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FM_Bill
04-03-2011, 05:01 PM
In 1979 (?) Australia played in the World Telex Teams championship. Only a small number of countries played.

We won against Guyana(?) and lost a close match to the Soviet Union. However, apparently they were disqualified for cheating.

Does anyone have any information on this?

Did Australia win?

frazer H (Axiom)
04-03-2011, 05:09 PM
In 1979 (?) Australia played in the World Telex Teams championship. Only a small number of countries played.

We won against Guyana(?) and lost a close match to the Soviet Union. However, apparently they were disqualified for cheating.

Does anyone have any information on this?

Did Australia win?



"In the latter part of our second telex match with Russia I as captain suspected Russia was playing at a much slower time control and after proving this to be the case I advised Peter Wallman, ACF President that we must claim the match 8-0 in our favour. This was agreed and I advised Campomanes who after investigation awarded the match to Australia. The massive World Tele-Trophy was flown from Moscow to Sydney and handed over by the Russian Ambassador to Australia to Senator Evans The Australian Foreign Minister in a Ceremony in Sydney attended by the members of the World Champion Team – Australia."
http://closetgrandmaster.blogspot.com/2010/10/australia-beat-russia-8-0.html

Denis_Jessop
04-03-2011, 07:02 PM
I vaguely remember this. I wonder what happened to the trophy after that?

DJ

Gattaca
06-03-2011, 12:37 AM
I seem to recall that we were paired against the might of communist East Germany in the semi finals. They could easily field an all Grandmaster team, most likely consisting of huge, hairy, steroid popping women. How could a minnow like mere 'us', prevail?

Easy! We simply arranged for the Berlin Wall to come down before the match could be played, and for East Germany to be abolished. :owned:

People always go on about The Zohan, but really... you don't mess with the Aussie Telex Chess Team!

I also vaguely recall Jamieson playing former World Champion Mikhail Tal in a Satellite chess game and drawing easily, whereupon he pointed the bony finger at a couple of Tal's moves. Tal was just lucky he played okay, or he would no doubt have got a lecture about a 'dead ned' or something. :D

ER
06-03-2011, 09:42 AM
:lol:

Ian Murray
06-03-2011, 09:56 PM
I thought at first that was the match in which Guy was drawn against this little ankle-biter called Kasparov, but a little digging showed that to be the 1977 match:
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1069675

Despite the embarrassing result, few other Aussies (if any) can claim to have played Gazza in a tournament

Bereaved
06-03-2011, 10:12 PM
[Event "EUR-ASIA m 30'"]
[Site "Batumi"]
[Date "2001.09.17"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Kasparov, Garry"]
[Black "Rogers, Ian"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "2838"]
[BlackElo "2538"]
[PlyCount "95"]
[EventDate "2001.09.17"]
[EventType "team (rapid)"]
[EventRounds "12"]
[EventCountry "GEO"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2002.02.05"]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bg4 6. f3 Bh5 7. Nge2 a6 8. Bf4 Qd7 9. d5 Bg6 10. Qd2 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 g6 12. O-O-O Bg7 13. Qc4 c6 14. d6 O-O 15. Kb1 Re8 16. Ng3 exd6 17. Bxd6 Qe6 18. Qxe6 Rxe6 19. Nge4 Nbd7 20. Bg3 b5 21. a3 Nxe4 22. Nxe4 Nb6 23. Bf2 Nd5 24. Bd4 a5 25. g4 h6 26. h4 Bxd4 27. Rxd4 Kg7 28. h5 b4 29. a4 Nf6 30. Nd6 Re3 31. Rf4 g5 32. Nf5+ Kh7 33. Nxe3 gxf4 34. Nc4 Nd5 35. Re1 Kg7 36. Re5 Kf6 37. Rf5+ Ke6 38. Re5+ Kf6 39. Re4 Kg5 40. Ne5 Kh4 41. Nxc6 Kg3 42. Nd4 Rd8 43. Kc1 Ne3 44. c3 bxc3 45. bxc3 Rc8 46. Kd2 Rb8 47. Ne2+ Kxf3 48. Rxf4+ 1-0



