deceased
3 3383AM Ker, Anthony F CI 2321 active
4 3002AM Garbett, Paul A NS 2295 active
5 3178AM Nokes, Roger I NS 2293 Christchurcn
6 3459AM Dive, Russell J CI 2289 active
6 3001VM Sarapu, Ortvin AC 2289 deceased
8 3251AM Sarfati, Jonathan D WE 2285 USA
9 3206AM Watson, Bruce R NS 2272 active
10 3199UM Green, Peter R AC 2257
11 3007AM Green, Ewen M HP 2256 active
12 3416UM Levene, Mark 2246 London, UK
13 3231UM Aptekar, Lev CI 2243 Australia
14 3390UM Lloyd, Adrian J 2242
15 3025AM Carpinter, Anthony L NS 2239 active
16 3552JM Martin, Benjamin M S OT 2224 Aberdeen, UK
17 3174UM Beach, David H CI 2211
18 3314UM McLaren, Leonard J GA 2204 active
19 3088AM Smith, Robert W WT 2201 active
20 3616UM Hampl, Michael CI 2185
20 3176AM Love, Anthony J OT 2185 Dunedin
22 3292UM Gollogly, David A NS 2184
23 3163AM Clemance, Philip A CI 2176 deceased
24 3696AM Lukey, Stephen G CA 2174 active
24 3009AM Wansink, Robert OT 2174 Dunedin
26 3482AM Spain, Graeme A GA 2171 active
27 3011UM Leonhardt, Wolfgang NS 2153 Perth, AUS
28 3208UM Cordue, Patrick L CI 2148 Wellington
29 3005AM Stuart, Peter W NS 2137 deceased
30 3296UM Anderson, Bruce R CA 2131
31 3336UM Bates, Giles T H CA 2120
32 3460AM Dreyer, Martin P AC 2115 active
32 3026UM Whaley, Michael G NS 2115
34 3052UM Weir, Peter B NS 2109
35 3573UM Cooper, Paul R AC 2104
36 3041UM Metge, J Nigel AC 2100 active
37 3503UM Ker, Charles M PE 2096
38 3029UM Jackson, Jon R NE 2094
39 3151AM Freeman, Michael R NP 2090 active
40 3255AM Noble, Mark F PE 2089 active
41 3201AM Steadman, Michael V R CI 2082 active
42 3629AM Wilson, Mark C CA 2081
43 3148AM Dowden, R Anthony OT 2073 active
44 3603UM Reyn, Isidor 2061
44 3440UM Spencer-Smith, Gregory J OT 2061
46 3512UM Alexander, Ben J 2051
47 3010UM Hensman, Peter J 2050
48 3034UM Baker, Chris P CA 2048
49 3028SM Haase, Graham G OT 2044 deceased
50 3613UM Fitzpatrick, Simon P AC 2041


16 players are still active in New Zealand chess.

One of the older members on this list must be Wolfgang Leonhardt (b. 1928), who hails from Germany and has had long associations with both Perth and Auckland. I only met him once that I recall but I was immediately impressed with his friendliness. I played him in an Auckland-Otago Bledisloe Cup match, perhaps in the late 1970s. The result eludes me, so presumably I lost.

Wolfgang is listed under Australia on the FIDE rating list with a rating of 2055, however he has shown no activity in the period July 2001-March 2019. Nonetheless, at the age of 84 he shocked the Sandgropers by winning the 2013 Perth Chess Club Championship.

Wolfgang is a Life Member of the Chess Association of Western Australia. Here is his bio (from the Perth ChessClub site):

--------------------------------------------------
Wolfgang was born on 27 December 1928 in Berlin, Germany. His father was Russian and his mother German. He first learnt chess when he was five years old, by his father. Wolfgang joined the Berlin Chess Club and won the U/12 Championship in 1939. Because of air raids on Berlin, all schools were evacuated to safe country areas or German protectorates.

Wolf's school; the German-Russian High school, was moved to the health spa Luhatschowitz, in Czechoslovakia. There he came 1st in the 1943 Bohemian Youth Championship. No more chess was played until after the war. In 1948 and 1949 Wolf obtained 1st place in the romantic "City of Rothenburg". University studies and work as an interpreter for the Australian Mission of the International Refugee Organisation in Schweinfurt left no time for chess.

Wolfgang's family immigrated to Australia, arriving at Fremantle on 31 December 1950. He lived for a while in the migrant camp at Northam. In 1951 Wolfgang appeared on the local chess scene and joined the Perth Chess Club. He found a great friend and mentor in Dr Alec Siglin, who was president of the Perth Club and the CAWA for some years.

