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Amir K.
06-09-2010, 08:04 PM
SHANGHAI 2010
pre-qualification for Bilbao 2010
Players:
1. Levon Aronian 2783
2. Vladimir Kramnik 2780
3. Alexei Shirov 2749
4. Wang Hao 2724

Only 2 players will qualify for Bilbao Masters 2010 on 09 October and join Vishy Anand and Magnus Carlsen.

Website: Shanghai 2010 (http://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/2010/en/bilbao-y-el-grand-slam/)

Amir K.
06-09-2010, 08:13 PM
Shirov 2749 vs Wang Hao 2724: Rd 3 / Checkmate - Bishop and Rook vs Rook

Event: Shangahi 2010
Site: ?
Date: 2010.09.05
Round: ?
White: Alexei , Shirov
Black: Wang, Hao
Result: 1-0
ECO: B42
WhiteElo: 2749
BlackElo: 2723
Annotator: ,Microsoft
PlyCount: 129
EventDate: 2010.09.06
SourceDate: 2010.09.06

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Bd3 Nf6 6. O-O Qc7 7. Qe2 d6 8. c4
g6 9. Nc3 Bg7 10. Nf3 O-O 11. Rd1 Nc6 12. Bc2 Nd7 13. Be3 Nde5 14. Bb3 Bd7 15.
Qd2 Nxf3+ 16. gxf3 Qa5 17. Qxd6 Qh5 18. Qg3 Ne5 19. Kg2 Bc6 20. f4 Ng4 21. Bd4
f5 22. f3 Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Ne3+ 24. Kf2 fxe4 25. Kxe3 e5 26. Rxe4 Bxe4 27. f5 Bc6
28. c5+ Kg7 29. Qxe5+ Kh6 30. Qf4+ Qg5 31. Qxg5+ Kxg5 32. Ne4+ Kxf5 33. Rg1 h6
34. Bc2 Rae8 35. Kd4 Rd8+ 36. Nd6+ Ke6 37. Rxg6+ Rf6 38. Bb3+ Ke7 39. Rg7+ Kf8
40. Rh7 Rxf3 41. Be6 b6 42. b4 bxc5+ 43. bxc5 Be8 44. Bd5 Rf2 45. Rh8+ Ke7 46.
Rxh6 Bf7 47. Be4 Rxa2 48. Rh7 Rxd6+ 49. cxd6+ Kxd6 50. Rxf7 Rxh2 51. Rf6+ Ke7
52. Ke5 a5 53. Ra6 Rd2 54. Rh6 Rf2 55. Re6+ Kd7 56. Ra6 Kc7 57. Rc6+ Kd7 58.
Rb6 Rd2 59. Rb7+ Kc8 60. Rh7 Re2 61. Kd5 Kb8 62. Re7 a4 63. Kc6 Rf2 64. Re8+
Ka7 65. Kc5 1-0

Amir K.
06-09-2010, 08:19 PM
Shirov 2749 vs Vladimir Kramnik 2800: Great positional game Rd 4 / Kramnik blundered....

Event: Shanghai Chess Masters 2010
Site: Shanghai, China
Date: 2010.09.06
Round: 4
White: GM_Shirov
Black: GM_Kramnik
Result: 1-0
WhiteElo: 2749
BlackElo: 2780
Opening: Nimzo-Indian: Kmoch variation
ECO: E20
NIC: NI.30
Time: 02:14:14
TimeControl: 5400+0

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 c5 5. d5 b5 6. e4 O-O 7. e5 Ne8 8. f4
exd5 9. cxd5 d6 10. Nf3 c4 11. a4 Bg4 12. axb5 Nd7 13. e6 fxe6 14. dxe6 Nb6
15. Be2 Nc7 16. Ng5 Bxe2 17. Qxe2 d5 18. O-O Qf6 19. f5 Rae8 20. Rxa7 Nxe6
21. Nxe6 Rxe6 22. Qf2 Qe5 23. g4 Rg6 24. Qg2 Rgf6 25. Bf4 Qd4+ 26. Qf2 Qxf2+
27. Kxf2 d4 28. Ne4 R6f7 29. Rxf7 Rxf7 30. Ra1 h6 31. Be5 d3 32. Bd4 Rb7 33.
h4 Bf8 34. Rc1 Nd5 35. Rxc4 Rxb5 36. Rc8 Kf7 37. g5 Ne7 38. Nd6+ {White
wins} 1-0

ER
06-09-2010, 08:24 PM
Shirov!!! In his good days he fears none!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: And I was wondering why he doesn't take the a-Pawn :lol: Thanks Amir!