[Event "Wch U16"]
[Site "Wattignies"]
[Date "1976.07.??"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Kasparov, Garry"]
[Black "Rogers, Ian"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B33"]
[BlackElo "1865"]
[PlyCount "67"]
[EventDate "1976.07.??"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "9"]
[EventCountry "FRA"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1998.11.10"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 Be6 9. Nc4 Rc8 10. Ne3 Be7 11. Bxf6 Bxf6 12. Bc4 O-O 13. Bb3 Nd4 14. O-O Bg5 15. Ncd5 Nxb3 16. axb3 g6 17. Kh1 Bh6 18. Qd3 f5 19. exf5 gxf5 20. f4 Kh8 21. Rad1 Qh4 22. Qe2 exf4 23. Nc4 Bf7 24. Qd3 Bh5 25. Nxd6 Bxd1 26. Nxc8 Bh5 27. Nce7 f3 28. gxf3 Qh3 29. Nf4 Qh4 30. Qd4+ Qf6 31. Qxf6+ Rxf6 32. Nxh5 Rf7 33. Nd5 f4 34. Re1 1-0


Take care and God Bless, Macavity

FM_Bill
08-03-2011, 09:39 PM
Ok, I have more information...

Australia actually played in 2 World Telechess Championships, and had to play the USSR both times.

In 1977 we beat Guyana in the first round and then lost 2.5-5.5 to the USSR in the second. That's when Tal played Jamieson on board one. The games were so slow many were adjudicated draws around move 25 or so. Chekhov-Prods was a played out draw. Travers lost. Guy West lost on the junior board to Kasparov who then as the story goes, sat on Gulko's knee for the remainder of his game against Ian Rogers.

Then in 1990 we beat Singapore, Ireland and had to play the USSR in the semi-finals. (This time Khalifman was board 1.) We were losing about 2-6 but by the end of the match we realised they had made so many breaches of the rules - including taking an hour break for dinner when it was after midnight in Sydney! - that we appealed and were awarded the match 8-0. By then East Germany (who had already won the final against the USSR) were forced to replay it. However in the meantime, as Guy says, they ceased to exist, so we won the cup, handed to us by the USSR ambassador at a ceremony in Sydney in 1991.

MichaelBaron
08-03-2011, 10:17 PM
Ok, I have more information...

Australia actually played in 2 World Telechess Championships, and had to play the USSR both times.

In 1977 we beat Guyana in the first round and then lost 2.5-5.5 to the USSR in the second. That's when Tal played Jamieson on board one. The games were so slow many were adjudicated draws around move 25 or so. Chekhov-Prods was a played out draw. Travers lost. Guy West lost on the junior board to Kasparov who then as the story goes, sat on Gulko's knee for the remainder of his game against Ian Rogers.

Then in 1990 we beat Singapore, Ireland and had to play the USSR in the semi-finals. (This time Khalifman was board 1.) We were losing about 2-6 but by the end of the match we realised they had made so many breaches of the rules - including taking an hour break for dinner when it was after midnight in Sydney! - that we appealed and were awarded the match 8-0. By then East Germany (who had already won the final against the USSR) were forced to replay it. However in the meantime, as Guy says, they ceased to exist, so we won the cup, handed to us by the USSR ambassador at a ceremony in Sydney in 1991.

Every dog has his day and once in a while even pigs can fly :). Facinating story! Australia's appeal reminds me of a story how a 1500-rated lunatic was complaning to the arbiter that I was speaking Russian to someone during a tournament game outside the playing hall... and getting some chess advice. It should be noted that the person I was talking to was rated about 1400 :owned: ... luckily i was not forfeited. Furthermore, when the arbiter pointed it out to me that I should not be speaking Russian during the game, it was fun to suggest that if he wants to enforce the no talking rule - he'd better make it applicable to all of the languages :).

Russia's telechess team has never been a national team consisting of the top GMs - every time they would look around for some GMs (whoever was available in the Moscow Central chess club at the time of the matches) and ask them to play. Still, they had no trouble winning the Telechess competitions. 5.5-2.5 was a ''friendly score''...since 5.5 points is enough for victory!