Between 1952 and 1972 Wolf won the WA State Championship 8 times and was runner-up on 7 occasions. He also won the State Lightning Championship 11 times, and the "City of Perth" Championship 10 times. Wolfgang probably holds the record for a local player in a simultaneous event. He played against 38 competitors and finished with a score of 33 wins, 4 draws and one loss.

He also played a blindfold competition against 8 players and recorded 5 wins and 3 draws. Wolf's best result in an Australian Championship was 3rd place (wins against J Purdy, G Koshnitsky, Cook and others). In 1964 he established a chess column in the Sunday Times newspaper (for the CAWA) which he ran until 1984.

In 1956 Wolfgang became naturalised. He helped to establish, in 1958, the German speaking Rhein Donau Club in which he served as President from 1967 to 1969. Wolfgang married Gisela in 1960, and they had two sons. In 1968 he left employment with H. Selby & Co. (a company dealing in scientific apparatus, laboratory chemicals and apparatus and process control equipment) and joined Lufthansa German Airlines as the Manager for WA, opening their Perth office in 1969. He was subsequently promoted to Manager, New Zealand & the Pacific Islands in 1973 and was transferred to Auckland.

Naturally, due to work commitments, he hardly had any time to play competitive chess. However Lufthansa, with a worldwide staff of some 55,000 had a very active staff chess club. From 1974 to 1992 Wolf won the biannually held LH World Championship five times. The International Airline Teams World Championships began in Rio de Janeiro in 1977.

From the beginning, Wolf played on board 1 for his company. It is interesting to know that he participated in these championships for many years, which were played at many exotic venues such as Bangkok, Madrid, Honolulu, Penang, Tampa, Kathmandu, Las Vegas, Reykjavik, Miami, Lisbon, and twice on board a cruise ship in the Carribean Sea.

In NZ Wolf was for many years President of the German Association of New Zealand, the Auckland Goethe Society, and for 17 years President of the NZ German Student Exchange Society, member of the Executive Board of the NZ German Business Association. He also initiated and moderated the "Deutsche Stunde", a German Language broadcast from 1991 until 1999.

In 1955 he was awarded the "Federal Cross of Merit" by the President of the Federal Republic of Germany in recognition for his services. Other honours (chess) include Honorary Life Member of the ACF in 1961, the Perth Chess Club in 1973, and the CAWA 2000.

After returning to Perth in 1999 and settling in Landsdale, he shared 1st prize in the Yanchep/Two Rocks Tournament, and finished equal second in the 2001 State Championship.

Wolf joined the Metropolitan Chess Club and this year came equal first in the Club Championship, and first in the Respini Tournament. a very impressive return to the local chess scene.

Wolf is the WA President of the Society for Australian-German Student Exchange, Vice President of the Rhein Donau Club, and Co-moderator of the local "Deutsche Stunde" radio program on 6EBA FM 95.3.

He lectures chess at primary school and tutors privately. In addition, Wolf was invited to play for Lufthansa in this year's Airline teams World Championship, which was to be held in Cadun, Mexico, in November but the tournament was cancelled because of the events in USA in September.

Wolf's other hobby (besides chess) is music. He plays the saxophone, clarinet and piano-accordion in a Big Band in Germany, and in a smaller band in Perth. Due to an accident he stopped playing the piano, and instead plays the balalaika in a balalaika orchestra in Perth.
--------------------

Tony Dowden
02-03-2019, 12:02 PM
On Thursday I played a simul at a local mall (drew two, lost one :( ). Anyway, one of my opponents told me he knows FM Craig Laird and commented that he met him 'up the coast' (Hervey Bay?) just a few months ago. All my previous inquires had had Craig last sighted in FNQ (Far North Queensland) working on a shrimp boat (with his brother?) about 20 years ago.

Craig (b.1953) is affiliated with Australia on the FIDE rating list with an inactive rating of 2297. His last FIDE-rated event was the exotic Papua New Guinea Open Championship in July 2001.

Bill Forster
03-03-2019, 12:42 PM
One of the older members on this list must be Wolfgang Leonhardt (b. 1928), who hails from Germany and has had long associations with both Perth and Auckland...

Interesting stuff Tony. I notice that the otherwise rather nice biography pretty much ignores Wolf's NZ Chess career, which is a shame because I think he was quite an important figure in the Auckland scene during his years here, and I am pretty sure that Auckland then as now was a much better chess city (with many more strong opponents for Wolf) despite being around the same size (Auckland vs Perth I mean).

