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View Full Version : Nice new article by Kasparov



Paul Cavezza
26-01-2010, 08:54 AM
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/23592

Desmond
26-01-2010, 09:54 AM
Another group postulated that the game would be solved, i.e., a mathematically conclusive way for a computer to win from the start would be found. (Or perhaps it would prove that a game of chess played in the best possible way always ends in a draw.) Perhaps a real version of HAL 9000 would simply announce move 1.e4, with checkmate in, say, 38,484 moves. These gloomy predictions have not come true, nor will they ever come to pass. Chess is far too complex to be definitively solved with any technology we can conceive of today.

One thing for sure is that such statements about future technology's capabilities are almost always proved wrong, in time.

aransandraseg
27-01-2010, 06:57 PM
There is little doubt that different people are blessed with different amounts of cognitive gifts such as long-term memory and the visuospatial skills chess players are said to employ. One of the reasons chess is an "unparalleled laboratory" and a "unique nexus" is that it demands high performance from so many of the brain's functions. Where so many of these investigations fail on a practical level is by not recognizing the importance of the process of learning and playing chess. The ability to work hard for days on end without losing focus is a talent. The ability to keep absorbing new information after many hours of study is a talent. Programming yourself by analyzing your decision-making outcomes and processes can improve results much the way that a smarter chess algorithm will play better than another running on the same computer. We might not be able to change our hardware, but we can definitely upgrade our software.

Kasparov.

Worth listening to. So true.

Tony Dowden
29-01-2010, 08:55 PM
Quoting from Kasparov:

... Countries with little by way of chess tradition and few available coaches can now produce prodigies. I am in fact coaching one of them this year, nineteen-year-old Magnus Carlsen, from Norway, where relatively little chess is played ...

A pity Gary forgot the detail that Carslen is the current World No 1.

Jesper Norgaard
30-01-2010, 04:42 PM
Quoting from Kasparov:

... Countries with little by way of chess tradition and few available coaches can now produce prodigies. I am in fact coaching one of them this year, nineteen-year-old Magnus Carlsen, from Norway, where relatively little chess is played ...

A pity Gary forgot the detail that Carlsen is the current World No 1.

I don't think he forgot - rather he mentioned "the little chess in Norway" as a contrast to the magnificent results of the young Norwegian prodigy. What he did neglect (knowingly or not) was that Simen Agdestein, for some time Magnus' trainer and mentor (I believe) which became Nordic champion among other things, has probably been a katalysator for Magnus' early development. Sometimes talent will not develop into skill because of lack of opportunities or motivation.

Denis_Jessop
31-01-2010, 08:19 PM
Quoting from Kasparov:

... Countries with little by way of chess tradition and few available coaches can now produce prodigies. I am in fact coaching one of them this year, nineteen-year-old Magnus Carlsen, from Norway, where relatively little chess is played ...

A pity Gary forgot the detail that Carslen is the current World No 1.

I don't think that this detail is relevant to the point that Kasparov is making. To take a generous view, Kasparov might not have wanted to appear to be taking credit for Carlsen's no. 1 ranking anyway. In fact, Carlsen had a coach from early on in GM Simen Agdestein and later was coached by someone else so Kasparov's point here is not as strong as it may seem.

DJ