P.S. I still remember a fun conversation that I had with Naum Kagan few days after my arrival to Melbourne. I asked him how different was the Australian chess scene from the Russian one to which he replied ''here - we got Darryl Johansen and Ian Rogers only and in Russia - every village has its own Johansen. (the conversation has taken place in the year 1991)

FM_Bill
08-03-2011, 10:34 PM
in Russia - every village has its own Johansen

Could be a good theme for a sci-fi horror, clones in every village.

Does every village also have a David Hacche?

or more to the point

Does every village have a Michael Baron or Naum Kagan?

MichaelBaron
08-03-2011, 11:50 PM
Could be a good theme for a sci-fi horror, clones in every village.

Does every village also have a David Hacche?

or more to the point

Does every village have a Michael Baron or Naum Kagan?

Every village has 15 barons and Kagans and Goldenbergs and Smirnovs :). In russia, nobody at the chess scene had a clue who we are :)

peter_parr
10-03-2011, 09:40 AM
The first tele-chess Olympiad (FIDE - Euwe and ICCF) was held 1977/8. Rd 1 Australia 6.5-Guyana 1.5 (Jamieson, Shaw, Woodhams, Rogers, Sztern, Prods, Kellner, Fardell)

Rd 2 on 24 Sep 1977 Soviet Union 5.5 Australia 2.5 sponsored by telecom – our players in Telecom Sydney and from Melbourne – SU in Moscow. Started about 6pm Aus time – most spectators left by 1am – state of the art transmission over a third of a century ago was very slow. We agreed to halt the match about 5am Australian time when it was clear Russia had won the match after about 11 hours with nearly all games still in progress. I offered the Russian Captain 3-5 with draws on the top six boards (Kasparov beat West after about 5 hours). We accepted the counter offer of 2.5 – 5.5 as ex world corro champion Zagorovsky was winning against Travers and on the state of play at 5am it was a good result for Australia – draws on the top five boards. Tal played well in the complications against Jamieson and stood slightly better in the final position. 2 Dec 1978 Soviet Union beat East Germany 5-3 in the final.

Australia played in the third Tele-chess Olympiad 1989/1990 beating Singapore 6.5-1.5 and Ireland 7.5 – 0.5 to reach the semi-final.
East Germany reached the final on 23 Jun 1990 defeating Austria 6-2. Australia played the Soviet Union on 22 Sep 1990 in the other semi-final. Transmission was still slow but much better than 34 years ago in 1977. Australia was heading for a decisive defeat judging by our board positions. Late into the match with players short of time and our clock times were being sent to Moscow regularly as the rules required. It occurred to me that very slow responses from Moscow to our moves and Soviet Union clock times not being sent (or sometimes players extremely short of time) that maybe they were using slower time controls than Australia. If true I needed evidence. I sent simple messages to Moscow eg board Y move 36 is Rd6 our time used is 1hr 45 mins. Please advise your move 36 and your clock time used. Thank you. It soon became clear from several boards that they ran out of clock time. I then sent another message on one of the boards - please confirm rate of play – yes they were playing at a slower rate. The Soviet Union claimed a 6-2 victory based on the state of play at adjudication time. I had already consulted a number of players and held a lengthy conversation with ACF President Peter Wallman at the venue. The reply to Moscow was that Australia claims an 8-0 victory as Russia were using a slower time control than the written rules of the competition. The matter was unresolved. FIDE was advised and awaited written reports from Australia and Russia.

23 September 1990. East Germany had arranged to play Russia in the final the day after the semi-final assuming Russia would win against Australia. We were of course unable to stop the match. East Germany won on board count-back after a 4-4 tie. (Knaak beat Vyzhmanavin on board 2 and Russia lost on board 8).

3 October 1990 The Berlin Wall was gone and reunification complete – Federal Republic of Germany replacing East and West Germany.