When I was putting up the NZ Chess Magazines I experimented with making electronic, interactive editions for a few issues. [I thought I might get some encouragement and extend the exercise to many more issues]. One of the issues I picked was December 1979. It wasn't a completely random choice, Sarapu, Sutton, Small and Steadman (his first for NZ chess no doubt) for example contributed annotated games to that issue. Sutton's analysis was particularly impressive, and his widely admired personality and lack of ego (compared to some others anyway) is very noticeable. Anyway, I bring this up because I made the effort to transcribe all the chess in the magazine, and one of the articles was by Wolf Leonhardt on the North Shore club champs of that year. He contributes an annotated game of his own, against David Beach actually who appears in this thread for the umpteenth time. I never knew David Beach finished his short chess career in Auckland. You can see the game here (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/interactive/1979-12-north-shore-club-champs.html). An amusing point is that Wolf missed an amazing little tactic in his notes that the computer brought to my attention as I made the transcription. I couldn't resist the temptation to add "a note from the future" pointing out the tactic. Finally, I'll note that Peter Hawkes, who has also featured in this thread many times, contributes an article about a Tawa weekender, and I transcribed the chess for that as well.

Adamski
03-03-2019, 09:14 PM
Thanks for that Bill - including the work on electronic editions of NZ Chess. 1979 was the last year that I played at the Otago Chess Club. Late that year was my move to Wellington, and first Civic (from 1980) then Wellington clubs.

Adamski
04-03-2019, 11:13 PM
Chatted on Welington chess clubs history with Gavin Marner (whose FIDE rating is still under NZL rather than Aus) last night. He told me that he and Peter Collins, also mentioned earlier in this thread, set up a Harbour Chess Club which was on the scene for a short time. Another club that ultimately got swallowed up by Welington CC. Peter was from Wainuiomata and went to school with GM Murray Chandler.

Bill Forster
05-03-2019, 07:14 AM
Chatted on Welington chess clubs history with Gavin Marner (whose FIDE rating is still under NZL rather than Aus) last night. He told me that he and Peter Collins, also mentioned earlier in this thread, set up a Harbour Chess Club which was on the scene for a short time. Another club that ultimately got swallowed up by Welington CC. Peter was from Wainuiomata and went to school with GM Murray Chandler.

I asked Brian Foster who coached the Wainuiomata 70s kids about Fomotor and Rolfe, the two who I couldn't recall their forenames. It was in fact Philip Fomotor and Colin Rolfe. I had thought as much earlier but talked myself out of it as I was assuming I was getting confused with Philip Monrad (another chess player for the same era) and Colin Rofe (someone else entirely from later in my life, not a chess player). Brian also relayed the news that Colin Rolfe had died recently which was sad. I googled and found many online articles about him. He made a big mark in another recreational area entirely, held running records etc., was extraordinarily fit and strong then very surprisingly died suddenly.


Thank you for the information about the schoolpupil chess scene in Wellington in the few years before I started playing. A lot of those names bring back memories.

I did overlap with you in school chess Jonathan (just). I think I am about five years older and I recall playing a Wellington Schools Champs (or similar) individual tournament at Victoria Uni, Kelburn Campus in about 1976/77. It was multiple games a day so probably rapid. I'm a little vague but I distinctly remember you playing as a precociously talented new youngster everyone was talking about. Your mother accompanied you. I played you and I can remember the outline of the game. I'd just discovered "New Ideas in Chess" by Reti and I was experimenting with the double fianchetto Reti opening. You cleaned me up with simple and effective classical chess.

Edit added later: This memory is not as vivid as the Newlands College vs Wainui one from earlier and it is of course exactly the sort of thing that is susceptible to mixing and matching multiple events after such a long period of time. So I should say more than "I'm a little vague". But the one thing I am very confident of is the outline of the game. We have played one game, when you were very (very) young, and the game went as I described it. The quality of your play probably made a lasting impression.

Tony Dowden
05-03-2019, 10:19 PM
I vaguely remember Brian Foster proudly telling me that apart from Murray Chandler there were two other juniors from Pencarrow Chess Club(?) in Wainuiomata who were very talented. One was "Cookie", who was around 1800-2000(?) with the surname Cook(?) - but I don't know the other name (or if there was even a third junior). Does anyone remember Cookie? Um, maybe the third junior was Fenella Foster!

Quoting from just above: ... I think I am about five years older ...
For the record, JDS (Capa Fan) was born in October 1964 (in Australia!), so Bill as a Dec 1960 baby you are a little under four years older than Jonathan.

