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ursogr8
10-09-2004, 08:58 AM
On this thread, I intend to post selected excerpts from the publication issued with Box Hill Chess Club's 50th anniversary. (A similar, but much more historic publication is available for the Melbourne Chess Club, and I would encourage firegoat to share their rich history by re-printing parts on the BB).

Here is the first, (written in 2002) >

1. The Development of Junior Chess at Box Hill Chess Club

From its inception in 1952 the Box Hill chess club has produced strong junior players, one of the foundation members Don Robson won the Australian junior championship in 1954. He was followed by the very talented Bill Kerr who won the tournament in 1964 and 1965 but left the club shortly after never to be seen again.
Probably the best known player to get a start at Box Hill was IM Stephen Solomon whose first major success was a victory at the Australian Junior in 1980 although no longer a member at that stage.
Many other well-known Victorian players such as FM Eddy Levi, Robin Hill, Greg Frean and very briefly Bill Jordan started their career at the club
However the club always failed to hang on to these talented young players due to the lack of goals once they reached the top level at the club, and as that top level was only moderately high they needed to further their development some place else.
This however all changed when an 8-year-old Denis Bourmistrov arrived and in his second year at the club gained selection for the under 10 world junior tournament; he brought a coach and a group of admirers including Ruperto Lugo, Ryan Carey, and James Papa. The club then decided that something needed to be done and appointed IM Michael Gluzman as club coach and a junior coaching program was started under his guidance.
Almost overnight membership doubled and doubled again with the shift to new premises.
Due to the pressure of large groups of beginners on the Friday night a Tuesday coaching program was started and Whitehorse Junior Chess Inc. was formed to take over the Tuesday night coaching and organise Sunday tournaments.
The club coach IM Michael Gluzman remains ('starter' edit...written in 2002) heavily involved with the club and has been responsible for the introduction of many talented young players such as Michelle Lee and Sally-Ann Richter who now form the backbone of a talented and strong girls group at the club. Mindful however of the mistakes of the past, the committee continues to search for top players from the past and the present who provide the role models for our juniors and provide them with the incentive to reach the very top. This policy culminated this year (2002) in the Golden Jubilee Club championship when the participation of GM Darryl Johansen, IM Michael Gluzman, and Mirko Rujevic, FM Scott Wastney and top players Sam Low and Michael Woodhams was secured.
It was very pleasing and exciting for us the BHCC committee that the player who came out on top of this distinguished field was the very same Denis Bourmistrov who started us on this journey.
Now some statistics for 2002 Club members 172 of which 62 are juniors
National titleholders in 2001
Michelle Lee under 18 girls champion.
Sam Chow under 14 open champion
Sally-Ann Richter under 14 girls champion
Rochelleh Ziffer under 10 girls champion
World junior selections
Sally Ann Richter [under 14 girls]
Rochelleh Ziffer [under 10 girls]
National titleholders in 2002
Denis Bourmistrov under 14 open champion.
Ruperto Lugo under 12 open champion
Casey Hickman under 12 girls champion
World junior selections
Anjelija Zivanovic [under 18 girls]
Ruperto Lugo [under 12 boys]
Michelle Lee [under 12 girls]

ursogr8
10-09-2004, 10:55 PM
3. Personal reflections from the early years
from Brian Robson

During 1951 I was a student at Melbourne High School where I was a member of the chess club. In 1951 the Victorian Government held a Victorian Schoolboys' Chess Championship as part of its Centenary Celebrations. This was held at the Melbourne Chess Club. I succeeded in winning the Championship, which entitled me (and also the second place getter, Miles Salter, also from Melbourne High School) to play in the Australian Junior Championship, held in January 1952 in Adelaide. This tournament was essentially the first of the Victorian Junior Championships. In the 1952 Australian Junior Championship, I finished in 6th place with 6pts (3pts behind the winner) out of 11pts while Miles finished in 10th place in a field of 12. We were the first official Victorian entries to participate in the Australian Junior Championships, which had commenced a few years earlier and were dominated by boys from NSW or South Australia.

So in late 1951 I was thrilled to learn, through an advertisement in the local paper, that it was planned to form a chess club in Box Hill, where I lived. I was 17 and I also persuaded both my younger brothers, Derek (aged 16) and Donald (aged 14) to attend the foundation meeting, which was held on December 6th in the Box Hill library, then situated in the middle of Whitehorse Road near the Town Hall. I believe we were the only juniors at that meeting. At that meeting Ern Saul was elected chairman and Alex Hall Acting Secretary/Treasurer. Of the 17 people who attended the meeting, held 12 days later, the newly-formed club accepted the Box Hill City Council's offer of a fine room (the Auxiliary Room in the Town Hall) for its meetings which started early in 1952.

In 1954 the Club moved to the Irving Avenue Tennis Pavilion.
I am not sure what the reasons were for moving. Possibilities are that the Box Hill Council wanted the Chess Club to move, that the players wished to smoke(!), or both. I believe that smoking was not allowed in the meetings room of the Town Hall.

My brother Derek served as Hon. Secretary, a position that he held for a number of years. Derek was not a strong player but had a keen interest in books, history and keeping records. He eventually gave up chess as he became more interested in history and education. He retired in 1989 as Principal of Broadmeadows High School and the author of several history text books. Sadly he died in 1998 at the age of 62.

My younger brother, Donald, was a strong chess player even at 14 years of age but showed little desire to be a chess administrator. In 1952 he came second in the Victorian Junior Championship and qualified to play in the 1953 Australian Junior Championship held in January 1953 in Sydney. In that event he finished 4th ahead of the Victorian Junior Champion, Miles Salter. The following two years, as Victorian Junior Champion, he won the 1954 Australian Junior Championship in Toowoomba and came second in the 1955 Australian Junior Championship in Melbourne. In the 1950s Don played for the Box Hill A-grade team when he could but spent less and less time on chess as he developed other interests and continued his studies at Melbourne University, where he obtained a PhD in 1963. During his lunch times at Melbourne University he played many rapid chess games with Doug
Hamilton and won the majority of these games. He went to Florida State University on a Fulbright Fellowship in 1963 and unfortunately for Australian chess never returned permanently to Australia. He is still a Professor of Physics at Florida State University in Tallahassee.

I also studied physics at Melbourne University, obtaining a PhD in 1960. In 1952 I played for the B-grade team of the University since Box Hill had not yet entered the Interclub Competition. It did this in 1953. I became the Box Hill Club Captain (I think) in 1953 and held this position for most years of the 1950s. I was elected President in 1959 until the AGM held 1 April 1960, when I was made a Life Member in view of my past contributions
to chess, especially Box Hill C.C. and my imminent departure to Canberra to take up a research position at The Australian National University.

I played most of my chess at Box Hill C.C. winning the Club Championship five times and coming second on other occasions during 1952-60. Box Hill C.C. joined the Victorian Chess Association in March 1953 and competed in both B and C grade interclub competitions. In 1954 Box Hill entered teams in all three grades A, B and C of the Interclub Competition. In 1954 there were only three teams in the A-grade: Melbourne, Venta (a very strong Latvian club, which had won all three grades in 1953) and Box Hill. This continued in 1955. Needless to say, Box Hill finished 3rd in the A-grade in both years but the team obtained strong competition in the double round events. Don and I usually played on boards 1 and 2, respectively. In 1955 Box Hill was the only club with teams in A, B and C grades. In 1956 there were 8 teams in the A-grade competition, including two teams from Venta. Box Hill finished 4th. Thus even in the 1950s Box Hill was one of the stronger clubs in Melbourne.

In March 1955 at the AGM of the Victorian Chess Association I was elected Hon. Secretary, a position I held for two years. This was an interesting time since the Australian Championship was to be held in Melbourne in 1956 at a time close to the Olympic Games. In this tournament it was hoped for the first time to attract several overseas participants. In fact four overseas players did participate: Sarapu (NZ) and Campomanes, Cardoso, and Pascual from the Phillipines. Campomanes, who did so much for chess in the Phillipines, later became President of FIDE. It was very interesting to meet these people in addition to the leading Australian players.