Amir K.
06-09-2010, 08:34 PM
Shirov!!! In his good days he fears none!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: And I was wondering why he doesn't take the a-Pawn :lol: Thanks Amir!

Yes, JAK, Shirov is playing super chess :clap: .
It was great to watch how Kramnik just blundered under pressure.
Shirov told me before Shanghai that he is little bit rusty but so far every game is just crazy.

ER
06-09-2010, 10:18 PM
Hi Amir are you preparing anything really special this or early next year??? :)
Apart from the 2010 Gold Coast Chess Festival that is! I anticipate we are about to hear some big announcement! :) then I might be wrong, who knows?? :)

Amir K.
07-09-2010, 09:42 PM
Shirov has secured his way to Bilbao Masters 2010 with the win over Wang Hao as black.
Bilbao Masters 2010 scheduled in October:
Carlsen, Anand, Shirov and "?" (Kramnik or Aronian will be known tommorow)



Event: Shanghai Chess Masters 2010
Site: Shanghai, China
Date: 2010.09.07
Round: 5
White: GM_Hao_Wang
Black: GM_Shirov
Result: 0-1
WhiteElo: 2724
BlackElo: 2749
Opening: QGD Slav: 4.e3 Bf5
ECO: D12
NIC: SL.01
Time: 02:14:37
TimeControl: 5400+0

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nh4 Bg6 7. Be2 Nbd7 8.
O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Be2 a6 11. f4 b4 12. Nxg6 hxg6 13. Na4 c5 14. b3 Nd5
15. e4 N5b6 16. Nxb6 Qxb6 17. d5 e5 18. Bg4 Bd6 19. Bxd7+ Kxd7 20. Qg4+ Ke8
21. Kh1 Qd8 22. g3 Qd7 23. f5 Kf8 24. Be3 Rc8 25. Qe2 gxf5 26. Rxf5 Qb5 27.
Qg4 Rc7 28. Raf1 Kg8 29. Rxf7 Rxf7 30. Rxf7 Kxf7 31. Qe6+ Kf8 32. Qxd6+ Kg8
33. Qe6+ Kh7 34. Qf5+ Kg8 35. Bg5 Qd3 36. h4 Qb1+ 37. Kg2 Qxa2+ 38. Kh3 Qa1
39. Qc8+ Kh7 40. Qf5+ Kg8 41. Qf3 Qc3 42. Qg4 Qa1 43. Qe2 Qh1+ 44. Kg4 Kh7
45. Be7 a5 46. Bxc5 Rc8 47. d6 Qc1 48. Bb6 Qh6 49. Qd1 a4 50. Qd5 Rc3 51.
Qxe5 axb3 52. d7 Qg6+ 53. Kh3 b2 54. h5 Qf7 55. Qe8 Qf1+ 56. Kh4 Qh1+ 57.
Kg5 Rxg3+ 58. Kf5 Qf3+ 59. Ke5 b1=Q 60. Kd4 {Black wins} 0-1

Amir K.
07-09-2010, 09:45 PM
Aronian lost his game against Kramnik: Nice ending.

Event: Shanghai Chess Masters 2010
Site: Shanghai, China
Date: 2010.09.07
Round: 5
White: GM_Aronian
Black: GM_Kramnik
Result: 0-1
WhiteElo: 2783
BlackElo: 2780
Opening: Catalan: open, 5.Nf3
ECO: E04
NIC: CA.03
Time: 02:14:01
TimeControl: 5400+0