Reminds me: I played young Jonathan in the last round of the 1977 NZ Schoolpupils final in Auckland and he cheered me up immensely by allowing me to get my only win (after a dismal two losses and four draws) by utilising a set-up invented by Korchnoi to launch a massive attack in a ...Qd6 variation of the Exchange Ruy Lopez where the players castle on opposite sides. The only other time I can remember us having a decisive result was in a Premier Reserve(?) - maybe 1978/79 - when I crazily played a Double Muzio (a two-piece sac line) King's Gambit and - incredibly - Jonathan, who was meant to be surprised at the board, knew more theory than I did and I promptly imploded and lost in truly ignominious fashion. After that I realised how strong he was and usually played a straight bat and headed for careful draws.

Adamski
06-03-2019, 05:29 PM
My memory of this game is simply that I was slaughtered! I gave up the Dragon soon after - too many losses! (Another Dragon I lost was against my current Rooty Hill clubmate, Gavin Marner, then also in Wellington.) I have that scoresheet somewhere - I will try to find it!

The whole Gollogly-Adams story was interesting.
Gavin has sent me that scoresheet plus a third game we played in a Wellington champs. He did not have Year for our Morra but can tell from place in his scorebook that it was PRE1984.

Adamski
06-03-2019, 08:02 PM
[Event "Premier Reserves, Wgtn, 1977-78"]
[Site "Civic Chess Club, Wellington"]
[Date "1977.12.30"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Marner, Gavin"]
[Black "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B72"]
[Annotator "J. Adams"]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8.
Qd2 Ng4 9. Bxg4 Bxg4 10. f3 Bd7 11. Nb3 O-O 12. Bh6 Rc8 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. h4 h5
15. O-O-O Qb6 16. g4 hxg4 17. h5 Na5 18. hxg6 Rh8 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. Rxh8 Qxh8 21.
Nxe7 gxf3 22. Qxd6 Rd8 23. gxf7 Kxf7 24. Nc5 Qf6 25. Qd5+ Ke8 26. Qg8+ Qf8 27.
Qg6+ {If 27...Kxe7, 28 Qd6+ Ke8 29 Qxf8+ Kxf8 30 Nxd7 should win. Why I
resigned rather than taking the N I do not know!} 1-0

Adamski
06-03-2019, 08:23 PM
Here is our other game. Though I lost both, happy for you to add them to the DB, Bill.
[Event "Wellington Champs"]
[Site "Wellington"]
[Date "1987.08.22"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Marner, Gavin"]
[Black "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[PlyCount "85"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Ne7 7. Nf3 Nbc6 8. a4
O-O 9. Bd3 h6 10. O-O Qa5 11. Bd2 c4 12. Be2 Bd7 13. Qc1 Kh7 14. Nh4 Ng6 15.
Nxg6 fxg6 16. f4 Ne7 17. Rf3 Qd8 18. g4 a5 19. Qe1 Nc8 20. Rh3 Nb6 21. g5 h5
22. Qg3 Qe8 23. Kh1 Bxa4 24. Rg1 Bxc2 25. Bxh5 gxh5 26. g6+ Kg8 27. Rxh5 Be4+
28. Rg2 Qxg6 29. Qxg6 Bxg6 30. Rxg6 Kf7 31. Rg1 Rh8 32. Rhg5 Rh7 33. Rb1 Ra6
34. f5 exf5 35. Rxf5+ Ke6 36. Rg5 a4 37. Rg6+ Kf5 38. Rbxb6 Rxb6 39. Rxb6 Rh3
40. Rxb7 Rd3 41. Rb2 g6 42. Kg2 Ke6 43. Ra2 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
07-03-2019, 02:50 AM
I did overlap with you in school chess Jonathan (just). I think I am about five years older and I recall playing a Wellington Schools Champs (or similar) individual tournament at Victoria Uni, Kelburn Campus in about 1976/77. It was multiple games a day so probably rapid. I'm a little vague but I distinctly remember you playing as a precociously talented new youngster everyone was talking about. Your mother accompanied you. I played you and I can remember the outline of the game. I'd just discovered "New Ideas in Chess" by Reti and I was experimenting with the double fianchetto Reti opening. You cleaned me up with simple and effective classical chess.

Edit added later: This memory is not as vivid as the Newlands College vs Wainui one from earlier and it is of course exactly the sort of thing that is susceptible to mixing and matching multiple events after such a long period of time. So I should say more than "I'm a little vague". But the one thing I am very confident of is the outline of the game. We have played one game, when you were very (very) young, and the game went as I described it. The quality of your play probably made a lasting impression.
Thank you for the generous comments and the reminder. However, I owe you an apology, because my memory has drawn a blank. It might have been the Wellington Regional Schoolpupils where I finished 2nd, or a school teams match where my was the only primary team so we lost badly on most boards but I won all board 1 games but for one loss. Classical style sounds like the way I would have played, given that my username reflects my attitude even >40 years ago. In a way, not remembering that game is a good reflection on you and other highschool kids playing a kid not yet in high-school, because it means there was nothing unpleasant. When I was 11- or 12-year old playing older kids like you as well as adults, most were sporting to me.


