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blue_skies
01-08-2010, 12:07 PM
I was wondering if someone could recommend some good chess books for children. My kids are aged 7 and 9 and have just about reached the limit of what they can learn on their own. They learnt using the Fritz and Chesster software (1 and 2), so know how to play and know a few basic openings and tactics, but do not have a very wide knowledge. They have just started playing in a couple of the local NSW tournaments and are at a reasonable standard for their age but it is very obvious that they are lacking. They can both read well and are very motivated (they can also read chess notation). I guess what I am looking for is books that can be read by the kids themselves without being too dry or complicated (they ARE young) and also not too simple as they are not absolute beginners. I am not great at chess, but from what I understand, they need to grow their understanding of openings, tactics and particularly end game tactics, which seems to let them down a lot. A good puzzle/problems book recommendation would be great also.

I would love to get them a coach, but I don't know if we can quite manage that at the moment. Can anyone tell me what I would expect to pay for a private chess coach in Sydney? I looked at the Academy of Chess, but it is just too far away.
Thanks!!

Garrett
01-08-2010, 06:34 PM
Hi Blue_Skies

Welcome to ChessChat !

I cannot directly answer your question as I am past the advanced beginner stage and do not know any books that would suit your children.

However, if I had two children at that age I would strongly consider signing them up to Chess.com.

It might be worthwhile checking it out.

They have chess video's suited to beginners through to advanced.

They have chess tactics training that increases in difficulty as the players gets better (and they have a rating they can see increase).

They have chess mentor, which is a strategy training tool that gives feedback on all moves and starts at the beginner level through to advanced which get harder as the child improves.

And, of course, they can play chess there from blitz games (a few minutes) to online correspondence games (up to weeks/ months).

There is an opening explorers section where you can make moves and see what masters have played in similar positions.

The site costs money with different levels of access, but free to check out.

Best of luck !
cheers
Garrett.

BrendanNorman
01-08-2010, 07:07 PM
Hi Blue_Skies

Welcome to ChessChat !

I cannot directly answer your question as I am past the advanced beginner stage and do not know any books that would suit your children.

However, if I had two children at that age I would strongly consider signing them up to Chess.com.

It might be worthwhile checking it out.

They have chess video's suited to beginners through to advanced.

They have chess tactics training that increases in difficulty as the players gets better (and they have a rating they can see increase).

They have chess mentor, which is a strategy training tool that gives feedback on all moves and starts at the beginner level through to advanced which get harder as the child improves.

And, of course, they can play chess there from blitz games (a few minutes) to online correspondence games (up to weeks/ months).

There is an opening explorers section where you can make moves and see what masters have played in similar positions.

The site costs money with different levels of access, but free to check out.

Best of luck !
cheers
Garrett.

I agree with everything Garrett says, chess.com is a great site with outstanding features of which many even decent players use regularly.

I'm not sure of your residential location but we at Smart Dolphins Chess could possibly coach your children and visit your home as well if more convenient?

Check the site if you like ;)

http://www.smartdolphins.net/privatecoaching.html

Other than that, a good book I have found for kids to learn some fundamentals is "The Chess Kids Book of Checkmate" which will teach the basic mating patterns etc as well.... You can read a review here:

http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Kids-Book-Checkmate/dp/0812935942

Good luck! :)

Vlad
01-08-2010, 08:09 PM
However, if I had two children at that age I would strongly consider signing them up to Chess.com.


Hi Garett,

As you know I have one kid at that age. I would be interested to know what you think is the maximum level for which chess.com is useful/worthwhile? 2000 ACF? 2300 ACF? or maybe even 2600 ACF?

Thanks.

BrendanNorman
01-08-2010, 08:30 PM
Hi Garett,

As you know I have one kid at that age. I would be interested to know what you think is the maximum level for which chess.com is useful/worthwhile? 2000 ACF? 2300 ACF? or maybe even 2600 ACF?

Thanks.

To be honest, Anton probably wouldn't get much use from the site Vlad, especially as a paid member as you surely provide all of his training material already and he is already of too high a level.

Chess.com is best for learning players from perhaps 0-1800 ACF and has a HUGE base of players, most of whom are very weak and thus good practice for beginners.

Garrett
02-08-2010, 05:20 AM
Hi Garett,

As you know I have one kid at that age. I would be interested to know what you think is the maximum level for which chess.com is useful/worthwhile? 2000 ACF? 2300 ACF? or maybe even 2600 ACF?

Thanks.

Hi Vlad, I am 1831 ACF and I get a lot of use from the site. I am sure there are tactics and chess mentor that will be challenging for Anton, and even a lot above his level.

A lot of the really difficult chess mentor challenges are really beautiful positional ideas from the games of Karpov etc.

The tactics are timed like a real game and it is fun to try to push up your rating and get into the top 100, 50, 10 etc.

I've found the video's useful for ideas, and some are quite entertaining too.

It's cheaper on a monthly rate to sign up for a year ($96 USD for full access) but I initially signed up for a month to see what it was like, which was only $12-00 USD full access.

I don't see how you can go wrong for $12-00 USD.

Anyway, in repsonse to your initial question I would guess that chess.com would be useful up to 2100-2200 perhaps. That's just a guess of course, as I have never scaled such lofty heights :wall:

If you do give it a go, I would be interested to hear your opinion.

cheers
Garrett.

Garrett
02-08-2010, 05:32 AM
furthermore, although I didn't join chess.com for correspondence chess, I am finding it very addictive, and I think it is improving my chess already.

Okay, back to the original question, seeing as you have a young child perhaps you can recommend some books for blue-skie's children.

Perhaps you have some second-hand ones to sell even ha haha.

cheers
Garrett.

Tyson
20-10-2010, 08:08 PM
Maybe im too late to help answer this question. But winning chess tactics for kids, winning chess strategies for kids and winning chess exercises for kids are pretty good for lower level players. Winning chess tactics is great for complete beginners up to 500-600. Winning chess exercises probably for working 600-800 players up. The are both focused on tactics (thought puzzles), but i really like them cause there are recurring patterns to help pattern recognition. Then the winning chess strategies focuses more on strategic/positional ideas (at a level kids can understand)

As mentioned in previous answers, chess.com is good. There is also world chess live, which is made by the same ppl that made Internet Chess Club. I believe its identical to internet chess club except it's for weaker players. I have a student in the 600s who plays on it. he wins and loses on it, so i guess that gives a idea of the strength of the opponents

FM_Bill
25-10-2010, 06:38 PM
Some older books are very good by Bott & Morrison (written in English descriptive though)

Chess for Children

More chess for children

Junior chess puzzles

Junior chess games

Might be hard to get though,

chessview
21-01-2011, 10:47 PM
I think each chess book is good for children, but the thing is that the child should be interested chess, so the main role of parents is to interest their child this sport.