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siow, weng nian
22-07-2011, 12:15 AM
The pairings for the 2011 World Cup have been published: see here: http://reports.chessdom.com/news-2011/world-chess-cup-2011

Our very own GM Zhao faces GM Zahar Efimenko from Ukraine (currently playing in the World Team Champs)


29 GM Efimenko, Zahar UKR - GM Zhao, Zong-Yuan AUS

Garvinator
23-07-2011, 02:47 AM
Pairings have now changed:

28 28 GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny RUS - 101 GM Zhao, Zong-Yuan AUS

http://www.fide.com/images/stories/NEWS_2011/fide_news/World_Cup_2011/World_Cup_R1_Pairings.pdf

William AS
23-07-2011, 02:29 PM
Sebastien Feller is playing in the World Cup!! :doh: :eek: :wall: :wall:

Garvinator
23-07-2011, 04:13 PM
Sebastien Feller is playing in the World Cup!! :doh: :eek: :wall: :wall:
So much for Fide's ethics committee.

Garrett
24-07-2011, 05:16 PM
From FIDE's website,

"The pairings of the 1st round will be announced one month before the start of the event."

The tournament starts August 28th.

Max Illingworth
25-08-2011, 08:48 PM
Bumping this thread since the World Cup starts in three days time.

Also does anyone know what time the games will start?

Kevin Bonham
25-08-2011, 11:40 PM
15:00 Sunday night Khanty-Mansiysk time is round 1. They're only four hours behind us so that's 7 pm in eastern Aus. Very manageable.

Three players from this qualify for the next Candidates.

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2011, 06:57 PM
Official site is running very slowly. Claims webcast starting at 9 pm.

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2011, 11:15 PM
Unfortunately Zong-Yuan Zhao was severely disadvantaged by a part of his flight being cancelled and was probably playing Tomashevsky in a jetlagged state. He got a very bad position out of the opening but was fighting back well when, presumably in time trouble, he blundered.

Tomashevsky,Evgeny (2707) - Zhao,Zong-Yuan (2570) [E04]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.1), 28.08.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 d5 4.Bg2 dxc4 5.Nf3 a6 6.0-0 Nc6 7.e3 Bd7 8.Qe2 b5 9.b3 cxb3 10.axb3 Be7 11.Bb2 0-0 12.Rc1 Nb4 13.Ne5 Rb8 14.Nd2 Rb6 15.Ndf3 Bc8 16.Ne1 Nd7 17.N5d3 Nxd3 18.Nxd3 Bd6 19.e4 Bb7 20.Nc5 Bc8 21.Rc2 c6 22.Qe3 Be7 23.Nd3 Bb7 24.Qe1 b4 25.Qe3 Rb5 26.h4 Ra5 27.Rd1 Qb6 28.Qe2 Rd8 29.Rc4 h6 30.Qc2 Bf8 31.Rc1 Ra2 32.Qb1 Ra5 33.e5 Rc8 34.Qc2 Qb5 35.Qb1 Nb6?? 36.Rc5 Bxc5 37.Rxc5 Nd7 38.Rxb5 Rxb5 39.Qc2 a5 40.Nc5 Nxc5 41.dxc5 Ba8 42.Bf1 Rbb8 43.Qe4 1-0

Kevin Bonham
28-08-2011, 11:42 PM
Among the 2700+s, so far Malakhov (with white), Vachier-Lagrave, Moiseenko and Svidler have drawn. Sutovsky and Leko (latter white) are also headed for likely draws but I don't think any 2700+s have lost.

Garvinator
29-08-2011, 12:01 AM
It seems like each time an event is held in Khanty that there are flight issues.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 12:52 AM
It seems like each time an event is held in Khanty that there are flight issues.

It does though in this case what I think was shouted before was that it was ZYZ's connecting flight from Aus to Abu Dhabi that was cancelled.

Leko didn't even get his draw. A great fight by Samuel Shankland and eventually Leko lost the plot and made a meal of the ending. The thing about the little ones is that some of them run very fast. You have to keep an eye on those pawns. :lol:

Leko,Peter (2717) - Shankland,Samuel L (2539) [D45]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.1), 28.08.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nf3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 b6 7.Bd3 Bb7 8.0-0 dxc4 9.Bxc4 c5 10.Rd1 Be7 11.Ne5 0-0 12.dxc5 Qc7 13.c6 Nxe5 14.cxb7 Qxb7 15.Be2 Rac8 16.Qa4 Rc5 17.Bd2 Qa8 18.Rac1 Rfc8 19.b4 R5c7 20.Ba6 Rd8 21.Be1 h5 22.Rxd8+ Qxd8 23.Rd1 Qa8 24.Be2 Rc8 25.a3 Nc4 26.Qa6 Nd6 27.h3 g6 28.Bf3 Qb8 29.Ne2 Nd7 30.Bc3 Rc7 31.Ba1 b5 32.Nd4 Qb6 33.Qxb6 Nxb6 34.Nc6 Bf8 35.Be5 Nbc4 36.Bh2 f6 37.Nd8 e5 38.Bd5+ Kh8 39.Ne6 Rc8 40.g4 hxg4 41.hxg4 g5 42.Kg2 Kh7 43.Bxc4 Nxc4 44.Rd7+ Kg6 45.Rxa7 Re8 46.Ra6 Bd6 47.Nc5 Bxc5 48.bxc5 Rc8 49.c6 Kf7 50.Bg1 Ke6 51.f3 Kd6 52.c7+ Ke7 53.f4 Rxc7 54.fxg5 fxg5 55.Bf2 e4 56.Rg6 Rc5 57.Ra6 Rd5 58.Kf1 Rd1+ 59.Kg2 Rd3 60.Rg6 Rxa3 61.Rxg5 b4 62.Rb5 b3 63.Rb7+ Ke6 64.g5 Kf5 65.Rb5+ Kg6 66.Be1 b2 0-1

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 01:23 AM
Another upset win against a 2700+. Missed this one in my roundup before because I confused it with the loss by Wang Hao who was not able to play for health reasons.

Fier,Alexandr (2566) - Wang,Yue (2709) [D17]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.1), 28.08.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 e6 7.f3 c5 8.e4 Bg6 9.Be3 cxd4 10.Qxd4 Qxd4 11.Bxd4 Nfd7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bxc4 Rc8 14.Bb3 a5 15.Ke2 Rg8 16.Nb5 Bc5 17.Bc3 b6 18.Be1 Ne5 19.Bh4 Bh5 20.Rhd1 g5 21.Bg3 Nc6 22.Nd6+ Bxd6 23.Bxd6 g4 24.Kf2 gxf3 25.gxf3 Rg6 26.Bc4 Rf6 27.Ra3 Na7 28.Rc1 e5 29.Bxe5 Rfc6 30.Rac3 Ke7 31.Bd5 Rxc3 32.Rxc3 Rxc3 33.Bxc3 f6 34.Bd4 Nc8 35.Bb7 Nd6 36.Ba6 Be8 37.Bxb6 Bxa4 38.Bxa5 Bb5 39.Bxb5 Nxb5 40.Kg3 Kf7 41.Kf4 h5 42.e5 Ke6 43.exf6 Kxf6 44.Bc3+ Kg6 45.Be5 Na7 46.b4 Nb5 47.Ke4 1-0

Max Illingworth
29-08-2011, 01:56 AM
From memory Vladimir Akopian also forfeited his game today, though I don't know the reason.

When I was watching the Tomashevsky-Zhao game live I was looking at 35...c5 and indeed this seems at least equal for Black.

Another nice game was Parligras's win over Yu Yangyi.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 02:13 AM
From memory Vladimir Akopian also forfeited his game today, though I don't know the reason.

Also health - broken leg. Wang Hao has heart problems.

Skulte
29-08-2011, 11:14 AM
Does anyone know what time (EST) that the games start?

Thanks

Skulte
29-08-2011, 11:16 AM
Sorry never mind my post. :wall:

Just saw someone else replied it starts at 7pm. Thanks.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 10:22 PM
Shankland lets Leko off with an undeserved draw after completely dominating the game. Leko out.

Shankland,Samuel L (2539) - Leko,Peter (2717) [A61]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.2), 29.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.Nc3 g6 7.h3 a6 8.a4 Qe7 9.Bf4 Nbd7 10.e3 Bg7 11.Be2 0-0 12.0-0 Ne8 13.Qb3 h6 14.Rfe1 f5 15.Bh2 Rb8 16.Nd2 g5 17.Nc4 Kh8 18.a5 f4 19.Na4 Qf7 20.exf4 gxf4 21.Bf3 Bd4 22.Re4 Qg7 23.Rxf4 Rxf4 24.Bxf4 Ne5 25.Kh1 Bd7 26.Nab6 Bb5 27.Bg3 Qf6 28.Re1 Ng7 29.Nxe5 dxe5 30.Be2 Rd8 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 11:10 PM
Zhao,Zong-Yuan (2570) - Tomashevsky,Evgeny (2707) [C89]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.2), 29.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.Re1 Bd6 13.g3 Re8 14.d4 Ra7 15.Rxe8+ Qxe8 16.Nd2 Re7 17.Nf3 f6 18.c4 bxc4 19.Bxc4 Bg4 20.Bf1 Bb4 21.Qb3 Bxf3 22.Qxf3 Re1 23.Qd3 Qg6 24.Qc4 Qe4 25.a3 Bc5 26.Ra2 Qb1 27.Bd2 Rd1 28.Qe2 Be7 29.Kg2 Kf8 30.Qxa6 Rxd2 31.Qc8+ Kf7 32.Bc4 Qe4+ 33.Kh3 Rxf2 34.Qxc6 Qf5+ 0-1

Adamski
29-08-2011, 11:41 PM
Shankland lets Leko off with an undeserved draw after completely dominating the game. Leko out.

Shankland,Samuel L (2539) - Leko,Peter (2717) [A61]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.2), 29.08.2011
[Robot 4]
Shankland looks like another good American. I hadn't heard of him before.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 11:50 PM
Shankland looks like another good American. I hadn't heard of him before.

He did very well indeed in the most recent US Champs.

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 11:58 PM
Kamsky forced to tiebreak by sub-2500 rated opponent.



Di Berardino,Diego Rafael (2480) - Kamsky,Gata (2741) [D94]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.2), 29.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 g6 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.Be2 0-0 7.0-0 Qb6 8.h3 Bf5 9.b3 Ne4 10.Bb2 Rd8 11.Rc1 Nxc3 12.Bxc3 a5 13.Qd2 Nd7 14.Qb2 Nf6 15.Ne5 Ne4 16.Be1 f6 17.Nd3 e5 18.cxd5 cxd5 19.f3 Nd6 20.Nc5 a4 21.dxe5 fxe5 22.Qd2 Bh6 23.Bf2 d4 24.f4 axb3 25.axb3 Ne4 26.Nxe4 Bxe4 27.Bc4+ Kh8 28.exd4 Bxf4 29.Qe2 Bd5 30.dxe5 Qe6 31.Rce1 Rac8 32.Bh4 Bxc4 33.bxc4 Rd4 34.Bf6+ Kg8 35.Qb2 Rdxc4 36.Qxb7 R4c7 37.Qe4 Rc4 38.Qb7 R4c7 39.Qf3 Bh6 40.Rd1 Bf8 41.Kh1 Rc3 42.Rd3 Rxd3 43.Qxd3 Qc4 44.Qf3 Qe6 45.Rb1 Bh6 46.Qd3 Ra8 47.Qd4 Qc6 48.Rd1 Qe6 49.Qe4 Rb8 50.Rd6 Qb3 51.Kh2 Qf7 52.Qg4 Re8 53.Qd4 Qb3 54.Rd7 Qe6 55.Qa7 Rc8 56.Rg7+ Kf8 57.Qa3+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
29-08-2011, 11:59 PM
Vallejo forced to tiebreak by Ikeda victim. :lol:



Vallejo Pons,Francisco (2724) - Cori,Jorge (2514) [C04]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.2), 29.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nc6 4.c3 e5 5.exd5 Qxd5 6.Ngf3 exd4 7.Bc4 Qh5 8.cxd4 Be6 9.Bxe6 fxe6 10.Qb3 0-0-0 11.0-0 Nf6 12.Qxe6+ Kb8 13.Ne4 Bd6 14.Nxd6 Rxd6 15.Qe2 Re8 16.Qd3 Re4 17.Be3 Rg4 18.g3 Nd5 19.Rae1 b6 20.a3 Kb7 21.b4 a6 22.Bc1 Rf6 23.Kg2 Rd6 24.h3 Rgg6 25.Kh2 Rgf6 26.Ne5 Nde7 27.Nxc6 Nxc6 28.Qe4 Rxd4 29.Qg2 Rc4 30.Bb2 Rf7 31.Rc1 Rxc1 32.Rxc1 Qf3 33.Kg1 g6 34.h4 b5 35.Rc3 Qxg2+ 36.Kxg2 Ne5 37.Bc1 Rd7 38.Be3 Nc4 39.Bc5 Kc6 40.Rf3 a5 41.Rf6+ Kd5 42.h5 gxh5 43.Rf5+ Ke6 44.Rxh5 a4 45.g4 Nxa3 46.f4 Nc4 47.f5+ Ke5 48.Rh1 Kf4 49.Kh3 Kg5 50.Bf2 Rd3+ 51.Kg2 a3 52.Rxh7 a2 53.Rh1 Kxg4 54.f6 Ne5 55.Ra1 Rd2 56.Kf1 Kf3 57.Be1 Rb2 58.Rc1 Rb1 0-1

Jesper Norgaard
30-08-2011, 06:47 AM
Today was a really sad day for Chinese chess - almost all the Chinese lost participation in the World Cup, despite several being favorites, except Ding Liren who hangs on with two draws. Hou Yifan lost in the first round, but had a magnificent chance to hit back.

The web site http://chess.ugrasport.com/houdini.html is an absolutely thrilling web page for all the results, a trend-setter for the future I predict. All the 64 games are published with Houdini analysis of up to 5 moves in 3 variations, for all moves! That is quite impressive, something I haven't seen before. It also has all ratings, and easy list of the games with country flags, and photos of the players if available. Recommended!

I just wonder how to create this for the Allegro!?

I only stumbled over this fantastic combination which is easy because in the main display of a game for each move is given the relative value, and naturally the sudden value 20.68 interested me - some kind of display error, I thought?

White to move and win in Hou (2575) - Movsesian (2700):

2r2b1k/1qrpnppP/p3pB2/1p2P3/8/1PN3R1/P1PQ2PP/3R3K w - - 0 1

It is obvious that something is smelling around the black king. Besides the two black rooks and black queen are stored away in the other corner. Still the combination is extremely hard to find. Both players were clueless about it in the interview after the match. I ran it on Crafty and even after 20 seconds it is absolutely clueless. It takes further moves of pushing in the right direction to smell the coffee.

A test game on Houdini itself confirms, I won with the Houdini-variation 28.Rxg7,Bxg7 29.Qg5,Nf5 30.Rf1,Kxh7 31.Rxf5,Bh6 32.Qh5,Rg8 33.Qxf7+,Rg7 34.Bxg7,d5 35.Qxe6,Qc6 36.Qxc6,Rxc6 37.Bxh6,Rxc3 38.Bd2,Rxc2 39.Rf2 and white won easily.

Of course, beating Houdini with Houdini is easy enough! I am sure this position is one Hou won't forget for some time to come.

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 03:04 PM
That is a really nice site section there. Even brings up positions in the given variations by hovering over the move.

Max Illingworth
30-08-2011, 05:28 PM
Today was a really sad day for Chinese chess - almost all the Chinese lost participation in the World Cup, despite several being favorites, except Ding Liren who hangs on with two draws. Hou Yifan lost in the first round, but had a magnificent chance to hit back.

The web site http://chess.ugrasport.com/houdini.html is an absolutely thrilling web page for all the results, a trend-setter for the future I predict. All the 64 games are published with Houdini analysis of up to 5 moves in 3 variations, for all moves! That is quite impressive, something I haven't seen before. It also has all ratings, and easy list of the games with country flags, and photos of the players if available. Recommended!

I just wonder how to create this for the Allegro!?

I only stumbled over this fantastic combination which is easy because in the main display of a game for each move is given the relative value, and naturally the sudden value 20.68 interested me - some kind of display error, I thought?

White to move and win in Hou (2575) - Movsesian (2700):

2r2b1k/1qrpnppP/p3pB2/1p2P3/8/1PN3R1/P1PQ2PP/3R3K w - - 0 1

It is obvious that something is smelling around the black king. Besides the two black rooks and black queen are stored away in the other corner. Still the combination is extremely hard to find. Both players were clueless about it in the interview after the match. I ran it on Crafty and even after 20 seconds it is absolutely clueless. It takes further moves of pushing in the right direction to smell the coffee.

A test game on Houdini itself confirms, I won with the Houdini-variation 28.Rxg7,Bxg7 29.Qg5,Nf5 30.Rf1,Kxh7 31.Rxf5,Bh6 32.Qh5,Rg8 33.Qxf7+,Rg7 34.Bxg7,d5 35.Qxe6,Qc6 36.Qxc6,Rxc6 37.Bxh6,Rxc3 38.Bd2,Rxc2 39.Rf2 and white won easily.

Of course, beating Houdini with Houdini is easy enough! I am sure this position is one Hou won't forget for some time to come.

Ni Hua is also going into tiebreaks, and Bu Xiangzhi has qualified for Round 2.

Thank you very much for the link! Another game with a missed opportunity was Polgar-Corrales where Corrales could have maintained a decisive advantage with 34...Rb8 35.Rc1 Ng4 but played 34...Qa2 and went on to lose.

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 08:37 PM
Tiebreak disaster!