For the record, JDS (Capa Fan) was born in October 1964 (in Australia!), so Bill as a Dec 1960 baby you are a little under four years older than Jonathan.

Reminds me: I played young Jonathan in the last round of the 1977 NZ Schoolpupils final in Auckland and he cheered me up immensely by allowing me to get my only win (after a dismal two losses and four draws) by utilising a set-up invented by Korchnoi to launch a massive attack in a ...Qd6 variation of the Exchange Ruy Lopez where the players castle on opposite sides. The only other time I can remember us having a decisive result was in a Premier Reserve(?)—maybe 1978/79—when I crazily played a Double Muzio (a two-piece sac line) King's Gambit and—incredibly—Jonathan, who was meant to be surprised at the board, knew more theory than I did and I promptly imploded and lost in truly ignominious fashion. After that I realised how strong he was and usually played a straight bat and headed for careful draws.

Small correction: it would have been something invented against Korchnoi (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1082256) but I no longer have our score sheet. To my shame given my username, I had no awareness of this stratagem although it was first used by Capablanca (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1064762). I haven't got the Double Muzio game either, but according to the report (NZ Chess, Feb 1979 (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/pdfs/1979-02.pdf), pp. 12–15), I returned one of the two extra pieces so I could get my King to safety.

Tony Dowden
07-03-2019, 06:01 PM
Small correction: it would have been something invented against Korchnoi (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1082256) but I no longer have our score sheet ...

JDS: You might be right about Mecking-Korchnoi but going into the game my (increasingly unreliable) memory says I had the set-up all the way to move 10 in mind. I recall being out of 'book' when you played your sixth move of ...Bd7 (I had expected ...Be6) but you soon moved it there anyway. I still have the game (but, alas, not the King's Gambit game). The end is pretty gruesome so it is only fair to emphasise your extreme youth: I was in Form 6 (Year 12) whereas you must have been just beginning high school in Form 3 (Year 9). Of course these days seven-year-olds are dangerous but we were brought up in a different era!

NZ Schoolpupils' Championship, Auckland, Sept 1977
Tony Dowden (Dunedin) - Jonathan Sarfati (Wellington)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Bxc6 dxc6 5.0-0 Qd6 6.d3 Bd7 7.Be3 0-0-0 8.Nbd2 f6 9.Qe2 Be6 10.Rfb1 g5 11.b4 h5 12.a4 h4 13.b5 g4 14.bxa6 bxa6 15.Ne1 Bh6 16.Nb3 Bxb3 17.Rxb3 c5 18.Qxg4+ Rd7 19.Rab1 Kd8 20.Bxh6 Rdh7 21.Rb8+ Ke7 22.Bf8+ Kf7 23.Bxd6 cxd6 24.Rxg8 Rxg8 25.Rb7+ Kf8 26.Qc8#

Tony Dowden
07-03-2019, 08:06 PM
[Event "Premier Reserves, Wgtn, 1977-78"]
[Site "Civic Chess Club, Wellington"]
[Date "1977.12.30"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Marner, Gavin"]
[Black "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B72"]
[Annotator "J. Adams"]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8.
Qd2 Ng4 9. Bxg4 Bxg4 10. f3 Bd7 11. Nb3 O-O 12. Bh6 Rc8 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. h4 h5
15. O-O-O Qb6 16. g4 hxg4 17. h5 Na5 18. hxg6 Rh8 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. Rxh8 Qxh8 21.
Nxe7 gxf3 22. Qxd6 Rd8 23. gxf7 Kxf7 24. Nf5 Qf6 25. Qd5+ Ke8 26. Qg8+ Qf8 27.
Qg6+ {27...Qf7 28 Nd6+} 1-0

Correct 24th move inserted. Final note revised.

Adamski
07-03-2019, 09:06 PM
Dr Dowden is spot on! On both points. While transcribing the game (conversion from descriptive notation for all 3 NZ games JMA vs GM [Grand Master!!]), I could not see why I did not take that en prise Knight earlier.

White's 24th should be Nf5.