16 November 1990 Note well --------- East Germany yes East Germany lost 0.5 – 3.5 to Russia in round 1 of the Novi Sad Yugoslavia(now Serbia) Chess Olympiad

FIDE President Florencio Campomanes who I had known well since the 1976 Olympiad in Haifa, Israel was at the Novi Sad Olympiad in 1990 and had received Wallman’s written report containing a number of irregularities from the Soviet Union team. I was Captain of the Australian Olympiad Team and simply showed Campo – here are the written rules with the rate of play. The Soviet Union agreed they had used the incorrect and slower time control. Australia claimed an 8-0 win . After consulting his FIDE Presidential board and the Soviet Delegation FIDE agreed we won the match 8-0 and the match East Germany – Russia had no validity. FIDE also confirmed East Germany’s final event was the Novi Sad Olympiad.

It appears to me the players and organisers of the Soviet Union Team simply did not have a copy of the rules – amazing as they played many other matches – what time controls did they have in other matches??

December 1990. Peter Wallman and I agreed that our final task was to organise the giant 20kg trophy to be delivered from Moscow to Australia.

1991. The Australian Ambassador to Australia handed the trophy to Australian Foreign Minister Senator Gareth Evans at a ceremony in Sydney at Telecom. Melbourne and Sydney players and Captain attended and pictures taken etc. Australia have been World Champions for over 20 years. Where is the trophy you ask? Telecom had generously provided sponsorship for all tele-chess matches which were in fact very expensive. Larry Ermacora, a senior employee of Telecom had arranged the sponsorship over many years. The ACF, Larry etc. agreed with a director of Telecom at the presentation ceremony that Telecom would arrange to send the trophy round to its head offices in all states of Australia in their part of providing the services which made Australia Champions of the World. Ermacora later tried to locate the 20kg trophy at Telecom but despite numerous attempts and phone calls etc. 19 years ago it has not been found. The ACF would only have the photos left deep in their filing system next to their list of still unpublished (on their website) ACF Life Masters. I am still hopeful that one day the trophy may resurface from a dis-used vault formerly owned by Telecom.

For further reading see my columns in the Sydney Morning Herald (1973-2011) – recent years at…
SMH (http://www.chessdiscountsales.com/news/newsindex.htm)

FM_Bill
13-03-2011, 03:30 PM
I have heard it was only
the boards where the USSR were White that the organiser in Moscow gave
the players their own choice of time limit(!).

In any case the Telechess Olympiads were run under the auspices of the
ICCF, not FIDE, so Campomanes had nothing to do with the forfeit
decision.

We were lucky enough to have an ICCF official in Tilburg.
The official was shocked at
the many breaches of rules which emerged bit by bit that day
and he advised a protest. The ACF followed up with a
formal letter. By the time the Novi Sad Olympiad came around the ICCF
had decided to give the semi-final to us the
decision was announced at the ICCF meeting during the last week of the
Olympiad.

peter_parr
14-03-2011, 10:57 AM
I have heard it was only
the boards where the USSR were White that the organiser in Moscow gave
the players their own choice of time limit(!)

The suggestion that the eight members of the USSR team plus USSR officials all sitting in the same room for about 8 hours playing one international match against Australia were all playing to a variety of different time controls is beyond belief!
Indeed if any USSR player was playing with the correct time control we would not have claimed an 8-0 victory. Furthermore USSR agreed that the whole team had played with the wrong time controls as they did not have a written copy of the rules!


In any case the Telechess Olympiads were run under the auspices of the
ICCF, not FIDE, so Campomanes had nothing to do with the forfeit
decision.

This is simply not correct. In 1976 a meeting took place between the FIDE President Prof Euwe and the FIDE affiliated international organisation ICCF President Hans-Werner von Massow. It was agreed to start a telechess Olympiad. Each country had top 5 boards as well as one Correspondence board, a women’s board and a junior board.
The regulations were that the FIDE Laws of Chess are valid in all matches and the adjudication of the games under ICCF Rules were applicable. There were no games to adjudicate as board positions were not relevant. Campomanes as FIDE President had everything to do with the decision. A number of Australian players also discussed the event with Campo at the being of the Novi Sad Olympiad.
There was no controversy – USSR agreed they lost 0-8.


We were lucky enough to have an ICCF official in Tilburg.
The official was shocked at
the many breaches of rules which emerged bit by bit that day
and he advised a protest.