On moving to Canberra I joined the Canberra C.C. and later also the Woden C.C. In the 1960s and 1970s I had some tournament successes, including both the Canberra Chess Club and Woden Club Championships. In Melbourne I had enjoyed the interclub competitions so much that I was keen to have such a competition in Canberra. I initiated the formation of the Canberra Chess Association (now the ACT Chess Association) and among other activities both an interclub competition and interschool chess were started. In particular the Doeberl Cup held at Easter was begun in 1963 and has continued to this day. I was the D. of P. on three occasions 1963, 1965 and 1972. On the last occasion I had the pleasure of meeting Max Euwe then President of FIDE who opened the 1972 tournament. From 1960-1979 I was much involved in ACT chess and held several administrative positions: President Canberra
C.C., President Canberra (ACT) Chess Association, Captain Canberra C.C., Director of Inter-Schools' Competition, etc. About 1980 I essentially 'retired' from chess preferring to devote my leisure times to pursuits requiring less mental activity than that required in my profession as a theoretical physicist. However, I still retain a strong interest in chess and it gives me great pleasure to see how Box Hill C.C. has progressed in recent years.

ursogr8
12-09-2004, 08:24 AM
4. Relationship between Box Hill Chess Club and the Local Council
When the Box Hill Chess Club was first conceived the then Box Hill Council showed quite a bit of interest in the project and provided free accommodation for some time. However, this interest soon faded and user pay systems were introduced to all council properties and for all Box Hill sporting and community organisations, and so it was for the Box Hill Chess Club, doomed to stay in the cheap and inadequate Irving Avenue Tennis pavilion being unable to afford better accommodation. Then with the amalgamation between Box Hill and Nunawading Councils into the City of Whitehorse the attitude changed. Was it the increase in recognition of chess as a valuable educational tool? Or the increased awareness by the club of its need to project itself as a community organisation? Or perhaps the chess symbol of the white horse on the council's logo? No one knows, but over the last few years the value of council contribution in both money and kind has grown in parallel with the growth of the club.
1997 The rent at the Carrington centre is subsidised.
1998 The council provides a free venue and contributes towards the prize fund for a chess tournament during the Whitehorse festival.
1999 The Council makes a small travel grant for selected junior chess players travelling overseas.
2000 The council has provided a start-up grant towards our junior development scheme.
2001 The council joined in a bid to secure the Australian Junior Championships for Box Hill by offering a free venue [with a commercial value of $7000] for the tournament.
The times they are indeed a-changing

Spiny Norman
12-09-2004, 12:42 PM
Hey starter,

Thanks for posting this stuff. Its very helpful to know about this sort of thing (e.g. should help me in my discussions with my council in turn).

Cheers,

Frosty

ursogr8
12-09-2004, 07:24 PM
Hey starter,

Thanks for posting this stuff. Its very helpful to know about this sort of thing (e.g. should help me in my discussions with my council in turn).

Cheers,

Frosty


Steve
All of this is in a bound publication.........and has lots of more useful stuff (in particular for you) I have not posted here yet. Drop in again and I will give you a copy.
Btw are you an entrant for the OPEN next Friday?

starter

Spiny Norman
12-09-2004, 07:53 PM
Steve
All of this is in a bound publication.........and has lots of more useful stuff (in particular for you) I have not posted here yet. Drop in again and I will give you a copy.
Btw are you an entrant for the OPEN next Friday?

starter


I'd love to get a copy, so yes, I'll stop by the club one evening as soon as I can manage it. I've got sick kids at the moment, so my time is limited. But I'll join up @ Box Hill in due course.

Re: the Open ... I'm practising away here at home, but still very rusty and somewhat lacking confidence ... maybe next time? The thing I've noticed is that my combinational vision is pretty weak. I stopped by down @ Chess World on Saturday afternoon and picked up some 2nd hand books which should help:

- The Modern Chess Sacrifice (Leonid Shamkovich)
- Marshall's Best Games Of Chess
- My Best Games Of Chess 1908-1923 (Alexander Alekhine)

Hopefully they'll sharpen me up a bit.

See you soon,

Frosty

ursogr8
13-09-2004, 08:43 AM
Box Hill Chess Club and Dandenong Chess Club

Box Hill and Dandenong have always have common interests as Chess Clubs and have quite a few members in common. Many times over the years there have been visits from on club to the other for a 20 board challenge.
A variation on this theme occurred in 2000 when a sort of correspondence voting match was conducted.
The game and report is reproduced below. (Sorry it does not use K's zippy viewer...it is not something I have tried...perhaps jeffrei can construct for me).

Challenge 2000
Those of you who visit the web page may have noticed, in the archives, a game between Dandenong Chess Club and Box Hill Chess Club in the year 2000. This game arose from a challenge by the Box Hill club for a game to be played at a rate of at least one move per week. On each of the respective club nights, the latest move was placed on the notice board for consideration by all those present at the club. Following discussion of potential responses, the club selected the most popular move, by ballot, of the members present on the night.
Box Hill won this game, which is shown here.
1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.Bb5+ Bd7 4.Bc4 c6 5.dxc6 Nxc6 6.Nf3 e5 7.Ng5 Bc5 8.Nxf7 Bxf2+ 9.Kf1 Qb6 10.Nxh8 Bg4 11.Be2 Bh4 12.g3 Ne4 13.d4 Bh3+ 14.Ke1 Nxg3 15.Bg5 Nxe2+ 16.Bxh4 Ncxd4 17.c3 Qc6 18.cxd4 Qxh1+ 19.Kd2 Qxd1+ 20.Kxd1 Nxd4 21.Nc3 Bg4+ 22.Kc1 Rc8 23.Bg3 Nf3 24.Bf2 a6 25.Kc2 Bf5+ 26.Kd1 Ke7 27.Ke2 Nd4+ 28.Kf1 Bh3+ 29.Kg1 Rxh8 0-1


starter
ps (adapted from article written by BB member booboo).

jeffrei
13-09-2004, 02:52 PM
Event: Challenge 2000
Date: 2000
White: Dandenong Chess Club
Black: Box Hill Chess Club
Result: 0-1
ECO: B01
PlyCount: 58

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. Bb5+ Bd7 4. Bc4 c6 5. dxc6 Nxc6 6. Nf3 e5 7. Ng5 Bc5 8.
Nxf7 Bxf2+ 9. Kf1 Qb6 10. Nxh8 Bg4 11. Be2 Bh4 12. g3 Ne4 13. d4 Bh3+ 14. Ke1
Nxg3 15. Bg5 Nxe2+ 16. Bxh4 Ncxd4 17. c3 Qc6 18. cxd4 Qxh1+ 19. Kd2 Qxd1+ 20.
Kxd1 Nxd4 21. Nc3 Bg4+ 22. Kc1 Rc8 23. Bg3 Nf3 24. Bf2 a6 25. Kc2 Bf5+ 26. Kd1
Ke7 27. Ke2 Nd4+ 28. Kf1 Bh3+ 29. Kg1 Rxh8 0-1

ursogr8
13-09-2004, 05:52 PM
This next excerpt from the archives is a story about John Butler. BB readers will remember a few days back that FROSTY recalled playing John back in the 80's (at Ringwood or Croydon). Well, John is still playing well into his (personal) 80's. He is at Box Hill two evenings per week.

Life Member …John Butler
In the next paragraph John Butler reveals one of the great secrets to becoming a very good chess player. But first we should recognise John as our oldest member and perhaps with one of the best memories of a chess-playing career. John arrived from Britain when he was 10 years old and lived in the Western District with his brothers who taught him the chess moves. The two country newspapers (one with a green front page, and the other with an orange front page) carried chess columns and bulletins. John enthusiastically cycled for miles to a family who purchased the papers; John’s sole purpose of the trip was to read the chess column. Andrew Dall wrote one column for many years. A prize was offered by the newspaper for the best-annotated game by a reader, and John won the contest. His prize was a year’s subscription to the correspondence chess magazine. John played chess against one of the school-teachers and games meandered at a leisurely pace as moves were left on a piece of paper in the ‘cream cans’.
John’s first book was Masters of the ChessBoard by R Reti and this probably accounts for John’s chess excellence.
Through correspondence play John had met C. Deane of the Malvern Chess Circle and when John moved to Melbourne for employment Deane invited him to play Board 1 Interclub at the Railways Buildings venue. As John’s opponent was a Mr Lamparter, Victorian Champion, and John had no prior experience with clocks or spectators, he was instructed to ‘just try his best’. John won in 33 moves.
John played a lot of chess with the Melbourne Chess Club, then meeting at the Athenaeum. His best result was a 2nd in a championship to Max Green.
Geography started to play a part in John’s chess opportunities and he joined the Ringwood Chess Club for a few years. A chance meeting with our Gerrit Hartland saw him invited to join the Box Hill Chess Club. John has always enjoyed the camaraderie side to Box Hill, and served on Committee on occasions. He is a Life member of the Club.
John’s favourite chess memory is clearly his win, as a 17-year-old, in a Telegraphic Interstate match. He featured on the front page of the Herald newspaper for his triumph

ursogr8
15-09-2004, 08:30 AM
5. The COMPUTER…a tool to handle growth
As the growth in membership became evident in 1999 the Committee was faced with the problem common to all volunteer organisations…how to manage the extra work that comes with extra membership.
A deliberate decision was taken to slightly increase the annual subscriptions so as to create funding for any computer-related activities that would ease the workload.