Capablanca-Fan
07-03-2019, 11:36 PM
JDS: You might be right about Mecking-Korchnoi but going into the game my (increasingly unreliable) memory says I had the set-up all the way to move 10 in mind. I recall being out of 'book' when you played your sixth move of ...Bd7 (I had expected ...Be6) but you soon moved it there anyway. I still have the game (but, alas, not the King's Gambit game). The end is pretty gruesome so it is only fair to emphasise your extreme youth: I was in Form 6 (Year 12) whereas you must have been just beginning high school in Form 3 (Year 9). Of course these days seven-year-olds are dangerous but we were brought up in a different era!
I was 12 and in Form 2. Since NZ Chess mags are now online, the report for this was in the October 1977 issue (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/pdfs/1977-10.pdf), pp. 108–110.

Well played on your part. Clearly you had prepared the opening well and knew how to handle the resulting attack.

But yes, back in those ancient days, there were no 12–14yo GMs, and only one 15yo and very few other teenagers had ever made GM. It was a different time, for sure—when there were Informators not databases, Averbakh's endgame books rather than tablebases, and very weak instead of superhuman chess computers.

Adamski
08-03-2019, 03:37 PM
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Salient41081978-t1-body-d24.html contains a reference to Peter - and maybe a lost game for Bill?

Peter was still playing in 1996:

The 103rd consecutive New Zealand Chess Congress was held at the Wellington
Airport Hotel, Wellington, 28 December to 11 January 1996....

Reserve

The Reserve Championship was a close contest between the top three players.
Going in to the last round, Nigel Metge and Peter Hawkes were tied on 7.5,
with Matthew Barlow a half point back; Metge won quickly, but Hawkes was
lucky to draw with Arthur Pomeroy and was caught by Barlow.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total
1. Metge, Nigel x 1 1 1 0 1 = = 1 = 1 1 8.5
2. Hawkes, Peter 0 x = = 1 1 1 = 1 1 = 1 8
3. Barlow, Matthew 0 = x = 1 1 = 1 = 1 1 1 8
4. Pomeroy, Arthur 0 = = x 1 = = = = = = 1 6
5. Guthrie, David 1 0 0 0 x = = = = = 1 1 5.5
6. Steadman, Michael 0 0 0 = = x 1 1 1 = 1 0 5.5
7. Cooper, David = 0 = = = 0 x 1 0 = = 1 5
8. Mastilovich, Rajko = = 0 = = 0 0 x 1 = 1 = 5
9. van der Hoorn, M 0 0 = = = 0 1 0 x 1 0 1 4.5
10. Marner, Gavin = 0 0 = = = = = 0 x 0 = 3.5
11. Turner, Michael 0 = 0 = 0 0 = 0 1 1 x 0 3.5
12. Post, Martin 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 = 0 = 1 = 3

The success of the Metge family was continued by Nigel's son Russell Metge
winning the Major Open with 9/11.

Not a great tournament for Gavin but excellent for another friend of mine, Nigel Metge! And pretty good for Peter too!

Tony Dowden
08-03-2019, 05:15 PM
I was 12 and in Form 2....

Good grief! I was only playing in primary school events at that age! And I had only learned to play three years before.

I've corrected my earlier post :)

Tony Dowden
08-03-2019, 05:24 PM
Dr Dowden is spot on! On both points. While transcribing the game (conversion from descriptive notation for all 3 NZ games JMA vs GM [Grand Master!!]), I could not see why I did not take that en prise Knight earlier.
White's 24th should be Nf5.
You can call me 'Tony' :) I've revised the 24th move and the final comment.

Adamski
08-03-2019, 06:01 PM
Thanks, Tony!

Tony Dowden
09-03-2019, 01:17 PM
Thanks, Tony!
No worries!

Adamski
11-03-2019, 05:37 AM
Correct 24th move inserted. Final note revised.
Gavin has provided a corrected scoresheet. This time the Knight does not sit en prise!
[Event "Premier Reserves, Wgtn, 1977-78"]
[Site "Civic Chess Club, Wellington"]
[Date "1977.12.30"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Marner, Gavin"]
[Black "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B72"]
[PlyCount "53"]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8.
Qd2 Ng4 9. Bxg4 Bxg4 10. f3 Bd7 11. Nb3 O-O 12. Bh6 Rc8 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. h4 h5
15. O-O-O Qb6 16. g4 hxg4 17. h5 Ne5 18. hxg6 Rh8 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. Rxh8 Qxh8 21.
Nxe7 Nxf3 22. Qxd6 Rd8 23. gxf7 Kxf7 24. Nf5 Qf6 25. Qd5+ Ke8 26. Qg8+ Qf8 27.
Qg6+ *

Adamski
12-03-2019, 12:18 PM
Gavin and I worked out that our game in the Wellington ANZAC Weekender was played on a Saturday 26 April before 1984. The strong likelihood is it was 1980. Bill, you might like to use that date in the database. I moved to Wellington in 1979 so earlier dates are not possible.