This is also not correct. Australia never lodged a protest about the match result as no match result had been declared. At the end of transmission Russia claimed a 6-2 victory and Australia claimed an 8-0 victory after I had proved USSR had played the whole match using the incorrect time control and after confirmation by the players in the USSR team who agreed they used a slower time control.


The ACF followed up with a
formal letter. By the time the Novi Sad Olympiad came around the ICCF
had decided to give the semi-final to us the
decision was announced at the ICCF meeting during the last week of the
Olympiad.

FIDE received communication from USSR and Australia. I spoke to Campo at the beginning of the Novi Sad Olympiad. Campomanes consulted the USSR Federation, FIDE Presidential board and ICCF. There was no dispute.
Btw – heading “1979 world telex” should be 1990! (see also my earlier post)

Ian_Rogers
14-03-2011, 01:47 PM
I am surprised to see Peter Parr' post which would indicate that he was not privy to all the relevant information about the match infringements and the protest after the 1990 USSR-Australia match. However I suspect that it is just that details may have faded from his memory over time.
Australia's protest was not based solely on the time limit used, since only half of the Soviet team played at the wrong time limit.
Khalifman, the USSR board 1, confirmed that the Soviet captain only gave the players with White their choice of time limit. Most chose 40/150. (Like Peter, he thought the whole idea was pretty odd at the time too!) The players with Black such as Khalifman played at the correct time limit as the ICCF confirmed during their investigations.
However we also protested against the Soviet team taking a one hour meal break in the middle of the match (when it was after midnight in Australia) and also on them playing a team different to the submitted team list. These facts were again confirmed by Khalifman.
In any case Peter could not have 'proved' that the whole Soviet team played at the wrong time limit, because they didn't. (Khalifman said that the Soviet match organiser believed that Australia had the right to choose the time limit for the games when we were White - and of course we chose the legal one.)
The ICCF, to which FIDE had delegated responsibility for the Telechess Olympiads, made the decision to award the forfeit and that decision was made shortly before the Novi Sad Olympiad started.
As Bill stated, Campomanes had nothing (officially) to do with it. However, had the Soviets wished to dispute the decision - as we feared at first - I suspect the USSR would have gone through FIDE and then Peter's lobbying of Campomanes might have been useful.

peter_parr
16-03-2011, 10:43 AM
I am surprised to see Peter Parr' post which would indicate that he was not privy to all the relevant information about the match infringements and the protest after the 1990 USSR-Australia match. However I suspect that it is just that details may have faded from his memory over time.

Ian may rest assured that details of the match remain crystal clear in my memory and have not faded in my memory over time. Firstly it was not a protest as in my previous post. Of course as I was Australian Captain in Sydney I was privy to all the relevant information (having helped construct the letter to officials) about the infringements the main one being the incorrect rate of play of USSR which decided the match.


Australia's protest was not based solely on the time limit used, since only half of the Soviet team played at the wrong time limit. Khalifman, the USSR board 1, confirmed that the Soviet captain only gave the players with White their choice of time limit. Most chose 40/150. (Like Peter, he thought the whole idea was pretty odd at the time too!) The players with Black such as Khalifman played at the correct time limit as the ICCF confirmed during their investigations.

The regulations for FIDE telechess matches were fully detailed in the FIDE Handbook E. V1 sec 01 21 paragraphs, sec 02 6 paragraphs and sec 03 9 paragraphs. Sec 01 par 8 states "the time allotted to each player is 50 moves in 2 hours."

Imagine dear reader that you are in Moscow as a spectator/official or player at the match watching your very experienced World Champion Team in their semi-final World Telechess Match. The Soviet Captain advises his four players with the white pieces that they have the choice of time limit on their individual board and most (presumably three of the four players) chose 40/150. (Illegal of course). If this is true ---- The question I ask is why did the Soviet Captain and each of the four Soviet players (experienced top players) not advise any of their opponents the time control that they had selected? Surely if they were allowed to select their own time control they would ensure that their opponents were advised so they were using the same time control. Furthermore if you were at the match in Moscow knowing your own players with the white pieces had selected their own time controls would you not be surprised that none of the four Australian players had asked what time control applied to their particular board.