The initiatives that have emerged include a Club web-site (at http://www.BoxHillChess.org.au), and a Club computer on-site for Friday and Tuesday night pairings for tournaments. We are fortunate that most of these facilities have been developed professionally by Club member Phillip O’Connor. The computer facilities have progressed to being the main method that players enter tournaments (although post, phone, and personal approaches are still welcomed).

A small community of individuals takes the score-sheets of games played in tournaments and records these into a database of games; this database can be used by all players to prepare for the next opponent. Who is their next opponent? This can also be accessed on the web-site, usually by the Tuesday preceding a Friday round of games. Thank you to that small band of Club individuals who allocate time to typing in the games of all players. Perhaps you would like to volunteer to help, and in doing so you can learn from other stronger players.

The web-site itself is an entry point to the wonderland of the INTERNET. Click on our web-site and one more click and you are able to move to the Australian Chess Federation web-site; another click and you can link to the ACF Bulletin. Another click and you can move to the web-site of any current major chess event in any part of the world. Just now (edit...written in 2002)many of us are following the 8 game match between World Champion Vladimir Kramnik and the best computer Deep Fritz. Alternatively you can click within our web-site and see if you won a prize in a previous tournament, or who is your opponent for the next round. Really neat.
Even if you do not have a home computer (with Internet access) it is possible to access our web-site information from a friend’s computer, or the local library, such is the power of the Internet.

The Club computer has achieved all the objectives we had for handling growth and is the prime reason that we can run a 9 round lightning tournament involving 100 players, with minimum delay between rounds. The use of e-mail between members of the Club has enabled us to share the workload on organisation of tournaments and managing the affairs of the Club. We have ‘survived’ the growth to 180 members, but we must not presume that the computer is a substitute for people volunteering their time for tasks that benefit all members. There will always be a need for human hands on the (computer) tool.

The computer and the inventiveness of Club officials have combined to allow a major improvement in the method we use to run SWISS tournaments. A past problem with a large SWISS field of 100+ players is that games for about the first 7 rounds generally see rating differences between 150-300 points. The participation of highly rated players tends to be very selective as a consequence of many uneven games, with predictable results. Victoria’s best players seemed to ‘appear’ only for national championships and A Grade InterClub where they are guaranteed competitive pairings. This problem is now solved by Box Hill’s use of ‘acceleration’ in the computer pairings. In essence, the top 50% of the field is given a 2-point bonus for the duration of the tournament. This has the effect of running an A Division SWISS and a B Division SWISS and allowing those with the best results after a few rounds in B to be paired with those with poor results in A. That is, the B Division players still get to play A Division players, but only those that they have a reasonable chance of defeating. The Club now achieves dozens of challenging pairings for players at all rating levels, each and every round. There are no more SWISS ‘junk’ pairings that have been seen in the past. Since the introduction of this strategy in early 2002 I have lost count of the number of players who have remarked to me how “..hard it is to win games at Box Hill..”. We are all noticing that games in SWISS tournaments are now finely balanced between players of comparable ratings, and hence hard to win. (This is not applicable to Tuesday tournaments that are more in the tradition of small fields).

Spiny Norman
19-09-2004, 07:57 AM
This next excerpt from the archives is a story about John Butler. BB readers will remember a few days back that FROSTY recalled playing John back in the 80's (at Ringwood or Croydon). Well, John is still playing well into his (personal) 80's. He is at Box Hill two evenings per week.

John’s favourite chess memory is clearly his win, as a 17-year-old, in a Telegraphic Interstate match. He featured on the front page of the Herald newspaper for his triumph


I'd post a copy of my one-and-only draw with John, but I haven't yet worked out the FEN/PGN things. When I do I'll post it and you can all have a laugh at me struggling to keep my position afloat.

Cheers,

Frosty

Spiny Norman
19-09-2004, 05:22 PM
I'd post a copy of my one-and-only draw with John, but I haven't yet worked out the FEN/PGN things. When I do I'll post it and you can all have a laugh at me struggling to keep my position afloat.


OK ... here we go ... lets see if this works:

Event: Informal game
Site: Ringwood Chess Club
Date: 1982
White: Frost, Stephen (1390)
Black: Butler, John (1780)
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: C93

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d6 9.h3 { Why not d4 immediately? I must've been worrying about the Knight being pinned I guess. } h6 10.d4 Re8 11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.Nf1 Bb7 13.Ng3 Na5 14.Bc2 g6 15.a4 Bg7 16.dxe5 dxe5 17.Be3 Nc4 18.Qc1 Nxe3 19.Qxe3 Qe7 20.Red1 Bf8 21.Rd2 Qc5 22.Qxc5 Bxc5 23.Rad1 Bc6 24.b4 Ba7 25.a5 Bb7 26.Kf1 c5 27.Ke2 cxb4 28.cxb4 Rac8 29.Ne1 { This seems rather feeble when I look at it now. I was clearly losing the thread of the game. } Rc4 30.Nd3 Nxe4 31.Nxe4 Rxe4+ 32.Kf1 Rd4 33.Nxe5 { The only move to avoid a slaughter? I recall starting to panic, but Black goes a bit astray in the next couple of moves and lets me back into the game. } Rxd2 34.Rxd2 Re7 { Why not Rxe5? John must've wanted to keep his two bishops. } 35.Bb3 Kg7 36.Nxf7 Bb8 37.f3 { Nd8 might have been better? } Bf4 38.Rd3 Bg3 39.Rd1 Re3 40.Nd8 Bc8 41.Bd5 Bf5 42.Bb7 Rd3 43.Ke2 Rb3 44.Bxa6 Rxb4 45.Nc6 Rb2+ 46.Rd2 Rb1 { Threatening Re1#} 47.Rd1 ½-½

Spiny Norman
19-09-2004, 09:46 PM
Here's another game where John beat me fairly comfortably ... the game is only notable in my memory because it started:

1. d4 Nc6

and turned into a sort of mirror image Alekhine defense. I thought things were working out OK up until I went astray on move 13.

Event: Informal game
Site: Ringwood Chess Club
Date: 3/6/1982
White: Butler, John (1780)
Black: Frost, Stephen (1390)
Result: 1-0
ECO: A40

1.d4 Nc6 2.d5 Ne5 3.e4 e6 4.f4 Ng6 5.c4 Bc5 6.Nf3 exd5 7.cxd5 d6 8.Nc3 N8e7 9.Bc4 0-0 10.Bd2 Re8 11.Na4 Bb6 12.Nxb6 axb6 13.0-0 Kh8 14.f5 Nxf5 15.exf5 Bxf5 16.Ng5 Qd7 17.Qh5 Ne5 18.Rae1 Bg6 19.Qh4 h6 20.Bc3 Kg8 21.Nf3 Nxf3+ 22.gxf3 Rxe1 23.Rxe1 Re8 24.Rxe8+ Qxe8 25.Qd4 f6 26.Bf1 Bh5 27.Kf2 Qg6 28.Bd3 Qg5 29.Qe4 Kf7 30.Qe6+ Kf8 31.Qc8+ Be8 32.Bb5 Qh4+ 33.Ke3 Qg5+ 34.Kd3 Qg6+ 35.Kc4 Qf7 36.Qxb7 Bxb5+ 37.Kxb5 Qd7+ 38.Qc6 Ke7 39.Qxd7+ Kxd7 40.a4 1-0