Adamski
12-03-2019, 12:55 PM
Gavin and I worked out that our game in the Wellington ANZAC Weekender was played on a Saturday 26 April before 1984. The strong likelihood is it was 1980. Bill, you might like to use that date in the database. I moved to Wellington in 1979 so earlier dates are not possible.1980 confirmed. We were in Group B of the Feltex Carpet ANZAC Weekender. Played 25-27 April 1980 in Wellington. Phew, Bill. That took some detective work! Source: NZ Chess, 1980.

Bill Forster
17-03-2019, 10:54 AM
Gavin has sent me that scoresheet plus a third game we played in a Wellington champs. He did not have Year for our Morra but can tell from place in his scorebook that it was PRE1984.

I had a nagging alert at the back of my mind that I had unfinished work from these various Adams-Marner and Marner-Adams clashes. I must admit, these games have been making my head hurt this afternoon! There are three games in total. I originally put the Morra in the NZ database, but I have now removed it, since Gavin indicates it was actually pre 1984, and my serious doubts I expressed earlier about its date greatly grow in weight. I have put the dragon from the 1977-78 Premier reserve into the database. This was the tournament that started this whole thread. I just noticed that David Beach (now mentioned in the thread an umpeenth+1 times) won a strong tournament with a magnificent 10.5/11 and David Gollogly (similarly) wrote the tournament report in NZ Chess!


[Event "Premier Reserves, Wgtn, 1977-78"]
[Site "Civic Chess Club, Wellington"]
[Date "1977.12.30"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Marner, Gavin"]
[Black "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B72"]
[Annotator "J. Adams"]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8.
Qd2 Ng4 9. Bxg4 Bxg4 10. f3 Bd7 11. Nb3 O-O 12. Bh6 Rc8 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. h4 h5
15. O-O-O Qb6 16. g4 hxg4 17. h5 Na5 18. hxg6 Rh8 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. Rxh8 Qxh8 21.
Nxe7 gxf3 22. Qxd6 Rd8 23. gxf7 Kxf7 24. Nc5 Qf6 25. Qd5+ Ke8 26. Qg8+ Qf8 27.
Qg6+ {If 27...Kxe7, 28 Qd6+ Ke8 29 Qxf8+ Kxf8 30 Nxd7 should win. Why I
resigned rather than taking the N I do not know!} 1-0

(Game later fixed by Tony Dowden - 24.Nf5 not 24.Nc5 and everything makes sense - this was the version I put in the NZ Database)

However, I need to point out that NZ Chess report shows me that Marner did in fact beat Adams in this tournament, but in Round 8 (not in round 2) as shown above, on the 4th January 1978 (not 30 December 1977). In fact round 2 was on 28 December not 30 December! - so I'm sorry with my chess historian's hat on I am marking this scoresheet as a good effort but could do (much) better Jonathan! (I put the correct date/round information in the version I put in the database)

I had a quick look at the third game, but with no record of any "Wellington Champs" games from that month in the NZ database to synchronise against, and given the trouble the other two games had given me I decided to quietly ignore this one.

Bill Forster
17-03-2019, 07:38 PM
I was reading the first 2019 issue of New In Chess, when a Carlsen-Giri game gave me strong deja vu due to a game that appeared in this thread. Read more about it in the latest issue of the NZ Chess Bulletin (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/interactive/2019-03.html).

Adamski
18-03-2019, 06:59 AM
All good, Bill. In my defence I no longer have the paper score sheets for any of my Wellington games with Gavin. They were all provided by him. At least I now know the year each game was played in and have them all in a ChessBase 14 database. And fascinating parallel of Kai Jensen's win and the recent Super-GM blitz game. I join you in thanking Michael Freeman for unearthing Kai's win.

Bill Forster
18-03-2019, 10:46 AM
1980 confirmed. We were in Group B of the Feltex Carpet ANZAC Weekender. Played 25-27 April 1980 in Wellington. Phew, Bill. That took some detective work! Source: NZ Chess, 1980.

Goodness me somehow I missed these last posts when I was working on the Adams-Marner conundrum yesterday. I think it was likely the "same person makes multiple posts in a row and you don't realise anything's changed" syndrome. So now I will put the game back (yesterday I removed it) with the corrected meta data. But it will have to wait awhile, until the next time I work on the database.