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. g3 dxc4 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. Qa4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Nd5 8.
Bxb4 Nxb4 9. Nc3 Bd7 10. O-O a5 11. Qd1 O-O 12. e3 a4 13. Qe2 Na5 14. Ne5
Nd5 15. Nxd5 exd5 16. Bxd5 Bh3 17. Qf3 Bxf1 18. Bxf7+ Kh8 19. Rxf1 Nc6 20.
Nxc6 bxc6 21. Qh5 Rb8 22. Bxc4 Rxb2 23. Bd3 g6 24. Bxg6 Qe7 25. Bb1 Qf7 26.
Qc5 Rxf2 27. Qe5+ Rf6 28. Rf4 Qg7 29. Bf5 Rd6 30. Bc2 Rxf4 31. Qxf4 a3 32.
g4 Qe7 33. g5 c5 34. dxc5 Rd2 35. Bb3 Kg7 36. h4 Rd3 37. Kg2 Rxe3 38. Qd4+
Re5 39. Bd5 c6 40. Kg3 h6 41. gxh6+ Kxh6 42. Qf4+ Kh7 43. Bxc6 Rxc5 44. Qe4+
Qxe4 45. Bxe4+ Kg7 46. Kf4 Kf6 47. Ke3 Ke5 48. Kd3 Rb5 49. Kc4 Rb2 50. Bh7
Rh2 51. h5 Rxh5 52. Bc2 Rh2 53. Kb3 Kd4 54. Bg6 Rh4 55. Kb4 Rh6 56. Bf7 Ra6
57. Bg8 Ra7 58. Be6 Kd3 59. Bb3 Kd2 60. Ba4 Rb7+ 61. Kc4 Kc1 62. Kc3 Kb1 63.
Bb3 Rc7+ 64. Kd3 Kb2 65. Kd2 Rd7+ 66. Ke3 Kc3 67. Bg8 Re7+ 68. Kf2 Kd2 69.
Kf3 Kd3 70. Kf2 Re2+ 71. Kf3 Re8 {Black wins} 0-1

Amir K.
08-09-2010, 09:18 PM
1: Shanghai-Bilbao Final Masters 2010
: September 3rd - 8th Shanghai, China
: http://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/

: 6 Rounds - Double Round Robin


: Standings after Round 6 (Final)
4: 1 12.0 GM Alexei Shirov ESP 2749
: 2-3 7.0 GM Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2780
: GM Levon Aronian ARM 2783
5: 4 3.0 GM Wang Hao CHN 2724
:
6: Tie-Breaks for the 2nd ticket to the Bilbao Stage:
: Game 1 2 3 pts
: GM Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2780 1 0 1 2.0
7: GM Levon Aronian ARM 2783 0 1 0 1.0
:
: GM's Shirov and Kramnik qualified for the Bilbao stage
8: The Bilbao Masters will be played from October 9th-15th
: Three points for a win and a point for a draw
: Sofia rules will be applied
9: Time Control: Start with 90 minutes
: Add 60 minutes +10 sec. inc. after move 40

Jesper Norgaard
09-09-2010, 04:06 PM
Oh, no! The second finalist (after Shirov qualified) was decided between Kramnik and Aronian, and was not only decided in a blitz match, but after 1-1 in the first two blitz games, in an Armageddon blitz game. But not only was it Armageddon, it was without increment!

The end was pretty predictable, both players down to 11 seconds (according to www.chessvibes.com) and scrambling out moves cursing each other, "what are you doing" (when pieces were thrown on their side), "What is this, to play this position?", both players just hoping to be the next-last to fall for the guillotine. Ouch. Haven't we learned from the past? In the end Kramnik won on time as he would have by a normal draw, from having black and 4 minutes against Aronian's 5 minutes. He was also winning and drawing in the second blitz game when his clock fell, so it felt like the right result.

My lemma is: all chess moves must have an increment. Perhaps not a lemma but a rule of thumb. Then we would avoid this "clock-punching monkey business" as Irina Krush pointed out. It turns out ugly too often with guillotine.

So how can you put an increment of 2-3 seconds in an Armageddon game, won't black be a clear favorite if black wins by draw? Already with 5-4 Kramnik chose black. My answer is, let them bet on it in an open, free bidding where they bid until no bidding is left (0.05-8.55 perhaps?). Player 1 bids 4-5 on having black, player 2 bids 3.45-5.15, but then player 1 bids 3.30-5.30 etc. as in a Sotheby's auction of art. Any bid goes, as long as it is lower. I bet the bidding would not take more than 5 minutes. A small sacrifice for a more civilized ending than what we saw.

