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Kevin Bonham
29-09-2004, 10:45 PM
Presented for amusement only - my play for the first half of this typical G60 hustle is utter rubbish and had Black seen 17...a5! I would have been grovelling for the rest of the game ... but there is a rather cute aesthetic image along the way. Anyone else had one with this structure?

KB - Name Suppressed {1800s} 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Bd7 4.Bxd7+ Qxd7 5.0-0 Nc6 6.c4 g6 7.Nc3 Bg7 8.Re1 e5 9.d3 Nge7 10.Nd5 Nxd5 11.cxd5 Nd4 12.Nxd4 cxd4 13.f4 0-0 14.fxe5 dxe5 15.Bd2 f5 16.Bb4 Rfc8 17.Qb3 fxe4 18.dxe4 Bf8 19.Bd2 Bd6 20.Rac1 Rxc1 21.Rxc1 Rc8 22.Rxc8+ Qxc8 23.Bh6 Qd7 24.Qc2 a6 25.b3 Qg4 26.h3 Qd7 27.Kh2 Qc7 28.Qd3 b5 29.a4 {Hmmm, I wonder if I can sucker him into actually trying to win this} Qc3? {Yep.} 30.Qf1! d3?? 31.Qf6 1-0

JGB
30-09-2004, 09:00 PM
Presented for amusement only - my play for the first half of this typical G60 hustle ...

Whats a G60? Is this the time control?

Rincewind
30-09-2004, 09:26 PM
Whats a G60? Is this the time control?

Yes, it means whole of GAME in 60 minutes. Hence, G60.

JGB
30-09-2004, 09:50 PM
Thanks mate, pretty bad miss from an 1800 rated player with a good time control.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2004, 11:22 PM
Thanks mate, pretty bad miss from an 1800 rated player with a good time control.

Yes - of course having played 29...Qc3? he is already losing; 30...Qc7 losing the b-pawn is the best salvage attempt after that but his king is still exposed and I doubt White would have much trouble winning. At the time I had less than 15 minutes left and he had around 40, which makes it odder.

The same player has a really wierd habit of losing through blunders like this with loads of time on the clock and not many bits on the board. In a G90 with 46 minutes left he walked into a mate in 2 in a queen ending where he was a pawn up against me once (and I was very short of time). In another one, in a Q+R ending, which he was also winning with lots of time on the clock, he dropped a rook to a check followed by a fork.

I did some database searching last night and it appears that the purest possible Othello structure (interlocking pawns in the four central squares with no other pawns on the c,d,e or f files) appears about 1 game in 20,000.

Lucena
01-10-2004, 12:17 AM
I did some database searching last night and it appears that the purest possible Othello structure (interlocking pawns in the four central squares with no other pawns on the c,d,e or f files) appears about 1 game in 20,000.

Gee Kevin I was thinking there would be some related anecdote involving jealousy, betrayal, possible infidelity, and murder :doh: when I read "Othello". Oh well, I guess you'll have to work on it :)

Kevin Bonham
01-10-2004, 05:30 AM
Gee Kevin I was thinking there would be some related anecdote involving jealousy, betrayal, possible infidelity, and murder :doh: when I read "Othello". Oh well, I guess you'll have to work on it :)

Hmmm. Perhaps you are not familiar with the board game of the same name (or perhaps you are.) Also known as Reversi. It has a certain starting pattern ...

As for the above rather silly chess game, I would argue that ...Qc3 represented jealousy of White's more secure king position, ...d3 was both betrayal and infidelity towards the elegant pawn structure, and Qf6 was most certainly murder, if I do say so myself. Maybe this Shakespeare chap knew something about chess after all. :lol:

Lucena
02-10-2004, 12:32 AM
As for the above rather silly chess game, I would argue that ...Qc3 represented jealousy of White's more secure king position, ...d3 was both betrayal and infidelity towards the elegant pawn structure, and Qf6 was most certainly murder, if I do say so myself. Maybe this Shakespeare chap knew something about chess after all. :lol:
That's the way Kevin :thumbsup: much better. I have played Othello but forgot that there was a starting position. May I bring to your attention (if you haven't seen it) the game Karpov-Ribli, 1973 which had a similar opening and structure(no Othello though).

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2004, 01:40 AM
May I bring to your attention (if you haven't seen it) the game Karpov-Ribli, 1973 which had a similar opening and structure(no Othello though).

Yep, that one came out third from the top in my search for similar pawn structures and I was surprised how similar the position was. A few rounds earlier in the same event Unzucker-Gheorghiu had reached the same position but wimped out on move 14. :rolleyes:

In both cases the difference from my game is that the Black bishop came out to e7, which is clearly better than the fianchetto IMO.