Adamski
18-03-2019, 04:08 PM
Goodness me somehow I missed these last posts when I was working on the Adams-Marner conundrum yesterday. I think it was likely the "same person makes multiple posts in a row and you don't realise anything's changed" syndrome. So now I will put the game back (yesterday I removed it) with the corrected meta data. But it will have to wait awhile, until the next time I work on the database.Thank you, Bill. And of course the database update can wait.

Bill Forster
29-05-2019, 11:11 AM
I have only just noted that bringing the Peter Stuart database from Chessbase to PGN format with my (old) Chessbase V9 has resulted in thousands of games having bogus WhiteTeamCountry and BlackTeamCountry tags. For example Sarfati-Oliver above is bizarrely allegedly an Australia v Papua New Guinuea game! I put this down to a ChessBase bug, I think it is continuing on the tags with their existing values to games that don't have (and actually shouldn't have) the tags. Something else I'll have to fix in due course!

I have been investing a lot more hours on the Peter Stuart database, mainly wrestling with obscure technical problems like this one. (if you really want to give yourself a headache try sorting out the issues involved in Ansi v Unicode in chess databases). Anyway, today I republished the database on the NZCF site (see the History page (http://newzealandchess.co.nz/history.html) <--- link). I am happy that I've now finally got everything under control and have a firm base to continue maintaining the database into the future. The issues that came to light during this thread, (the duplicate Gollogly-Adams game, the rediscovered Jensen-Oliver game, the various Marner-Adams clashes, the fallacious Australia v Papua New Guinea tags), are all addressed and/or present. As well as 250 more games (from the 2018 and 2019 North Island Champs).

Incidentally the Australia v Papua New Guinea thing was indeed caused by a bug in ChessBase 9, and I had to dip into my pocket to buy ChessBase 15 to address it. This annoyed me as I am not a big ChessBase fan, having developed my own chess GUI Tarrasch (http://triplehappy.com) <--- link. Never mind the reality is that it is important to offer ChessBase format, not just PGN. At least I could fund the purchase from my Paypal account with Tarrasch donations! (thank you Capablanca Fan incidentally).

Bill Forster
25-10-2020, 02:30 PM
Definitely remember him. A tragedy that he died quite young not long ago. When we were both at Victoria Uni, we traded logic lessons by him for chess lessons by me for about a year at lunchtimes. Around that time, he played for the Wellington Chess Club.

I quote you in a small piece I wrote about the Chandler-Powell game (Murray unearthed the game).

See https://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/interactive/2020-10-ross-powell.html

Capablanca-Fan
27-10-2020, 06:14 AM
I quote you in a small piece I wrote about the Chandler-Powell game (Murray unearthed the game).

See https://newzealandchess.co.nz/nzchessmag/interactive/2020-10-ross-powell.html

Very good Bill; thank you for that account of some mid-1970s chess activity only barely before my time, and of course those memories of Ross. I also can't recall Ross talking about his draw with Murray. IIRC, he earned a B.Sc. in physics, a B.A. double major in Classics and Philosophy, and M.A. in Philosophy, in particular on Buridan's solution to semantic paradoxes.

Bill Forster
29-10-2020, 08:42 AM
Very good Bill; thank you for that account of some mid-1970s chess activity only barely before my time, and of course those memories of Ross. I also can't recall Ross talking about his draw with Murray. IIRC, he earned a B.Sc. in physics, a B.A. double major in Classics and Philosophy, and M.A. in Philosophy, in particular on Buridan's solution to semantic paradoxes.

Thanks, I took the liberty of adding this further information to the article.

Capablanca-Fan
30-10-2020, 03:09 AM
Thanks, I took the liberty of adding this further information to the article.

You're welcome. I also think that pic is likely closer to 1990 than 2000; I think 1992–3. The adjacent game has my former pupil Shamnika Rupasinghe, now a doctor living in Melbourne, against Bill Ramsay who edited NZ Chess for a time and before that wrote a weekly chess column in the Dominion.

Bill Forster
31-10-2020, 08:52 AM
You're welcome. I also think that pic is likely closer to 1990 than 2000; I think 1992–3. The adjacent game has my former pupil Shamnika Rupasinghe, now a doctor living in Melbourne, against Bill Ramsay who edited NZ Chess for a time and before that wrote a weekly chess column in the Dominion.

Interesting info, I might edit it again. I recognised Bill Ramsay, but not your former pupil. Funnily enough Bill Ramsay made one of his very infrequent visits to the Wellington Chess Club on Thursday night. I don't really know him, but I did say "I put a picture with you in it on the internet the other day". I showed him on my phone, but as he said, "My eyesight has gone" and the photo resolution is very sad to begin with.