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Maxwell843
15-08-2011, 06:59 PM
Hi,
I'm rated about 1500 and play regularly at my local chess club and also in a few tournaments throughout the year, but I play heaps online,

I am wondering what people think is a good study routine for improving in chess?

I just joined ICC-Internet Chess Club and will watch some of the videos on there, I know going over grandmaster game is a good idea, reviewing my own games, doing some tactics/ problems? any other ideas or suggestions would be most welcomed,

I'm just looking for a 30min-40min study routine I can use.

Max Illingworth
16-08-2011, 06:36 AM
Hi,
I'm rated about 1500 and play regularly at my local chess club and also in a few tournaments throughout the year, but I play heaps online,

I am wondering what people think is a good study routine for improving in chess?

I just joined ICC-Internet Chess Club and will watch some of the videos on there, I know going over grandmaster game is a good idea, reviewing my own games, doing some tactics/ problems? any other ideas or suggestions would be most welcomed,

I'm just looking for a 30min-40min study routine I can use.

I recommend a jog or a swim. This will be better for your chess than any study.

If you only have time to do one thing to improve your chess (involving deliberate study), analyse your games.

Igor_Goldenberg
16-08-2011, 11:57 AM
I am sure Max means well, however the road to improvement is different.

Ideally you need to identify areas that require improvement. Calculating variations and seeing tactics is usually #1. Learning endgame and strategy are #2 and #3.

For #1 I can recommend www.chesstempo.com
For endgame and strategy you need to start with books - from simple to more complicated. There were few discussed in various threads.
Word of caution - start with "classical" and relatively simple books. Even if you are too strong for them they will lay an excellent foundation.

Another word of caution - there is no single plan that is ideal to everyone, it depends on age, strength, level of knowledge and individual weak points.

Adamski
16-08-2011, 12:59 PM
I am sure Max means well, however the road to improvement is different.

Ideally you need to identify areas that require improvement. Calculating variations and seeing tactics is usually #1. Learning endgame and strategy are #2 and #3.

For #1 I can recommend www.chesstempo.com
For endgame and strategy you need to start with books - from simple to more complicated. There were few discussed in various threads.
Word of caution - start with "classical" and relatively simple books. Even if you are too strong for them they will lay an excellent foundation.

Another word of caution - there is no single plan that is ideal to everyone, it depends on age, strength, level of knowledge and individual weak points.
I also like chesstempo.com. Some words of wisdom here!

Max Illingworth
16-08-2011, 07:37 PM
I recommend a jog or a swim. This will be better for your chess than any study.

If you only have time to do one thing to improve your chess (involving deliberate study), analyse your games.

I have no idea what/if I was thinking when I wrote this. Here is what I suggest instead.



Hi,
I'm rated about 1500 and play regularly at my local chess club and also in a few tournaments throughout the year, but I play heaps online,

I advise against playing a large amount of online chess. If you play too much blitz, it causes you to play/calculate superficially in OTB tournament games as you become used to making quick decisions. Bullet is fun, but doesn't do anything to improve your chess.


I am wondering what people think is a good study routine for improving in chess?

As Igor noted, this depends on a number of factors, though at your level, tactics/blunders will decide the majority of your games.


I just joined ICC-Internet Chess Club and will watch some of the videos on there, I know going over grandmaster game is a good idea, reviewing my own games, doing some tactics/ problems? any other ideas or suggestions would be most welcomed,

All of the above should be helpful, but if you could only do one of the above, then it would be most useful to analyse your own games (first by yourself, then check your analyses with an engine). By doing this you improve your calculation, identify your strengths and weaknesses, and your understanding of the static and dynamic elements of chess. But of course it is ideal to do all of the above (and maybe more), to stop your study becoming tedious and to improve all aspects of your chess.


Ideally you need to identify areas that require improvement. Calculating variations and seeing tactics is usually #1. Learning endgame and strategy are #2 and #3.

In terms of chess knowledge I agree, though I would consider openings to be just as important as endgames and strategy.


For #1 I can recommend www.chesstempo.com

Seconded. There is also 'TrainingBot' on ICC and Chess Tactics Server.


For endgame and strategy you need to start with books - from simple to more complicated. There were few discussed in various threads.
Word of caution - start with "classical" and relatively simple books. Even if you are too strong for them they will lay an excellent foundation.

For strategy, I recommend starting with 'Simple Chess' by Michael Stean. 'Silman's Complete Endgame Course' is one of several good books for studying the endgame.


I'm just looking for a 30min-40min study routine I can use.

Of course, a chess routine should not be limited to chess study. The four determinants of your results in chess are chess knowledge, innate chess talent, health/reserves of energy and purposefulness/will-power/competitive character. Doing an hour of strenuous exercise each day and eating a healthy, balanced diet will give you good health and plenty of energy for tournament games. The fourth factor is more psychological, and can be maximised by having a positive but realistic attitude. 'Chess for Tigers' and 'The Survival Guide to Competitive Chess' are good books that cover chess psychology (and more).

littlesprout85
17-08-2011, 10:03 PM
Geez-

All Like Eating & working out- Meh thought that chess was a Leasure Sport m8 :doh:

sprout85 =)

Max Illingworth
17-08-2011, 10:55 PM
Geez-

All Like Eating & working out- Meh thought that chess was a Leasure Sport m8 :doh:

sprout85 =)

It's not, chess is an extreme sport that, in a competitive environment, uses as much adrenaline, testosterone and hormones as in deep sea diving, parachuting or extreme mountaineering! You need the emotion and blood pumping to get in the zone for the game! :) :D

nobi
18-11-2011, 10:10 PM
Hi,
I'm rated about 1500 and play regularly at my local chess club and also in a few tournaments throughout the year, but I play heaps online,

I am wondering what people think is a good study routine for improving in chess?

I just joined ICC-Internet Chess Club and will watch some of the videos on there, I know going over grandmaster game is a good idea, reviewing my own games, doing some tactics/ problems? any other ideas or suggestions would be most welcomed,

I'm just looking for a 30min-40min study routine I can use.

A good study routine for improving in chess is to watch chess teaching videos made by a grandmaster who has developed a unique chess teaching system.

Just click the link below.