ursogr8
20-09-2004, 08:36 AM
2. The Search for New Premises
1. Background.
In 1992 Box Hill Chess Club celebrated its 40th anniversary. By then, the number of active Club members was down to 35. Most members had been attending the club for over twenty years and were 50 years old or older. In club competitions one not only played the same opponents again and again but could also predict with reasonable certainty which round they would meet. The general picture was of stability but also of stagnation.
In the next few years it had become apparent that the number of active members was slowly but steadily decreasing. Some members left because of lack of interest or moved away upon retirement. The club was not able to attract younger members to offset the loss of the older players. The few younger players who came to the club did not stay for long.
Over the years, many chess clubs in Melbourne have disappeared. The experience has been that a minimum number of active members needed to keep a chess club going is about twenty, and when this critical mass is reached a club is well on its way to oblivion. Already in the Committee minutes of 11.12.1992 it was stated: “We are concerned about membership”.
In the mid-nineties the number of players in Box Hill Chess Club competitions regularly dipped below 30 and the Club Committee started to look into ways of stopping the decline in membership. To achieve this, advertising, improving the clubrooms at the Tennis Pavilion at Irving Avenue and attracting younger players were considered.
In 1993 John Lavery and Arie Meydan started to look for new premises in Doncaster. The idea was that by moving to the adjacent suburb, not only would modern premises become available, but also this would make the club more accessible to the pool of chess players who lived in the northern suburbs. A motion to approve on principle the relocation to Doncaster and to empower the Club Committee to negotiate for new premises was put to the 1993 AGM. After a lengthy discussion on how to arrest the decline in membership the motion was lost.
In the next two years various initiatives to attract members were tried. Publicity in the local paper and the community radio was sought. The club arranged promotional stalls in the ANZAC Day activities run by the Whitehorse Council and at the Warrandyte Festival. A visitor’s book was started to facilitate keeping in touch with visitors. A motion was passed to allow visitors to play in clubs tournaments, and visitors fees were waived for chess players younger than 21. A mentor scheme for new members was introduced and a kit for new members was updated and reprinted.
These initiatives were moderately successful and a few new players, most of them young, joined the club. Another, unexpected source of new players was the discontinued Croydon Chess Club, which was absorbed into the Box Hill Chess Club on 04.02.1996.
In the 1995-96 annual report, the then President, Arie Meydan, said: “There is no doubt that the absorption of new members has dispersed, I hope for ever, the clouds of stagnation which have recently hovered above our club. ….. However, the increase in membership and the poor conditions of the current clubrooms might put us under pressure to find alternative accommodation much earlier. Even though there is no urgency, the Committee will be on the lookout for new premises.”
To assist with the development of the newly acquired junior members and the rejuvenation of the Club, on 21.04.1996 the Committee decided to set up a Coaching Scheme for juniors and to apply to the City of Whitehorse Council for an establishment grant. The submission to the City of Whitehorse was prepared by the Treasurer, Trevor Stanning and was successful. The $1000 grant allowed the club to get a paid coach and to create the Coaching Scheme for juniors. Initially, the program was to be run on Tuesdays. This turned out to be highly unsatisfactory, because the participants either had to be brought to the Club by their parents twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fridays, or to miss the regular Friday competition. The coaching of juniors was transferred to Friday to be run before the regular chess program for seniors. This caused administrative problems, including a clash with late tennis players during summer. It became obvious that the limitations of the Tennis Pavilion were adversely affecting the Coaching Scheme for juniors.
By 1996 the danger to the club future was over, but the increase in membership, the establishment of the Coaching Scheme for juniors and the gradual deterioration of the premises’ condition made the search for alternative clubrooms imperative.
2. Irving Avenue Tennis Pavilion.
The Box Hill Chess Club had used the Tennis Pavilion since 1959. It could accommodate a maximum of 44 players, had no air-conditioning and the overall playing conditions there were poor. The landlord, the St Peters Anglican Church Tennis Club, had neither the money nor the motivation to upgrade the premises and the place was poorly maintained. In the 04.21.1996 meeting the Committee asked the Secretary to write to the landlord, requesting the repair of the dangerously damaged floorboards, the removal of the unserviceable refrigerator and the replacement of light globes. This was in addition to previous problems the club had experienced with a faulty urn and unhygienic toilets, occasionally with no toilet paper.
Due to its location next to a park the Tennis Pavilion also suffered from security problems. On one occasion the club was broken into and on a few other occasions, there were attempts to break into or steal members’ cars parked on Irving Avenue. In the 1995-96 annual report the following instructions to members were included: “If you are one of the last to leave on Friday night, please stick around for a few minutes to make sure that: a. All cars will start. b. The person locking the gate is not mugged by undesirables lurking in the park nearby.”
However, it was a heat wave in December 1996, which made it clear that a permanent move to an air-conditioned venue was not only desirable but essential. On one memorable Friday the heat was so unbearable that some players were rushing outside as soon as they pressed the clock, others agreed on a draw so they could go home.
3. The search for new premises.
On 29.09.1996 the Committee gave the President the task to search for alternative premises. Bill Collins was the only Committee member who opposed such a move, arguing that better premises would be much more expensive and thus the cost of such a lease might require raising membership fees to unacceptable levels.
Following this meeting, Gerrit Hartland, John Kable and Arie Meydan formed a sub-committee to search for and to evaluate prospective venues. A list of search criteria was prepared, the most important one being the cost of leasing. In 1995 Box Hill Chess Club paid to the landlord of the Tennis Pavilion $760/year or about $12 a night. The sub-committee agreed that it would be too difficult for the club to pay more than double this sum. This ruled out any commercially owned premises and limited the sub-committee to considering only those premises under the control of a community organization.
The list of criteria included the following: long term lease, sufficient space, sufficient lighting, air-conditioning, access to male and female toilets, adequate parking, availability of tables and chairs, equipment storage and general security.
Eventually, after several weeks of looking at prospective venues, two locations were short-listed: The Senior Citizens Club at 79 Carrington Road Box Hill and a Baptist Church at the corner of Ellingworth Parade and Station Street. The Senior Citizens Club was chosen. The sub-committee thought that because the Senior Citizens Club belonged to the City of Whitehorse it would provide a better long-term lease security than the Church Hall. Also, because in the previous years the Club had developed an amicable relationship with the City of Whitehorse Council administration, the sub-committee thought that this would make the negotiation process easier.
4. The move to the Box Hill Senior Citizens Club.
The subcommittee reported on its activities to the full Committee on 02.03.1997 and recommended leasing the dining hall at the Box Hill Senior Citizens Club. The Committee then empowered the President to complete the tenancy negotiations with the City of Whitehorse. These were successfully concluded in March 97. The tenancy agreement and the practical details of moving to and occupying the premises were sorted out by direct negotiation between our Captain Gerrit Hartland and Mrs. Helen Trotter, the manager of the Box Hill Senior Citizens Club.
Initially, the plan was to shift to the Senior Citizens Club during Easter, so that the forthcoming AGM on the 04.04.1997 would take place at the new premises. Because of a scheduled treatment of the floor, the move was postponed until the first weekend in May. Eventually, the move to the new premises took place on 05.05.1997. Coordinated by Gerrit Hartland, who was the Action Officer, and with the help of many enthusiastic volunteers, the shift to the new premises went smoothly.
The Club agreed to lease the dining hall on Fridays for $1045 a year. The following year, 1997/98, due to our need to also use the adjacent hall for coaching of juniors, our annual lease increased to $1485, still below the maximum limit imposed by the sub-committee.
Now, five years later, celebrating the 50 years of the Box Hill Chess Club, it may be safely concluded that the move to the Box Hill Senior Citizens Club has been remarkably successful. The move to the new premises and the establishment of the Juniors Coaching program have been the major factors in transforming a small and stagnant club into the largest and probably the most active chess club in Australia.

ursogr8
21-09-2004, 08:03 AM
6. Life Members
Life Member … Gordon Wilby

Gordon first joined the Club during the 1980’s and found it difficult for many months, perhaps even years, to win a serious tournament game. It became clear that Gordon was reading books and making a concerted effort to get ‘off the bottom’ of the rating table. Many of us took great pleasure when he won his first game because he had displayed unfailing good humour during his struggle to improve.
In fact Gordon’s humour came to be a calling card as his first item of business each night on arrival at the Club was to relate a joke of the week. In this endeavour a good mate Tom Kenney joined him as they shared good humour and sought to improve their rating position.
Gordon was first to arrive at the Club each evening and became instrumental in setting up tables and sets. He made himself available to make useful wooden items for the Club. These included a Box Hill Chess Club sign, various honour boards, and finally the handsome Autumn Cup trophy.
The Committee recognised Gordon’s contribution to Club harmony, and various wooden artefacts and his Life membership was proposed to and accepted at the AGM. Sadly Gordon was diagnosed with a serious illness and we watched in regret as the effect on his constitution became evident. Never, however, did it dilute his pleasant outlook on life.

