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antichrist
29-04-2004, 05:29 PM
AR
Remember that Filipino, Eddie I think, the Burwood Park chess regular who advances many of his pawns to third rank. I met a player from Germany the other day (rating 1850 who I beat!!!!!) and he told me that that opening has a name, something like Mary Louise ......... Eddie went very well in an Aussie Championship when using that opening.

Anyone what is the full name of the opening?????

Bill Gletsos
30-04-2004, 01:04 AM
AR
Remember that Filipino, Eddie I think, the Burwood Park chess regular who advances many of his pawns to third rank. I met a player from Germany the other day (rating 1850 who I beat!!!!!) and he told me that that opening has a name, something like Mary Louise ......... Eddie went very well in an Aussie Championship when using that opening.
Are you referring to Eddie Alcantara.

arosar
30-04-2004, 09:36 AM
Correct. The system (1. a4 or 1. h4 / and 1...a5 or 1...h5) are referred to as the Alcantara Attack.

AR

Kevin Bonham
30-04-2004, 06:20 PM
AR has the "and"s and "or"s the wrong way round there. The Alcantara has (a4 and h4) or (...a5 and ...h5). The idea is to make it difficult for the opponent to castle on either side of the board, and hope that this is worth the 1 or 2 pawns surrendered in the process.

I have a 1985 game in which Eddie, playing Black, beat a player rated 2135 with it; however the name of the victim is not mentioned. Will post this on request.

antichrist
28-09-2004, 05:43 PM
AR has the "and"s and "or"s the wrong way round there. The Alcantara has (a4 and h4) or (...a5 and ...h5). The idea is to make it difficult for the opponent to castle on either side of the board, and hope that this is worth the 1 or 2 pawns surrendered in the process.

I have a 1985 game in which Eddie, playing Black, beat a player rated 2135 with it; however the name of the victim is not mentioned. Will post this on request.

KB: Sorry but for some reason I did not follow this thread up at the time, when I think of it would have been SEC time. Can you post that game please. I know him well. Maybe that championship's games are all written up somewhere.

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2004, 07:51 PM
Enjoy.

To add insult to injury, White missed 6.Bxf7+ which wins.

Anon {2135} - Alcantara,E {1876} City of Sydney '85 [B00]

1.e4 h5 2.d4 h4 3.Nc3 a5 4.Bc4 a4 5.Nf3 h3 6.Ng5 e6 7.Nxh3 a3 8.d5 axb2 9.Bxb2 e5 10.Nb5 d6 11.Ng1 Nf6 12.Qd3 Be7 13.Ne2 Na6 14.f3 Nc5 15.Qd2 Bd7 16.Ng3 g6 17.f4 Nfxe4 18.Nxe4 Nxe4 19.Qe3 Ng3 20.fxe5 Nf5 21.Qc3 Bh4+ 22.Kf1 Rh7 23.Kg1 Bxb5 24.Bxb5+ c6 25.Bxc6+ bxc6 26.Qxc6+ Kf8 27.g4 Rc8 28.Qa6 Rxc2 0-1

antichrist
30-09-2004, 03:33 PM
Does this mean that Eddie Alcantara has an opening named after him and Bobby Fisher does not?

Rincewind
30-09-2004, 03:57 PM
Does this mean that Eddie Alcantara has an opening named after him and Bobby Fisher does not?

There is a line in the King Gambit Accepted named after Bobby Fischer.

arosar
30-09-2004, 04:00 PM
Does this mean that Eddie Alcantara has an opening named after him and Bobby Fisher does not?

You really should take up another interest. There is a bridge section on this BB.

AR

JGB
30-09-2004, 04:31 PM
There is a line in the King Gambit Accepted named after Bobby Fischer.

...and just a few more, ;)

antichrist
01-10-2004, 10:58 AM
You really should take up another interest. There is a bridge section on this BB.

AR

You seem to respond to the full moon phases - have your neighbours been complaining about strange wolfing noises at midnight.

antichrist
01-10-2004, 11:00 AM
There is a line in the King Gambit Accepted named after Bobby Fischer.

