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Capablanca-Fan
10-12-2009, 03:31 PM
Does KRudd really need to add so much to CO2 emissions by leading a team of 114 to Copenhagen (http://hey.ipa.org.au/):

Australia
H.E. Mr. Kevin Michael Rudd
Prime Minister
H.E. Ms. Penelope Wong
Minister, Climate Change and Water
Office of the Minister for Climate Change
and Water
H.E. Ms. Louise Helen Hand
Ambassador for Climate Change
Department of Climate Change
Mr. David Fredericks
Deputy Chief of Staff
Department of the Prime Minister and
Cabinet
Mr. Philip Green Oam
Senior Policy Adviser, Foreign Affairs
Department of the Prime Minister and
Cabinet
Mr. Andrew Charlton
Senior Adviser
Department of the Prime Minister and
Cabinet
Mr. Lachlan Harris
Senior Press Secretary
Prime Minister’s Office
Office of Prime Minister
Mr. Scott Dewar
Senior Adviser
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Clare Penrose
Adviser
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Fiona Sugden
Media Adviser
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Lisa French
Office of the Prime Minister
Office of Prime Minister
Mr. Jeremy Hilman
Adviser
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Tarah Barzanji
Adviser
Office of Prime Minister
Mr. Kate Shaw
Executive Secretary
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Gaile Barnes
Executive Assistant
Office of Prime Minister
Ms. Gordon de Brouwer
Deputy Secretary
Prime Minister and Cabinet
Mr. Patrick Suckling
First Assistant Secretary, International
Division
Prime Minister and Cabinet
Ms. Rebecca Christie
Prime Minister’s Office
Mr. Michael Jones
Official Photographer
Prime Minister and Cabinet
Mr. Stephan Rudzki
Mr. David Bell
Federal Agent
Australian Federal Police
Ms. Kym Baillie
Australian Federal Police
Mr. David Champion
Australian Federal Police
- 7 -
Australia (continued)
Mr. Matt Jebb
Federal Agent
Australian Federal Police
Mr. Craig Kendall
Federal Agent
Australian Federal Police
Mr. Ian Lane
Squadron Leader Staff, Officer VIP
Operations
Mr. John Olenich
Media Adviser / Adviser to Minister
Wong
Office of the Minister for Climate Change
and Water
Ms. Kristina Hickey
Adviser to Minister Wong
Office of the Minister for Climate Change
and Water
Mr. Martin Parkinson
Secretary
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Howard Bamsey
Special Envoy for Climate Change
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Robert Owen-Jones
Assistant Secretary, International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Clare Walsh
Assistant Secretary, International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Jenny Elizabeth Wilkinson
Policy Advisor
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Elizabeth Mary Peak
Principal Legal Adviser, International
Climate Law
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Kristin Tilley
Director, Multilateral Negotiations
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Andrew Ure
Acting Director, Multilateral Negotiations
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Annemarie Watt
Director, Land Sector Negotiations
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Kushla Munro
Director, International Forest Carbon
Section
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Kathleen Annette Rowley
Director, Strategic and Technical Analysis
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Anitra Cowan
Assistant Director, Multilateral
Negotiations
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Sally Truong
Assisting Director, Multilateral
Negotiations
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Jane Wilkinson
Assistant Director
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Tracey Mackay
Assistant Director
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Laura Brown
Assistant Director, Multilateral
Negotiations
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Tracey-Anne Leahey
Delegation Manager
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Nicola Loffler
Senior Legal Adviser, International
Climate Law
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Tamara Curll
Legal Adviser, International Climate Law
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Jessica Allen
Legal Support Officer
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Sanjiva de Silva
Legal Adviser, International Climate Law
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Gaia Puleston
Political Adviser
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Penelope Jane Morton
Policy Adviser, Multilateral Negotiations
(UNFCCC)
International Division
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Claire Elizabeth Watt
Policy Advisor
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Amanda Walker
Policy Officer, Multilateral Negotiations
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Alan David Lee
Policy Adviser, Land Sector Negotiations
Department of Climate Change
Ms. Erika Kate Oord
Australian Stakeholder Manager
Department of Climate Change
Mr. Jahda Kirian Swanborough
Communications Manager
Ministerial Communication
Department of Climate Change
H.E. Mr. Sharyn Minahan
Ambassador
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Julia Feeney