ursogr8
22-09-2004, 08:18 AM
6.2 Life Members
Life Member … John Illingworth


John learnt to play chess at school by watching the games of senior scholars. He can’t recall receiving any instructions on strategy such as openings etc., but depended on observation alone.
In 1958 he emigrated from England and took up residence in Elwood and shortly thereafter he became a member of the Melbourne Chess Club and stayed there for seven years. In 1965 he moved to Burwood and joined the Box Hill Chess Club where he has been a member ever since. He was appointed Secretary in 1980 and served in that position until 1990. John served as President in 1993 and 1994 and was recognised with Life Membership shortly after.
He was until recently a frequent member of the Box Hill group who travelled to Ballarat for the Begonia Festival chess tournament. The bond from those who have made these trips has given Box Hill a strong management at Committee level. John was also a keen golfer and he has had to give away this treasured activity due to a recent shoulder problem. John’s chess playing style has been to move decisively and quickly. This has led to some good victories but also some defeats by up-and-coming juniors. John has generously supported fund-raising efforts to send juniors to World titles.
Sadly, John passed away on 20/12/2002. Although not one of our strongest players John was a terrific club member who served as Club Secretary for many years and was President in 1993 and 1994. He was elected an honorary life member in 1979 and by his service to the club repaid the honour many times over.

ursogr8
23-09-2004, 08:30 AM
8. Box Hill Chess Club Champions 1952 - 2002

The first Club champion was Brian Robson, and he repeated this accomplishment on four occasions through to 1957. In 2002 a play-off was required to decide between Denis Bourmistrov and Michael Gluzman. In Chris Depasquale’s words (The AGE, 22/6/2002) the field of 127 players in the 2002 Box Hill Championship is an astonishing strength in our 50th year.
For me the Championship has always been the highlight of our calendar year. My favourite year was 1990 when no less than 6 players were involved in a play-off for first. Remarkable for the 6-way tie, and remarkable that 3 Club CHAMPIONS/OPEN winners played in that year but did not make the 6-way tie!


1952 Brian Robson
1953 J. Duncan
1954 Brian Robson
1955 Brian Robson
1956 Brian Robson
1957 Brian Robson
1958 J. Smith
1959 J. Smith
1960 Ken Higson
1961 Ken Higson
1962 Geoff Amos
1963 A. Thorvaldsen
1964 Bill Kerr
1965 Bill Kerr
1966 Geoff Amos
1967 Geoff Amos
1968 Robin Hill
1969 Gerald Lewison
1970 Gerald Lewison
1971 Brian Minto
1972 Robin Hill
1973 Robin Hill
1974 Greg Frean
1975 Greg Frean
1976 Greg Frean
1977 Greg Frean
1978 Greg Frean
1979 Richard White
1980 Bill Collins
1981 John Kable
1982 Michael Cowen
1983 Michael Cowen
1984 Michael Cowen
1985 Bill Collins
1986 Peter Morris
1987 Christian Craciun
1988 Christian Craciun
1989 Peter Hawkesworth
1990 Peter Hawkesworth
1991 Rod Macfarlan
1992 John Kable
1993 Arie Meydan
1994 David Flude
1995 John Kable
1996 Bill Collins
1997 Marcus Raine
1998 Tuan Le
1999 Leon Kempen
2000 Michael Gluzman
2001 Michael Gluzman
2002 Michael Gluzman
2003 Sam Chow
2004 Tim Anderson

ursogr8
24-09-2004, 07:38 AM
6.3 Life Member … Charles Herbert


Charlie, as he was called by most, was a wise President who served the Club in that capacity on four separate occasions. I can rarely recall watching any other chess player who sat so calmly at the chessboard considering his move. It was almost as though it was enough pleasure for Charlie to think about a move as actually make it. He really enjoyed long drawn out games. After his passing away Charles Herbert’s two sons attended an annual general meeting at the Club to present a shield to be awarded each year recognising service to the Club. I know each annual recipient appreciates this award.

ursogr8
30-09-2004, 08:29 AM
6.4. . Life Member … John Kable


John declares his DOB as 16th June 1924 and he would be one of the few venerables at the Box Hill Chess Club to be as forthcoming with his age (which makes awarding of ‘senior’ prizes quite controversial on occasions). John was taught how to play chess by his father in 1931 and joined Box Hill in 1969. He has four times been Club President and the Committee has stayed on course many times because of John’s wise counsel for tradition and high standards.
A feature of the Club’s time at the Irving Avenue pavilion was the honour board displays of past office-bearers and champions. John contributed the original board and maintained the lettering over many years. The 2004 Committee has succeeded in getting these boards taken out of storage and resume permanent display at the Senior Citizens premises. (starter edit: See Amiel's photographs on the VIC OPEN thread. Post #190 at
http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=303&page=13&pp=15).
John has mentored Marieke van Dijk and Norm Wilson in the role of Secretary in recent years. This passing on of skill and knowledge is the key to the continued functioning of a voluntary Committee.
If you scan the internet chess sites for any length of time you will spy John Kable’s name in quite a few articles discussing historical events. John has maintained some invaluable sources and records over many years of collecting chess literature.
John was asked for “…a game or incident that he would like included”. He volunteered his winning of the Inaugural Lightning Championship at the Club. Incidentally, if you look carefully at the trophy you will see that the Cup was donated by John himself. We should also note that John was Club champion in 1981, 1992, and 1995; given the strength of fields today John’s name on the Champions trophy will be a source of great pride.

ursogr8
03-10-2004, 09:24 AM
6.5. Life Member … Gerrit Hartland


Gerrit Hartland’s career as an Architect is usually associated with creativity and he has certainly provided that to all aspects of the development of the Box Hill Chess Club. As Club Captain he has been responsible for the design of the calendar of events and further he has been Director of Play for events that are notable for adherence to good playing standards and prompt up-to-date cross-tables.
His contribution to chess administration involved a term as Australian Chess Federation President, for which he was awarded Honorary Life membership, and also as the organiser of the Australian Junior Championships. Gerrit is also an Honorary Life member of the Victorian Chess Assocoaition (which recently changed its name to CHESS Victoria). Further, he has performed the role of fund-raiser to assist juniors (who are Australian Titleholders) to travel to the World Junior Championships. These include Denis Bourmistrov, Michelle Lee, Ruperto Lugo, and Andjelija Zivanovic.
Gerrit has encouraged the Box Hill Chess Club to open two nights each week, to have formal junior coaching, to have monthly junior tournaments on Sundays, and to advertise our facilities through schools.
After his retirement from the architectural profession Gerrit embarked on a learning curve to bring computerisation to the administration of our Club. Even with the advent of growth in membership to 160, and the sophistication of computer pairings, Gerrit has never wavered on the principle of recognizing the best performing players in all Divisions.
Recently, Gerrit has applied much energy to the Whitehorse Junior Chess Inc. (WHJ) which has been formed to promote the development of junior chess in the Box Hill district. Due to Gerrit’s relationship with the Whitehorse Council and local retailers a significant amount of sponsorship money has been attracted to the chess community. The WHJCL has also taken over the coffee club roster for our major events. Gerrit has thus engaged parents to become involved in Club activities and to have a say in directing any coffee club profits to junior development.
At a time when many other chess clubs are struggling to stay in existence Box Hill has enjoyed a golden period of growth. This is no doubt due to the voluntary contribution of people like Gerrit Hartland and his ability to motivate other volunteers to take on a vision of something new and see it through.

ursogr8
04-10-2004, 08:59 AM
6.6. Life Member … E. Saul

Although we have very few Club archives that remind us of Ernie’s contribution his name arose annually as we played a handicap event known as the Saul Cup. The handicaps applicable were based on taking some pieces off the board at the start of the game. The most common handicap was for Black to give up his King Bishop pawn. For many years the event was played as a knock-out during January and February and low-rated players frequently found themselves as potential winners. The event was abandoned in the year 2000 as the Committee felt that membership support for a handicap event was divided. In his commercial life it is believed that Ernie was a Stationmaster.