One minute to mate? Well there sure was no mate around, rather it was a clinical draw that was only played out because it had to, going in for the guillotine decision when chess couldn't decide.

Isn't this a way to degrade the noble game? Let us not degrade ourselves to clock-punching monkeys!

Kevin Bonham
09-09-2010, 06:49 PM
Oh, no! The second finalist (after Shirov qualified) was decided between Kramnik and Aronian, and was not only decided in a blitz match, but after 1-1 in the first two blitz games, in an Armageddon blitz game. But not only was it Armageddon, it was without increment!

Noooooooooooooo! :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall:

Video here:

http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/shanghai-kramnik-beats-aronian-in-blitz-play-off/#more-29488

Kramnik is the naughty one here as he knocks his king over at the end of his move and presses the clock before rectifying. Aronian should stop the clock and appeal to the arbiter to intervene the first time this happens under Art 7.3. But Aronian does not stop the clock.

If he did stop the clock the arbiter would have the option of penalising Kramnik by awarding Aronian extra time and it is possible this would cause Kramnik to lose on time - the only way Aronian can win the game from that position. The arbiter cannot fairly award much time in such a case, perhaps a few seconds.


So how can you put an increment of 2-3 seconds in an Armageddon game, won't black be a clear favorite if black wins by draw? Already with 5-4 Kramnik chose black. My answer is, let them bet on it in an open, free bidding where they bid until no bidding is left (0.05-8.55 perhaps?). Player 1 bids 4-5 on having black, player 2 bids 3.45-5.15, but then player 1 bids 3.30-5.30 etc. as in a Sotheby's auction of art. Any bid goes, as long as it is lower. I bet the bidding would not take more than 5 minutes. A small sacrifice for a more civilized ending than what we saw.

I think there is some resistance to this sort of thing mainly because a non-chess skill element becomes critical. But it should be possible anyway, over enough practical experience, to work out what a fair time control for Armageddon with increment is.

Amir K.
09-09-2010, 11:46 PM
Hi Amir are you preparing anything really special this or early next year??? :)
Apart from the 2010 Gold Coast Chess Festival that is! I anticipate we are about to hear some big announcement! :) then I might be wrong, who knows?? :)

Hi JAK /
Not sure how to answer this question but:
Something in 2011 could happen....
....But we have to first overcome evil forces in chess.................

Kevin Bonham
09-10-2010, 01:35 PM
Carlsen, Anand, Kramnik and Shirov.

Starts tonight, games start 1:30 am for those on daylight savings.

Time control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 60 minutes + 10 seconds/move as of move 41
Sofia rules.
3-1-0 scoring system
Ties broken by tiebreak: two game blitz match at 4/+3 followed by Armageddon at 5 vs 4 (with no increment, boo hiss!)

3 games then rest day then 3 games

I won't be watching too many of these, but should be interesting!

Tony Dowden
09-10-2010, 02:06 PM
:hmm: I'm hoping Carlsen can play seriously again.

Metro
10-10-2010, 09:03 PM
:hmm: I'm hoping Carlsen can play seriously again.
He lost 3 games in the Olympiad and about 15 rating points.He's having a bad patch.C'mon Magnus:D

Qbert
11-10-2010, 04:19 AM
Now Anand beats Carlsen!:doh: Looks like he's having a pre-life crisis :)

Now that the FIDE election is over, perhaps Kasparov will be available for more coaching...

Seriously, I hope sorts this out before long - He's too good a player to just drop off the number one spot so suddenly.

Igor_Goldenberg
11-10-2010, 10:07 AM
Young players (and despite being world #1 Carlsen is still a promising junior:D ) go up and down. Small decline is often a sign of impending surge.
And it usually does wonders for young boys proper self-assessment and cures them of carelessness. Almost every prodigy went through those temporary slides, and most of them come out much stronger then before.