Felgaer,Ruben (2573) - Malakhov,Vladimir (2706) [C67]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.3), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Ke8 10.h3 h5 11.Bg5 Be6 12.Rad1 Be7 13.b3 Rd8 14.Rxd8+ Bxd8 15.Rd1 Be7 16.Ne2 Bd5 17.Bxe7 Kxe7 18.Ng5 f6 19.Nf4 Rh6 20.exf6+ Kxf6 21.Nxd5+ cxd5 22.f4 d4 23.Re1 Ne3 24.Kf2 Kf5 25.Nf3 c5 26.c3 Rd6 27.cxd4 cxd4 28.g3 Nc2 29.Re5+ Kg6 30.Ke2 Ra6 31.Ng5 Nb4 32.a4 Rc6 33.g4 hxg4 34.hxg4 Kf6 35.Rb5 a5 36.Rxb7 d3+ 37.Kf3 Nc2 38.Rf7+ Kg6 39.Rd7 Kh6 40.Kg3 Ne1 41.Kf2 Nc2 42.Rxd3 Nb4 43.Rd8 Rc3 44.Ne4 Rxb3 45.f5 Nd3+ 46.Kg1 g5 47.Rd6+ Kg7 48.Rd7+ Kg8 49.Rd8+ Kg7 50.Rd7+ Kg8 51.Nxg5 Ne5 52.Rd8+ Kg7 53.Ne6+ Kf7 54.g5 Rf3 55.g6+ Ke7 56.g7 Rg3+ 57.Kf1 Rxg7 58.Rd5 Ng4 59.Rxa5 Rg8 60.Nf4 Kd6 61.Ke2 Rh8 62.Kf3 Rg8 63.Ng6 Nh6 64.Kf4 Rb8 65.Ra6+ Kc5 66.Ne5 Rh8 67.Kg5 Nxf5 68.Kxf5 Rh1 69.Ra5+ Kb6 70.Nc4+ Kc6 71.Ke4 Rd1 72.Rh5 Rd8 73.Re5 Rd1 74.Rh5 Rd8 75.Ne5+ Kb6 76.Rh6+ Kc5 77.Nd3+ Kc4 78.Rc6+ Kb3 79.a5 Ka4 80.Ra6 Kb5 81.Ra7 Rd6 82.Ne5 Rd1 83.Nd3 Rh1 84.Kd4 Rh4+ 85.Kc3 Rh3 86.Ra8 Rg3 87.Ra7 Rh3 88.Ra8 Rg3 89.Kd4 Rg4+ 90.Kd5 Rg1 91.a6 Kb6 92.Nb4 Rg4 93.Rb8+ Ka7 94.Rb7+ Ka8 95.Rb5 Ka7 96.Kc5 Rg5+ 97.Kc4 Rg7 98.Kb3 Rg1 99.Rb7+ Ka8 100.Rd7 Rc1 101.Ka4 Rc5 102.Rd5 Rc7 103.Kb5 Rc8 104.Rd7 Rb8+ 105.Ka5 Rh8 106.Nd5 Rh5 107.Kb6 Rh6+ 108.Kb5 Rh5 109.Kc6 Rh6+ 110.Rd6 Rh1 111.Nb4 Rh4 112.Rd8+ Ka7 113.Rd7+ Ka8 114.Kb5 Rh8 115.Nc6 Rh5+ 116.Kb6 Rb5+ 117.Kc7 Rd5 118.Rh7?? [118.Re7 Rd7+ 119.Kb6 Rxe7 120.Nxe7 Kb8 121.Nd5 Kc8] 118...Rd7+ 119.Kxd7 ˝-˝

aaaaarrrrrggggggghhhhh!

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 09:12 PM
Worse, Malakhov repaid the favour by blundering a pawn and then his queen (to a simple one-move discovered check) so Felgaer advances anyway.

Max Illingworth
30-08-2011, 09:12 PM
Tiebreak disaster!

Felgaer,Ruben (2573) - Malakhov,Vladimir (2706) [C67]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.3), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Ke8 10.h3 h5 11.Bg5 Be6 12.Rad1 Be7 13.b3 Rd8 14.Rxd8+ Bxd8 15.Rd1 Be7 16.Ne2 Bd5 17.Bxe7 Kxe7 18.Ng5 f6 19.Nf4 Rh6 20.exf6+ Kxf6 21.Nxd5+ cxd5 22.f4 d4 23.Re1 Ne3 24.Kf2 Kf5 25.Nf3 c5 26.c3 Rd6 27.cxd4 cxd4 28.g3 Nc2 29.Re5+ Kg6 30.Ke2 Ra6 31.Ng5 Nb4 32.a4 Rc6 33.g4 hxg4 34.hxg4 Kf6 35.Rb5 a5 36.Rxb7 d3+ 37.Kf3 Nc2 38.Rf7+ Kg6 39.Rd7 Kh6 40.Kg3 Ne1 41.Kf2 Nc2 42.Rxd3 Nb4 43.Rd8 Rc3 44.Ne4 Rxb3 45.f5 Nd3+ 46.Kg1 g5 47.Rd6+ Kg7 48.Rd7+ Kg8 49.Rd8+ Kg7 50.Rd7+ Kg8 51.Nxg5 Ne5 52.Rd8+ Kg7 53.Ne6+ Kf7 54.g5 Rf3 55.g6+ Ke7 56.g7 Rg3+ 57.Kf1 Rxg7 58.Rd5 Ng4 59.Rxa5 Rg8 60.Nf4 Kd6 61.Ke2 Rh8 62.Kf3 Rg8 63.Ng6 Nh6 64.Kf4 Rb8 65.Ra6+ Kc5 66.Ne5 Rh8 67.Kg5 Nxf5 68.Kxf5 Rh1 69.Ra5+ Kb6 70.Nc4+ Kc6 71.Ke4 Rd1 72.Rh5 Rd8 73.Re5 Rd1 74.Rh5 Rd8 75.Ne5+ Kb6 76.Rh6+ Kc5 77.Nd3+ Kc4 78.Rc6+ Kb3 79.a5 Ka4 80.Ra6 Kb5 81.Ra7 Rd6 82.Ne5 Rd1 83.Nd3 Rh1 84.Kd4 Rh4+ 85.Kc3 Rh3 86.Ra8 Rg3 87.Ra7 Rh3 88.Ra8 Rg3 89.Kd4 Rg4+ 90.Kd5 Rg1 91.a6 Kb6 92.Nb4 Rg4 93.Rb8+ Ka7 94.Rb7+ Ka8 95.Rb5 Ka7 96.Kc5 Rg5+ 97.Kc4 Rg7 98.Kb3 Rg1 99.Rb7+ Ka8 100.Rd7 Rc1 101.Ka4 Rc5 102.Rd5 Rc7 103.Kb5 Rc8 104.Rd7 Rb8+ 105.Ka5 Rh8 106.Nd5 Rh5 107.Kb6 Rh6+ 108.Kb5 Rh5 109.Kc6 Rh6+ 110.Rd6 Rh1 111.Nb4 Rh4 112.Rd8+ Ka7 113.Rd7+ Ka8 114.Kb5 Rh8 115.Nc6 Rh5+ 116.Kb6 Rb5+ 117.Kc7 Rd5 118.Rh7?? [118.Re7 Rd7+ 119.Kb6 Rxe7 120.Nxe7 Kb8 121.Nd5 Kc8] 118...Rd7+ 119.Kxd7 ˝-˝

aaaaarrrrrggggggghhhhh!

And yet after this, Felgaer managed to smash Malakhov with Black in the next game, thereby advancing to the next round. Although Malakhov was clearly not in form today, it's still impressive that Felgaer was able to put this game behind him so quickly.

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 09:44 PM
Missed opportunity.

Quesada Perez,Yuniesky (2635) - Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2673) [C16]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.4), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 b6 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Ba6 7.Bxa6 Nxa6 8.Qg4 f5 9.Qg3 Kf7 10.Ne2 Qd7 11.a4 Nb8 12.h4 Ne7 13.h5 h6 14.Nf4 Nbc6 15.Ba3 Rhe8 16.Qf3 Kg8 17.Rg1 Rac8 18.Qd3 Na5 19.Bxe7 Rxe7 20.g4 fxg4 21.Rxg4 c5 22.Rg6 cxd4 23.cxd4 Nc6 24.c3 Rf7 25.Nxe6 Ne7 26.f4 Rc6 27.Qh3 Qc8 28.Ra3 Nf5 29.Nd8 Rxg6 30.hxg6 Rf8 31.Nf7 Qe6 32.Qg4 Nxd4 33.Qxe6 Nxe6 34.f5 Ng5 35.e6 Ne4 36.c4 dxc4 37.Re3 Nf6 38.Nd6 Nd5 39.Re4 Ne7 40.Rxc4 Rd8 41.Nf7 Rc8 42.Rxc8+ Nxc8 43.Kf2 Ne7 44.Nd6 a6 45.Kf3 b5 46.axb5 axb5 47.Nxb5 Nxf5 48.Kg4 Ne7 49.Kh5 Nd5 50.Kg4 ˝-˝

What white missed: 43.Nxh6!! The knight cannot be taken or f6 and the king and the knight cannot together stop the three passed pawns. :wall:

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 11:00 PM
I thought Robson was going to draw this but he blundered at the end:


Bacrot,Etienne (2710) - Robson,Ray (2560) [D76]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.5), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.g3 Bg7 6.Bg2 Nb6 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.e3 0-0 9.0-0 Re8 10.Re1 a5 11.Qe2 Be6 12.Nd2 Nb4 13.Rd1 c6 14.a3 N4d5 15.Nce4 Qc8 16.Nc5 Bg4 17.Bf3 Bxf3 18.Nxf3 Nd7 19.Nxd7 Qxd7 20.e4 Nb6 21.Bf4 a4 22.Rac1 Ra5 23.Rc5 Rea8 24.Bd2 Rb5 25.Bb4 e6 26.h4 h5 27.Kg2 Bf8 28.Rxb5 cxb5 29.Bxf8 Kxf8 30.Ne5 Qe8 31.Qe3 Nc4 32.Nxc4 bxc4 33.Qc3 b5 34.d5 exd5 35.exd5 Kg8 36.d6 Rd8 37.Qf3 Qe5 38.Qc3 Qxc3 39.bxc3 Kg7 40.Rd5 Kf6 41.Rxb5 Rxd6 42.Rb4 Rd3 43.Rxc4 Ke5 44.Rc7 Ke6 45.Rc8 Ke5 46.Re8+ Kd5 47.Ra8 Rxc3 48.Rxa4 Ke6 49.Re4+ Kf6 50.Re3 Rc2 51.Kf3 Ra2 52.Rc3 Kf5 53.Rc5+ Ke6 54.Ra5 Kf6 55.Ke3 Ke6 56.Ra7 Kf6 57.a4 Ke6 58.a5 Kf6 59.a6 Ke6 60.Ra8 Kf6 61.Kf3 Ra4 62.Ke2 Ra3 63.Ra7 Ke6 64.Kd2 Ra2+ 65.Ke3 Kf6 66.Ra8 Ra3+ 67.Kd4 Ra2 68.Kc5 Rxf2 69.Rd8 Ra2 70.Kb6 Rb2+ 71.Kc6 Rc2+ 72.Kb7 Rb2+ 73.Ka8 Kf5 74.a7 Kg4 75.Rb8 Ra2 76.Rb3 f6 77.Rb6 g5 78.Rxf6 gxh4 79.gxh4 Kxh4 80.Kb7 Rxa7+ 81.Kxa7 Kg3 82.Rg6+ Kf3 83.Rh6 Kg4 84.Kb6 h4 85.Kc5 h3 86.Kd4 Kg3 87.Ke3 h2?? 88.Rg6+ Kh3 89.Kf2 h1N+ 90.Kf3 Kh2 91.Rg7 1-0

87...Kg2 still draws.

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2011, 11:57 PM
Robson eliminated in tactical mayhem.

Robson,Ray (2560) - Bacrot,Etienne (2710) [C36]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.6), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 Ne7 4.Bc4 d5 5.exd5 Nxd5 6.0-0 Be7 7.d4 Be6 8.Bb3 0-0 9.c4 Ne3 10.Bxe3 fxe3 11.Qd3 Bf6 12.Nc3 c5 13.d5 Bg4 14.Qxe3 Bxf3 15.Qxf3 Nd7 16.Rae1 Qc7 17.Bc2 Rae8 18.Qh3 g6 19.Nb5 Qd8 20.Rxe8 Rxe8 21.Nd6 Re3 22.Nxf7 Qe7 23.d6 Bd4 24.Nh6+ Kh8 25.Qg4 [25.Kh1 Re1 (25...Rxh3 26.dxe7 Re3 27.Rf8+ Kg7 28.e8Q Kxh6 29.Qxe3+ winning) ] 25...Qf6! 26.g3 Rxg3+ 0-1

Agent Smith
31-08-2011, 12:10 AM
White to move and win in Hou (2575) - Movsesian (2700):
...
It is obvious that something is smelling around the black king.
....
I am sure this position is one Hou won't forget for some time to come.

Those attacking positions can be a nightmare. You can smell it, but not always find it.
The win in Hou's game was pretty deep. :doh:

Kevin Bonham
31-08-2011, 01:09 AM
Last match went to Armageddon (it is 2x25/10 then 2x10/10 then 2x5/3 then armageddon).

This is the game but to make sense of it you need to know that as of about move 20 Motylev had only about twenty seconds left. He had to reach move 61 to get the increment and if he had done so in a drawable position he could have advanced but he lost on time after playing amazingly fast to try to survive. Drozdovskij deserved the win for playing strongly enough early in the game to force Motylev to use up so much time that the board became fairly irrelevant since Motylev could not avoid being clocked.

Drozdovskij,Yuri (2614) - Motylev,Alexander (2685) [D90]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (1.9), 30.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 g6 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.d4 Bg7 6.e4 Nb6 7.Nc3 Bg4 8.Be3 0-0 9.Be2 Bxf3 10.gxf3 Nc6 11.d5 Ne5 12.Qb3 c6 13.0-0-0 cxd5 14.Nxd5 Nxd5 15.Rxd5 Qc8+ 16.Kb1 Qh3 17.Bd4 Nc6 18.Bxg7 Kxg7 19.Qxb7 e6 20.Rd2 Qg2 21.Rc1 Ne5 22.Qc7 Qg5 23.Rdc2 Rfc8 24.Qa5 Rxc2 25.Rxc2 Qf4 26.h3 Nxf3 27.Qc3+ Ne5 28.Qd4 Qf6 29.Rc5 Ng4 30.Qxf6+ Nxf6 31.e5 Nd7 32.Ra5 Rc8 33.f4 Rc7 34.b3 Nb6 35.Kb2 Nd5 36.h4 Nxf4 37.Bf3 Nd3+ 38.Ka3 Nc5 39.b4 Nd3 40.Be4 Rc3+ 41.Ka4 Nb2+ 42.Kb5 Nc4 43.Rxa7 Nxe5 44.a4 Re3 45.Bb7 Rb3 46.a5 Rd3 47.a6 Ra3 48.Ra8 Nd3 1-0

Garvinator
31-08-2011, 11:39 PM
Ni and Pono certainly did not waste any time putting the pieces back in the box tonight.

Kevin Bonham
01-09-2011, 12:20 AM
Unpleasant reversal for Vallejo from an endgame he was a pawn up and better in:

Vallejo Pons,Francisco (2724) - Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2673) [C45]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (2.1), 31.08.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Bc5 5.Nb3 Bb4+ 6.c3 Be7 7.f4 d6 8.Bd3 Nh6 9.N1d2 0-0 10.Nf3 f5 11.0-0 Kh8 12.h3 fxe4 13.Bxe4 Nf5 14.Kh2 Bh4 15.Nxh4 Qxh4 16.Qd3 Nfe7 17.Bd2 Bf5 18.Rae1 Bxe4 19.Rxe4 Qf6 20.Rfe1 Ng8 21.Qb5 Rab8 22.Na5 a6 23.Qh5 Nce7 24.Re6 Qf7 25.Qxf7 Rxf7 26.g4 b6 27.Nb3 Nc6 28.Kg3 Nf6 29.c4 Kg8 30.Bc3 Rbf8 31.Nd4 Nd8 32.R6e2 d5 33.cxd5 Nxd5 34.f5 Nxc3 35.bxc3 h6 36.Kf4 Rd7 37.h4 Nb7 38.Re7 Rxe7 39.Rxe7 Nc5 40.Rxc7 Re8 41.g5 hxg5+ 42.hxg5 g6 43.f6 Kf8 44.Rc6 Nd3+ 45.Kg3 Re3+ 46.Kh2 Nf4 47.Rxb6 Rh3+ 48.Kg1 Rxc3 49.Rxa6 Nh3+ 50.Kf1 Nxg5 51.a4 Kf7 52.a5 Ne4 53.Rb6 Nc5 54.Rc6 Na4 55.Rd6 Nc5 56.Ke2 Ra3 57.Nc6 Ne6 58.a6 g5 59.a7 g4 60.Rd7+ Kxf6 61.Rb7 g3 62.Rb3 Ra2+ 63.Kf1? g2+ 64.Kg1 Nf4 65.Kh2 Ra1 66.a8=Q 0-1

MichaelBaron
01-09-2011, 12:50 PM
Several chess experts believe that Zhao's loss to Tomashevsky was the best game of the first round of the World Cup. The game was annotated in Russian: http://www.chess-news.ru/node/3829

Kevin Bonham
02-09-2011, 12:32 AM
Through to round 3:

Ivanchuk, Gashimov, Radjabov, Kamsky, Jakovenko, Vitiugov, Parligras, Navara, Dominguez, Gupta, Le Quang Liem, Potkin, Jobava, Caruana, Morozevich, Tomashevsky, Efimenko, Felgaer, Sutovsky, Polgar

Tiebreaks round 3
So - Karjakin
Fridman-Mamedyarov
Pono - Ni Hua
Grischuk - Feller
Nguyen - Svidler
Bruzon - Vallejo
Bu - Vachier-Lagrave
Lysyj - Ivanov
Inarkiev - Moiseenko
Nielsen - Adams
Riazantsev - Nepo
Bacrot - Fillipov

Kevin Bonham
03-09-2011, 01:03 AM
So - Karjakin
Fridman-Mamedyarov
Pono - Ni Hua
Grischuk - Feller
Nguyen - Svidler
Bruzon - Vallejo
Bu - Vachier-Lagrave
Lysyj - Ivanov
Inarkiev - Moiseenko
Nielsen - Adams
Riazantsev - Nepo
Bacrot - Fillipov

Through: Karjakin, Mamedyarov, Ponomariov, Grischuk, Svidler, Bruzon, Bu, Lysyj, Moiseenko, Nielsen, Nepomniatchi, Bacrot.

Nearly every match ended in the first phase of rapids. Pono and Svidler needed to go to the second.