ursogr8
05-10-2004, 07:47 AM
6.7. Life Member … Don Nunn

Don was awarded life membership for sponsoring a large tournament celebrating Box Hill Chess Club’s first 25 years of existence. Participants included the famous Cecil Purdy and Ian Rogers, who won the event. The event was called the 1977 Box Hill Jubilee OPEN.

ursogr8
07-10-2004, 09:33 AM
7. Box Hill Chess Club Presidents 1952 - 2002
The names of the Box Hill Chess Club Presidents are inscribed on an honour board at the Club. Until recent years this board has been hidden from view as a consequence of us being a tenant at the Senior Citizens Club. The contribution of the individuals who feature on the honour board deserves more.
Publication of the names in the 50th Celebration publication is a first step to rectifying the low profile. As a second step, the recognition of the service of these Club members is now on the Club web-site.
A feature of the Club in the early years was the rotation of the Presidency amongst many Club members. This surely represented a healthy situation for new ideas and energy. It was a commendable policy given the small nature of the Club in those days. I hope these remarks here will encourage new volunteers into Committee positions, including the prestigious Presidential role.
1952 E. Saul
1953 A Hall
1954 S. Rowell
1955 A. Brown
1956 M. Gold
1957 A. Hall
1958 A. Brown
1959 B. Robson
1960 A. Hart
1961 C. Herbert
1962 K. Higson
1963 E. Sholl
1964 E. Sholl
1965 A. Jones
1966 A. Thorvaldsen
1967 C. Herbert
1968 S. Clifton
1969 A. Cottingham
1970 C. Herbert
1971 E. Stannard
1972 J. Kable
1973 D. Nunn
1974 G. Lewison
1975 F van der Linde
1976 H. Liston
1977 N. Davis
1978 W. Collins
1979 J. Kable
1980 J. Kable
1981 G. Hartland
1982 H. Liston
1983 H. Liston
1984 F. van der Linde
1985 F. van der Linde
1986 J. Lavery
1987 J. Lavery
1988 C.Herbert
1989 C. Herbert
1990 J. Kable
1991 J. Kable
1992 G. Hartland
1993 J. Illingworth
1994 J. Illingworth
1995 A. Meydan
1996 A. Meydan
1997 R. Exner
1998 R. Exner
1999 J. Kable
2000 J. Kable
2001 A. Meydan
2002 A. Meydan
2003 H. Liston
2004 H.Liston

Commentator
07-10-2004, 08:41 PM
7. Box Hill Chess Club Presidents 1952 - 2002

1982 H. Liston
1983 H. Liston
1984 F. van der Linde
1985 F. van der Linde
1986 J. Lavery
1987 J. Lavery
1988 C.Herbert
1989 C. Herbert
1990 J. Kable
1991 J. Kable
1992 G. Hartland
1993 J. Illingworth
1994 J. Illingworth
1995 A. Meydan
1996 A. Meydan
1997 R. Exner
1998 R. Exner
1999 J. Kable
2000 J. Kable
2001 A. Meydan
2002 A. Meydan
2003 H. Liston
2004 H.Liston

Is it the policy of the Club to have Presidents for 2 years or just the practice?

ursogr8
11-10-2004, 01:24 PM
8. Box Hill Chess Club Champions 1952 - 2004

The first Club champion was Brian Robson, and he repeated this accomplishment on four occasions through to 1957. In 2002 a play-off was required to decide between Denis Bourmistrov and Michael Gluzman. In Chris Depasquale’s words (The AGE, 22/6/2002) the field of 127 players in the 2002 Box Hill Championship is an astonishing strength in our 50th year.
For me the Championship has always been the highlight of our calendar year. My favourite year was 1990 when no less than 6 players were involved in a play-off for first. Remarkable for the 6-way tie, and remarkable that 3 Club CHAMPIONS/OPEN winners played in that year but did not make the 6-way tie!

1952 Brian Robson
1953 J. Duncan
1954 Brian Robson
1955 Brian Robson
1956 Brian Robson
1957 Brian Robson
1958 J. Smith
1959 J. Smith
1960 Ken Higson
1961 Ken Higson
1962 Geoff Amos
1963 A. Thorvaldsen
1964 Bill Kerr
1965 Bill Kerr
1966 Geoff Amos
1967 Geoff Amos
1968 Robin Hill
1969 Gerald Lewison
1970 Gerald Lewison
1971 Brian Minton
1972 Robin Hill
1973 Robin Hill
1974 Greg Frean
1975 Greg Frean
1976 Greg Frean
1977 Gregory Frean
1978 Gregory Frean
1979 Richard White
1980 Bill Collins
1981 John Kable
1982 Michael Cowen
1983 Michael Cowen
1984 Michael Cowen
1985 Bill Collins
1986 Peter Morris
1987 Christian Craciun
1988 Christian Craciun
1989 Peter Hawkesworth
1990 Peter Hawkesworth
1991 Rod Macfarlan
1992 John Kable
1993 Arie Meydan
1994 David Flude
1995 John Kable
1996 Bill Collins
1997 Marcus Raine
1998 Tuan Le
1999 Leon Kempen
2000 Michael Gluzman
2001 Michael Gluzman
2002 Michael Gluzman
2003 Sam Chow
2004 Tim Anderson

ursogr8
12-10-2004, 08:01 AM
10. Box Hill Chess Club LIGHTNING tourney winners 1988 - 2003
Although Lightning tournaments were held periodically in the Club in earlier years it was not until 1988 that Fred van der Linde, the then-Captain, inaugurated a Lightning Championship to be contested annually. John Kable recognised the event with a perpetual cup.
The speed of play in this event has not been a favourite of all members and the field size does not match the Championship entries. However, our game of chess is rich because we can contest variants such as correspondence chess, Internet chess, rapid chess, lightning chess as well as championship rates of play. Different skills come into play for each variant and each individual can delight in his own preference.
1988 John Kable
1989 John Kable
1990 David Flude
1991 Peter Hawkesworth
1992 Bill Collins
1993 Trevor Stanning
1994 John Kable
1995 Trevor Stanning
1996 Greg Grose
1997 Natalie Mills
1998 Bill Collins
1999 Dimitri Partsi
2000 Tuan Le
2001 Marcus Raine
2002 David Small
2003 Peter Froehlich

ursogr8
13-10-2004, 08:04 AM
The Box Hill Chess Club AUTUMN CUP gained prominence in 1993 as the Club copied a good naming idea from the Dandenong Chess Club, and we elevated a small Club event into the full focus of recording winners on a trophy. The first winner was David Flude and to commemorate the occasion he donated the materials for a handsome trophy which Life member Gordon Wilby turned from wood.
Although we copied the naming idea from the DCC we still have a bit to learn because we play our tournament mainly in summer, with the finish just in autumn.
1993 David Flude
1994 Rolf Exner
1995 David Flude
1996 Bill Collins
1997 Tuan Le
1998 Michael Woodhams
1999 Bill Collins
2000 Michael Gluzman
2001 Michael Gluzman
2002 Michael Gluzman
2003 Sam Chow
2004 Geoff Saw

Recherché
13-10-2004, 10:45 AM
2004 Geoff Saw

With full points too, as I recall. The Geoff Saw Tournament Sightings Appreciation Society awaits with bated breath his next appearance. :)

ursogr8
14-10-2004, 11:37 AM
13. From Garry Lycett


I first joined Box Hill Chess Club as a twelve-year-old in 1972. I had learnt the moves about a year prior to that but it was the interest caused by the Fischer - Spassky match that made my parents find out about a chess club for me to join. I left the club in 1978 and then after about twenty years joined first Waverley, then Dandenong and finally Box Hill for the second time.

The first tournament I played was the Box Hill Open, which began the week I joined, I lost the first eight rounds but managed a comprehensive victory in the ninth, on forfeit. The player who forfeited to me was Alan Elliot who I played for the first time two weeks ago; I won again.

There are a number of differences between the 1972 chess club and the 2002 version. I was at the time one of very few juniors playing at Box Hill. Greg Frean and Bill Jordan* were there, Bill Collins joined shortly after me. A young Stephen Solomon joined the club about 1974, I was able to beat him at first but looking at my old scoresheets the 1976 Vic U16's was the last time, after that he slaughtered me.

(*Interestingly when I started playing chess again I went to a tournament at Melbourne Chess Club where I saw a player leaning forward and rubbing his hands together beneath the table, although he looked completely different I knew it was Bill Jordan as he had that habit
back in 1972).