But is an original opening attributed to Alcantara whereas only lines on existing openings attributed to BF?

Rincewind
01-10-2004, 11:17 AM
But is an original opening attributed to Alcantara whereas only lines on existing openings attributed to BF?

What is called a line and what is called an open is only conventional. The Najdorf, for example, has a huge body of theory behind it but in your mind is nothing more than a line in the Sicilian. Whereas something like the Nimzo-Larsen Attack is an opening in its own right and so, to you, more impressive? Please!

antichrist
01-10-2004, 05:55 PM
in error

arosar
01-10-2004, 06:19 PM
You seem to respond to the full moon phases - have your neighbours been complaining about strange wolfing noises at midnight.

There you go again mate. Your shrink ought to really increase your dose. Even better: lock you up.

AR

antichrist
02-10-2004, 06:01 PM
There you go again mate. Your shrink ought to really increase your dose. Even better: lock you up.

AR

What authority do you have to be rude to people. Compare your behaviour with those who want to censor your film festivals. You are good at swearing and not for anything else much. Do something constructive for a change.

antichrist
05-10-2004, 03:38 PM
What is called a line and what is called an open is only conventional. The Najdorf, for example, has a huge body of theory behind it but in your mind is nothing more than a line in the Sicilian. Whereas something like the Nimzo-Larsen Attack is an opening in its own right and so, to you, more impressive? Please!

Sorry for being persistent but is Alcantara the only "Aussie" with an opening named after him. Is the Alcantara Opening officially recognised?

Kevin Bonham
06-10-2004, 10:55 PM
Does this mean that Eddie Alcantara has an opening named after him and Bobby Fisher does not?

It's not as simple as just talking about "openings" vs "lines". One player might get a completely original position on the board after a couple of moves, but if the line is rubbish, who cares if it's named after them? To some it might almost be an insult.

On the contrary, some lines 15 or 20 moves deep could be far more "critical" than the sort of "opening" only Eric Schiller would categorise as "theory".

antichrist
08-10-2004, 02:53 PM
It's not as simple as just talking about "openings" vs "lines". One player might get a completely original position on the board after a couple of moves, but if the line is rubbish, who cares if it's named after them? To some it might almost be an insult.

On the contrary, some lines 15 or 20 moves deep could be far more "critical" than the sort of "opening" only Eric Schiller would categorise as "theory".

To about what level does the Alcantara Attack hold up?

Rincewind
08-10-2004, 03:12 PM
To about what level does the Alcantara Attack hold up?

It's probably below even Schiller's standard. Doesn't rate a footnote in Nunn.

Kevin Bonham
08-10-2004, 05:37 PM
To about what level does the Alcantara Attack hold up?

Objectively - total crap, probably even forced loss.

JGB
08-10-2004, 05:59 PM
Objectively - total crap, probably even forced loss.

Yeah but winning against it is not always so easy against players who use these lines often and keep it tidy. Their is a player in my league who opens with the 'elephant' regardless (almost) of what the opponet plays, and scored 7 from 9 last season with an average opponent rating from over 2000 DWZ. Thats a fair effort for a so called 'dud' line.

Kevin Bonham
08-10-2004, 07:12 PM
Yeah but winning against it is not always so easy against players who use these lines often and keep it tidy.

Yes. Can't remember now who it was who said that at club level almost any opening is playable - can someone remind me?

Lucena
08-10-2004, 11:34 PM
Yes. Can't remember now who it was who said that at club level almost any opening is playable - can someone remind me?

Johnny Bolens?

Kevin Bonham
02-04-2009, 10:43 PM
*bump*

Bill has reported in the shoutbox that the character behind this quirky opening is sadly no longer with us, having recently passed away at the age of 67.