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 12:40 AM
Navara draw Moiseenko
Le Quang Liem draw Bruzon
Parligras draw Nielson
Ponomariov draw Efimenko
Polgar 1-0 Karjakin :eek:
Gupta draw Bu
Grischuk 1-0 Morozevich (note to Moro: look after your rating and this sort of thing won't happen so early in the tournament)
Ivanchuk 0-1 Sutovsky :eek:
Kamsky 1-0 Nepomniatchi (ah well there probably goes my silly tip)
Jakovenko 1-0 Jobava
Dominguez 1-0 Lysyj
Bacrot draw Radjabov
Caruana draw Svidler
Potkin draw Vitiugov
Tomashevsky draw Gashimov
Zherebukh (only player left I haven't heard of!) draw Mamedyarov

Polgar - Karjakin. 10...h5 is unusual, might not be seen again for a while after this as it seems white was always better.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Ke8 10.h3 h5 11.Rd1 Be7 12.Ne4 Bd7 13.b3 h4 14.Bg5 Rd8 15.c4 b6 16.Rd2 Bc8 17.Rxd8+ Kxd8 18.Rd1+ Ke8 19.Bf4 c5 20.e6 Bxe6 21.Bxc7 f6 22.Bb8 a6 23.Ba7 Bd8 24.Nc3 Kf7 25.Na4 b5 26.Nxc5 Bc8 27.cxb5 axb5 28.a4 bxa4 29.bxa4 Re8 30.Rb1 g5 31.Bb6 Be7 32.a5 Bxc5 33.Bxc5 Re6 34.Rb6 Ng7 35.Be3 Nf5 36.Rb8 Re8 37.Ra8 Bb7 38.Ra7 Re7 39.Bc5 Rd7 40.a6 Bc6 41.Rxd7+ Bxd7 42.Nd2 Ke6 43.Nc4 Bc6 44.Nb6 Nd6 45.Bxd6 Kxd6 46.a7 Kc7 47.a8=Q Bxa8 48.Nxa8+ Kb7 49.f4 1-0

Grischuk - Morozevich

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Bd7 5.Nf3 Qb6 6.Bd3 cxd4 7.Nxd4 Bc5 8.0-0 Bxd4 9.cxd4 Qxd4 10.Nc3 a6 11.Re1 Bc6 12.Ne2 Qg4 13.h3 Qh5 14.Bf4 Bb5 15.Qb3 Ne7 16.Bxb5+ axb5 17.Qxb5+ Nbc6 18.Qxb7 0-0 19.Qb3 Rab8 20.Qc3 Rfc8 21.Qd2 h6 22.Rac1 Qh4 23.b3 Nf5 24.g4 Nfe7 25.Kg2 Ra8 26.Rc5 f5 27.gxf5 Nxf5 28.Rec1 Nce7 29.Rxc8+ Nxc8 30.Rc6 Qe7 31.Qc2 Qe8 32.a4 Qg6+ 33.Bg3 Nce7 34.Nf4 Qf7 35.Rc7 g5 36.Ne2 Rf8 37.a5 h5 38.Qd2 Qg6 39.a6 h4 40.Bh2 g4 41.Nf4 Qg5 42.Qe2 Nh6 43.Rxe7 gxh3+ 44.Kxh3 Qxe7 45.Ng6 Qb4 46.Nxf8 Kxf8 47.a7 Qa5 48.Bf4 Nf5 49.Qh5 Kg7 50.Qg5+ Kh7 51.Qh5+ Kg7 52.Bg5 Qc3+ 53.Kg2 h3+ 54.Qxh3 Qc6 55.Bf6+ Kg6 56.Qg4+ 1-0

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Sutovsky,Emil (2690) [B55]

Another classic Ivan-chuck alas. :(

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.f3 e5 6.Nb3 Be7 7.c4 a5 8.Be3 a4 9.Nc1 Qa5+ 10.Qd2 Bd8 11.Ne2 Be6 12.Na3 Qxd2+ 13.Kxd2 Ba5+ 14.Nc3 Nc6 15.Nab5 Ke7 16.Be2 Rhc8 17.Rhc1 Bb4 18.Rab1 Nd7 19.Ke1 Bc5 20.Bf2 Na5 21.Nd5+ Bxd5 22.cxd5 g6 23.Bh4+ f6 24.Kd2 g5 25.Bg3 f5 26.exf5 Nf6 27.Nc3 Bb4 28.Kd3 Rc4 29.Bf2 Rac8 30.Be3 a3 31.Nb5 [31.Ne4 Nxd5 32.Bxg5+ Kf8 and black has a pawn deficit and problems] 31...axb2 32.Rxc4 Nxc4 33.Bxg5 e4+ 34.Kd4 Na3 35.Nxa3 Bc5+ 36.Kc3 Bxa3+ 37.Bc4 b5 38.Kb3 bxc4+ 39.Kxa3 c3 40.fxe4 Rb8 0-1

Kamsky,Gata (2756) - Nepomniachtchi,Ian (2718) [D87]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.1), 03.09.2011
[Robot 3]

So much for all rook endings being draws.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.0-0 Qc7 11.Rb1 a6 12.Bf4 Qa5 13.Bd5 cxd4 14.cxd4 Bg4 15.f3 Be6 16.Bd2 Qc7 17.Bxe6 fxe6 18.Bc3 Rad8 19.Qb3 Nxd4 20.Bxd4 Bxd4+ 21.Nxd4 Rxd4 22.Qxe6+ Rf7 23.Rbc1 Qd6 24.Qc8+ Kg7 25.Qxb7 Rd2 26.Qb3 e5 27.Rcd1 Qd4+ 28.Kh1 Rd7 29.Rxd2 Qxd2 30.Qe6 Qd6 31.Qxd6 Rxd6 32.h4 Rd2 33.Rc1 Rxa2 34.Rc7+ Kf6 35.Rxh7 a5 36.Ra7 a4 37.Kh2 a3 38.Kh3 Ke6 39.Ra6+ Kf7 40.Kg3 Kg7 41.Re6 Re2 42.Rxe5 a2 43.Ra5 Kf6 44.f4 Rxe4 45.Rxa2 Kg7 46.Kg4 Rb4 47.Ra5 1-0



Jakovenko,Dmitry (2736) - Jobava,Baadur (2713) [C41]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.1), 03.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e5 4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.Bc4 Be7 6.0-0 0-0 7.a4 c6 8.h3 h6 9.Re1 Re8 10.Be3 Qc7 11.Nh4 d5 12.exd5 Nb6 13.Bb3 Nfxd5 14.Nf3 Nxc3 15.bxc3 e4 16.Ne5 Nd5 17.Bd2 Bd6 18.Rxe4 Bf5 19.Bxd5 cxd5 20.Rf4 Bg6 21.Nxg6 fxg6 22.Rf3 Qc4 23.Qb1 Re7 24.Qb5 Rc8 25.Re3 a6 26.Qxc4 Rxc4 27.Rxe7 Bxe7 28.Kf1 Kf7 29.Rb1 Rxa4 30.Rxb7 Ra2 31.c4 Ke8 32.cxd5 Rxc2 33.Bf4 Bf6 34.Be5 a5 35.Rb8+ Kd7 36.Rb7+ Ke8 37.Rb8+ Kd7 38.Ra8 Ra2 39.Ra7+ Ke8 40.Ra8+ Kd7 41.Ra7+ Ke8 42.g3 a4 43.Kg2 a3 44.Kf3 Ra1 45.Bd6 a2 46.Bc5 Kd8 47.d6 Kc8 48.d7+ Kb8 49.h4 Bd8 50.Ke2 g5 51.hxg5 Bxg5 52.d5 Rc1 53.Be3 Rc2+ 54.Kd3 Rc7 55.Rxa2 Rxd7 56.Ke4 Re7+ 57.Kd4 Bf6+ 58.Kc5 Kb7 59.Kd6 Re8 60.Ra7+ Kb8 61.Rf7 h5 62.Bf4 Re2 63.Kc6+ Be5 64.Bxe5+ Rxe5 65.Rf8+ 1-0

Another Berlin wall crumbles. Maybe this will go out of fashion someday.

Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) - Lysyj,Igor (2632) [C67]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.1), 03.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Rd1+ Ke8 10.Nc3 Ne7 11.h3 Ng6 12.Re1 Bb4 13.Bd2 Be6 14.a3 Bxc3 15.Bxc3 Rd8 16.Kh2 Rd5 17.g4 h5 18.Kg3 h4+ 19.Kh2 c5 20.Ng5 Rd7 21.Rad1 Rxd1 22.Rxd1 Bc8 23.Ne4 Ke7 24.Nxc5 b6 25.Ne4 Bb7 26.Ng5 Bc8 27.Bb4+ c5 28.Bc3 Nf4 29.Ne4 Ba6 30.Nd6 g6 31.Nxf7 Rf8 32.Ng5 Ne6 33.Nxe6 Kxe6 34.Rd6+ Ke7 35.Kg1 1-0

that Caesar guy
04-09-2011, 12:58 AM
Mr. No vowels in his last name (a.k.a. Lysyj) missed some extremely simple tactics...

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 08:36 PM
Can we get Pauline Hanson in to annotate this one?

Morozevich,Alexander (2694) - Grischuk,Alexander (2746) [E35]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.cxd5 exd5 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bxf6 Qxf6 8.a3 Bxc3+ 9.Qxc3 0-0 10.Nf3 Bf5 11.e3 Rc8 12.Rc1 ˝-˝ Grischuk wins the match 1.5 to 0.5

Garvinator
04-09-2011, 09:57 PM
Judit is through.

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 09:58 PM
Karjakin out!

Karjakin,Sergey (2788) - Polgar,Judit (2699) [C83]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.Nbd2 Be7 10.c3 0-0 11.Bc2 f5 12.Nb3 Qd7 13.Nbd4 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 c5 15.Nxe6 Qxe6 16.f3 Ng5 17.a4 Rad8 18.axb5 axb5 19.Ra7 Rd7 20.Rxd7 Qxd7 21.f4 Ne4 22.Bxe4 fxe4 23.f5 d4 24.f6 gxf6 25.Bh6 Rf7 26.cxd4 fxe5 27.Rxf7 Kxf7 28.Qh5+ Kg8 29.dxe5 c4 30.e6 Qa7+ 31.Kf1 Qa1+ 32.Kf2 Qxb2+ 33.Kg3 Qf6 34.Qe8+ Bf8 35.Bxf8 Qg5+ 36.Kh3 Qf5+ 37.Kh4 Qf4+ 38.Kh3 Qf5+ 39.g4 Qxf8 40.Qd7 Qf3+ 41.Kh4 Qf6+ 42.g5 Qf4+ 43.Kh5 Qf3+ 44.Kh4 Qf4+ Polgar wins the match 1.5 to 0.5 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 10:17 PM
Nepo levels so at least my rogue pick outlasts that of all the suckers who picked the top seed. May well get eliminated tomorrow though.

Nepomniachtchi,Ian (2711) - Kamsky,Gata (2741) [A34]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.g3 g6 6.Bg2 Bg7 7.h4 Nc6 8.h5 Nxc3 9.bxc3 Bf5 10.Qb3 Qb6 11.Ng5 Qxb3 12.axb3 0-0 13.hxg6 hxg6 14.Ne4 Bxe4 15.Bxe4 Rfc8 16.e3 Rc7 17.Ke2 a6 18.g4 e6 19.Ba3 Na7 20.f4 Nb5 21.Bb2 Nd6 22.Bf3 Rd8 23.Ra2 c4 24.bxc4 Nxc4 25.Ba1 Nd6 26.Rb1 Bf6 27.g5 Bg7 28.Rb6 Rdd7 29.Rb3 Re7 30.d4 Nc4 31.Kd3 Nd6 32.e4 Red7 33.e5 Nc8 34.c4 Ne7 35.Bc3 b5 36.cxb5 axb5 37.Ra8+ Rc8 38.Rxc8+ Nxc8 39.Rxb5 Bf8 40.Rb8 Rc7 41.Bb7 Match tied 1-1 -> tiebreak 1-0

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 10:36 PM
A crazy game (which is exactly what black sanely wanted!) and Ivanchuk equalises with black.



Sutovsky,Emil (2700) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2768) [B09]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.f4 Nf6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.e5 Nfd7 7.h4 c5 8.h5 cxd4 9.hxg6 dxc3 10.gxf7+ Rxf7 11.Bc4 e6 12.Ng5 cxb2 13.Bxb2 Qa5+ 14.Ke2 Nf8 15.Nxf7 Kxf7 16.f5 [16.Qxd6 is essential and white probably has good chances but black has at least unbalanced the position.] 16...Bxe5 17.Rh5 Ke8 18.fxe6 Bxe6 [18...Qb4 seems to win] 19.Bxe6 Qb5+ 20.Qd3 Qxb2 21.Qf5 Qb5+ 22.c4 Qb2+ 23.Kf3 Nc6 24.Qf7+ Kd8 25.Qxf8+ Kc7 26.Rxh7+ Kb6 27.Qxa8 Nd4+ 28.Kg4 Qxg2+ 29.Kh5 Qh2+ 30.Kg6 Qc2+ 31.Kh6 Bf4+ 32.Kg7 Nxe6+ 33.Kf6 Qxh7 34.Kxe6 Qg6+ 35.Ke7 Bg5+ 36.Kf8 Qf6+ Match tied 1-1 -> tiebreak 0-1

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 11:14 PM
Radjabov qualifies for round 4.

Radjabov,Teimour (2744) - Bacrot,Etienne (2710) [C50]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.d3 Nf6 5.0-0 0-0 6.Nbd2 d5 7.exd5 Nxd5 8.Re1 Nf6 9.h3 Bd6 10.a3 a6 11.Ba2 Bf5 12.b4 Re8 13.Bb2 h6 14.Ne4 Be6 15.Bxe6 Rxe6 16.c4 Nxe4 17.dxe4 a5 18.c5 Bf8 19.Qb3 axb4 20.axb4 Rxa1 21.Rxa1 b6 22.b5 Nd4 23.Nxd4 exd4 24.Qd5 Qxd5 25.exd5 Re5 26.d6 Rxc5 27.Bxd4 Bxd6 28.Bxc5 Bxc5 29.Ra8+ Kh7 30.Kf1 Kg6 31.Re8 h5 32.Ke2 Kf5 33.g3 g6 34.Kf3 g5 35.g4+ hxg4+ 36.hxg4+ Kf6 37.Rg8 Be7 38.Ke4 Ke6 39.Rh8 Bc5 40.Rh6+ f6 41.f4 gxf4 42.g5 Be7 43.Kxf4 Bd6+ 44.Kg4 Be5 45.Kh5 Bd4 46.g6 f5 47.Rh7 f4 48.Rf7 Kd5 Radjabov wins the match 1.5 to 0.5 1-0

Adamski
04-09-2011, 11:26 PM
Congrats to Judit Polgar on eliminating the top seed, Karjakin. Should have realised that was dumb pick in such an "anyone can win" format event.

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 11:28 PM
Congrats to Judit Polgar on eliminating the top seed, Karjakin. Should have realised that was dumb pick in such an "anyone can win" format event.

The record of top seeds in these things is not too bad; a couple of them have won. The problem is that because of the vagaries of the format, no matter who you pick they are unlikely to win the event.

Kevin Bonham
04-09-2011, 11:32 PM
Gashimov is through, beating the player who beat Zhao.

Gashimov,Vugar (2760) - Tomashevsky,Evgeny (2707) [C88]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.h3 Bb7 9.d3 d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxe5 Nd4 12.Nd2 c5 13.c3 Nxb3 14.Nxb3 Qc7 15.a4 Bd6 16.d4 Rae8 17.axb5 axb5 18.Ra7 cxd4 19.cxd4 Ra8 20.Rxa8 Bxa8 21.Bd2 Re8 22.Qa1 f6 23.Rc1 Qe7 24.Nf3 Nf4 25.Bxf4 Bxf4 26.Re1 Qf7 27.Nc5 Bd5 28.Nd3 Bb8 29.Nb4 Bxf3 30.gxf3 Bd6 31.Nc2 Rd8 32.Ne3 Qg6+ 33.Ng2 Qf5 34.Qa5 Rc8 35.Qa6 Bb4 36.Rd1 h5 37.d5 Rc2 38.Qe6+ Qxe6 39.dxe6 Rxb2 40.Rd8+ Kh7 41.Ne3 Ba3 42.Rd3 Bc5 43.Rc3 Bb4 44.Nd5 Bd6 45.Re3 Rd2 46.e7 Bxe7 47.Nxe7 Rd7 48.Kg2 g5 49.Nc6 Rd6 50.Nb4 g4 51.hxg4 hxg4 52.Re7+ Kg6 53.Rb7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 12:08 AM
Through to round 4:

Polgar, Gashimov, Grischuk, Bu (Gupta blundered), Radjabov, Jakovenko, Navara (if he wins queen vs rook)

Tiebreaks for round 3:

Sutovsky - Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov - Zherebukh
Efimenko - Ponomariov
Nepomniatchi - Kamsky
Svidler - Caruana
Vitiugov - Potkin
Nielsen - Parligras
Bruzon - Le
Lysyj - Dominguez

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 01:03 AM
[EDIT: Extraordinarily it was a draw after all - see below]

Confusion! Navara made heavy weather of king and queen vs king and rook using up 41 of his moves. On the video I saw Kc6 winning played followed by the king being moved to e5, but Ke5 was initially displayed as the move with result indicated as draw, then that move removed and draw left showing as the result. [EDIT: Yes I have checked again and it is clear Navara played the move and there was an immediate handshake suggesting resignation as the win is obvious]

The intention seems to have been to move the king such as to indicate that black won the game.

Another confusing aspect - a lot of people were getting sucked in by tablebases showing the number of moves to mate. Navara did not have to mate Moiseenko inside 50 moves in either the KQ vs KRP or KQ vs KR; he just had to take something to reset the clock. Hence there were some claims he was outside the window that I believe were false.

Moiseenko,Alexander (2715) - Navara,David (2722) [E15]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.2), 04.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.Qb3 Nc6 6.Nbd2 Na5 7.Qa4 c5 8.Bg2 Bb7 9.dxc5 bxc5 10.0-0 Be7 11.Ne5 Qc7 12.Bxb7 Nxb7 13.Ndf3 Nd6 14.Rd1 Rb8 15.b3 Nfe4 16.Bb2 f6 17.Nd3 h5 18.Rac1 Kf7 19.b4 cxb4 20.c5 Nf5 21.Rc4 Nxc5 22.Nxc5 d6 23.e4 Nh6 24.e5 dxc5 25.Rd7 Qb6 26.exf6 gxf6 27.Qd1 Nf5 28.Nh4 Rbd8 29.Nxf5 Rxd7 30.Qxd7 exf5 31.Qxf5 Qe6 32.Qd3 h4 33.gxh4 Rh5 34.Re4 Qd5 35.Qe2 Bd6 36.Qg4 Qf5 37.Qe2 Rh7 38.Qc4+ Kf8 39.Qe6 Bxh2+ 40.Kf1 Qxe6 41.Rxe6 Rxh4 42.Rxf6+ Ke8 43.Ra6 c4 44.Ke2 Bf4 45.Bd4 c3 46.Kd3 Rh1 47.Be3 Bxe3 48.fxe3 Rh2 49.Rxa7 Rd2+ 50.Ke4 Rd1 51.Rc7 Ra1 52.Rc4 Rxa2 53.Rxb4 c2 54.Rc4 Ra4 55.Rxa4 c1Q 56.Rd4 Ke7 57.Kd3 Qd1+ 58.Ke4 Qf1 59.Ke5 Qf3 60.Re4 Kd7 61.Kd4 Kd6 62.Rf4 Qd1+ 63.Kc3 Ke5 64.Rc4 Qc1+ 65.Kd3 Qa3+ 66.Kd2 Qb2+ 67.Kd3 Qb3+ 68.Rc3 Qd1+ 69.Kc4 Ke4 70.Kc5 Qd5+ 71.Kb4 Kf3 72.Rc5 Qd6 73.Kb5 Kxe3 74.Rc6 Qd5+ 75.Kb6 Kd4 76.Kc7 Qe5+ 77.Kd7 Kd5 78.Ra6 Qg7+ 79.Ke8 Qc7 80.Rh6 Ke5 81.Rg6 Kf5 82.Rh6 Qc1 83.Rd6 Qc8+ 84.Ke7 Qc7+ 85.Rd7 Qe5+ 86.Kd8 Qb8+ 87.Ke7 Ke5 88.Kf7 Qh8 89.Re7+ Kf5 90.Rd7 Qh7+ 91.Ke8 Qg8+ 92.Ke7 Ke5 93.Rc7 Qg7+ 94.Kd8 Qf8+ 95.Kd7 Kd5 96.Rc1 Qf5+ 97.Ke8 Kd6 98.Rd1+ Ke6 99.Re1+ Kf6 100.Rc1 Qb5+ 101.Kd8 Ke6 102.Re1+ Kf7 103.Re7+ Kf8 104.Rb7 Qd5+ 105.Rd7 Qa5+ 106.Rc7 Qa8+ 107.Kd7 Qd5+ 108.Kc8 Ke8 109.Kb8 Kd8 110.Rc8+ Kd7 111.Rc7+ Kd6 112.Rc1 Qb3+ 113.Kc8 Qa3 114.Rd1+ correction: aliens invaded earth and caused a draw, see below 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 03:14 AM
It was a draw! Playchess carries the following account from Navara:


http://www.ulozto.cz/10169611/navara-txt

This is an autom. translation from CZE to ENG.