If all this is true you ask what about the four Soviet players with the black pieces. They have all been notified by the Soviet Captain that their four Australian opponents with white will choose the time control on each of their boards. Why may I ask did the Soviet players not ask their opponents at move one the time control that each of them had selected. OK you are black - Australia plays the first move. Soviet player has not been advised of time control. What time control would he have used. 3 of his 4 team mates used 40/150. Regular time controls in tournaments were 40/150 or 40 in 120. Question(?) with no knowledge of the time control from his opponent I find it beyond belief that the extremely unusual time control of 50 in 2 hours (the correct time control) was randomly selected by the Soviet players with the black pieces. It is certainly proven beyond reasonable doubt that it was not only the Soviet players of the white pieces using incorrect time contols.

It is frankly impossible to believe that all eight Soviet players, all officials and spectators in Moscow were watching a match with different time controls on each board and none of the eight players checked what time controls were being used or selected by their opponents.

A number of these Soviet players had played in other Telematches. How would any player believe these were the rules. How is it possible that no arbiter/official/player asked the captain to see a copy of these absurd so-called rules.

My simpler explanation is that the Soviet team was told the incorrect time control at the beginning of the match ---- end of story.


However we also protested against the Soviet team taking a one hour meal break in the middle of the match (when it was after midnight in Australia) and also on them playing a team different to the submitted team list. These facts were again confirmed by Khalifman.

“However I suspect that it is just that details may have faded from memory over time.” The Soviets insisted on a one-hour delay for "technical reasons" at the 5pm Sydney starting time. This was a breach of the rules and included in our submission. Also in our submission (not forgotten by me) was that the Soviets had changed seven of their eight players at the last minute and the Australian team had not been notified. Also in our submission (not forgotten by me) was the Soviets broke the rules on exchanging clock times. Furthermore teams were exchanged on 7 Sep and confirmed again on 20 Sep 20 (not forgotten by me). The match nearly never happened after negotiations broke down on May 6 1990. The Soviets again postponed to June 16th 1990 and again to September. There were later delays in transmission from the Soviet end but a one hour meal break did not occur in the 1990 match. Note connections to Moscow were via the USA Today Sports Centre/Tilburg/Brisbane/Melbourne and Sydney. Peter Wallman and Rogers both spoke to the arbiter A. Heintze near the end of the match.


In any case Peter could not have 'proved' that the whole Soviet team played at the wrong time limit, because they didn't. (Khalifman said that the Soviet match organiser believed that Australia had the right to choose the time limit for the games when we were White - and of course we chose the legal one.)

See above!

It was of course unfortunate that GM Rogers on top board had done a lot of opening preparation for his clash with Vaganian. The opening selected by his board one opponent was totally different to what Rogers had prepared!


The ICCF, to which FIDE had delegated responsibility for the Telechess Olympiads, made the decision to award the forfeit and that decision was made shortly before the Novi Sad Olympiad started.
As Bill stated, Campomanes had nothing (officially) to do with it. However, had the Soviets wished to dispute the decision - as we feared at first - I suspect the USSR would have gone through FIDE and then Peter's lobbying of Campomanes might have been useful.

The detailed regulations for the Telechess Olympiad were fully detailed as above in the FIDE handbook. As in my earlier posts I confirm E V1 03 page 2 par 6 from the FIDE handbook. The FIDE/ICCF Commission is responsible for the organization of the Telechess Olympiad. I spoke to FIDE President Campomanes at the Novi Sad Olympiad about the match as did the head of the Australian Delegation in Novi Sad Peter Wallman. The final decision was Australia 8 USSR 0 indeed no other decision was possible - it was agreed by all parties. So the title World Telechess Olympiad for FIDE/ICCF Challenge Cup (The correct name as in the FIDE Handbook) was shared between Australia and East Germany.

Note - Australian Chess Historian Bob Meadley suggested last week that I should put my life on a disk - then I could just press a button when more details of all matters are requested.

ER
16-03-2011, 11:28 AM
.... Note - Australian Chess Historian Bob Meadley suggested last week that I should put my life on a disk - then I could just press a button when more details of all matters are requested.