Desmond
11-10-2010, 10:21 AM
Young players (and despite being world #1 Carlsen is still a promising junior:D ) go up and down. Small decline is often a sign of impending surge.
And it usually does wonders for young boys proper self-assessment and cures them of carelessness. Almost every prodigy went through those temporary slides, and most of them come out much stronger then before.
Yes I agree with this. When I was improving (notice past tense :lol:) I had periodic drops followed by improvements. I think that when you learn something new, you place too much importance on that new thing. After you lose a couple of times that way, you learn to place more appropriate emphasis and assimilate it into what you knew before.

ER
11-10-2010, 03:17 PM
Shirov will beat him too!

Tony Dowden
11-10-2010, 03:54 PM
Shirov will beat him too!

Actually, I reckon Carlsen will win. Probably crushingly :cool:

Tony Dowden
11-10-2010, 04:02 PM
Young players (and despite being world #1 Carlsen is still a promising junior:D ) go up and down. Small decline is often a sign of impending surge.
And it usually does wonders for young boys proper self-assessment and cures them of carelessness. Almost every prodigy went through those temporary slides, and most of them come out much stronger then before.

Aside from referring to 'young boys' rather than late adolescents I think you are right Igor. A dip back into 2700 territory might help 19-year-old Magnus develop a more nuanced and adult perspective towards nailing the World Championship and testing 2850+ territory.

Even Bobby Fischer had the odd lapse (e.g. Mar del Plata 1960 - where I gather he realised there was life beyond the 64 squares) before getting even stronger. Just a pity in Bobby's case that he had more complex issues to contend with other than 'mere' late adolescence.

Qbert
12-10-2010, 04:59 AM
Well he's currently trying to win an enthralling 3 piece vs Q ending against Shirov - I'd say he won't make 'Audi' this time. :)