Director, Climate Change and
Environment
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Mr. Chester Geoffrey Cunningham
Second Secretary
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Germany
Ms. Rachael Virginia Cooper
Executive Officer, Climate Change and
Environment
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Ms. Rachael Grivas
Executive Officer, Environment Branc
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Moya Elyn Collett
Desk officer, Climate Change and
Environment Section
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Mr. Rob Law
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Mr. Robin Davies
Assistant Director General, Sustainable
Development Group
Australian Agency for International
Development
Ms. Deborah Fulton
Director, Policy and Global Environment
Australian Agency for International
Development
- 8 -
Australia (continued)
Ms. Katherine Renee Ann Vaughn
Policy Advisor, Policy and Global
Environment
Australian Agency for International
Development
Mr. Brian Dawson
Policy Adviser
Australian Agency for International
Development
Mr. Andrew Leigh Clarke
Deputy Secretary
Department of Resources Development,
Western Australia
Mr. Bruce Wilson
General Manager, Environment Energy
and Environment Division
Department of Resources Development,
Western Australia
Ms. Jill McCarthy
Policy Adviser
Department of Resources, Energy and
Tourism
Mr. Simon French
Policy Adviser
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and
Forestry
Mr. Ian Michael Ruscoe
Policy Adviser
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and
Forestry
Mr. David Walland
Acting Superintendent, National Climate
Centre
Bureau of Meteorology
Mr. Damien Dunn
Senior Policy Adviser
The Australian Treasury
Ms. Helen Hawka Fuhrman
Policy Officer, Renewable Energy Policy
and Partnerships
Mr. Scott Vivian Davenport
Chief Economics
NSW Department of Industry and
Investment
Mr. Graham Julian Levitt
Policy Manager, Climate Change
NSW Department of Industry and
Investment
Ms. Kate Jennifer Jones
Minister, Climate Change and
Sustainability
Queensland Government
Mr. Michael William Dart
Principal Policy Advisor
Office of the Hon. Kate Jones MP
Queensland Government
Mr. Matthew Anthony Jamie Skoien
Senior Director, Office of Climate Change
Queensland Government
Mr. Michael David Rann
Premier, South Australia
Department of Premier and Cabinet,
Southern Australia
Ms. Suzanne Kay Harter
Adviser
Department of Premier and Cabinet,
Southern Australia
Mr. Paul David Flanagan
Manager, Communications
Government of South Australia
Mr. Timothy William O’Loughlin
Deputy Chief Executive, Sustainability
and Workforce Management
Department of Premier and Cabinet
South Australian Government
Ms. Nyla Sarwar
M.Sc student
Linacre College
University of Oxford
Mr. Gavin Jennings
Minister, Environment and Climate
Change and Innovation, Victorian
Government
Ms. Sarah Broadbent
Sustainability Adviser
Ms. Rebecca Falkingham
Senior Adviser
Victoria Government/Office of Climate
Change
Mr. Simon Camroux
Policy Adviser
Energy Supply Association of Australia
Limited
Mr. Geoff Lake
Adviser
Australian Local Government Association
Sridhar Ayyalaraju
Post Visit Controller
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Tegan Brink
Deputy Visit Controller and Security
Liaison Officer
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Melissa Eu Suan Goh
Transport Liaison Officer and Consul
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Lauren Henschke
Support Staff
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Maree Fay
Accommodation Liaison Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Patricia McKinnon
Communications Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Eugene Olim
Paasport / Baggage Liaison Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Belinda Lee Adams
Ms. Jacqui Ashworth
Media Liaison Officer
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Patricia Smith
Media Liaison Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Martin Bo Jensen
Research and Public Diplomatic Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Mauro Kolobaric
Consular Support
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Susan Flanagan
Consular Support
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Stephen Kanaridis
IT Support Officer
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
- 9 -
Australia (continued)
Mr. George Reid
Support Staff
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Ashley Wright
Support Staff
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Jodie Littlewood
Support Staff
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Thomas Millhouse
Support Staff
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Timothy Whittley
Support Staff Driver
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Ms. Julia Thomson
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Donald Frater
Chief of Staff to Minister Wong
Office of the Minister for Climate Change
and Water
Ms. Jacqui Smith
Media Liaison
DFAT
Diplomatic Mission of Australia to
Denmark
Mr. Greg French
Senior Legal Advisor, Environment
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Mr. Jeremy Hillman
Advisor
PMO

