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rob
23-09-2004, 02:44 PM
On the ABC's website (health section) today there is an article about how deferring the onset of dementia can save $heaps. I also recall a US study a while back indicating that seniors involved in playing chess, bridge, doing crosswords were much less likely to develop dementia.

An energetic person maybe able to utilise the benefits of chess on dementia (and studies) to promote chess/get govt support.

Bill Gletsos
23-09-2004, 03:38 PM
If you look at the ravings of some posters on this board, you could be forgiven for thinking that chess made them demented.
Of course its more likely they were that way long before they got involved in chess.

Alan Shore
23-09-2004, 04:08 PM
If you look at the ravings of some posters on this board, you could be forgiven for thinking that chess made them demented.
Of course its more likely they were that way long before they got involved in chess.

Yourself included in that category, old man? ;)

Actually rob's correct, research does show that being involved in tasks that require constant mental activity does delay the onset of dementia/senility. It think it'd be an ambitious way to promote chess but hey, whatever works!

eclectic
23-09-2004, 04:14 PM
On the ABC's website (health section) today there is an article about how deferring the onset of dementia can save $heaps. I also recall a US study a while back indicating that seniors involved in playing chess, bridge, doing crosswords were much less likely to develop dementia.

An energetic person maybe able to utilise the benefits of chess on dementia (and studies) to promote chess/get govt support.

yeah, but knowing the way chess is organised in australia we'd FORGET to apply for the grants

;) :whistle: :hand:

eclectic

Bill Gletsos
23-09-2004, 04:28 PM
Yourself included in that category, old man? ;)
Of course not junior. ;)
I was especially thinking of some posters in the off topic threads.

Recherché
23-09-2004, 05:48 PM
It think it'd be an ambitious way to promote chess but hey, whatever works!

No more ambitious than promoting chess as being good for the educational performance of kids, really.

Although I suppose seniors don't have parents to gently (or otherwise) push them into it.

JGB
23-09-2004, 06:19 PM
Many a great chess legend has ended up with Dementia at an early age, arguabley as a result of too much chess (& booze) and 20 match Blindfold simultan chess. I though this was one of the reasons those blindfold 20 table exhibitions were banned in Russia. In 'moderation' Chess like anything has to be good.

eclectic
23-09-2004, 06:25 PM
Many a great chess legend has ended up with Dementia at an early age, arguabley as a result of too much chess (& booze) and 20 match Blindfold simultan chess. I though this was one of the reasons those blindfold 20 table exhibitions were banned in Russia. In 'moderation' Chess like anything has to be good.

dementia or simply insanity or burnout due to mental overstrain or other factors?

cases in point

bobby fischer
nelson pilsbury
akiba rubinstein
paul morphy
wilhelm steinitz

any others ?

eclectic

Trent Parker
24-09-2004, 12:04 AM
Many a great chess legend has ended up with Dementia at an early age, arguabley as a result of too much chess (& booze) and 20 match Blindfold simultan chess.

well..... theres your answer. Its not chess at all... its booze!!! that does the damage.

Rincewind
24-09-2004, 08:20 AM
dementia or simply insanity or burnout due to mental overstrain or other factors?

cases in point

bobby fischer
nelson pilsbury
akiba rubinstein
paul morphy
wilhelm steinitz

any others ?

eclectic

Alekhine hit the bottle pretty hard. Not sure about premature dementia though.

But what about counterexamples?

Korchnoi, Najdorf, Em. Lasker. All mentally alert well into old age.

Garvinator
24-09-2004, 10:47 AM
Alekhine hit the bottle pretty hard. Not sure about premature dementia though.
alekhine was also a little young for dementia in his 40's when he died.

Rincewind
24-09-2004, 02:06 PM
alekhine was also a little young for dementia in his 40's when he died.

We are talking premature.

rob
24-09-2004, 02:30 PM
If you want to avoid, alzheimers disease,
just choose one, of the 3 C's,

Cards Chess Crosswords :)

PHAT
24-09-2004, 03:44 PM
If you want to avoid, alzheimers disease,
just choose one, of the 3 C's,

Cards Chess Crosswords :)

Death is the ultimate avoidance stratergy, so I though it was:
Carcinoma; Coronary; Cerebral thrombosis

Recherché
26-09-2004, 09:42 AM
^ I'm not sure that finding a worse problem to replace it really counts as successful avoidance.