Qbert
12-10-2010, 09:14 AM
GM Shirov, Alexei (2749) - GM Carlsen, Magnus (2826)
Grand Slam Final Masters Bilbao ESP (3), 2010.10.11
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 O-O 9.h3 Nb8 10.d4 Nbd7 11.Nbd2 Bb7 12.Bc2 Re8 13.a4 Bf8 14.Bd3 c6 15.b4 Nb6 16.axb5 cxb5 17.d5 Rc8 18.Bb2 Nh5 19.Bf1 f5 20.Nxe5 Rxe5 21.c4 Nf6 22.Bxe5 dxe5 23.c5 fxe4 24.d6 Na4 25.Nc4 Nxc5 26.bxc5 Rxc5 27.Qb3 Bd5 28.Qb4 Rxc4 29.Bxc4 bxc4 30.Rxa6 Qc8 31.Qa5 c3 32.d7 Qxd7 33.Qxc3 Qb7 34.Rea1 Qb8 35.Ra7 h6 36.Rc7 Qb6 37.Qxe5 Bd6 38.Rc8+ Kf7 39.Qc3 Qb7 40.Rca8 Qxa8 41.Rxa8 Bxa8 42.Qd4 Bd5 43.Qa7+ Be7 44.Qc7 h5 45.Qe5 g6 46.Kh2 Be6 47.Kg1 Bf5 48.Kf1 Ne8 49.Kg1 Ng7 50.Qd5+ Ne6 51.Qb7 h4 52.Kh2 Nf4 53.Kg1 Nd3 54.Kf1 Nc5 55.Qd5+ Be6 56.Qe5 Bf5 57.Qd5+ Ne6 58.Qb7 Kf8 59.Qa8+ Bd8 60.Qa7 Bf6 61.Qb7 Kg8 62.Qa7 Bg5 63.Ke2 Nf4+ 64.Kf1 Nh5 65.Ke2 Kf8 66.Kf1 Bf6 67.Qc7 Ng7 68.Qa7 Ne6 69.Qb7 Nd8 70.Qa7 Nf7 71.Kg1 Kg7 72.Kf1 Be5 73.Qe7 g5 74.Kg1 Bf6 75.Qb7 Kg6 76.Qd5 Ne5 77.Qg8+ Bg7 78.Qe8+ Kh6 79.Qe7 Nd3 80.Kf1 Nf4 81.Qd6+ Bg6 82.Qe7 Nd5 83.Qe6 Nf6 84.Kg1 Be8 85.Qf5 Bd7 86.Qe5 Kg6 87.Kf1 Bf8 88.Kg1 Ba3 89.Qc7 Bb4 90.Qe5 Bd2 91.Qd4 Bf4 92.Qb6 Be8 93.Kf1 Bf7 94.Kg1 Kf5 95.Qa7 Be6 96.Kf1 Kg6 97.Qb6 Bd7 98.Kg1 Ba4 99.Qe6 Bb5 100.Qb6 Bc4 101.Qd4 Be6 102.Kf1 Bf5 103.Kg1 g4 104.hxg4 Bxg4 105.Qc3 Bf5 106.Qb3 Bg5 107.Kf1 Kh6 108.Kg1 Kg6 109.Kf1 Bd7 110.Kg1 Be8 111.Qc3 Bf7 112.Qe5 Bd5 113.Qc3 Be6 114.Qe5 Bd7 115.Qc3 Bf5 116.Qb3 Nh5 117.Qg8+ Ng7 118.Qb3 Ne6 119.Kh2 Bf6 120.Kg1 Bg7 121.Kf1 Ng5 122.Qb6+ Bf6 123.Kg1 h3 124.gxh3 Bxh3 125.Qd6 Bf5 126.Kg2 Nf3 127.Qd5 Kg5 128.Qg8+ Bg6 129.Qd5+ Be5 130.Qd8+ Kh5 131.Qd5 Bf5 132.Qf7+ Kg4 133.Qg8+ Ng5 134.Qc4 Bf4 135.Qg8 Be6 136.Qg7 Bf7 137.Qd4 Kf5 138.Qc5+ Be5 139.Qf8 Kg6 140.Qc5 Bf6 141.Qd6 Bc4 142.Qc6 Be6 143.Qd6 Bg4 144.Qd5 Bf3+ 145.Kf1 Nf7 146.Kg1 Ne5 147.Qg8+ Kf5 148.Qc8+ Kg5 149.Qg8+ Ng6 150.Qd5+ Kh6 151.Qe6 Be5 152.Qf5 Bf4 153.Qf6 Bg5 154.Qe6 Kg7 155.Qd7+ Ne7 156.Qe6 Bf6 157.Kf1 Kg6 158.Kg1 Nf5 159.Qg8+ Kh5 160.Qf7+ Kg5 161.Qg8+ Kf4 162.Qb8+ Kg4 163.Qg8+ Bg5 164.Qc8 Bf6 165.Qg8+ Kf4 166.Qb8+ Be5 167.Qb4 Nd4 168.Qf8+ Kg5 169.Qg8+ Kh6 170.Qf8+ Bg7 171.Qd6+ Kh5 172.Qh2+ Kg5 173.Qg3+ Bg4 174.Qe3+ Kf5 [Tony's humorous moves from the live display were 175.Qd2!! moving to a square where no capture is possible and 175...e4? is the only way to prolong the game due to the 50-move rule 175... Ke5! accepting the draw]
1/2-1/2

Garrett
12-10-2010, 09:16 AM
thanks for posting the game Qbert !

Amir K.
14-10-2010, 07:37 AM
This game is for Boris, french defence:

Event: ICC 90 0 u
Site: Internet Chess Club
Date: 2010.10.13
Round: -
White: *GM_Anand
Black: *GM_Shirov
Result: 1/2-1/2
WhiteElo: 2800
BlackElo: 2749
Opening: French: MacCutcheon, Lasker variation, 8...g6
ECO: C12
NIC: FR.05
Time: 13:26:23
TimeControl: 5400+0

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. e5 h6 6. Bd2 Bxc3 7. bxc3 Ne4 8.
Qg4 g6 9. Bd3 Nxd2 10. Kxd2 c5 11. h4 Qa5 12. Nf3 Nc6 13. Qf4 cxd4 14. h5 g5
15. Qf6 Rf8 16. Qxh6 g4 17. Ng5 Nxe5 18. Nh7 Rh8 19. Ke2 Nxd3 20. cxd3 Bd7
21. Nf6+ Ke7 22. Qg5 dxc3 23. Ne4+ Ke8 24. Nf6+ Ke7 25. Nxg4+ Kd6 26. Ne5 f6
27. Qxf6 Raf8 28. Qg7 Qa4 29. Nf7+ Rxf7 30. Qxf7 Qc2+ 31. Kf1 Qxd3+ 32. Kg1
Qd2 33. Qg7 c2 34. Qxh8 c1=Q+ 35. Rxc1 Qxc1+ 36. Kh2 Qf4+ 37. Kg1 Qc1+ 38.
Kh2 {Game drawn} 1/2-1/2