ER
03-04-2009, 10:37 AM
At least he was original! If I remember well he was a strong player having claimed quite a few impressive victories and reached a 1900+ rating (I stand to be corrected in this one)!
Two anecdotes of his:
Around 1977 a lovely poster of the then young Anatoly Karpov appeared on the wall of Peter Parr's (I think it then was at) Sussex St Chess Centre only to mysteriously disappear a few days later! "Maybe ASIO don't like Karpov, he is communist!" said Alcantara.
He always dressed nicely, although a little flashy, and chain - smoked those fine slim cigars.
In another case commending on the (very tasty indeed) jaffles (or was it toasted sandwiches?) Peter Parr was serving, he told me confidentially: "hey, I think Peter would make much better business selling this stuff than chess books"! :)

pax
03-04-2009, 04:13 PM
Is this the game that prompted this thread in the first place?


[Event "AUS Open"]
[Site "Sydney"]
[Date "1996.12.29"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Rosario, Amiel"]
[Black "Alcantara, Eddy"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1229"]
[PlyCount "87"]
[EventDate "1996.12.??"]
1. d4 h5 2. e4 a5 3. Nf3 h4 4. h3 e6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bf4 c6 7. a4 Ne7 8. Bg5 Qb6 9. Qd3 Ng6 10. Be2 Nd7 11. O-O e5 12. Be3 Qc7 13. Ng5 Be7 14. Qc4 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Nb6 16. Nd5 Nxd5 17. exd5 Bf5 18. Rfe1 f6 19. dxe5 Nxe5 20. Qf4 Qd7 21. Bxh4 O-O-O 22. dxc6 bxc6 23. Bg3 Bxh3 24. gxh3 Qxh3 25. Bf3 g5 26. Qe3 f5 27. Bg2 Qh5 28. f4 gxf4 29. Qxf4 Rdg8 30. Rxe5 Rg4 31. Qxf5+ Qxf5 32. Rxf5 Rxg3 33. Raf1 Kc7 34. Rxa5 Rhg8 35. Rf2 R3g4 36. Kf1 Kb6 37. Raf5 Rxa4 38. Rd2 Rg6 39. Rh5 Re6 40. Rd1 Rf4+ 41. Kg1 d5 42. Rf1 Rg4 43. Rh3 Re2 44. Rf2 1/2-1/2

ER
03-04-2009, 10:02 PM
Hi Pax, Eddie Alcantara was exhibiting this style at least 20 years before the particular game was played! :)

antichrist
04-04-2009, 07:06 PM
what a shame, Eddie was a lovely friendly bloke. Yeah always smoking. I think he played Fred Flatow at Burwood Park.

pappubahry
29-06-2009, 12:39 PM
Bump.

I found a couple of games between Jacob Edwards and Max Leskiewicz the other day when going through some of my old stuff. They were clippings from the chess column of the Courier-Mail (I think) in 1996.

Annotations from whoever wrote that chess column.

Edwards-Leskiewicz, Noosa 1996.

1. h4?! e5 2. h5?! d5 3. d3 Bc5 4. e3 Nc6 5. Bd2 h6 6. a4 {White's plan becomes apparent - dissuade Black from castling kingside or queenside, then assault the centralised king.} Nf6 7. Be2 Be6 8. Na3 Qe7 9. c3 a5 10. d4 exd4 11. exd4 Bb6 {White is unconcerned with his lagging piece development, contending that lack of development will play an important part in White's attack!} 12. Qc2 Ne4 13. Nf3 Bg4 14. Qd3 0-0 15. Be3 Bf5 16. Qd1 Rae8 17. Nc2 Ng3 18. Rh2 {if 18. fxg3 Bxc2 19. Qxc2 Qxe3} Nxe2 19. Qxe2 Na7 20. 0-0-0 Nc8 21. Ne5 Nd6 22. g4 Bd7 23. b3 Ne4 24. Kb2 Rc8 25. f3 Nd6 26. Rg1 c5 27. g5 cxd4 28. cxd4 Bf5 29. Na3 Nc4+ {Both players now have less than five minutes to reach the 40-move time control} 30. bxc4 Qb4+ 31. Ka2 dxc4 32. Nexc4 Be6 33. Rc1 Rfd8 34. Qd3 Qxa4 35. Rb2 Bxd4 36. Bxd4 b5 37. Rxb5 Bxc4+ 38. Rxc4 Rxc4 39. Qxc4 Qxc4 40. Nxc4 Rxd4 41. g6 fxg6 42. hxg6 {And White went on to win in another 12 moves}

Then a few months later at Redcliffe, with colours reversed.