Tornelo??? :hmm: :lol:

Ian_Rogers
16-03-2011, 12:19 PM
Your explanation is indeed simpler, Peter. Unfortunately you have no evidence to support it and, most importantly, it is not true.

Basil
16-03-2011, 01:13 PM
Fantastic! Seriously considering bringing back the HADBBAs

antichrist
16-03-2011, 09:20 PM
I feel sorry for Ian, twice having black against Kasparov. But admittingly I have no idea how the draw was worked out.

Adamski
16-03-2011, 10:59 PM
Fantastic! Seriously considering bringing back the HADBBAs
Yeah , do so CU! Fascinating story which I have just read through. The one fact that is undisputed is that in 1990 Australia had a title which could be reasonably shortened to (joint) world telex chess champions.

And how on earth did Telecom lose the trophy? What a tragedy,

antichrist
17-03-2011, 09:51 AM
Yeah , do so CU! Fascinating story which I have just read through. The one fact that is undisputed is that in 1990 Australia had a title which could be reasonably shortened to (joint) world telex chess champions.

And how on earth did Telecom lose the trophy? What a tragedy,

If cant be found we should all donate towards a replica

Denis_Jessop
18-03-2011, 02:59 PM
If cant be found we should all donate towards a replica

A cardboard replica as favoured by Spike Milligan in various Goon Shows would be relatively inexpensive. Moreover as we haven't the original design it could be simple, say, a cardboard banana. :hmm:

DJ

Oepty
18-03-2011, 03:18 PM
A cardboard replica as favoured by Spike Milligan in various Goon Shows would be relatively inexpensive. Moreover as we haven't the original design it could be simple, say, a cardboard banana. :hmm:

DJ

A cardboard banana, love it.
Or perhaps a version of the A-league's toilet seat or the pitchfork from cycling's Tirreno Adriatico which Cadel Evans just won.

http://images.smh.com.au/2011/03/16/2234786/art_cadel_evans-420x0.jpg
http://www.roadcycling.com/artman2/uploads/2/cadel_evans_spid_spear_podium_2011_tirreno-adriatico_2.jpg

peter_parr
15-06-2011, 11:21 AM
The following game was played on board 1 between Ian Rogers and Alexander Khalifman who later became World Champion. Final match score: Australia 8 Russia 0

Rogers,Ian (2505) - Khalifman,Alexander (2560) [B66]
Telechess ol3 8990 telex (2), 1990
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0–0–0 h6 9.Be3 Be7 10.f4 Bd7 11.Kb1 b5 12.Bd3 0–0 13.h3 Nxd4 14.Bxd4 Bc6 15.e5 dxe5 16.fxe5 Nd5 17.Ne4 Nb4 18.Nf6+ Kh8 19.Be2 Bb7 20.Rhf1 Rc8 21.a3 Nxc2 22.Rf4 Nxd4 23.Rxd4 Bxf6 24.Rxd8 Rfxd8 25.Qf4 Rxd1+ 26.Bxd1 Rc4 ½–½

MichaelBaron
15-06-2011, 01:05 PM
What were the team compositions? would be great to see the rest of the games

antichrist
07-05-2020, 01:53 PM
If cant be found we should all donate towards a replica

This thread states that photos were taken with the trophy and team. That being the case we can launch a fund to purchase a replica if that design is still avaible. The remaining available players may agree to a new photo opportunity.

Patrick Byrom
07-05-2020, 03:08 PM
What were the team compositions? would be great to see the rest of the gamesJust for the record (https://gardinerchess.com.au/gm-rogers-the-mouse-that-roared-part-2/).

antichrist
07-05-2020, 04:37 PM
I can't believe that it was 9 years ago we were last conversing in here???
Are the posting dates correct?

Kevin Bonham
07-05-2020, 04:45 PM
I can't believe that it was 9 years ago we were last conversing in here???
Are the posting dates correct?

Of course they are.

antichrist
08-05-2020, 02:04 PM
What were the team compositions? would be great to see the rest of the games

I read somewhere Michael how a migrant from Russia notified you that in Russia in every village they have a Rogers and Johansen - well can you just remind of this thread's little tale.