Amir K.
14-10-2010, 07:42 AM
Event: ICC 90 10 u
Site: Internet Chess Club
Date: 2010.10.13
Round: -
White: *GM_Carlsen
Black: *GM_Kramnik
Result: 1/2-1/2
WhiteElo: 2826
BlackElo: 2780
Opening: English: four knights, kingside fianchetto
ECO: A29
NIC: EO.03
Time: 15:31:21
TimeControl: 5400+10

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7
8. d3 O-O 9. Be3 Re8 10. Rc1 Bf8 11. Ne4 Nd4 12. Bg5 f6 13. Nxd4 exd4 14.
Bd2 Be6 15. b4 Bd5 16. a4 c6 17. a5 Nc8 18. Re1 a6 19. Nc5 Bxg2 20. Kxg2
Qd5+ 21. Kg1 Nd6 22. Qb3 Qxb3 23. Nxb3 Nb5 24. Kf1 Rad8 25. Rc4 Rd5 26. Bc1
Red8 27. Bb2 Kf7 28. Kg2 h5 29. h3 g5 30. g4 Kg6 31. Rf1 Be7 32. f4 hxg4 33.
hxg4 gxf4 34. Rxf4 Bd6 35. Rf3 Rg5 36. Bxd4 Rxg4+ 37. Kf2 Nxd4 38. Nxd4 Rh8
39. e4 Rh2+ 40. Ke3 Rb2 41. Nc2 Rg5 42. d4 Rb5 43. Kd3 Bxb4 44. Rxb4 R5xb4
45. Nxb4 Rb3+ 46. Ke2 Rxb4 47. Rg3+ Kf7 48. Rd3 Ke6 49. Ke3 Rb5 50. Ra3 c5
51. dxc5 Rxc5 52. Kf4 Rh5 53. Rb3 Rb5 54. Ra3 Kd6 55. Ra1 Rc5 56. Rd1+ Kc7
57. Ra1 Kc6 58. Ke3 f5 59. exf5 Rxf5 60. Kd3 Rf3+ 61. Kc4 Rf4+ 62. Kc3 Kc5
63. Rh1 Rf3+ 64. Kc2 Rf5 65. Kc3 Rf3+ 66. Kc2 Ra3 67. Rh7 Kc6 68. Rh6+ Kc7
69. Rh7+ Kb8 70. Rh8+ Ka7 71. Rh5 Re3 72. Kb2 Kb8 73. Rc5 Re6 {Game drawn}
1/2-1/2

Desmond
14-10-2010, 08:56 AM
This game is for Boris, french defence:

Event: ICC 90 0 u
Site: Internet Chess Club
Date: 2010.10.13
Round: -
White: *GM_Anand
Black: *GM_Shirov
Thanks mate. Actually I was looking at a similar game in MacCutcheon last night with ...Qa5.

Amir K.
15-10-2010, 05:27 AM
:(

Event: ICC 90 10 u
Site: Internet Chess Club
Date: 2010.10.14
Round: -
White: *GM_Carlsen
Black: *GM_Shirov
Result: 1-0
WhiteElo: 2826
BlackElo: 2749
Opening: Ruy Lopez: 5.O-O
ECO: C78
NIC: RL.12
Time: 14:17:02
TimeControl: 5400+10