"Good evening everyone,probably wondering why I gave it a draw. The reason was that the opponent time constraints in the implementation, I accidentally touched the strength of two pieces of approximately same time (I played gunner, but I've touched the king). rival demanded I played the king, which would lead to my resignation. I replied that I do not know which of the two figures I touched before, but in any case it was obvious that I'm not going to play the king and that I perform a coup scorer. After the move I missed due to hit the opponent's clock protest, I is the opponent protest stopped, but so badly that the referee then had to order again. Then we continued on, but I was pretty nervous. before opponent a second time pressure I did not make the bathroom, so I failed to concentrate on the game and also because I played D terminal x to wrong. (Not only because, I admit.) Finally, I am on the verge of winning opponent offered a draw because I did not want a match is decided such a crazy game or protest without evidence.

Thus I have to play tomorrow playoffs in the first game will be white. Sorry to please me, but I really do not know what I should do. The opponent is a decent man, but there was just this sort of disagreement, and I do not know who had the formal terms of truth. I did not want to be told that I was assigned unfairly. Thank you for your understanding." ˝-˝

?????????

This is just bizarre. If there was genuine doubt over which of two pieces was touched first, and if the move involving touching the king first would have been so loopy a blunder that it would not have been played deliberately anyway, then surely any decent referee (or appeal committee) would not allow a touchmove claim to proceed.

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 03:27 AM
Game one between the same two players was quite incredible too.

Navara,David (2722) - Moiseenko,Alexander (2715) [A20]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (3.1), 03.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.c4 e5 2.g3 c6 3.d4 Bb4+ 4.Bd2 Bxd2+ 5.Qxd2 d6 6.Nc3 Nf6 7.Bg2 0-0 8.e3 Re8 9.Nge2 Nbd7 10.h3 Nf8 11.0-0 e4 12.f4 exf3 13.Rxf3 h6 14.Raf1 N8h7 15.e4 Be6 16.b3 a6 17.R3f2 Qe7 18.g4 Rad8 19.Ng3 b5 20.cxb5 axb5 21.Nd1 c5 22.Ne3 cxd4 23.Qxd4 Bd7 24.Rd1 Bc6 25.Nef5 Qe5 26.Qxe5 Rxe5 27.Rxd6 Rxd6 28.Nxd6 Rc5 29.Ngf5 Bd7 30.Ne7+ Kf8 31.Nd5 Be6 32.b4 Rc1+ 33.Kh2 Re1 34.a3 Bd7 35.Rf1 Re2 36.Nc3 Rc2 37.Ncxb5 h5 38.e5 hxg4 39.Nd4 Rd2 40.exf6 gxh3 41.fxg7+ Kg8 42.Rxf7 Rxg2+ 43.Kh1 Rxg7 44.Rxg7+ Kxg7 45.b5 Nf6 46.b6 Ba4 47.Ne6+ Kg6 48.Nf8+ Kg7 49.Ne6+ Kg6 50.Nf8+ Kg7 51.b7 Bc6+ 52.Kh2 Bxb7 53.Ne6+ Kg6 54.Nxb7 Kf5 55.Nc7 Ng4+ 56.Kxh3 Ne3 57.a4 Nc4 58.Kh4 Kf6 59.Nc5 Ke5 60.Nb3 Kd6 61.Nb5+ Kc6 62.N5d4+ Kb6 63.Ne6 Nb2 64.a5+ Kb5 65.Ned4+ Ka6 66.Ne6 Nc4 67.Nec5+ Ka7 68.a6 Kb6 69.Kg5 Ne5 70.Na5 Nd7 71.Nc4+ Ka7 72.Nxd7 ˝-˝

Yes, king, two knights and rook's pawn in that position cannot defeat lone king [edit: because the pawn will be taken immediately of course]

Adamski
05-09-2011, 06:37 AM
From 2 posts above:

"I did not make the bathroom, so I failed to concentrate on the game".

Oh dear.

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 08:14 AM
A better translation than Google is here:

"Good evening to all,
you are probably wondering, why I offered a draw. The reason is that, while my opponent was pressed for time, I accidentally touched two pieces at approximately the same time when executing a move (I moved my bishop and brushed over my king). My opponent asked me to move my king, which would lead me to give up. I replied that I do not know which piece out of the two I touched first, but it was obvious in any case that I was not planning to move my king and that I was executing a bishop move. After making my move I did not manage to press the clock [in time] because of my opponent's protest, so I subsequently stopped it, but in such an unfortunate way that the arbiters had to re-start it. Then we kept playing, but I was already pretty nervous. Prior to my opponent's second time pressure I did not manage to get to the bathroom in time, so I could not focus on the game, which is why I played the queen versus rook ending so badly. (I admit it was not the only reason.) Finally, at the verge of winning, I offered a draw to my opponent, as I did not want the match to be decided by such a mad game or a protest without a body of evidence. Therefore I have to play a tiebreak tomorrow. I will have the white pieces in the first game. Please, do not be angry with me, but I seriously do not know what I should have done. My opponent is a polite person, but here this sort of disagreement simply took place and I do not even know who was formally right. I did not want people to say that I advanced unfairly. Thank you for your understanding."

Source is http://chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1633790
I changed "grazed" to "brushed over" the king which was probably closer to the meaning. I don't think he scratched the king as if the king was itching.

Shipov commented:

"I talked to Moiseenko after his game against Navara – they DREW! What happened was as follows: in the first time trouble Navara accidentally touched one of his pieces and if he moved it he’d lose a piece. Moiseenko pardoned him that touch in a short dialogue.

It seems a sense of guilt weighed on David and then, having achieved a won position, he considered it wasn’t possible for him to win and offered a draw.

All in all, they’re going to play tiebreaks tomorrow.

David Navara and Alexander Moiseenko are the noblest representatives of the chess world. Let’s remember their names…"

I applaud that. Both players deserve praise for their sportmanship. Presumably Moiseenko's protest was rather an adrenaline reaction to protest over the "king move", because he was short of time. But he conceded to the arbiter that it was not to be taken as a deliberate king move. Also some would have preferred that Navara should have offered the draw at move 40, but that would be in a wide-open situation, where both could win. When he got to the Q vs. R ending, he could be criticized for taking the draw from "chickening out" from the task of winning this comparatively difficult ending, so he continued until there was mate in 5 and it would be clear he was winning. Moiseenko put up fierce defense and Navara erred on several occasions to slip out, losing many moves on the way. The highest number of moves I think is 33 moves to mate, in the most difficult situations of QvR, so at least 10 moves had been lost on the way (although Moiseenko obviously did not play perfect either).

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 09:08 AM
A few comments on the QvR endgame which is interesting, and I have been training lately.

After 73...Kxe3 starts the count, and black has 25 moves to mate. In the beginning Navara plays quite well and after 79...Qc7! (a key move to break the third rank defense) 78. Rh6! (78.Rf6! is also good while 78.Rg6 would be a simple mistake because of 78...Ke5 79.Rh6 Kf5 and White is in a serious zugzwang) 78...Ke5 79.Rg6 we get a key position:

4K3/2q5/6R1/4k3/8/8/8/8 b - - 3 79

19 moves to mate. Here Navara "erred" with Kf5 and literally gains no moves all the way to move 106 where there are still 21 moves to mate. I wanted to show this position because it is quite difficult to handle for those who don't have the precious knowledge, but at the same time appears in about 70% of the games I play against the perfect defense (table bases), and the winning sequence from here is quite easy to memorize (something that is unfortunately not true for the harrassment defenses, working with rook checks from a distance).

Now the correct move is 79...Qc4! where we see the Qc4,Ke8,Rg6 forming a sort of a big "T" on the board (makes it easy to remember) and whites best defense is 80.Ke7 Qh4+! 81.Kf7 Qh7+! 82.Rg7 Qf5+ 83.Kg8 Ke6! (beware of 83...Kf6?? 87.Rf7+ draw) 84.Rb7 Qd5! 85.Rf7! and here there are several ways to win, but the easiest way is probably the triangulation 85...Qc4! (once again the same square as in move 79!) 86.Kf8 Qc5+ 87.Kg8 Qd5! 88.Rg7 Kf6+ 89.Kh7 Qh1+! 90.Kg8 Qh5 91.Rg1 Qd5+ 92.Kh7 Qe4+ 93.Kg8 Qa8+ 94.Kh7 Qa7+ 95.Kg8 Qxg1+ (saving around 20 moves over Navara) 96.Kf8 Qg7+ 97.Ke8 Qe7+ checkmate.

Garvinator
05-09-2011, 10:00 AM
After 73...Kxe3 starts the count, and black has 25 moves to mate. He has 50 moves to mate, not 25.

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 11:22 AM
He has 50 moves to mate, not 25.

Sorry didn't phrase that very skillfully. I know the 50 move rule. But in that particular position, with perfect (table base) play from both, black mates in 25 moves. It just happened by coincidence to be half the distance to a white draw claim :P

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 11:40 AM
Game one between the same two players was quite incredible too.
Navara,David (2722) - Moiseenko,Alexander (2715) [A20]
...
Yes, king, two knights and rook's pawn in that position cannot defeat lone king.

That should be easy with just a single knight extra. If you wanna have fun the rook pawn can be promoted to a bishop. What you probably mean is that in that position two knights and a rook pawn couldn't defeat a knight. It might have been winning, but it is infinitely more difficult to find the precise moves coordinating the two knights and the pawn, as they are cut off from the king, than finding a plausible defense.

Perhaps you meant that two knights against lone king is also a draw (although to clarify or perhaps further muddle the issue, a win on flagfall would stand if that were to happen, because helpmate exists).

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 03:03 PM
That should be easy with just a single knight extra.

Not in this case, because knight and pawn vs king is sometimes drawn when the pawn starts on rook six specifically. In this case with the pawn on that specific square it is also a draw with two knights plus the pawn - in this case the draw was agreed with that material balance. Black was able to use the knight to force the pawn up to that square before throwing the knight away.

In the ending with KNNP v KN, Navara initially had a tablebase win but 58.Kh4 made it a draw (58.Kg3 or Kg2 won). From that point on it was always a tablebase draw.

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 04:42 PM
More on the Moiseenko-Navara incident:

Press release commending players on fair play (http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/fide-world-cup-khanty-mansiysk-2011/moiseenko-and-navara-remind-the-world-about-fair-play) with comments from the players.

Dennis Monokroussos has a different view. (http://www.thechessmind.net/blog/2011/9/4/the-moiseenko-navara-draw-honorable-or-not.html)

From what I have seen Navara was overgenerous.

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 04:53 PM
N+rook pawn should be easy

Not in this case, because knight and pawn vs king is sometimes drawn when the pawn starts on rook six specifically.

Okay maybe I'm splitting hairs here, but this is only the case in unstable positions where either the pawn or the knight must be given up e.g. Kf4,Nc7,a6 vs. Ka7 here obviously 1...Kb8? 2.Nb5 is losing, but 1...Kb6! is a draw because Kxc7 or Kxa6 follows. Is that your idea? In stable positions knight + rook pawn always wins, or do you have counter examples? If the king had been on e5 then 2.Kd6 would win.


In this case with the pawn on that specific square it is also a draw with two knights plus the pawn - in this case the draw was agreed with that material balance. Black was able to use the knight to force the pawn up to that square before throwing the knight away.
Okay maybe I'm getting your idea, at the moment black gave up the knight, so after knight takes knight, right before king takes pawn, we have a volatile situation where white momentarily has the two knights and rook pawn against the lone king, but that will of course be vanished by next move king takes pawn. Just like in a queen exchange right after queen takes queen "wow, he has a queen extra!" well not a very interesting fact IMHO.


In the ending with KNNP v KN, Navara initially had a tablebase win but 58.Kh4 made it a draw (58.Kg3 or Kg2 won). From that point on it was always a tablebase draw.
Interesting, I didn't know it was so close, but I actually summed up three knights and a pawn plus the two king 7 men, which is not readily available yet. Of course this is only 6 men, which is browsable online. That would be this position

8/1NN5/8/5k2/P1n5/7K/8/8 w - - 0 58
58.Kh4 is a draw as in the game. Funny that 58.Kg2 can win - what is the plan? Apparently the white king is going nowhere if black just stays put, white can follow up with Kf2 and Ke2 but then what? Ke3 and Kd2 are illegal, and Kd3 and Kd1 don't go because of Nb2+. Obviously the position is far more complicated than my little brain can handle, but after 58.Kg2 Ke4 59.Kf2 Kd4 60.Ke2 Ke4 61.Na6! the idea is that 61...Nb6 is now not dangerous because 62.a5 Nc4 63.Nac5+! permitting 64.a6 etc.

I think I wouldn't have found this idea in a million years. Perhaps in correspondence game. I browsed a few moves ahead, but the move sequences are mind baffling. White eventually gets the knights to b3 and d4, and now can round the white king back via f6 go c8. I think it is a position where the silicon beasts can truely laugh at mere mortals attempt to understand.

Kevin Bonham
05-09-2011, 05:01 PM
OK, it was actually only drawn in the end because white had just taken the knight and offered the draw; black's next move would have been king takes pawn. :doh: I should have looked at the final position a bit more closely!

This is an example of a drawn KNP v K for what it's worth:

1.Ke4 Ng4 2.Kf3 Kg7 3.Kg3 h2 4.Kg2=

Jesper Norgaard
05-09-2011, 05:58 PM
Ah, I see. But in that position white cannot avoid mate!

Garvinator
05-09-2011, 06:56 PM
The fair play prize should be given to a person who understands the rules, which clearly neither of these players do and so should not be congratulated for their 'sportsmanship'. It is amazing to me that they were aware that a piece has to be deliberately touched.

Kevin Bonham
06-09-2011, 12:27 AM
Dominguez - Lysyj made it to Armageddon tonight after some quick draws in the 5/3 blitz but Dominguez won the Armageddon with white easily. There were a lot of won games (nine, with six won by black) in the first lot of 25/10 rapids.

Round 4 is:

Polgar-Dominguez
Kamsky-Svidler
Ponomariov-Bruzon
Gashimov-Nielsen
Ivanchuk-Bu
Radjabov-Jakovenko
Zherebukh-Navara
Grischuk-Potkin

I had never heard of Zherebukh before this tournament. He's Ukrainian and aged just 18. He won Capelle-la-Grande in 2010.

siow, weng nian
06-09-2011, 11:51 AM
For those interested in the thoughts of our No 1 player and his experiences in the land far far far away ...... check out his blog (guest-blogging on Canadian GM Mark Bluvshtein's blog) here (http://markbluvshtein.wordpress.com/2011/09/05/2011-chess-world-cup-a-perspective-from-the-man-from-down-under/).

PS From the blog, I understand that GM Bluvshtein was here in 2007 playing in the Australian Champs.

Jesper Norgaard
06-09-2011, 03:35 PM
The fair play prize should be given to a person who understands the rules, which clearly neither of these players do and so should not be congratulated for their 'sportsmanship'. It is amazing to me that they were aware that a piece has to be deliberately touched.

Lemma: Everyone is entitled to their own opinion - a person is not entitled to their own facts.

They were both aware of the rules, just check the testimonies and it should be quite clear. The fact was that the king was touched before the bishop - the matter of opinion was wether it was done deliberately. Asking Moiseenko not to speak unless he was sure it was deliberate when something like this happens, is indeed asking for a lot of ethics, short of time as he was. Still, after discussing with the arbiter he realized it could not have been deliberate, and therefore did not insist on the touch-move rule. If he had, perhaps the video could have been used and shown that there was no case.

Therefore a lot of people have critisized the act of Navara - if the case was solved, why give a draw? I agree that there was no legal obligation nor ethical obligation to do so. Still I think it is not fair to judge him as some kind of moron that just did something stupid. I'm sure if the game had ended in a draw would have meant Moiseenko would have qualified right away, Navara would not have offered the draw. But I do speculate why we have such a "raw" society that ethical considerations are just considered weaknesses or worse. Navara made a gesture of worldmanship, of forgiveness and repent of own "sins". Are we to condemn that?

I think he acted quite rationally. In fact he gained a psychological advantage not only for the rest of the match with Moiseenko, which he won, but quite possibly for the next matches to come.

Speaking of ethical reasons for offering a draw, I am just as opposed to Morozevich' draw offer after 12 moves as I am in favor of Navara's gesture. Why would Moro do that? Grischuk was just as baffled. In fact you could say that Morozevich was not being ethical to his fans who hoped for an exciting battle with Grischuk, no matter the result. Was he trying to save 5 ELO points? Some quite expensive 5 ELO points, I would say!

If anybody has information about his reasons, please share.

Kevin Bonham
06-09-2011, 03:58 PM
Speaking of ethical reasons for offering a draw, I am just as opposed to Morozevich' draw offer after 12 moves as I am in favor of Navara's gesture. Why would Moro do that? Grischuk was just as baffled. In fact you could say that Morozevich was not being ethical to his fans who hoped for an exciting battle with Grischuk, no matter the result. Was he trying to save 5 ELO points? Some quite expensive 5 ELO points, I would say!

Grischuk doesn't know why Moro offered the draw and said it was up to journalists to figure it out. Some sources speculate that he might have been devastated by losing game one and simply have lacked the motivation to fight. Others question his commitment.

It reminds me of the Australian Champs playoff between Johansen and Speck where Johansen won the first two games of the four game match and rather than try to beat Johansen twice in a row, Speck took an eight-move draw in game three thus conceding the playoff.

Things like this at the level of the World Cup are unfortunate because they often lead to suspicion of either rigging or insider betting.

Kevin Bonham
06-09-2011, 04:25 PM
Svidler on his second win against Caruana yesterday:


In the second game, and this has happened to me for the 3rd time in my life. I made a move on move 2 which I had absolutely no intention of making. After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4, I mean I've been doing OK in the Gruenfeld here, I haven't had any particular problems and I was planning to stick with it and then I just found myself holding the e-pawn in my hand, and you can't really put it back and say J'Adoube at this point so I thought, OK, I have to play e6 now .

And now it is a bit of a problem for me because I'm not really a Catalan player. Luckily for me (I still got a very bad position) I've played some Catalans as White recently so I knew some modicum of theory so (against Naiditsch). The position after bxc3 is currently thought to be close to equal but not the way I played it I suppose.

There's hope for us all. :P

Agent Smith
06-09-2011, 06:00 PM
Grischuk doesn't know why Moro offered the draw and said it was up to journalists to figure it out. Some sources speculate that he might have been devastated by losing game one and simply have lacked the motivation to fight. Others question his commitment.

Well, imho any speculation of that nature is stupid. After reading the official interview :
Today you played Nimzowitsch Defense with Morozevich. How often do you use it in your games? — I don’t think that I played it with Morozevich before but in my entire chess career I implemented it about 50 times. It was an obvious sign of respect, and in all probablility, a draw was all Moro would have achieved. And he possibly felt Grischuk deserved to win after the great chess he played in the first game.