Now there is a large junior contingent, many of whom are very good due to the coaching they receive. I remember in 1976 first starting a junior club with Greg Frean. I would open up the clubhouse at 6.00 and the kids would arrive, to be coached by Greg with me assisting. I was amazed when in 1997 I met Ken Holt at Waverley Chess Club who was one of the kids in that group.

When I look at the current facilities I can't help but remember the Tennis Pavilion in Irving Ave where the chess club was originally. Not only was it much smaller, but back then you could smoke. Charlie Herbert’s cigars and everyone else’s cigarettes would result in a thick cloud of smoke that would be unthinkable today.

There used to be a knockout tournament, the Saul Cup (I think), that was also a handicap event. Rating differences determined the handicap given. As a knockout it was meant to go five weeks with thirty-two people whittled down to two. Being lowly rated I got between pawn and move up to a knight against the final opponent. But by drawing and then winning the quarter-final against Gerrit Hartland and the semi-final against Grant Crocker, and then drawing the first game of the final, I think everyone was sick of the event as it had now gone three weeks longer than it should have. I lost the final in the end.

I remember the second game against Grant Crocker only because it ended with my King and Queen against his King and two connected pawns. After the game Ian Rogers, (a very promising junior at the time), sat down and analysed the ending with us. Although saying I played well to win it, he then showed me all the mistakes we had both made. Ian was there playing a simul. to raise money to go to France and play in the World Cadet (U16) Chp. He finished 3rd, ahead of a then unknown G. Kasparov.

That knockout handicap event was probably one of my best events in the five years I was at the club, I never won an event although I did progress in the Club Championship from the Minor to the Major to the Championship itself. It was held as three separate events back then and you had to qualify from the lower event to play the higher event the following year. I also played B and C Grade Interclub for Box Hill, back then it was held, (Tuesday nights I think), at the Melbourne Chess Club in Elizabeth St. John Illingworth used to drive me there and back.

Probably the biggest event held by Box Hill up to then was the 1977 Jubilee Open.
Attracting players from NSW it included Robert Jamieson, Terry Shaw, Doug Hamilton
and some other promising juniors Guy West and Darryl Johansen. Also playing was
CJS Purdy, (who I believe died not long after), the author of the first two chess books
I owned, and still have. 'Chess Made Easy' and 'How Fischer Won'. Another player was
that other promising junior Ian Rogers who won the event with the remarkable score against
the best players in the country of 9/9. It was held at the Community Centre over a very long weekend.
Guy West beat me in the first round but I remember beating Bill Collins in the second. He was a better player than me and swore he would never lose or draw to me again. He never did and in the first tournament I played at Box Hill for over twenty years I met him in the first round. He beat me again.

I was on the committee in 1976, (or 1975 ?), when Neil Davis was president. I think I was too young to say anything back then and spent the entire committee meetings mute. Other members on the committee however included John Kable and the then, (now and forever?), club captain Gerrit Hartland.

But no matter how much things have changed some things remain the same. Not long after rejoining the club I was drawn to play John Kable, I looked up my old scoresheets and found some games I had played and lost against him twenty-three years earlier. I prepared my opening based on these and unbelievably John played exactly the same, and by playing what I should have played all that time ago I exacted my revenge.

ursogr8
15-10-2004, 08:05 AM
The Box Hill Chess Club has been smoke-free since March, 1992. Using a Monash University Policy Paper headed “Policy with respect to Smoking” to support the proposal, I arranged for a motion to be debated at the 1992 Annual General Meeting that would declare the Club smoke-free.
Some of our members had misgivings about such a proposal, fearing that the inveterate smokers amongst our membership would leave the Club if the motion were carried, but when it came to the point nobody spoke against it and we lost only one member.
We were not the first chess body to ban smoking. Some years earlier Gerrit Hartland, during his term as president of the Australian Chess Federation, had succeeded in having all ACF venues declared smoke-free.

(written by John Kable)


starter

ursogr8
17-10-2004, 08:04 AM
In recent years, with the recording of the members register on computer, we are fortunate that statistical details can be easily maintained and retained. The details are not to hand from fifty years ago.
The growth in membership can be seen in the table below. Although details for earlier years are not recorded the collective memory of ‘oldies’ at the Club is that 40 was the maximum for the first 40 years.

1995-1996 30 members
1996-1997 50 members
1997-1998 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members

In 1996 the Croydon Chess Club folded and a number of members transferred to Box Hill. Croydon generously donated their equipment assets to Box Hill. Croydon members were welcomed with free entry into the Box Hill Open in that year.

Spiny Norman
17-10-2004, 08:06 AM
1997-1998 30 members
1997-1999 50 members
1997-2000 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members


.... an analysis of the success factors behind that growth should be of interest to all clubs I would have thought. I'm certainly interested as you know!

ursogr8
18-10-2004, 08:15 AM
15. Taught by a World Champion: Marieke Van Dijk
( article by Howard Liston)
Funny things happen at the Rookies Cup. I took my son along to play in the last Rookies Cup of the Jubilee year and was promptly “encouraged” by Gerry Hartland to play in it myself, to make up the numbers. (At least I am useful for something)
My first game was against Marieke, that kindly lady who helps out in so many ways – club secretary; setting up and putting away chess sets on club nights and tournaments; playing the odd game when a youngster would otherwise have a bye; assisting on Tuesdays with the Whitehorse Juniors.
The game finished a little early, so we had the chance for a chat. Marieke got to talking about her school days at a grammar school in the Netherlands, where she had this very nice gentleman as a maths teacher and who, by the way, also started a chess club.
She mentioned his name – sounded like Hughie or something. (See note below)
Being a maths teacher myself, I quickly put 2 and 2 together and arrived at the correct answer.
(I leave the working as an exercise for the reader)
Nice gentleman + maths teacher + Netherlands + chess = Dr. Max Euwe, World Chess Champion 1935 to 1937.
So a chance conversation had led to a most interesting link between our club and a very well known chess player, author of many books on chess and president of FIDE for many years.
Marieke went on to tell about the World Championship rematch in 1937 between Alekhine and Euwe. This match was played, like the original 1935 match, in many different locations. One of these places was the school Marieke attended. She related how, while the games were in progress, the moves were read out over the loudspeakers into the classrooms. The students would discuss the moves, try to anticipate the next move, and generally had a great time. (After all, they got to play games in school instead of doing “real” work – anticipating the future?)
As is well known, after Alekhine won the Championship back and promptly died shortly after the war, the world championship was taken over by FIDE. And that is another story.
(Note: Marieke, when first relating the story, and probably allowing for her listener, a crass Australian (she was half right), pronounced Euwe to sound like you-ie. (In fact this is exactly how I used to pronounce it back in 1972 until some “friends” of mine, after having a great giggle, told me the correct pronunciation.) Marieke then also gave the correct, uhr-vuh, pronunciation.)

Bill Gletsos
18-10-2004, 12:39 PM
In recent years, with the recording of the members register on computer, we are fortunate that statistical details can be easily maintained and retained. The details are not to hand from fifty years ago.
The growth in membership can be seen in the table below. Although details for earlier years are not recorded the collective memory of ‘oldies’ at the Club is that 40 was the maximum for the first 40 years.

1997-1998 30 members
1997-1999 50 members
1997-2000 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members

In 1996 the Croydon Chess Club folded and a number of members transferred to Box Hill. Croydon generously donated their equipment assets to Box Hill. Croydon members were welcomed with free entry into the Box Hill Open in that year.
Care to explain the multiple year 1997-1999 and 1997-2000 numbers in relation to the other year figures.

Recherché
18-10-2004, 12:47 PM
^My guess would be that the correct table would look like this:

1995-1996 30 members
1996-1997 50 members
1997-1998 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members

Bill Gletsos
18-10-2004, 12:55 PM
^My guess would be that the correct table would look like this:

1995-1996 30 members
1996-1997 50 members
1997-1998 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members
So I suspect, but I thought I would ask rather than speculate.

Recherché
18-10-2004, 12:58 PM
The other possibility is that it has something to do with Whitehore Junior Chess, but I doubt it. Now if only I could lay hands upon my copy of the anniversary publication...

ursogr8
18-10-2004, 01:00 PM
^My guess would be that the correct table would look like this:

1995-1996 30 members
1996-1997 50 members
1997-1998 100 members
1998-1999 110 members
1999-2000 130 members
2000-2001 180 members

Bill

Rob has got it correct.
Now that I look back to the source of the original I see that autoformat plays havoc with copy-paste for some reason.