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. a4 Rb8 8.
axb5 axb5 9. c3 d6 10. d4 Bb6 11. h3 O-O 12. Re1 h6 13. Na3 exd4 14. cxd4
Na5 15. Bc2 b4 16. Nb5 Ba6 17. Na7 Bb7 18. d5 Ra8 19. Nb5 Nc4 20. Rxa8 Qxa8
21. Nbd4 Qa7 22. b3 Ne5 23. Bb2 Nxf3+ 24. gxf3 Qa2 25. Qc1 Bxd4 26. Bxd4 Nd7
27. Kh1 f6 28. Rg1 Rf7 29. Qd2 Qa8 30. Qxh6 Ne5 31. Bd1 Qe8 32. Qe3 c5 33.
Bb2 Re7 34. f4 Nd7 35. Qg3 Qf7 36. Bf3 Ba6 37. Bg4 Nf8 38. Bf5 c4 39. bxc4
Bxc4 40. Qh4 Bxd5 41. f3 Be6 42. Bxf6 Bxf5 43. exf5 Rc7 44. Rxg7+ Qxg7 45.
Bxg7 Rxg7 46. f6 Rd7 47. Qe1 d5 48. Qxb4 d4 49. Qc4+ Kh7 50. Qd3+ Kg8 51. f5
Kf7 52. Kg2 Kxf6 53. Kg3 Kg7 54. h4 Nh7 55. Kf2 Nf6 56. Qd2 Nh7 57. Ke1 d3
58. Qg2+ Kh8 59. Kd2 Nf8 60. Qg5 Kh7 61. h5 Kh8 62. f6 Kh7 63. f4 Kh8 64. h6
Kh7 65. f5 {White wins} 1-0

Amir K.
15-10-2010, 05:29 AM
1: Bilbao Final Masters 2010
: October 9th - 15th Bilbao, Spain
: http://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/
2: LIVE COVERAGE on ICC and ChessFM
: 6 Rounds - Double Round Robin
: Rest day: October 12th
3: Games start at 10:30 AM ICC
:
4: Standings after Round 5
5: 1 9.0 GM Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2780
: 2 7.0 GM Viswanathan Anand IND 2800
6: 3 5.0 GM Magnus Carlsen NOR 2826
: 4 3.0 GM Alexei Shirov ESP 2749

Event: ICC 90 0 u
Site: Internet Chess Club
Date: 2010.10.14
Round: -
White: *GM_Kramnik
Black: *GM_Anand
Result: 1/2-1/2
WhiteElo: 2780
BlackElo: 2800
Opening: QGD: 4.Nf3
ECO: D37
NIC: QI.01
Time: 12:13:17
TimeControl: 5400+0

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e4 Bb4 6. Bg5 c5 7. Bxc4 cxd4 8.
Nxd4 Qa5 9. Bd2 Qc5 10. Bb5+ Bd7 11. Nb3 Qe7 12. Bd3 Nc6 13. O-O O-O 14. a3
Bd6 15. Kh1 Be5 16. f4 Bxc3 17. Bxc3 e5 18. f5 Rfd8 19. Qe2 b6 20. Nd2 Bc8
21. Nf3 Bb7 22. Rae1 a6 23. Bc4 b5 24. Ba2 h6 25. Bd5 Nxd5 26. exd5 Rxd5 27.
f6 Qxf6 28. Nxe5 Qe6 29. Nxf7 Qxe2 30. Rxe2 Rd7 31. Ne5 Re7 32. Ree1 Nxe5
33. Rxe5 Rxe5 34. Bxe5 Re8 35. Re1 Kh7 36. Bc3 Rxe1+ 37. Bxe1 {Game drawn}
1/2-1/2

Amir K.
17-10-2010, 04:58 AM
http://kingsofchess.biz/myPictures/Bilbao.jpg


Chess Masters Final: Kramnik declared winner
Staff - 10/16/2010 eitb.com
The Russian beat India's Wisvanathan Anand in the Masters Final played out in Bilbao on Saturday.

Russian chess player Vladimir Kramnik, climbed to third position in the FIDE ranking following an excellent performance in the Basque city of Bilbao in which he was declared winner of the 2010 Chess Grand Slam without settling for a tie with Indian rival Wisvanathan Anand.

The sixth and last rounds of the Masters Final ended on two high-scoring draws.

Final positions following the six-day Final

1. Vladimir Kramnik (RUS) 10 points
2. Wisvanathan Anand (IND) 8
3. Magnus Carlsen (NOR) 6
4. Alexei Shirov (SP) 4