Kevin Bonham
06-09-2011, 11:20 PM
Polgar struggled for much of this game then finally blundered:

Polgar,Judit (2701) - Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) [B90]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.1), 06.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e5 7.Nf3 Be7 8.Bc4 0-0 9.0-0 Qc7 10.Bb3 Be6 11.Qe2 Rc8 12.Rfd1 b5 13.Bg5 Nbd7 14.Rac1 b4 15.Nd5 Bxd5 16.Bxf6 Nxf6 17.exd5 Qd7 18.Bc4 Qa7 19.c3 bxc3 20.Rxc3 Bd8 21.Ng5 a5 22.Rf3 Qe7 23.b3 a4 24.Rh3 g6 25.Qc2 axb3 26.axb3 Bb6 27.Rf1 Ng4 28.Ne4 f5 29.Rg3 Nf6 30.Nxf6+ Qxf6 31.Rd3 Rc7 32.Qc3 Rca7 33.Rd2 Bd4 34.Qd3 Ra1 35.g3 Rxf1+ 36.Kxf1 Bc5 37.Kg2 e4 38.Qe2 Re8 39.f3 exf3+ 40.Qxf3 Re3 41.Qf1 Qe5 42.Qf4 Qe7 43.Ra2 Re1 44.b4?? Be3 45.Qf3 The only square and blocking the escape square 45...Rg1+ 46.Kh3 Qg5 0-1

Grischuk's move 40 was also a howler; an early pawn sac never quite paid dividends:

Potkin,Vladimir (2671) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [E73]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.1), 06.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0-0 6.Bg5 Na6 7.f4 Qe8 8.Nf3 e5 9.fxe5 dxe5 10.d5 Nc5 11.Nd2 Nh5 12.Bxh5 gxh5 13.Qxh5 Nd3+ 14.Ke2 Nf4+ 15.Bxf4 exf4 16.Rhf1 Be5 17.g3 fxg3 18.Nf3 Bg7 19.e5 Bxe5 20.Nxe5 f6 21.Qxe8 Rxe8 22.hxg3 Rxe5+ 23.Kd2 Kf7 24.Rf4 Rf5 25.Raf1 Rxf4 26.Rxf4 Bd7 27.Ne4 f5 28.Nc5 Bc8 29.b4 b6 30.Nd3 Kf6 31.Rh4 Kg7 32.Kc3 Bd7 33.Ne5 Be8 34.Kd4 h5 35.Nd3 Bf7 36.Nf4 Re8 37.Nxh5+ Bxh5 38.Rxh5 Re4+ 39.Kd3 b5 40.c5 Re5 41.d6 cxd6 42.c6 Re4 43.Rxf5 Rxb4 44.Rf2 1-0

Radjabov,Teimour (2752) - Jakovenko,Dmitry (2716) [A05]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.1), 06.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.b3 Bg7 5.Bb2 0-0 6.c4 dxc4 7.bxc4 c5 8.0-0 Nc6 9.d3 Bf5 10.Nc3 Qd7 11.Re1 Rac8 12.Rb1 b6 13.Nb5 Bh3 14.Bh1 Ne8 15.Bxg7 Nxg7 16.Ng5 Bg4 17.Qd2 h6 18.Ne4 Kh7 19.Nec3 f5 20.f3 Bh5 21.f4 e6 22.Bg2 Rfd8 23.Kh1 Qe7 24.Qe3 Ne8 25.h3 Nd6 26.Nxd6 Rxd6 27.Kh2 Rd7 28.Rg1 g5 29.g4 gxf4 30.Qxf4 Bg6 31.gxf5 exf5 32.Nd5 Qd6 33.Rbf1 Kh8 34.h4 Bh7 35.Bh3 Re8 36.e4 Nb4 37.Qxd6 Rxd6 38.Bxf5 Nxd5 39.cxd5 Bxf5 40.Rxf5 c4 41.Rf4 c3 42.Rf7 Rc8 43.Rgg7 Rdd8 44.Rh7+ Kg8 45.Rfg7+ Kf8 46.Rxa7 Kg8 47.Rag7+ Kf8 48.Rd7 1-0

Zherebukh went a bit silly against Navara (not entirely sure how much was mistake and how much was an intentional unsound hack) and lost. Bu-Ivanchuk and Bruzon-Pono drawn.

Kevin Bonham
06-09-2011, 11:45 PM
This was an odd one - just when it looked like Kamsky might have a good shot at saving this endgame a pawn down he collapsed.

Svidler,Peter (2740) - Kamsky,Gata (2756) [C90]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.1), 06.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.a3 d6 9.c3 Re8 10.d4 h6 11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.Ba2 Bb7 13.b4 a5 14.d5 Ne7 15.Nb3 axb4 16.cxb4 Rb8 17.Bb2 c6 18.Na5 Ba8 19.dxc6 Nxc6 20.Nxc6 Bxc6 21.Qd3 Qd7 22.Rac1 Rbd8 23.Bb1 Ba8 24.Qe2 g6 25.Bd3 Rb8 26.Rc2 Nh5 27.g3 Bg7 28.Rec1 Qg4 29.Nd4 Qxe2 30.Nxe2 Nf6 31.Nc3 Bc6 32.f3 Bd7 33.Nd1 d5 34.exd5 e4 35.fxe4 Nxe4 36.Bxg7 Kxg7 37.Rc7 Bf5 38.Bxe4 Rxe4 39.Nc3 Rd4 40.Rd1 Rxd1+ 41.Nxd1 Ra8 42.Ne3 Be4 43.Re7 Bb1 44.Re5 Ra6 45.Kf2 h5 46.Kf3 Ba2 47.Ke4 Rxa3 48.Kd4 Rb3 49.d6 f6 50.Re7+ Kf8 51.Nd5 Bb1 52.Kc5 Rd3 53.Ra7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
07-09-2011, 12:28 AM
Nice finish by Gashimov



Gashimov,Vugar (2756) - Nielsen,Peter Heine (2687) [C67]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.1), 06.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Rd1+ Ke8 10.Nc3 Be7 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bxe7 Nxe7 13.Nd4 Bd7 14.Rd3 Rd8 15.Rad1 Nd5 16.Ne4 Nf4 17.R3d2 Ke7 18.f3 Bc8 19.Kf2 Rhe8 20.g3 Nh3+ 21.Ke3 Ng5 22.f4 Nxe4 23.Kxe4 g6 24.f5 Rxd4+ 25.Kxd4 Bxf5 26.Kc3 a5 27.a3 Be6 28.Rd4 c5 29.Rf4 h5 30.b4 axb4+ 31.axb4 Ra8 32.bxc5 Ra3+ 33.Kb2 Ra2+ 34.Kb1 Ra5 35.Rb4 Rxc5 36.Rxb7 Bf5 37.Rd2 Be4 38.Ra7 Ke6 39.Re2 Kxe5 40.Ra4 f5 41.Ra6 g5 42.Rg6 g4 43.Rh6 Kd4 44.Rxh5 Bf3 45.Rd2+ Ke3 46.Rd3+ Kf2 47.Kb2 Be4 48.Rc3 Rb5+ 49.Kc1 c6 50.Rh8 Kg2 51.Rc4 Re5 52.Rd4 Bf3 53.Rd2+ Kg1 54.Kb2 Re3 55.Rh7 Be4 56.Rd1+ Kg2 57.Rd2+ Kg1 58.Re7 Kh1 59.Rf2 Kg1 60.Rxf5 Bxc2 61.Rf1+ Kxf1 62.Rxe3 Bd1 63.Kc1 Bf3 64.Re5 Kg1 65.Rh5 Bg2 66.Kd2 Bh3 67.Ke3 Kxh2 68.Kf2 c5 69.Rxc5 Bg2 70.Rc4 Bh3 71.Ra4 Kh1 72.Ra1+ Kh2 73.Rg1 1-0

Agent Smith
07-09-2011, 08:44 AM
Yes - nice Zugzwang :)

Kevin Bonham
07-09-2011, 09:37 PM
Kamsky was going rather well in this one I thought, then he got wiped out by a tactic.

Kamsky,Gata (2756) - Svidler,Peter (2740) [C78]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.axb5 axb5 9.c3 d6 10.d4 Bb6 11.Be3 0-0 12.Nbd2 h6 13.h3 Re8 14.Qc2 exd4 15.cxd4 Na5 16.Ba2 Bb7 17.e5 Nd5 18.Bb1 g6 19.Bxh6 Nc6 20.exd6 Qxd6 21.Ne4 Qb4 22.Ba2 Nxd4 23.Nf6+ Kh8 24.Nxd4 Nxf6 25.Nc6 Qh4 26.Nxb8? Re2!! 27.Qc3 Rxf2 28.Nc6 Rxf1+ 0-1

If the rook is taken after Re2, ...Qg3 leads to mate.

Kevin Bonham
07-09-2011, 09:57 PM
Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2682) [B90]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.a4 e5 7.Nf3 Be7 8.Bc4 0-0 9.0-0 Be6 10.Qe2 Qc7 11.Bb3 Rc8 12.Bg5 Nbd7 13.Rfd1 h6 14.Bxf6 Nxf6 15.Nh4 Qd7 16.g3 Rc5 17.Rd3 Rac8 18.Ng2 Bd8 19.Rad1 Ba5 20.Rxd6 Qe7 21.Nh4 Bxc3 22.Rxe6 fxe6 23.Nf5 Qe8 24.Nd6 Qe7 25.Nxc8 Rxc8 26.bxc3 Rxc3 27.Qd2 Rc6 28.Qa5 Nxe4 29.Qxe5 Nc5 30.Qb8+ Kh7 31.Rd8 Qc7 32.Rh8+ Kg6 33.Qg8 Nxb3 34.cxb3 Rc1+ 35.Kg2 Qc6+ 36.Kh3 Rc5 37.Qh7+ Kf7 38.Qg8+ Kg6 39.Qh7+ ˝-˝

...off to playoffs for them

Kevin Bonham
07-09-2011, 10:28 PM
Zherebukh did extremely well to get this far but in this match he was just not up to it. And so after the difficult match with Moiseenko the previous round, Navara is in the quarter-finals, as is Radjabov who had little trouble drawing with Jakovenko.

Navara,David (2705) - Zherebukh,Yaroslav (2580) [C04]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nc6 4.Ngf3 Nf6 5.e5 Nd7 6.Bd3 Nb4 7.Be2 c5 8.c3 Nc6 9.0-0 a5 10.a4 Be7 11.Re1 0-0 12.Bb5 f6 13.exf6 Nxf6 14.Nf1 Bd6 15.Ng3 Qc7 16.b3 Bd7 17.Ba3 b6 18.Ra2 Rae8 19.Rae2 Nd8 20.Bd3 Nf7 21.Ne5 c4 22.Bxd6 Nxd6 23.bxc4 dxc4 24.Bc2 Nd5 25.Qb1 g6 26.Bxg6 Re7 27.Qc1 hxg6 28.Nxg6 Rf6 29.Nxe7+ Nxe7 30.Nh5 Rg6 31.Nf4 Rg4 32.f3 Rg7 33.Nxe6 Bxe6 34.Rxe6 Ndf5 35.R1e5 Nh4 36.Rxe7 Nxf3+ 37.Kf2 Nxe5 38.Re8+ Kh7 39.Rxe5 Qc6 40.Qc2+ 1-0

Grischuk equalised - off to playoffs:

Grischuk,Alexander (2757) - Potkin,Vladimir (2671) [C11]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 a6 8.Qd2 b5 9.Nd1 b4 10.Be2 Qb6 11.c3 bxc3 12.Nxc3 Rb8 13.b3 Qa5 14.Rc1 cxd4 15.Nxd4 Nxd4 16.Bxd4 Ba3 17.Rc2 0-0 18.Na4 Bb4 19.Bc3 f6 20.Bg4 Re8 21.Bxb4 Rxb4 22.0-0 Bb7 23.a3 Rxa4 24.bxa4 Qxd2 25.Rxd2 fxe5 26.fxe5 Nxe5 27.Be2 Rc8 28.Rb2 Rc7 29.Rb6 Nc4 30.Bg4 g6 31.Bxe6+ Kg7 32.Rxb7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 12:46 AM
Three epics tonight and this has just finished. Ivanchuk missed 24.N1d2 which traps Q for R and P (not obvious though) and there were plenty of other exciting moments. Playoffs for these two (they'll be exhausted!)

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Bu,Xiangzhi (2666) [B80]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Be7 8.0-0 0-0 9.Be3 Qc7 10.f4 Nc6 11.a4 Re8 12.Nb3 Nd7 13.g4 b6 14.g5 Nb4 15.Rf2 Bb7 16.Qg4 Bf8 17.Raf1 g6 18.f5 Ne5 19.Qh3 Bg7 20.Bf4 Rad8 21.f6 Bf8 22.Qg3 Qc4 23.Nb1 Nbc6 24.Nc3 Nd4 25.Nxd4 Qxd4 26.h4 Rc8 27.Rd1 Qb4 28.Bc1 Rc4 29.Na2 Qc5 30.Be3 Qc7 31.Nc3 Rc8 32.Rd4 Rxd4 33.Bxd4 Qc4 34.Rd2 Qb4 35.b3 Nc6 36.Bf2 Ne5 37.Bd4 b5 38.axb5 axb5 39.Bf1 Qa5 40.Re2 Nc6 41.Bf2 Ne5 42.Bd4 Ba6 43.Rd2 Qa1 44.Kg2 b4 45.Bxa6 bxc3 46.Be2 Qa8 47.Bxc3 Qxe4+ 48.Kf1 h5 49.Bxe5 dxe5 50.Bd3 Qd5 51.Qg2 Qa5 52.Re2 Rd8 53.Re4 Qa1+ 54.Ke2 Bc5 55.Qf1 Qb2 56.Rc4 e4 57.Rxe4 Bd4 58.Qe1 Qa3 59.b4 Qa7 60.Qg3 Qb6 61.b5 Qc5 62.Qf4 e5 63.Qf3 Qb4 64.Kf1 Qd2 65.Qe2 Qc3 66.Qe1 Qc7 67.Qb4 Ba7 68.Ke2 Qb6 69.Qe1 Qc7 70.Kf3 Bd4 71.Qb4 Ra8 72.Qe7 Qc8 73.Ke2 Ra7 74.Qd6 Qh3 75.Rxd4 Qg2+ 76.Ke3 exd4+ 77.Kxd4 Qg4+ 78.Kc3 Qc8+ 79.Bc4 Rd7 80.Qe5 Rc7 81.Qe4 Kh7 82.Kb3 Ra7 83.Qd4 Qc7 84.Bd3 Qa5 85.Qb4 Qa2+ 86.Kc3 Qa1+ 87.Kd2 Qg1 88.Qf4 Qc5 89.Ke2 Qg1 90.Kd2 Rd7 91.Qc4 Qh2+ 92.Kc1 Qe5 93.Kd2 Qh2+ 94.Kc1 Qe5 95.Kd2 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 01:20 AM
Epic two (an amazing game!)

Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) - Polgar,Judit (2701) [B33]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qb6 5.Nb3 Nf6 6.Nc3 e6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Qf3 Be7 9.Qg3 d6 10.0-0-0 0-0 11.Kb1 Rd8 12.f4 Qc7 13.Bd3 b5 14.Qh4 h6 15.Bxh6! gxh6 [15...Nxe4 16.Bg5 Bxg5 17.fxg5 Nxc3+ 18.bxc3 g6 material is equal but the position is very messy with black's king vulnerable but white with many awful pawns] 16.Qxh6 Ne8 [16...b4 17.Nd5 exd5 18.Qg5+ Kf8 19.Qh6+ Ke8 20.Qh8+ Bf8 (20...Kd7 21.Qh3+=) 21.Qxf6 and white looks to have plenty of compensation] 17.e5 [17.Nd5! exd5 18.exd5 the mate threat gets one piece back and then white has a great position eg] 17...f5 18.Bxf5?! [18.Qg6+ Ng7 19.h4 may have been better] 18...exf5 19.Nd5 Bf8 20.Nxc7 Bxh6 21.Nxa8 Bxf4 22.exd6 Bxd6 23.Nb6 Be6 24.Nd5 Kf7 25.Ne3 Nf6 26.g3 Ng4 27.Nxg4 fxg4 28.Nd4 Nxd4 29.Rxd4 Bc7 30.Rf1+ Ke7 31.Re4 Rg8 32.a4 Bd6 33.axb5 axb5 34.Rf5 b4 35.Rh5 Rg6 36.h3 gxh3 37.Rxh3 Kd7 38.Rh7+ Kc6 39.b3 Bd5 40.Re3 [40.Rd4! Bxg3 (40...Rxg3 41.Rh6 Kc5 42.Rxb4=) 41.Rh5=] 40...Bxg3 41.Ra7 Rg4 42.Ra4 Bf4 43.Re1 Bd2 44.Rd1 Bc3 45.Ra6+ Kb7 46.Ra5 Be4 47.Ra4 Rg2 48.Ra2 Kb6 49.Rd6+ Kb5 50.Rd1 Bf3 51.Rf1 Kc5 52.Ra7 Be4 53.Rc1 Kb6 [53...Kd4 here led to similar ideas as black found later in the game.] 54.Ra2 Rg3 55.Rf1 Bg7 56.Kc1 Rg2 57.Kb1 Rd2 58.Kc1 Rh2 59.Kb1 Bc3 60.Rd1 Bf3 61.Rf1 Kc5 62.Ra7 Be4 63.Rc1 Kd4 64.Rd7+ Ke3 65.Re7 Rh6 66.Ra7 Bd2 67.Rg1 Kf2 68.Rd1 Ke2 69.Rg1 Be3 70.Re7 Rh4 71.Rg8 Bd4 72.Ka2 Kd2 73.Rd7 Bxc2 74.Rh8 Rxh8 [74...Kc1!! a shame this was missed] 75.Rxd4+ Bd3 76.Rxb4 Kc3 Oddly Fritz does not give this a high evaluation - it is nonetheless a tablebase win. 77.Ra4 Rh2+ [eg 77...Rb8 only winning move 78.Ra3 Rb7 79.b4+ Kc2 80.Ra4 Rc7 81.Ra5 Rc3 82.Ka1 Bc4 83.b5 Kb3] 78.Ka3 Rb2 79.Rg4? [79.Rb4 draws][79.Ra7 draws since the KRB v KR is drawn in this instance] 79...Rxb3+ 80.Ka4 Rb1 81.Ka5 Rb5+ 82.Ka4 Rf5 83.Rg3 Rf4+ 84.Ka3 Rf1 85.Rg2 Rh1 86.Rb2 Ra1+ 87.Ra2 Rb1 88.Rg2 Rb3+ 89.Ka4 Rb4+ 90.Ka3 Rb6 91.Rg4 Ra6+ 92.Ra4 Rb6 93.Rg4 Rb7 94.Rh4 Rb1 95.Rh2 Rb6 96.Rh4 Bf1 97.Rg4 Rb5 98.Rg3+ Bd3 99.Rg4 Rb1 100.Rg2 Rb3+ 101.Ka4 Rb5 102.Rg4 Rf5 103.Ka3 Rf1 104.Rg2 Rb1 105.Rh2 Bf5 106.Rg2 Now Dominguez needed to claim a draw by intention to play the following move (written on scoresheet) thus producing a triple repetition 106...Bd3 107.Rh2 Bf1 108.Rf2 Bc4 109.Rf3+ Bd3 110.Rf2 Rb3+ 111.Ka2 Rb6 112.Ka1 Rg6 0-1

Epic three. Nielsen was winning this for most of the game; it just took him a very long time because of the difficulties of conversion.

