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ER
16-10-2014, 08:36 PM
Following FM Dr Jonathan Sarfati's suggestion in regards to useful Chess books I am recently studying HR Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals

I analysed a game played more than a century ago (Havana International Masters Tournament, 1913, French Defence. White: J. R. Capablanca. Black: R. Blanco) with the help of a relatively recent computer program (Fritz 13).

I was surprised to observe that the program agrees almost entirely with the ideas presented by the legendary World Champion.

Capablanca-Fan
17-10-2014, 02:04 AM
Following FM Dr Jonathan Sarfati's suggestion in regards to useful Chess books I am recently studying HR Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals
Hope it's been helpful so far.


I analysed a game played more than a century ago (Havana International Masters Tournament, 1913, French Defence. White: J. R. Capablanca. Black: R. Blanco) with the help of a relatively recent computer program (Fritz 13).

I was surprised to observe that the program agrees almost entirely with the ideas presented by the legendary World Champion.
I am not surprised though. Computers tend to like his moves too—in 1911, analysis with the super-strong Rybka 3 (http://en.chessbase.com/post/using-che-engines-to-estimate-human-skill) (Elo ~3000) corroborated an earlier analysis with the relatively weak Crafty 20.14 (Elo ~2650) that Capa's moves had the smallest deviation from computer choices than any other world champ. In world championship matches only (before Carlsen), the even stronger Houdini at 20-ply (Elo >3000) rates Capa #3 behind Anand and Kramnik (http://en.chessbase.com/post/the-quality-of-play-at-the-candidates-090413). Also, it's well known that Alekhine's book of the New York 1927 tourney (http://www.amazon.com/New-York-1927-Alexander-Alekhine/dp/1888690836/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdt_img_top?ie=UTF8), which Capa won by a large margin, had a strong anti-Capa agenda. But according to the favourable forward by GM Andy Soltis, where Alekhine criticized Capablanca'a moves, the computer often agreed with Capa.

ER
17-10-2014, 03:49 AM
Hope it's been helpful so far.
...

It has indeed. I did unexpectedly well at a recent tournament in Sydney, where I played and scored points against opponents who were all higher rated than myself. All the preparation I had was just reading and going through the first few chapters of Chess Fundamentals. What I really enjoy in Capablanca's writings is the no nonsense, mutual trust relationship with which he encourages his student. For example when he says "White's Knight posted on e5 undermines Black's plan of playing b6 with the idea of developing the Bishop at b7, he trusts that you work it out yourself why it is so! If you do it you will understand it and then the idea becomes knowledge. I have noticed another couple of situations in which he uses the same approach instead of giving specific variations. I have also noticed that he does that (giving variations) in tactical positions. In positional chess, you have to do the work yourself!

antichrist
17-10-2014, 09:24 AM
I like Euwa and Lasker's books plus those immortal games by Capa etc

Adamski
17-10-2014, 04:41 PM
It has indeed. I did unexpectedly well at a recent tournament in Sydney, where I played and scored points against opponents who were all higher rated than myself. All the preparation I had was just reading and going through the first few chapters of Chess Fundamentals. What I really enjoy in Capablanca's writings is the no nonsense, mutual trust relationship with which he encourages his student. For example when he says "White's Knight posted on e5 undermines Black's plan of playing b6 with the idea of developing the Bishop at b7, he trusts that you work it out yourself why it is so! If you do it you will understand it and then the idea becomes knowledge. I have noticed another couple of situations in which he uses the same approach instead of giving specific variations. I have also noticed that he does that (giving variations) in tactical positions. In positional chess, you have to do the work yourself!Great stuff, Elliott. I read Capa's Fundamentals as a junior but must re-read it! I do enjoy playing over Capa's games too - I have one short collection. And well done at the Labour Weekend tournament here at Ryde Eastwood where you did score some notable results!

ER
17-10-2014, 07:36 PM
Great stuff, Elliott. I read Capa's Fundamentals as a junior but must re-read it! I do enjoy playing over Capa's games too - I have one short collection. And well done at the Labour Weekend tournament here at Ryde Eastwood where you did score some notable results!

Thanks Jonathan, congrats for your great win vs that corro GM too! I will keep you all posted re my Capa studies here! :)

Capablanca-Fan
18-10-2014, 12:15 AM
Glad my advice here has been helpful.

MichaelBaron
18-10-2014, 12:44 AM
Going through Capa's games is always great!~Hils play was always logical and easy to follow.