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Watto
25-11-2011, 09:20 AM
I have a nephew who has begun to take an interest in chess. He's 21, knows the moves and can beat other beginners but still a beginner. I think he'd be good once he knows a bit more.

I'm going to post him Chess Made Easy and then one slightly more advanced book so he can move on to that. I thought of 'Simple Chess' but any suggestions?

Brian_Jones
25-11-2011, 10:10 AM
http://www.chessaustralia.com.au/index.cfm?p=detail&o=9781580625869

or maybe

http://www.chessaustralia.com.au/index.cfm?p=detail&o=9781592573165

Max Illingworth
25-11-2011, 10:19 AM
Maybe 'The Chess Player's Bible' by James Eade. 'Simple Chess' by Michael Stean is a good second book; I'll also suggest Bain's 'Basic Chess Tactics' or John Nunn's 'Learn Chess Tactics'.

Watto
25-11-2011, 10:58 AM
Thanks Max and Brian! Much appreciated.

Alekhine2000
20-12-2013, 12:06 AM
Logical Chess: Move by Move” by Irving Chernev. He explains every single move. Very helpful.

ER
20-12-2013, 06:37 AM
Logical Chess: Move by Move” by Irving Chernev. He explains every single move. Very helpful.

best suggestion ever Dr! :clap: a fantastic Christmas present! :)

antichrist
20-12-2013, 08:31 AM
what I found terrific was The Complete Chess Course by Rheinfeld and Horowitz I think it was. I went and defeated a champ in friendly games after that. But they must specialize in at least two openings before they can really shake the tree.

Capablanca-Fan
24-12-2013, 03:21 AM
Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals is excellent (Botvinnik agreed) for those past the elementary tactics phase. Don't get the butchered version with Nick DeFirmian.
Stean's Simple Chess is a good book but not really for beginners.

Patrick Byrom
24-12-2013, 05:21 PM
Play Better Chess by Leonard Barden is also quite good.

Max Illingworth
24-12-2013, 06:50 PM
Two years on, I would recommend 'Everyone's 2nd Chess Book' by Dan Heisman, as it doesn't just provide a lot of useful tips but also teaches you how to improve at the 'starting out' level. At the beginning level what's important is not so much your knowledge of chess (bar the rules) but your ability to see moves (especially those that capture undefended pieces or deliver checkmate!).

Hasimir
11-08-2014, 05:02 AM
I've seen Tiger and Dragon along with The Bear, both by Walter Thomas Downs as interesting and advantageous alternatives to learning massive numbers of openings. The books are available here for free (http://www.chess.com/download/view/chess-systems) (as a zip file of PDFs). They're being given away by the author, so nothing to fret about there. He also explains how and why he developed these systems (http://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-openings/chess-systems-the-whole-enchilada).

I've heard very good things about them from people who play far better than I do, but I haven't yet read through them so I don't know for sure. On the other hand it's not like you'll get worse for reading them, so why not have a look.

MichaelBaron
12-08-2014, 03:54 AM
Some good books writtens by the Soviet chess authors ''old but gold'' some years ago. Many translated into English. I would try one by Averbakh and Beilin

jkec
26-11-2014, 08:48 PM
for openings (from beginner to intermediate) i recommend a new book :

kindle version:
http://www.amazon.com.au/LEARNING-CHESS-OPENINGS-home-player-club-player-ebook/dp/B00PULUACW/

pdf version:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/jef-kaan/better-chess-openings/ebook/product-21906312.html

MichaelBaron
27-11-2014, 09:31 AM
I prefer old books :)

Capablanca-Fan
28-11-2014, 12:29 PM
Play Better Chess by Leonard Barden is also quite good.

That's a pretty good book; it was written in 1980 and quite fresh for its time. It could probably be obtained via Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Play-Better-Chess-Leonard-Barden/dp/0706409671).

Adamski
01-12-2014, 11:56 AM
The Mastering Chess course by Danny Kopec, Geoff Chandler, Chris Morrison and Ian Mullen builds up nicely from the basics. Available in paperback.

MichaelBaron
01-12-2014, 07:45 PM
The Mastering Chess course by Danny Kopec, Geoff Chandler, Chris Morrison and Ian Mullen builds up nicely from the basics. Available in paperback.

Not one the best book choices in my opinion ...but as this is not a ''wishing good luck'' or ''congratulations'' post...congratulations to Adamski on making an imformative post :)

Averbakh and Beilin book ''Journey to the Chess Kingdom'' is my sentimental favorite.

Redmond Barry
02-12-2014, 04:34 AM
Dont forget the classics!!!

Encyclopedia of chess wisdom by Eric S.

Adamski
03-12-2014, 12:08 PM
FYI it appears from Facebook that Eric Schiller has not been vey well lately. I have one of his books which I like.

MichaelBaron
05-12-2014, 09:53 AM
And for openings: Grant Szuveges lectures on MCC website are really good for beginners

FM_Bill
24-12-2014, 11:54 AM
You cannot go wrong with the classic "Chess Made Easy" by Purdy and Koshnitsky.

"Bobby Fischer teaches chess" trains beginners to see up to 4 moves ahead.

There is a book by Maurice Ashley is really good and focuses on developing sight of the board.