Nielsen,Peter Heine (2687) - Gashimov,Vugar (2756) [D94]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.2), 07.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 g6 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.Be2 0-0 7.0-0 dxc4 8.Bxc4 Bg4 9.Be2 Qb6 10.Qc2 Nbd7 11.Rd1 Bxf3 12.Bxf3 e5 13.dxe5 Nxe5 14.Be2 Rfe8 15.h3 h6 16.Bd2 Qc5 17.Rac1 Rad8 18.a3 Ned7 19.b4 Qe7 20.a4 Qxb4 21.Rb1 Qc5 22.Rxb7 Ne4 23.Rc1 Nxd2 24.Qxd2 Nb6 25.Qc2 Rd7 26.Rxd7 Nxd7 27.Qd2 Qe7 28.a5 Nc5 29.Qc2 Nb7 30.Qa4 Qc5 31.a6 Nd8 32.Na2 Qb6 33.Qb4 Qc7 34.Nc3 Qe7 35.Qb3 h5 36.Bf3 Qc5 37.Ne2 Qd6 38.Rd1 Qc7 39.Nf4 Kh8 40.Qd3 Rf8 41.Qd7 Be5 42.Be2 Kg7 43.h4 Qb6 44.Bc4 Qb4 45.Bf1 Qb6 46.Qe7 Bf6 47.Qe4 Qc7 48.Bc4 c5 49.Rd5 Qc6 50.g3 Qa4 51.Kg2 Re8 52.Qd3 Ne6 53.Nxh5+ gxh5 54.Bb5 Nf4+ 55.gxf4 Qe4+ 56.Qxe4 Rxe4 57.Rxc5 Bxh4 58.Rxh5 Bd8 59.Rd5 Bb6 60.Rd6 Re6 61.Rd7 Kf8 62.Rb7 Bc5 63.Rb8+ Kg7 64.Bc4 Re7 65.Kf3 Rc7 66.Bb3 Rd7 67.Ke4 Bd6 68.Rb5 Kf8 69.Kf5 Rc7 70.Rb8+ Ke7 71.Ra8 Bc5 72.Rh8 Rc6 73.Rh7 Rf6+ 74.Ke4 Bb4 75.Bc4 Be1 76.Kf3 Bd2 77.Rh8 Rc6 78.Bb5 Rb6 79.Re8+ Kf6 80.Bc4 Rc6 81.Bd3 Ba5 82.e4 Bb6 83.e5+ Kg7 84.f5 f6 85.e6 Rc7 86.Rb8 Bc5 87.Be4 Bd6 88.Ra8 Bc5 89.Bd5 Be7 90.Ke4 Bf8 91.Bb7 Bc5 92.Kd5 Kh6 93.Bc6 Bxf2 94.Rg8 Be3 95.Rg6+ Kh7 96.Rxf6 Bg5 97.Rg6 Be7 98.Rg2 Rc8 99.Rb2 Rd8+ 100.Bd7 Rf8 101.Ke4 Kg7 102.Rg2+ Kh7 103.Ke5 Bb4 104.Rg3 Be7 105.Rg2 Bb4 106.Rc2 Be7 107.Rc7 Kh6 108.Bc6 Bd8 109.Rb7 Kg5 110.Rg7+ Kh6 111.Rxa7 Bf6+ 112.Ke4 Rc8 113.Rf7 1-0

Jesper Norgaard
08-09-2011, 03:17 PM
In the Dominguez-Polgar battle it was amazing they actually got a threefold repetition on board since Dominguez played 107.Rh2 and had the same position as Kevin points out after 105.Rh2 and 95.Rh2 so if instead of making move 107.Rh2 he would have just written it on the scoresheet and claimed the draw, he would have won the match - but apparently that woke up the sleeping lioness and she found the Philidor maneuver 107...Bf1! 108.Rf2 Bc4! 109.Rf3+ Bd3 110.Rf2 Rb3+! where the point is that after 111.Ka4 Rb6 it is no longer possible to defend Ra6+ with Ra5 using 112.Rf5 because of 112...Bxf5 but also after 111.Ka2 there was no defense. Great stuff!

I had already convinced myself that 79.Rb4 loses because of 79...Rb1 but I had overlooked that 80.Ka2! Kxb4 is the strangest stalemate. Apparently after 79.Rb4 it is just a draw then.

Rooting for Peter Heine Nielsen of course, we are both Danish. Let's see if Gashimov is up to defend the favorite role in the tie-break games tomorrow.

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 08:50 PM
Ivanchuk is the first through after booting Bu in a couple of rapidplay massacres. Here's the second:

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Bu,Xiangzhi (2666) [A56]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.4), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e5 4.Nc3 d6 5.e4 Be7 6.g3 Nbd7 7.Bg2 a6 8.Nge2 0-0 9.0-0 b5 10.cxb5 axb5 11.Nxb5 Ba6 12.Nec3 Qb6 13.a4 Ne8 14.Re1 Nc7 15.Bf1 Bxb5 16.Nxb5 Nxb5 17.Bxb5 Qxb5 18.axb5 Rxa1 19.Qg4 Nb6 20.Kg2 g6 21.Bg5 Rxe1 22.Bxe7 h5 23.Qf3 Rc8 24.Bxd6 Nd7 25.b6 Nxb6 26.Qb3 1-0

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 09:30 PM
Grischuk advances - Potkin blunders in drawn pawn ending enters an apparently lost pawn ending and misses the only chance he is given to draw it.


Potkin,Vladimir (2671) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [E73]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.4), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 0-0 6.Bg5 Na6 7.f4 c6 8.Qd2 d5 9.Bxf6 exf6 10.exd5 cxd5 11.Nxd5 Re8 12.Nf3 Be6 13.Ne3 Qe7 14.0-0 Bd7 15.Kf2 Bc6 16.Rae1 Rad8 17.d5 Nc5 18.Bd3 Qc7 19.g3 a5 20.Kg2 Bd7 21.Nd1 f5 22.b3 b5 23.cxb5 Ne4 24.Bxe4 fxe4 25.Nd4 Qc5 26.Nc6 Bxc6 27.bxc6 Rxd5 28.Qf2 Qxc6 29.Ne3 Bd4 30.Qc2 Qxc2+ 31.Nxc2 Bc5 32.Re2 Red8 33.Rc1 f5 34.Kf1 Kf7 35.Ne3 Bxe3 36.Rxe3 Rd1+ 37.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 38.Re1 Rxe1+ 39.Kxe1 Ke6 40.Kd2 Kd5 41.Kc3 Kc5 42.a3 Kd5 43.b4 axb4+ 44.axb4 h6 45.h3 h5 46.h4 Kc6 47.Kc4 Kb6 48.Kb3?? Kb5 49.Kc3 e3 50.Kd3 Kxb4 51.Kxe3 Kc3 52.Ke2 Kc2 53.Ke3 Kd1 54.Kf2 Kd2 55.Kf3 Ke1 56.Ke3 Kf1 57.Kf3 Kg1 0-1

Pono also blundered in a drawn position:

Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2682) - Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) [D00]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.4), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4.e3 Qb6 5.Bxf6 exf6 6.Ngf3 cxd4 7.Nxd4 Qxb2 8.Rb1 Qc3 9.Rb3 Qc7 10.c4 Bc5 11.Nb5 Qd8 12.cxd5 0-0 13.Nc3 Nd7 14.Be2 Bd6 15.Nc4 Nc5 16.Rb2 Be5 17.Nxe5 fxe5 18.0-0 Bf5 19.Qd2 Rc8 20.Rd1 Qf6 21.f3 a6 22.a4 Qd8 23.Rb4 Qa5 24.Qb2 Rfd8 25.h3 h6 26.Rc4 Nxa4 27.Nxa4 Rxc4 28.Bxc4 Qxa4 29.Rc1 b5 30.Ba2 Qa5 31.e4 Bd7 32.Kh2 Re8 33.f4 exf4 34.e5 Qb6 35.Re1 Qg6 36.Qf2 Qg3+ 37.Qxg3 fxg3+ 38.Kxg3 Kf8 39.e6 fxe6 40.dxe6 Bc8 41.Kf4 Bb7 42.Ke5 Ke7 43.Rf1 Rf8 44.Rxf8 Kxf8 45.Kd6 Bxg2 46.e7+ Ke8 47.Be6 Bc6 48.Bf5 Kf7 49.Bd7 1-0

Polgar lost and also goes to playoff stage 2. Ditto Gashimov.

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 10:08 PM
Polgar defeats former World Blitz Champion from terrible position with unsound sacrifice; objectively it shouldn't have even drawn but at short time limits you can get lucky.

Polgar,Judit (2701) - Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) [B87]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.5), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bc4 e6 7.0-0 b5 8.Bb3 Be7 9.Qf3 Qb6 10.Be3 Qb7 11.a3 0-0 12.Rae1 Bd7 13.g4 Nc6 14.g5 Ne5 15.Qg2 Nh5 16.f4 Nc4 17.Bxc4 bxc4 18.f5 g6 19.Nce2 e5 20.f6 Bd8 21.Nf5 gxf5 22.Nc3 Kh8 23.Qh3 Nf4 24.Bxf4 exf4 25.Rxf4 Rg8 26.Rh4 Rxg5+ 27.Kf1 Bxf6 28.Nd5 Qxb2 29.Rxh7+ Kg8 30.Qh6 Bd8 31.e5 Rg1+ 32.Kxg1 Qd4+ 33.Kf1 1-0

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 10:12 PM
Bruzon beats Pono in tiebreak 3:

Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2682) [A05]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.5), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 b6 3.Bg2 Bb7 4.0-0 e6 5.d3 d5 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.Re1 Bc5 8.h3 0-0 9.e4 dxe4 10.dxe4 e5 11.Nh4 g6 12.Nb3 Be7 13.Bh6 Re8 14.Qe2 Bf8 15.Bg5 h6 16.Bd2 a5 17.Rad1 Qe7 18.a3 Qe6 19.Bc1 a4 20.Nd2 Nc5 21.Kh2 Rad8 22.Qe3 Kh7 23.f3 Qc6 24.Qc3 Nh5 25.Bf1 Qf6 26.Ng2 Ne6 27.Nc4 Nd4 28.Rd3 c5 29.g4 Ng7 30.Nd2 b5 31.Rde3 c4 32.Kg3 Nge6 33.h4 Bc5 34.b4 Ba7 35.Qb2 Qg7 36.c3 f5 37.exf5 Nxf5+ 38.gxf5 gxf5+ 39.Kh2 f4 40.Qc2+ Kh8 41.Ne4 fxe3 42.Bxe3 Bxe3 43.Rxe3 Rg8 44.Qf2 Rdf8 45.Re1 Nf4 46.Nc5 Ba8 47.Ne3 Nd3 48.Nxd3 Rxf3 49.Qg2 Rh3+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 11:05 PM
Nielsen out after blundering against Gashimov, but Pono and Dominguez both levelled to make it to the 5/3 blitz. Pono was lucky as he won a marginally better ending:

Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2682) - Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) [B27]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.6), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 g6 2.e4 c5 3.d4 Bg7 4.dxc5 Qa5+ 5.c3 Qxc5 6.Na3 Nf6 7.Be3 Qa5 8.Nc4 Qc7 9.e5 Ng4 10.Bf4 b5 11.Ne3 Nxe3 12.fxe3 Qb6 13.Qd4 Qb7 14.Bd3 0-0 15.0-0 Nc6 16.Qc5 b4 17.Be4 bxc3 18.bxc3 Qb6 19.Qa3 Qa6 20.Qxa6 Bxa6 21.Rfd1 Rad8 22.Bxc6 dxc6 23.Rd4 Rxd4 24.cxd4 f6 25.Rc1 g5 26.Bg3 Rc8 27.exf6 exf6 28.Kf2 Bf8 29.Nd2 c5 30.Ne4 cxd4 31.Rxc8 dxe3+ 32.Kxe3 Bxc8 33.Nxf6+ Kf7 34.Ne4 Kg6 35.Bd6 Bg7 36.Bc5 a6 37.Bd4 Bh6 38.g3 g4+ 39.Kd3 Bf5 40.Be3 Bg7 41.Bd4 Bf8 42.Ke3 Bh6+ 43.Kd3 Kf7 44.Be3 Bg7 45.Bd4 Bf8 46.Bb6 Ke6 47.Kd4 Bg7+ 48.Ke3 Kd5 49.Nd2 Bh6+ 50.Ke2 Kc6 51.Be3 Bf8 52.Nb3 Bb1 53.a4 Kd5 54.Nd2 Bc2 55.a5 Kc6 56.Bb6 Kb5 57.Nf1 Be4 58.Ne3 h5 59.Bd8 Bb4 60.Bc7 Bxa5 61.Bxa5 Kxa5 62.Nc4+ Kb4 63.Nd6 Bg6 64.Kd2 a5 65.Kc1 a4 66.Kb2 a3+ 67.Ka2 Bc2 68.Ne8 Bb3+ 69.Ka1 Kc3 70.Nf6 Bf7 71.Nh7 Kd4 72.Ng5 Bg8 73.h3 Ke5 74.Kb1 Kf5 75.h4 Ke5 76.Ka1 Kd4 77.Kb1 Kd3 78.Ka1 Ke3 79.Kb1 Bd5 80.Ka1 Kf2 0-1

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 11:32 PM
Both matches drawn in the first blitz game but anything could have happened here:



Polgar,Judit (2701) - Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) [B23]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.7), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.f4 Nc6 4.Nf3 g6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.0-0 Bg7 7.d3 a6 8.Bxc6 Bxc6 9.Qe1 Qd7 10.a4 Nh6 11.a5 f5 12.Nd5 Bxd5 13.exd5 Nf7 14.Rb1 0-0 15.b4 Rfe8 16.bxc5 dxc5 17.Qe6 Qxe6 18.dxe6 Nd8 19.Re1 Rc8 20.Bb2 Bh6 21.Be5 Rc6 22.d4 cxd4 23.Nxd4 Rc4 24.Red1 Bg7 25.Nf3 Rc5 26.Rd7 Bxe5 27.fxe5 Nxe6 28.Rbxb7 Kf7 29.Nd2 Rxc2 30.Ra7 Rc6 31.h4 Nc5 32.Rdc7 Rxc7 33.Rxc7 Ne6 34.Ra7 Nc5 35.Rc7 Ne6 36.Ra7 Rd8 37.Nc4 Rd4 38.Nd6+ Kf8 39.Nc8 Nc5 40.Rc7 Nb3 41.e6 Nxa5 42.Rxe7 Nc6 43.Rf7+ Ke8 44.Rxh7 Kd8 45.e7+ Kd7 46.Rg7 Rd3 47.Nb6+ Ke8 48.Nc8 Kd7 49.Nb6+ Ke8 50.Rg8+ Kxe7 51.Rxg6 Ne5 52.Rh6 Rd1+ 53.Kf2 Ng4+ 54.Ke2 Nxh6 55.Kxd1 a5 56.Ke2 Ke6 57.Ke3 Kf6 58.Kf4 Kg6 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 11:50 PM
And after a match of incredible adventures Polgar is through:

Dominguez Perez,Leinier (2710) - Polgar,Judit (2701) [B33]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.8), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qb6 5.Nb3 Nf6 6.Nc3 e6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Qd2 Qc7 9.0-0-0 b5 10.f3 Be7 11.Kb1 0-0 12.g4 Ne5 13.Bf4 b4 14.Ne2 Rd8 15.Ned4 Bb7 16.Qe1 Rac8 17.h4 d5 18.exd5 Rxd5 19.h5 Nxf3 20.Qg3 e5 21.Bg2 exf4 22.Qxf3 Rxd4 23.Nxd4 Bxf3 24.Bxf3 Nd7 25.Rhe1 Bf6 26.Nc6 Ne5 27.Nxe5 Qxc2+ 28.Ka1 Bxe5 29.Rb1 f6 30.Be4 Qd2 31.Bf5 Bxb2+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 11:55 PM
Ponomariov also through to the 1/4 finals continuing his exceptional record in knockout events:

Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Bruzon Batista,Lazaro (2682) [E18]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (4.8), 08.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 b6 3.d4 Bb7 4.c4 e6 5.Bg2 Be7 6.Nc3 0-0 7.Bf4 Na6 8.0-0 d5 9.Ne5 c5 10.cxd5 exd5 11.Rc1 Re8 12.Qa4 cxd4 13.Qxd4 Bc5 14.Qa4 g5 15.Nxf7 Kxf7 16.Bxg5 Qd7 17.Qh4 Qf5 18.Bxf6 Qxf6 19.Qxh7+ Qg7 20.Qf5+ Qf6 21.Bxd5+ Bxd5 22.Qxf6+ Kxf6 23.Nxd5+ Kf7 24.e3 Rad8 25.Rfd1 Rd7 26.Nc3 Red8 27.Rxd7+ Rxd7 28.Ne4 Be7 29.Kf1 Nb4 30.a3 Nd3 31.Rc2 b5 32.Ke2 b4 33.axb4 Nxb4 34.Rc4 Rb7 35.h4 Nd5 36.Rc2 Nb4 37.Rd2 Nc6 38.f4 Na5 39.Rc2 Nb3 40.Kf3 Na1 41.Rc1 Nb3 42.Rc6 Na5 43.Rc2 Rb3 44.h5 Bd8 45.Nc5 Rb5 46.g4 Bf6 47.Nd3 Rb3 48.Ke2 Rb5 49.b4 Nb7 50.g5 Bd8 51.h6 Nd6 52.Rc6 Nf5 53.Ne5+ Kg8 54.Rc8 1-0

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2011, 11:59 PM
Quarter-Finals

Polgar - Svidler
Ponomariov - Gashimov
Ivanchuk - Radjabov
Navara - Grischuk

Pretty good that this lot are all 2700+ players so at least whoever qualifies for the three World Champs places will have some credibility.

Jesper Norgaard
09-09-2011, 05:44 AM
Grischuk advances - Potkin blunders in drawn pawn ending.

Without being able to make a thorough analysis, my impression is that this pawn ending is just dead lost, at least after pushing b4,axb4,axb4, especially after moving h2-pawn. But Crafty doesn't smell the coffee early. I think improvements should be sought before any rook was exchanged. After Rd1+ i think white is lost.

Jesper Norgaard
09-09-2011, 01:02 PM
My analysis shows the pawn ending to be lost, in fact you could say that 35.Ne3 is a decisive mistake, and it is peculiar that Houdini sees this as an advantage of -0.21 when in fact it should be around -1 to -2 already. I thought it might be an improvement to play 35.Ke1 but after 35...Rd3 white is almost in zugzwang. The bishop is much stronger than the knight here, and the pawn e4 is simply a giant in all endings.

A sample game with Houdini after 35...Bxe3 is 36.Rxe3 Rd1+ 37.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 38.Re1 Rxe1+ 39.Kxe1 Ke6 40.Ke2 Kd5 41.a3 Kd4 42.Kd2 h6
(my first attempt 42...h5? 43.h3 e3+ 44.Ke2 Kc3 45.b4 axb4 46.axb4 Kxb4 47.Kxe3 Kc4 (hoping for 47.h4 Kc3) 48.Kd2 h4 (48...Kd4 49.h4!=) 49.Ke3 hxg3 50.Kf3 Kd4 51.Kxg3 Ke3 52.Kh4! Kxf4 stalemate Houdini really *did* escape)
43.h3 h5 44.h4 e3+ 45.Kc2 Ke4 46.Kd1 Kf3 47.Ke1 Kxg3 48.b4 axb4 49.axb4 Kxf4 50.Ke2 Ke4 51.b5 Kd5 52.Kxe3 Kc5 53.Kd2 Kxb5 and Houdini was checkmated on move 73 ...