Unfortunately I can't correct because K.'s latest change.

starter

Recherché
18-10-2004, 01:03 PM
^ I'm sure one of the moderators will be kind enough to fix it when and if they stroll by. A private message would probably hurry up the process if you think it's important enough.

Bill Gletsos
21-10-2004, 12:33 PM
^ I'm sure one of the moderators will be kind enough to fix it when and if they stroll by. A private message would probably hurry up the process if you think it's important enough.
I see Barry did it but I dont think it mattered as anyone reading it hopefully would have followed the posts following it.

Rincewind
21-10-2004, 02:06 PM
I see Barry did it but I dont think it mattered as anyone reading it hopefully would have followed the posts following it.

In some ways fixing the original post makes the thread more confusing as new readers can't follow what the problem was. However, crime novel fans could always look for clues in your post which quoted the original table.

Bill Gletsos
21-10-2004, 02:13 PM
In some ways fixing the original post makes the thread more confusing as new readers can't follow what the problem was. However, crime novel fans could always look for clues in your post which quoted the original table.
True.
I wasnt suggesting you should not have changed it but was just commenting that as far as Recherché's original suggestion was concerned that it didnt really matter.

ursogr8
21-10-2004, 02:27 PM
In some ways fixing the original post makes the thread more confusing as new readers can't follow what the problem was. However, crime novel fans could always look for clues in your post which quoted the original table.

Sorry Baz
I didn't realise it was going to turn into one your puzzle thingies.
Otherwise I would not have pasted >>

Auto Format did it, with the Cntl_C key, at the laptop.

I guess I have given it all away, eh?

starter

ursogr8
15-11-2004, 12:30 PM
9. Box Hill Chess Club OPEN winners 1971 - 2002
From records that we have inspected, the Box Hill Chess Club OPEN seems to have first been held in 1971. The full list of winners contains at least 5 members of Australian Chess Olympic teams. The strongest fields assembled occurred when Robert Jamieson used the event as a tune-up for an Olympiad to be held later in that year.
1971 Michael Winslade
1972 Greg Frean
1973 Neil Davis
1974 Guy West
1975 Olgerts Bergmanis
1976 Olgerts Bergmanis
1977 Bill Collins
1978 Gerald Lewison/ Ken Higson
1979 Bill Collins
1980 Stephen Solomon
1981 Stephen Solomon
1982 Robert Jamieson
1983 Stephen Solomon
1984 Peter Hodgetts
1985 Richard White
1986 Victor Kildisas
1987 Christian Craciun
1988 Jan Revelins/ Adrian Chng
1989 David Flude
1990 John Lavery
1991 Arie Meydan
1992 Robert Jamieson
1993 Peter Schultzer
1994 Victor Kildisas
1995 Marcus Raine
1996 Bill Collins
1997 Guy West
1998 Domagoj Dragicevic
1999 Mirko Rujevic
2000 Samuel Chow
2001 Dimitri Partsi
2002 Denis Bourmistrov
2003 Tuan Le
2004 Peter Froehlich (on c/b from Sam Chow)


starter

ursogr8
08-03-2005, 07:20 PM
Month Queens Cup winner Rookies Cup winner
February 04 Elena Galiabovich Denis Bourmistrov
March 04 Casey Hickman Ruperto Lugo
April 04 Elena Galiabovich Ruperto Lugo
May 04 Shuyu Wang James Morris

July 04 Elena Galiabovich Matthew Potter
August 04 Elena Galiabovich / Susan Sheng Zhigen Lin / Chris Wallis
September 04 Elena Galiabovich / Vanja Rozenblat Denis Bourmistrov
October 04 Vanja Rozenblat Chris Wallis
November 04 Elena Galiabovich James Morris / Eugene Schön


starter

ursogr8
28-03-2005, 08:43 AM
The Box Hill Chess Club AUTUMN CUP gained prominence in 1993 as the Club copied a good naming idea from the Dandenong Chess Club, and we elevated a small Club event into the full focus of recording winners on a trophy. The first winner was David Flude and to commemorate the occasion he donated the materials for a handsome trophy which Life member Gordon Wilby turned from wood.
Although we copied the naming idea from the DCC we still have a bit to learn because we play our tournament mainly in summer, with the finish just in autumn.
1993 David Flude
1994 Rolf Exner
1995 David Flude
1996 Bill Collins
1997 Tuan Le
1998 Michael Woodhams
1999 Bill Collins
2000 Michael Gluzman
2001 Michael Gluzman
2002 Michael Gluzman
2003 Sam Chow
2004 Geoff Saw
2005 Tuan Le, Dimitri Partsi, Domagoj Dragicevic

ursogr8
06-04-2005, 08:36 AM
Announcements from last nights AGM for Box Hill included >

Last year Dusan Stojic won the most improved player award with a ratings increase of 184 followed closely by Denis Bourmistrov. This year Chris Wallis the 2004 winner had no close competition to his massive increase of 402 points. His nearest rival Zhigen Lin gaining a very respectable 293 points. Eugene Schön the winner of the Junior most improved trophy increased his rating by an incredible 490 points.
By the way Zhigen and Chris won the Junior trophies in 2002 and 2003 respectively. The person who gave the club her best shot in 2004 and won the Charles Herbert memorial shield was Kerry Lyall Eugene's mother. Congratulations all


starter

ps Kerry has established a new route for progression from minion to big wheel.
She started a few years back by demonstrating needle-point work on Rookies cup days, progressed to Tea Club organising (with noidea), was promoted to envelope licker for mail-outs, and is now assistant DOP with training wheels. ;)
A valued member, who is now on committee...well done.

ursogr8
09-04-2005, 10:02 PM
10. Box Hill Chess Club LIGHTNING tourney winners 1988 - 2005
Although Lightning tournaments were held periodically in the Club in earlier years it was not until 1988 that Fred van der Linde, the then-Captain, inaugurated a Lightning Championship to be contested annually. John Kable recognised the event with a perpetual cup.
The speed of play in this event has not been a favourite of all members and the field size does not match the Championship entries. However, our game of chess is rich because we can contest variants such as correspondence chess, Internet chess, rapid chess, lightning chess as well as championship rates of play. Different skills come into play for each variant and each individual can delight in his own preference.
1988 John Kable
1989 John Kable
1990 David Flude
1991 Peter Hawkesworth
1992 Bill Collins
1993 Trevor Stanning
1994 John Kable
1995 Trevor Stanning
1996 Greg Grose
1997 Natalie Mills
1998 Bill Collins
1999 Dimitri Partsi
2000 Tuan Le
2001 Marcus Raine
2002 David Small
2003 Peter Froehlich
2004 Denis Bourmistrov
2005 Rukman Vijayakumar


starter

Mischa
09-04-2005, 10:22 PM
Starter, had a query today re: no play offs in Vic junior. Was asked what form of countback will be instigated. hope you can help.

ursogr8
12-04-2005, 01:05 PM
^
Response on the VIC JUNIOR OPEN thread.

Mischa
12-04-2005, 01:26 PM
Got it already, thanks starter

ursogr8
29-12-2005, 03:38 PM
Vale, Adrian Turner (http://www.boxhillchess.org.au/e2005/news/dec.htm#29) , as written by his great friend John Kable.

Adrian will be sadly missed by all at quite a few chess clubs, including Box Hill.


starter

WhiteElephant
29-12-2005, 04:26 PM
That is sad news indeed. I knew Adrian as a member of Waverley and Monash Chess Clubs.

I remember when I first met Adrian, thinking (being a junior) that here was another one of these fuddy duddies that hangs around chess clubs. But when I got to know Adrian, I realised that he was one of the sharpest, kindest and coolest (yes!) people I had ever met. He was always supportive of juniors and it was a privelege playing in a couple of winning Interclub teams with Adrian.

I hadn't seen Adrian for a few years but will always remember him.

ursogr8
08-07-2006, 04:32 PM
Fred van der Linde held many official positions at the Box Hill chess Club in the 70's and 80's. He graduated his efforts to be the editor of the VCA magazine, On The Move. Fred achieved Life membership at Box Hill for his contributions.
Some of his friends who knew him well are preparing material for recognition of Fred's services to chess in Victoria.



starter