Leskiewicz-Edwards

1. h4 e5 2. h5 d5 3. a4 c5 4. d3 Nc6 5. g3 Be6 6. Bg2 f5 7. Na3 Nf6 8. Bd2 Rc8 9. Nf3 Bd6 10. Ng5 Qe7 11. c4 d4 12. Nxe6 Qxe6 13. Nb5 Bb8 14. e4 Nb4 15. Bxb4 cxb4 16. exf5 Qd7 {If 16... Qxf5 17. Bh3} 17. h6 a6 {Trapping the knight, but after ... axb5 White's connected passed pawns become deadly} 18. g4 gxh6 19. Rxh6 Qg7 20. Rxf6 {If 20. Rh4 Qg5 21. Rh1 Nxg4} Qxf6 21. Bxb7 Rd8 22. Qf3 0-0 23. Ke2 axb5 24. cxb5 Qg5 25. a5 Qf4 26. b6 Rf6 27. a6 Rxb6 28. a7 Bxa7 29. Rxa7 Qc1 {With the idea ... Rh6-h1 and ... Qe1 mate} 30. Bd5+! Kh8 31. b3 Rh6 32. Ra2 Rhd6 33. Bc4 Qg1 34. Qe4 Qh2 35. Ra7 R6d7 36. Rxd7 Rxd7 37. Qa8+ Kg7 38. Qg8+ Kh6 39. g5+ Kh5 40. Qe8+ Kg4 41. Qxd7 Qf4 42. f6+ Qf5 43. Qxf5+ {Or Be6} Kxf5 44. f7 {Black resigns}

antichrist
06-03-2012, 02:54 PM
Objectively - total crap, probably even forced loss.

at least he had a go at something original and was reasonably successful at such.

Unfortunately modern day chess players are not living up to national average I dont think.

Hobbes
06-03-2012, 03:14 PM
I remember 1.h4 being called the Kadas Attack, or the Kadas Gambit, something like that, similarly 1...h5, don't remember hearing it called the Alcantara attack before.

Kevin Bonham
06-03-2012, 08:17 PM
As noted in #4 it is only the Alcantara if both h4 and a4 are played (in either order). I think both 1.a4 and 1.h4 (considered individually) have acquired quite a few obscure names.

ER
08-03-2012, 12:35 AM
Almost three years after Eddie's death here is a post that I entered then based on my own experience of Alcantara's times!


At least he was original! If I remember well he was a strong player having claimed quite a few impressive victories and reached a 1900+ rating (I stand to be corrected in this one)!
Two anecdotes of his:
Around 1977 a lovely poster of the then young Anatoly Karpov appeared on the wall of Peter Parr's (I think it then was at) Sussex St Chess Centre only to mysteriously disappear a few days later! "Maybe ASIO don't like Karpov, he is communist!" said Alcantara.
He always dressed nicely, although a little flashy, and chain - smoked those fine slim cigars.
In another case commending on the (very tasty indeed) jaffles (or was it toasted sandwiches?) Peter Parr was serving, he told me confidentially: "hey, I think Peter would make much better business selling this stuff than chess books"! :)

antichrist
08-03-2012, 01:00 AM
At Burwood Park giant set he was always friendly, dignified and helpful explaining his game, in contrast to other obusive folk. The Filipino was a gentleman in contrast.

ER
08-03-2012, 01:12 PM
At Burwood Park giant set he was always friendly, dignified and helpful explaining his game, in contrast to other obusive folk. The Filipino was a gentleman in contrast.

He definitely wasn't a silly old troll like you! He would never copy my posts from here and unashamedly paste them elsewhere without crediting the source!

antichrist
08-03-2012, 03:14 PM
He definitely wasn't a silly old troll like you! He would never copy my posts from here and unashamedly paste them elsewhere without crediting the source!

purely accidental when highlighting - even put your proper name on it I did