The silicon beasts still have some problems evaluating some types of endgames.

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 01:09 PM
I'll have a closer look at this. The claim is 48.b5 draws and I can't (yet) see why it shouldn't.

In your sample game line white plays Ke2 then Kd2. This prevents white from reaching c3 and allows black's king to reach d4. The game continuation with Kd2 and Kc3 right away seems to reduce black's resources - I can't see any value in white wasting a move.

Jesper Norgaard
09-09-2011, 02:22 PM
I'll have a closer look at this. The claim is 48.b5 draws and I can't (yet) see why it shouldn't.

In your sample game line white plays Ke2 then Kd2. This prevents white from reaching c3 and allows black's king to reach d4. The game continuation with Kd2 and Kc3 right away seems to reduce black's resources - I can't see any value in white wasting a move.

Which is in fact true, 48.b5 is a draw! After 48...Ka5 49.Kc5 e3 50.b6 e2 51.b7 e1=Q 52.b8=Q Qc3+ 53.Kd5 Qxg3 54.Kc4! intending Qb5+ mate it is just a perpetual check after 54...Ka6.

8/8/2k3p1/5p1p/1PK1pP1P/6P1/8/8 b - - 0 47

That however only proves that 47...Kb6?? was a decisive error allowing the draw! After 47...Kc7 48.Kd4 Kb6 49.Kc4 Kc6 there is no draw in sight since 50.Kd4 Kb5 51.Kc3 Ka4 52.Kc4 e3 53.Kc3 Kb5! is one tempo slower than the above variation (well looking at the race with 53.b5 I mean).

Pawn endgames are indeed tricky!

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 05:50 PM
That however only proves that 47...Kb6?? was a decisive error allowing the draw!

I am getting this too now - wins all the way back to the start except for the apparent double-blunder 47...Kb6??= 48.Kb3??-+

If instead of 42.a3 white tries 42.Kc2 it appears that 42...a4! wins.

This key position keeps coming up:

8/8/6p1/5p1p/5P1P/2k1K1P1/8/8 w - - 0 57

where white to move loses.

#84 edited to reflect re-evaluation.

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 07:48 PM
Quarter-finals and Pono wimps out without even permanently leaving theory:

Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Gashimov,Vugar (2756) [E16]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.1), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 b6 4.g3 Bb7 5.Bg2 c5 6.d5 exd5 7.Nh4 g6 8.Nc3 Bg7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Bg5 Qe8 11.Bf4 Qd8 12.Bg5 Qe8 13.Bf4 Qd8 14.Bg5 ˝-˝

Hope Gashimov is not so accommodating tomorrow. :lol:

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 08:19 PM
Quick draw for Polgar playing the "Grivas Sicilian"

Svidler,Peter (2740) - Polgar,Judit (2701) [B32]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.1), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qb6 5.Nb3 Nf6 6.Bd3 e6 7.0-0 Be7 8.c4 d5 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Nc3 Be6 11.exd5 Nxd5 12.Nxd5 Bxd5 13.Be3 Qb4 14.Qc2 Bxg2 15.Kxg2 Qg4+ 16.Kh1 Qf3+ 17.Kg1 Qg4+ ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 10:07 PM
Another draw:

Grischuk,Alexander (2757) - Navara,David (2705) [E15]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.1), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Nc3 0-0 8.Rc1 Ba3 9.Rc2 Nc6 10.Bc1 Bxc1 11.Rxc1 d5 12.cxd5 Nxd5 13.Bg2 Nxc3 14.Rxc3 Nb4 15.a3 Nd5 16.Rc2 Qe7 17.Qa1 Rac8 18.0-0 c5 19.Rfc1 Rc7 20.dxc5 Rxc5 21.Rxc5 bxc5 22.Nd2 Rc8 23.Bf3 h6 24.h4 Nb6 25.Qe5 c4 26.bxc4 Qxa3 27.Ra1 Qb4 28.Qa5 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2011, 10:37 PM
Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Radjabov,Teimour (2752) [B70]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.1), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.g3 Nc6 7.Nde2 Bg7 8.Bg2 Bd7 9.h3 h5 10.a4 Qc8 11.Be3 Be6 12.Nd5 0-0 13.Rc1 Re8 14.b3 Rb8 15.c4 b6 16.Nef4 Bd7 17.0-0 Nh7 18.Kh2 h4 19.g4 Qd8 20.Ne2 e5 21.Qd2 Be6 22.f4 exf4 23.Nexf4 Rb7 24.Rf2 Rd7 25.Rcf1 Ne5 26.Kh1 Nc6 27.Ne2 g5 28.Nf6+ Nxf6 29.Bxg5 Nxg4 30.Bxd8 Nxf2+ 31.Rxf2 Rdxd8 32.Qg5 Bc8 33.Nf4 Re5 34.Qxh4 Rde8 35.Nh5 R8e6 36.Qf4 f6 37.Bf3 Rg5 38.Bg4 Rxh5 39.Bxh5 Ne5 40.Rg2 Kf8 41.Bg4 1-0

Impressive win by Chucky; 20...e5 doesn't look right but is black already struggling?

Max Illingworth
09-09-2011, 11:09 PM
If Black plays 20...e6 21.Ndc3 Qe7 followed by ...a6 and preparing ...b5 then Black's position is only slightly worse. Comparing to the Hedgehog, Black's h7-knight is misplaced.

Kevin Bonham
10-09-2011, 10:49 PM
Ivanchuk - winning sublimely one day and walloped the next. Playoffs for these two.

Radjabov,Teimour (2752) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) [A37]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 c5 2.g3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.Nc3 e6 6.d3 Nge7 7.h4 h6 8.Bd2 b6 9.h5 g5 10.Nxg5 hxg5 11.Bxg5 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Bb7 13.Qd2 Qc7 14.Bf6 0-0-0 15.0-0-0 Rhg8 16.Bxc6 dxc6 17.h6 Rg6 18.h7 Rxf6 19.h8Q Rxh8 20.Rxh8+ Kd7 21.d4 Qd6 22.Qg5 Rf5 23.Qh4 cxd4 24.Rxd4 Rd5 25.cxd5 Qa3+ 26.Kb1 cxd5 27.Rh7 Qxc3 28.Rxf7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
10-09-2011, 11:19 PM
Svidler eliminates Polgar.

Polgar,Judit (2701) - Svidler,Peter (2740) [B82]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 e6 7.f4 b5 8.Qf3 Bb7 9.Bd3 Nbd7 10.0-0 Rc8 11.f5 e5 12.Nde2 Nc5 13.Rad1 b4 14.Nd5 Bxd5 15.Bxc5 Rxc5 16.exd5 Rxd5 17.Ng3 Rc5 18.Ne4 Nxe4 19.Bxe4 Be7 20.Bc6+ Kf8 21.Bd5 Bf6 22.Bb3 Qb6 23.Kh1 Ke7 24.Rd5 Qc6 25.Rfd1 Rxd5 26.Rxd5 Rc8 27.Qh5 h6 28.Ra5 Rf8 29.Qe2 Ra8 30.h3 Ra7 31.Qe3 Rc7 32.Rd5 Bg5 33.Qf3 Qb6 34.Rd1 Qc6 35.Qh5 Kf8 36.Rd5 e4 37.Qe2 e3 38.Rd4 a5 39.h4 Bf6 40.Rc4 Qa6 41.Qg4 Re7 42.Re4 Qf1+ 43.Kh2 Be5+ 44.g3 Qf2+ 45.Kh3 Bxg3 0-1

Max Illingworth
10-09-2011, 11:33 PM
Ivanchuk - winning sublimely one day and walloped the next. Playoffs for these two.

Radjabov,Teimour (2752) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) [A37]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.Nf3 c5 2.g3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.Nc3 e6 6.d3 Nge7 7.h4 h6 8.Bd2 b6 9.h5 g5 10.Nxg5 hxg5 11.Bxg5 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Bb7 13.Qd2 Qc7 14.Bf6 0-0-0 15.0-0-0 Rhg8 16.Bxc6 dxc6 17.h6 Rg6 18.h7 Rxf6 19.h8=Q Rxh8 20.Rxh8+ Kd7 21.d4 Qd6 22.Qg5 Rf5 23.Qh4 cxd4 24.Rxd4 Rd5 25.cxd5 Qa3+ 26.Kb1 cxd5 27.Rh7 Qxc3 28.Rxf7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
10-09-2011, 11:43 PM
Playoffs for these two as well - how did Navara only draw this?



Navara,David (2705) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [D37]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.d4 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.Rc1 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.e3 Nc6 9.a3 a6 10.cxd5 exd5 11.Be2 d4 12.Na4 Ba7 13.exd4 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 Qxd4 15.Qxd4 Bxd4 16.0-0 Bd7 17.b3 Bb5 18.Rfd1 Bxe2 19.Rxd4 Bb5 20.Nc3 Bc6 21.Bg5 Rfe8 22.Bxf6 gxf6 23.f3 Re5 24.Kf2 Rae8 25.b4 Kg7 26.Rc2 a5 27.Rcd2 Rc8 28.Rd8 Rxd8 29.Rxd8 axb4 30.axb4 f5 31.Ne2 Rb5 32.Rd4 Kf6 33.Nc3 Re5 34.Rh4 Kg7 35.Kg3 Re1 36.Rd4 Rc1 37.Nd1 Kf6 38.Kf4 Ke7 39.Kxf5 Bd7+ 40.Kf4 Be6 41.g4 h6 42.h4 Rb1 43.Nc3 Rb2 44.h5 Rc2 45.Ne4 Rc6 46.b5 Rc2 47.Rd6 Rb2 48.Rb6 Bd5 49.Ke5 Bc6 50.g5 Rxb5+ 51.Rxb5 Bxb5 52.g6 fxg6 53.hxg6 Bd3 54.Nc5 ˝-˝

Max Illingworth
11-09-2011, 12:44 AM
Playoffs for these two as well - how did Navara only draw this?



Navara,David (2705) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [D37]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.d4 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0-0 6.Rc1 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.e3 Nc6 9.a3 a6 10.cxd5 exd5 11.Be2 d4 12.Na4 Ba7 13.exd4 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 Qxd4 15.Qxd4 Bxd4 16.0-0 Bd7 17.b3 Bb5 18.Rfd1 Bxe2 19.Rxd4 Bb5 20.Nc3 Bc6 21.Bg5 Rfe8 22.Bxf6 gxf6 23.f3 Re5 24.Kf2 Rae8 25.b4 Kg7 26.Rc2 a5 27.Rcd2 Rc8 28.Rd8 Rxd8 29.Rxd8 axb4 30.axb4 f5 31.Ne2 Rb5 32.Rd4 Kf6 33.Nc3 Re5 34.Rh4 Kg7 35.Kg3 Re1 36.Rd4 Rc1 37.Nd1 Kf6 38.Kf4 Ke7 39.Kxf5 Bd7+ 40.Kf4 Be6 41.g4 h6 42.h4 Rb1 43.Nc3 Rb2 44.h5 Rc2 45.Ne4 Rc6 46.b5 Rc2 47.Rd6 Rb2 48.Rb6 Bd5 49.Ke5 Bc6 50.g5 Rxb5+ 51.Rxb5 Bxb5 52.g6 fxg6 53.hxg6 Bd3 54.Nc5 ˝-˝

Absolutely miraculous that Grischuk drew this. Amazingly 49.Ke5 is the decisive mistake, since 52.f4 or 52.Nd6 both lead to Black fortresses, which I stated in the shoutbox.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2011, 01:12 AM
Knockout king Ponomariov strikes again; he's into the semis defeating Gashimov in a very tricky endgame.

Gashimov,Vugar (2756) - Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) [C67]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.2), 09.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Rd1+ Ke8 10.Nc3 Ne7 11.Nd4 Bd7 12.Ne4 Ng6 13.f4 Be7 14.Re1 c5 15.Nf3 Be6 16.Nfg5 Bxg5 17.Nxg5 Bf5 18.Ne4 b6 19.Ng3 Ne7 20.Nxf5 Nxf5 21.c3 h5 22.Kf2 Rd8 23.Be3 Ke7 24.Rad1 f6 25.exf6+ Kxf6 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.Bc1 a5 28.a4 c4 29.g3 Rd3 30.Ke2 Ke6 31.Bd2 Rd5 32.Rf1 g6 33.Rf3 Kf7 34.Rf1 Rd8 35.Bc1 Ke6 36.Re1 Rd3 37.Bd2 Rd8 38.Kd1+ Kf7 39.Re5 Nh6 40.Kc2 Ng4 41.Re2 Nf6 42.Be1 Rd6 43.h3 Rd3 44.b3 Rf3 45.bxc4 h4 46.gxh4 Rxf4 47.c5 Rxa4 48.cxb6 cxb6 49.Re5 Re4 50.Rxe4 Nxe4 51.c4 Ke6 52.Kb3 Kd6 53.Kc2 Ke5 54.Kd3 Kf4 55.Kd4 Kf3 56.Kd3 Nc5+ 57.Kd4 a4 58.Bb4 Ke2 59.Kc3 Ke3 60.Ba3 Ne4+ 61.Kb4 Kd3 62.Kb5 Kc3 63.Be7 Kb3 64.Kxb6 Kxc4 65.Kc6 Ng3 66.Kd7 Kd5 67.Ke8 Ke6 68.Ba3 Nf5 69.Kf8 Nxh4 70.Kg7 Kf5 71.Kh6 Nf3 72.Be7 Ke6 73.Ba3 Kf6 74.Bc5 Nh4 75.Bd4+ Kf5 76.Bc5 g5 77.Be7 Nf3 78.Kh5 Ng1 79.Bxg5 a3 80.Bc1 a2 81.Bb2 Nxh3 82.Kh4 Nf4 83.Kg3 Ke4 84.Ba1 Nd3 85.Kg2 Ke3 86.Kg3 Nc5 87.Kg2 Ke2 88.Kg3 Na4 89.Kg2 Nb6 90.Kg3 Nc4 91.Kg2 Ne3+ 92.Kg3 Nd1 93.Kg2 Ke3 94.Kg3 Kd2 95.Kf3 Kd3 96.Kf4 Kc2 97.Ke4 Nb2 98.Ke3 Na4 99.Ke2 Kc1 100.Kd3 Kb1 101.Kd2 Nb2 102.Kc3 Kxa1 103.Kc2 Nd3 0-1

Jesper Norgaard
11-09-2011, 01:29 AM
Playoffs for these two as well - how did Navara only draw this?

The most obvious response is that playing 49.Ke5 he overlooked that 49...Bc6 was possible, otherwise he would have found the very human winning line 49.Nc3! where 49...Bc6 doesn't work because of 50.bxc6! Rxb6 51.Nd5+ Kd6 52.Nxb6 - and both 49...Rd2 50.Nxd5+ Rxd5 51.Rxb7+ as well as 49...Bxf3 50.Kxf3 Rb3 51.Rxb7+ Kd8 52.Rxf7 Rxc3+ 53.Kf4 Rb3 54.Rf6! are a walk in the park. Grishuk was very lucky this time to draw both games, now Navara will have to prove his quickplay qualities.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2011, 02:02 AM
In Gashimov-Ponomariov 67.Ke8 seems to have made white's defensive task much harder. 67.Ba3 seems OK although it is a very tricky ending to analyse.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2011, 07:55 PM
After the letoff yesterday Grischuk wins rapid one easily:

Navara,David (2722) - Grischuk,Alexander (2746) [B12]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.3), 11.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Nd2 e6 5.Nb3 Nd7 6.Nf3 a6 7.Be3 Rc8 8.c3 c5 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Nxc5 Nxc5 11.Be2 Ne7 12.Nh4 h6 13.Nxf5 Nxf5 14.Bxc5 Rxc5 15.Bd3 d4 16.Qa4+ b5 17.Qxa6 Rxe5+ 18.Kf1 0-0 19.Bxb5 dxc3 20.bxc3 Qd2 21.Be2 Qxc3 22.Re1 Rd8 23.h4 Ng3+ 24.fxg3 Rf5+ 25.Kg1 Qxe1+ 26.Kh2 Qa5 27.Qc4 Qc5 28.Qb3 Rf2 29.Bf3 Qc2 30.Qb6 Rf8 31.Be4 Qxa2 32.Rd1 Rd2 33.Rf1 Qb2 34.Qc5 Rdd8 35.Qe7 Qd4 36.Bb1 Qd6 37.Qb7 Rb8 38.Qe4 f5 39.Qe3 Rb4 40.Kh3 Kh8 41.Ba2 Re4 42.Qf3 Qe5 43.Qa3 Rb8 0-1

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2011, 09:43 PM
Grischuk,Alexander (2746) - Navara,David (2722) [E11]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.4), 11.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 Bb4+ 4.Bd2 a5 5.g3 d6 6.Bg2 Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.e3 c6 9.Nh4 Nb6 10.a3 Bxd2 11.Nxd2 0-0 12.b4 exd4 13.exd4 d5 14.c5 Nc4 15.Qc2 Be6 16.Nhf3 Re8 17.Rfe1 h6 18.h3 Qc8 19.Nxc4 dxc4 20.Ne5 axb4 21.axb4 Rxa1 22.Rxa1 Bxh3 23.Qxc4 Be6 24.Qd3 Bd5 25.b5 Qd8 26.bxc6 Bxg2 27.Kxg2 Qd5+ 28.Qf3 Qxd4 29.Re1 bxc6 30.Nxc6 Qxc5 31.Rxe8+ Nxe8 32.Nd8 Qe7 33.Nc6 Qd6 34.Na5 Nf6 35.Nc4 Qd4 36.Ne3 g6 37.Nc2 Qe5 38.Ne3 h5 39.Nc4 Qd4 40.Ne3 Kg7 41.Nc2 Qe5 42.Ne3 Ne4 43.Nc4 Qd4 44.Ne3 Qe5 45.Nc4 Qe6 46.Ne3 Kh7 47.Kg1 Ng5 48.Qd5 Qf6 49.Kg2 Ne6 50.Qf3 Kg7 51.Qxf6+ Kxf6 52.f4 Nd4 53.Kf2 Nf5 54.Nd5+ Ke6 55.Nc3 Kd6 56.Kf3 Kc5 57.Ne4+ Kd5 58.Ng5 Nd4+ 59.Ke3 Nf5+ 60.Kf3 Nd6 61.f5 gxf5 62.Nh3 Ke5 63.Nf4 Nb5 64.Nxh5 Nd4+ 65.Ke3 Ne6 66.Kf3 f6 67.Ke3 Ng5 68.Nf4 Ne4 69.Nd3+ Ke6 ˝-˝

Grischuk through, Navara out.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2011, 09:44 PM
Ivanchuk wins, Radjabov out:



Ivanchuk,Vassily (2768) - Radjabov,Teimour (2744) [D78]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (5.4), 11.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.g3 g6 2.Bg2 Bg7 3.d4 d5 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.0-0 0-0 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 Qb6 8.Nc3 Rd8 9.Rd1 Bf5 10.Ne1 Na6 11.Qxb6 axb6 12.cxd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 cxd5 14.a3 Rac8 15.Bg5 Kf8 16.Rac1 Rxc1 17.Bxc1 Nc7 18.e3 Bd7 19.Bd2 e6 20.Nd3 Bb5 21.Rc1 Na6 22.Bf1 Ke8 23.b3 Bd7 24.Ne5 Bxe5 25.dxe5 Nc5 26.Rb1 Rc8 27.f3 Na6 28.Rb2 Nc5 29.a4 Na6 30.Kf2 Ke7 31.e4 dxe4 32.Bg5+ Ke8 33.fxe4 Nc5 34.Ke3 Bc6 35.Bg2 Rc7 36.b4 Nxa4 37.Rc2 b5 38.Bf1 Nb6 39.Bxb5 Rc8 40.Bd3 Bd7 41.Ra2 Na4 42.Kd4 b5 43.g4 Rc7 44.h4 Kf8 45.h5 Be8 46.Rh2 Rd7+ 47.Ke3 Rc7 48.Bd8 Rd7 49.Ba5 Rb7 50.Kf4 Kg7 51.Rc2 Bd7 52.Bd8 Nb6 53.hxg6 fxg6 54.Bxb6 1-0

Max Illingworth
11-09-2011, 10:25 PM
Semi-final matches:

Svidler-Ponomariov
Ivanchuk-Grischuk

Russia vs. Ukraine :lol:

Garvinator
12-09-2011, 10:29 PM
What was that about short draws?

Garvinator
13-09-2011, 10:54 AM
Interesting that this year the semi finalists are almost the same as 2001.

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2011, 07:53 PM
Interesting that this year the semi finalists are almost the same as 2001.

Yes; if Carlsen doesn't want his spot on rating then it could be a rather mature-age Candidates' lineup.

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2011, 11:08 PM
Ivanchuk - Grischuk drawn and off to playoffs:

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Bg5 Bb4+ 5.Nc3 dxc4 6.e4 c5 7.e5 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Qa5 9.exf6 Bxc3+ 10.bxc3 Qxg5 11.fxg7 Qxg7 12.Qd2 0-0 13.Bxc4 Rd8 14.Qe3 Bd7 15.0-0 Nc6 16.Nf3 Ne7 17.Ne5 Ng6 18.f4 Rac8 19.Be2 Bc6 20.Bf3 Bd5 21.Kh1 b6 22.a4 h6 23.Rae1 Nxe5 24.fxe5 Qg5 25.Qf2 Bc4 26.h4 Qg7 27.Re4 Bxf1 28.Rg4 Bd3 29.Rxg7+ Kxg7 30.Bb7 Bf5 31.Bxc8 Rxc8 32.Qd4 h5 33.Kh2 Rc5 34.c4 Ra5 35.Qd7 Rc5 36.Qd4 Ra5 37.Qd8 Bg4 38.Kg3 Rxa4 39.Qc7 a5 40.Qxb6 Rxc4 41.Qxa5 Bf5 42.Qd8 Rg4+ 43.Kf2 ˝-˝

Impressive game by Svidler who qualifies for the final and is now a World Championship Candidate. Pono will play off for Candidate status against the loser of the chuk-chuk playoff.

Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Svidler,Peter (2740) [D85]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (6.2), 12.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Qa4+ Bd7 8.Qa3 Nc6 9.Nf3 e5 10.Be3 exd4 11.cxd4 Qe7 12.Qxe7+ Nxe7 13.Rb1 0-0-0 14.Bc4 f5 15.Ng5 fxe4 16.Nf7 Nf5 17.0-0 Nxd4 18.Bxd4 Bxd4 19.Nxh8 Rxh8 20.Bd5 b5 21.Bxe4 c5 22.g3 a5 23.Kg2 b4 24.Bd5 Kc7 25.Bc4 Kd6 26.Rfe1 a4 27.f3 Rb8 28.Re2 Bf5 29.Rd1 b3 30.axb3 axb3 31.g4 Bd7 32.Re3 b2 33.Rb3 Rxb3 34.Bxb3 Bb5 35.Ba2 Kc6 36.Rd2 Kb6 37.f4 Bc6+ 38.Kg3 Be4 39.Rd1 Kb5 40.Re1 Bd3 41.Re7 c4 42.Rd7 c3 43.Rd5+ Bc5 0-1

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2011, 08:23 PM
Grischuk wins rapid 1 - surprisingly as ending looked drawish.

Grischuk,Alexander (2757) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) [C02]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (6.3), 14.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 6.Be2 Nge7 7.0-0 Nf5 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.Bd3 Nfe7 10.Nbd2 Ng6 11.Nb3 Bb6 12.Re1 Qb8 13.Qe2 Bc7 14.Bxg6 hxg6 15.h4 Rh5 16.Bg5 Nxe5 17.Nxe5 Bxe5 18.Qxe5 Qxe5 19.Rxe5 f6 20.Re3 fxg5 21.hxg5 Rxg5 22.Nc5 0-0-0 23.Nxe6 Bxe6 24.Rxe6 d4 25.cxd4 Rxd4 26.Rae1 Rd7 27.g3 a6 28.R1e2 Rf7 29.Rc2+ Kd7 30.Rb6 Kd8 31.Kg2 Ra5 32.a3 g5 33.Rd6+ Ke7 34.Rc7+ Kxd6 35.Rxf7 Rb5 36.b4 a5 37.bxa5 Ke6 38.Rxg7 Rxa5 39.Kh3 Kf6 40.Rxb7 Rxa3 41.Kg4 Ra4+ 42.Kh5 g4 43.Rb6+ Kf5 44.Rb8 1-0

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2011, 09:26 PM
Ivanchuk retaliates:

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [A30]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (6.4), 14.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e6 5.g3 Qb6 6.Nc2 Ne5 7.b3 Qc6 8.f3 Nf6 9.Bb2 Qc7 10.Nc3 a6 11.f4 Ng6 12.e4 d6 13.Qf3 b6 14.0-0-0 Bb7 15.Kb1 Be7 16.g4 e5 17.g5 Nd7 18.f5 Nf4 19.Rg1 g6 20.Ne3 Nc5 21.h4 Bc6 22.Rg4 Qb7 23.Rxf4 exf4 24.Ned5 0-0-0 25.b4 Na4 26.Nxa4 Bxa4 27.Rc1 Kb8 28.b5 gxf5 29.Qa3 fxe4 30.bxa6 Qxa6 31.Nxe7 Qa7 32.Bxh8 Rxh8 33.Qxd6+ Qc7 34.Qf6 Rd8 35.Nd5 Qd6 36.Qxf4 Qxf4 37.Nxf4 Rd2 38.Be2 Rd4 39.Nd5 Kb7 40.Rf1 Rd2 41.Rxf7+ Ka6 42.a3 1-0

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2011, 09:59 PM
Then blunders:

Grischuk,Alexander (2757) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) [C02]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (6.5), 14.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 6.Be2 Nge7 7.0-0 Ng6 8.g3 Be7 9.h4 0-0 10.h5 Nh8 11.dxc5 Bxc5 12.b4 Be7 13.b5 Na5 14.h6 f5 15.hxg7 Kxg7 16.Kg2 Ng6 17.Rh1 Rf7 18.Bh6+ Kh8 19.Nbd2 Qc7 20.Rc1 Rg8 21.c4 d4 22.Bd3 b6 23.Nxd4 Qxe5 24.N2f3 Qc7 25.Ng5 Bxg5 26.Bxg5 e5 27.Qh5 Bc8 28.c5 exd4 29.cxb6 Bb7+ 30.Kg1 Qe5 31.Rc7 Rxc7 32.bxc7 Rg7 33.Rh2 Rxc7 34.Qxg6 Rc1+ 35.Bxc1 1-0

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2011, 10:40 PM
Grischuk is through:

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [A13]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (6.6), 14.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 d5 4.Bg2 dxc4 5.Qa4+ c6 6.Qxc4 b5 7.Qc2 Bb7 8.0-0 Nbd7 9.a4 a6 10.Nc3 Rc8 11.d3 Be7 12.e4 0-0 13.Be3 Ng4 14.Bf4 Ngf6 15.Rfd1 Qb6 16.a5 Qa7 17.e5 Nd5 18.Nxd5 cxd5 19.Qe2 d4 20.h4 Qa8 21.Ne1 Bxg2 22.Nxg2 Qd5 23.Re1 h6 24.Qg4 Kh7 25.Re2 Rc6 26.Ne1 Rfc8 27.Nf3 f5 28.Qh5 Kg8 29.Nh2 Nc5 30.Rd1 Nxd3 31.Bxh6 gxh6 32.Qg6+ Kf8 33.Qxh6+ Ke8 34.Red2 Nxe5 35.Rxd4 Nf7 36.Qh7 Qe5 37.Nf3 Qh8 38.Qg6 Qh6 39.Qg8+ Qf8 40.Qh7 Qh6 41.Qg8+ Qf8 42.Qh7 Qh6 43.Qg8+ Qf8 ˝-˝

Garvinator
16-09-2011, 06:36 PM
On the main website, clocks for both games are currently showing the rapid time control ;)

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2011, 10:26 PM
One up for Svidler as Grischuk gets an interesting attack and then completely self-destructs, apparently in his habitual time trouble.

Grischuk,Alexander (2757) - Svidler,Peter (2740) [B43]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.1), 14.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Nc3 b5 6.Bd3 Qb6 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.0-0 Qb8 9.Re1 Bd6 10.e5 Bc7 11.Bf4 Nge7 12.Qe2 Ng6 13.Bg3 Bb7 14.Rad1 Nce7 15.Be4 Bxe4 16.Nxe4 0-0 17.Rxd7 Nd5 18.Nd6 Nb6 19.Rxf7 Rxf7 20.Nxf7 Kxf7 21.Ng5+ Kg8 22.Nxe6 Qc8 23.Qg4 Ra7 24.Rd1 Na4 25.h3 Nxb2 26.Rd5 Bb6 27.Rd6 Nc4 28.Qf5 Rf7 29.Qe4 Nxd6 30.exd6 Nf8 0-1

Kevin Bonham
17-09-2011, 11:05 PM
Svidler - Grischuk was a short draw while Ivanchuk goes one up in the playoff for the third Candidates spot. He got a slightly better position which became stronger as Pono got short of time.

Ponomariov,Ruslan (2764) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2768) [D39]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.2), 14.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.e4 Bb4 6.Bg5 c5 7.Bxc4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 Qa5 10.Bb5+ Nbd7 11.Bxf6 Qxc3+ 12.Kf1 gxf6 13.Nxe6 Qe5 14.Nd4 0-0 15.Qd3 Nc5 16.Qg3+ Kh8 17.Qxe5 fxe5 18.Nf3 a6 19.Bc4 Nxe4 20.Nxe5 f6 21.Nf3 Bf5 22.h3 b5 23.Bb3 Nc3 24.Nd4 Bd3+ 25.Kg1 a5 26.Kh2 a4 27.Bd1 Bc4 28.a3 Rad8 29.Nc6 Rd2 30.Bf3 Rxf2 31.Rhc1 Na2 32.Re1 Rc8 33.Re7 Nc3 34.Nb4 f5 35.Rae1 Rg8 36.R7e5 Be2 37.Rxf5 Bxf3 38.Rxf3 Rgxg2+ 39.Kh1 Rh2+ 40.Kg1 Ne2+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
18-09-2011, 10:14 PM
Grischuk's time usage was shocking tonight (clearly not well prepared for this line) but the game was drawn:

Grischuk,Alexander (2746) - Svidler,Peter (2739) [C64]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.3), 18.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.e5 Ne4 7.0-0 d5 8.exd6 Nxd6 9.Re1+ Be6 10.Bg5 Qc8 11.Bxc6+ bxc6 12.Nxd4 Bxd4 13.Qxd4 0-0 14.Nd2 Qa6 15.b3 Qb6 16.Be3 Qxd4 17.Bxd4 Rfd8 18.Nf3 Bd5 19.Ne5 Nb5 20.Rad1 f6 21.Nd3 Bf7 22.Nc5 Rd5 23.Rc1 Nxd4 24.cxd4 Rxd4 25.h3 Rd2 26.Re7 Rxa2 27.Rxc7 Re8 28.Nb7 h5 29.Rxf7 Kxf7 ˝-˝

Grischuk must win with black tomorrow or Svidler wins the match.

Kevin Bonham
19-09-2011, 12:01 AM
Ivanchuk survives a pawn down. If he can hold with black tomorrow he will be into the Candidates Matches:



Ivanchuk,Vassily (2768) - Ponomariov,Ruslan (2764) [D98]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.3), 18.09.2011
[Robot 3]

1.c4 Nf6 2.d4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Qb3 dxc4 6.Qxc4 0-0 7.e4 Bg4 8.Be3 Nfd7 9.Rd1 Nc6 10.Be2 Nb6 11.Qc5 Qd6 12.e5 Qxc5 13.dxc5 Nc8 14.Bf4 Bxf3 15.Bxf3 Nxe5 16.Bxe5 Bxe5 17.0-0 c6 18.Rfe1 Bg7 19.Rd7 Rb8 20.Ne4 Bxb2 21.g3 b6 22.Rc7 Rd8 23.Rxc6 bxc5 24.Nxc5 Bd4 25.Rd1 Nb6 26.Na6 Rbc8 27.Nb4 Bf6 28.Rxd8+ Rxd8 29.Rc7 Rd7 30.Rxd7 Nxd7 31.Nc6 a6 32.a4 Nc5 33.a5 Kf8 34.Be2 Bc3 35.Nb8 Bxa5 36.Nxa6 Nb3 37.Bd1 Nd4 38.Nc5 Bb4 39.Nd3 Bd6 40.f4 h6 41.Kf2 g5 42.Ke3 Nf5+ 43.Kf3 e6 44.Nf2 Ba3 45.Nd3 Ke7 46.Kf2 Bd6 47.Bh5 Bc7 48.Kg2 Ne3+ 49.Kf2 Nd5 50.fxg5 hxg5 51.Bf3 Bb6+ 52.Ke2 Nc3+ 53.Kd2 Nb5 54.g4 Kd6 55.h3 Bd4 56.Ke2 Bg1 57.Kf1 Nd4 58.Be4 Be3 59.Kg2 Bd2 60.Ba8 Be3 61.Kg3 Nb5 62.Bb7 Kc7 63.Bg2 Nd6 64.h4 gxh4+ 65.Kxh4 Kd7 66.g5 Ke7 67.Kg4 Bd2 68.Bc6 Kf8 69.Nc5 Bb4 70.Ne4 Nf5 71.Kh5 Ba3 72.Ba4 Bc1 73.Bc2 Kg7 74.Bd3 Nd4 75.Bb1 Nf3 76.Bc2 Be3 77.Bd3 Kf8 78.Bc2 Ke7 79.g6 f5 80.Nd6 Bd4 81.Nxf5+ exf5 82.Bxf5 Bg7 ˝-˝

Kevin Bonham
19-09-2011, 10:30 PM
Peter Svidler is the World Cup winner

Svidler,Peter (2740) - Grischuk,Alexander (2757) [B51]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.4), 19.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nd7 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 a6 6.Be2 Ngf6 7.0-0 Qc7 8.c4 e6 9.b3 b6 10.Nc3 Bb7 11.Rd1 Be7 12.h3 Rd8 13.Qe3 0-0 14.Ba3 Rfe8 15.Rac1 h6 16.b4 Rc8 17.Bb2 Qb8 18.Bd3 Nh7 19.Ne2 Ba8 20.e5 Ng5 21.Nxg5 Bxg5 22.f4 Be7 23.Be4 Bxe4 24.Qxe4 Red8 25.Nd4 Bf8 26.Nxe6 fxe6 27.exd6 Re8 28.Rc3 Qa8 29.Qxa8 Rxa8 30.c5 bxc5 31.bxc5 Reb8 32.Ba3 Rd8 33.c6 Rac8 34.Bb2 Nb8 35.c7 Rxd6 36.Rxd6 Bxd6 37.cxb8=Q Rxb8 38.Bc1 Rb4 ˝-˝

Note that there were stronger options compared to Bb2 if Svidler wanted to win this game.

Kevin Bonham
19-09-2011, 11:48 PM
Ponomariov,Ruslan (2758) - Ivanchuk,Vassily (2765) [E15]
FIDE World Chess Cup 2011 Khanty-Mansiysk/Russia (7.4), 19.09.2011
[Robot 4]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.Qb3 d5 6.cxd5 Qxd5 7.Nc3 Qxb3 8.axb3 Bb7 9.Bg2 a6 10.0-0 Nbd7 11.Bg5 Bd6 12.Rfc1 0-0 13.Nd2 Bxg2 14.Kxg2 Rfc8 15.Nce4 Bf8 16.Bxf6 gxf6 17.g4 c5 18.dxc5 Bxc5 19.Nf3 Kf8 20.b4 Bxb4 21.Rxa6 Bc5 22.Rca1 Rxa6 23.Rxa6 b5 24.Ra5 b4 25.Rb5 Be7 26.b3 Rc7 27.Nd4 Kg7 28.f4 Bf8 29.e3 Kg6 30.h4 Kg7 31.Kf3 Be7 32.Ke2 Nc5 33.Nd2 Nb7 34.Nc4 Nc5 35.Nd2 Nb7 36.Ne4 Nd6 37.Rc5 Rxc5 38.Nxc5 h5 39.gxh5 Kh6 40.Nc6 Bf8 41.Nxb4 Kxh5 42.Nc6 Kxh4 43.Kf3 Kh5 44.b4 Kg6 45.Nd7 Bh6 46.Ke2 e5 47.Ne7+ Kg7 48.Kf3 exf4 49.e4 Nb5 50.Kg4 f3 51.Nf5+ Kh8 52.Kxf3 Bd2 53.Nxf6 Bxb4 54.e5 Bc3 55.Ke4 Nc7 56.Nd7 Kh7 57.Kf4 Nd5+ 58.Ke4 Nc7 59.Ne7 Kg7 60.Kf5 Bb4 61.Nc6 Ba3 62.Nd4 Ne6 63.Nxe6+ fxe6+ 64.Kxe6 Bb2 65.Ke7 Bxe5 66.Nxe5 ˝-˝

Adamski
20-09-2011, 12:14 AM
Peter Svidler is the World Cup winner
Is this a prediction? As yet he is just in the final. May well be proved correct though (or else maybe a case of foot in mouth, noting Kev's current sig:uhoh: ).

Kevin Bonham
20-09-2011, 12:16 AM
Is this a prediction? As yet he is just in the final. May well be proved correct though (or else maybe a case of foot in mouth, noting Kev's current sig:uhoh: ).

No; he has actually won the World Cup now. What he has qualified for is the next Candidates Matches for the World Championship.

I thought he did very well in winning that, despite some luck against Caruana. Also the final pairings had much more of an elite feel to them than in some past World Cup style events where there have been a lot of outsiders hanging around in the final rounds (and even sometimes winning). Still think the matches near the pointy end should be longer though.

Max Illingworth
20-09-2011, 12:16 AM
Is this a prediction? As yet he is just in the final. May well be proved correct though (or else maybe a case of foot in mouth, noting Kev's current sig:uhoh: ).

The classical matches were four games long, and Svidler just drew the fourth game to win 2.5-1.5. :clap:


Still think the matches near the pointy end should be longer though.

I agree; it would be better to have 4-game classical matches for the quarter-finals and 6-game classical matches for the semis and finals.

Adamski
20-09-2011, 12:17 AM
I sit corrected, guys! Well done PS.

Agent Smith
20-09-2011, 06:36 AM
Nice piece sack in the last game. At move 34
2rr1bk1/3n2p1/p1PPp2p/8/5P2/B1R4P/P5P1/3R2K1 w - - 1 34
Svidler probably could have forced a win with 34. c7