Igor_Goldenberg
10-12-2009, 03:40 PM
Does KRudd really need to add so much to CO2 emissions by leading a team of 114 to Copenhagen (http://hey.ipa.org.au/):


Hey, they worked so hard for the last two years, they deserve a break and a nice overseas trip.:lol:

Desmond
10-12-2009, 04:40 PM
Would it be fair to say that the people listed as "Diplomatic Mission of Australia to Denmark " are not making the trip for the conference as they are already there? 21 at a quick count.

Capablanca-Fan
10-12-2009, 06:00 PM
Would it be fair to say that the people listed as "Diplomatic Mission of Australia to Denmark " are not making the trip for the conference as they are already there? 21 at a quick count.
Even taking that into account, our delegation is bigger than the UK's. But it's not such a great junket for Britons to hop over the Channel.

Capablanca-Fan
12-12-2009, 11:35 AM
Charles Krauthammer on the New Socialism (http://patriotpost.us/opinion/charles-krauthammer/2009/12/11/the-new-socialism/) of the Watermelons (green on the outside, red on the inside):


On the day Copenhagen opened, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency claimed jurisdiction over the regulation of carbon emissions by declaring them an “endangerment” to human health.

Since we operate an overwhelmingly carbon-based economy, the EPA will be regulating practically everything. No institution that emits more than 250 tons of CO2 a year will fall outside EPA control. This means more than a million building complexes, hospitals, plants, schools, businesses and similar enterprises. (The EPA proposes regulating emissions only above 25,000 tons, but it has no such authority.) Not since the creation of the Internal Revenue Service has a federal agency been given more intrusive power over every aspect of economic life.

This naked assertion of vast executive power in the name of the environment is the perfect fulfillment of the prediction of Czech President (and economist) Vaclav Klaus that environmentalism is becoming the new socialism, i.e., the totemic ideal in the name of which government seizes the commanding heights of the economy and society.

Socialism having failed so spectacularly, the left was adrift until it struck upon a brilliant gambit: metamorphosis from red to green. The cultural elites went straight from the memorial service for socialism to the altar of the environment. The objective is the same: highly centralized power given to the best and the brightest, the new class of experts, managers and technocrats…

Forget for a moment the economic effects of severe carbon chastity. There’s the matter of constitutional decency. If you want to revolutionize society—as will drastic carbon regulation and taxation in an energy economy that is 85 percent carbon-based—you do it through Congress reflecting popular will. Not by administrative fiat of EPA bureaucrats.

Desmond
12-12-2009, 11:50 AM
Even taking that into account, our delegation is bigger than the UK's. But it's not such a great junket for Britons to hop over the Channel.
Oh yes I agree it seems excessive, I just think it's best not to exaggerate (because the truth is damning enough).

Capablanca-Fan
14-12-2009, 07:41 PM
“I cannot give any scientist of any age better advice than this: the intensity of the conviction that a hypothesis is true has no bearing on whether it is true or not. The importance of the strength of our conviction is only to provide a proportionally strong incentive to find out if the hypothesis will stand up to critical examination.”—Sir Peter Medawar, Advice to a Young Scientist, Harper and Row Publishers, 1979.

Oepty
14-12-2009, 07:53 PM
Ms. Nyla Sarwar
M.Sc student
Linacre College
University of Oxford

I wonder how this person got onto the delegation, not part of any government although listed under the SA representatives.
Scott

Kevin Bonham
14-12-2009, 09:18 PM
“I cannot give any scientist of any age better advice than this: the intensity of the conviction that a hypothesis is true has no bearing on whether it is true or not. The importance of the strength of our conviction is only to provide a proportionally strong incentive to find out if the hypothesis will stand up to critical examination.”—Sir Peter Medawar, Advice to a Young Scientist, Harper and Row Publishers, 1979.

Excellent advice but I wonder how intensely convinced Medawar was of its truth and whether it provided him with a proportionally strong incentive to find out if it stood up to critical examination.

No bearing whatsoever? That's a big call ... :lol:

Capablanca-Fan
19-12-2009, 01:22 PM
Climate conferees should do nothing (http://washingtontimes.com/news/2009/dec/17/lieberman-climate-conferees-should-do-nothing/?feat=home_columns)
Ben Lieberman
Washington Post, 17 Dec 09

...

The United States never ratified Kyoto, for good reason. Its provisions would have cost American consumers trillions, while having virtually no impact on world temperatures. In much the same way, a new global warming treaty would be all economic pain and little environmental gain for the American people.

Our government would be wise to adhere to the Senate's 1997 Byrd–Hagel Resolution. It passed 95-0 and made it clear that our government wouldn't enter into any global warming treaty that harmed the American economy or gave major developing nations a free pass on emissions. Indeed, America's strong environmental record demonstrates that free markets, rather than binding treaties, provide the more sensible way to address global warming.

...

Emerging nations' emissions have exceeded the developed world's emissions since 2005. They are projected to continue increasing seven times faster than those of the developed world.

China is of particular concern. It now out-emits the U.S., and its emissions growth through 2030 is projected to be nine times higher than ours. Yet China insists on keeping its exemption from emissions reduction obligations, regardless of what America does.

In effect, any reduction in emissions from the U.S. and other developed nations would be more than offset by growing emissions from developing nations. And as constraints on developed nations shift more and more economic activity to exempted nations, the net increase in emissions will only expand.

...

However large or small a problem global warming proves to be, a growing body of evidence shows that free markets — not binding treaties — are the best way to deal with it. According to U.N. data, the U.S. reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 3 percent from 2000 to 2006. Of all the European and other developed nations that committed to reducing emissions under Kyoto, only France did better than that. That's right: America did better as a Kyoto treaty outsider than most treaty insiders.

There are reasons that explain this seemingly counterintuitive result. A sensible approach to global warming has to center on technological innovation, and in particular ways to produce and use energy more efficiently and with fewer emissions.

Innovation is the solution, and we know from long experience that free economies innovate better than centrally planned ones. However, a treaty with binding targets introduces a significant element of central planning and stifles innovation.

We also know that strong economies innovate better than weak ones, but these costly energy controls weaken economies. Perhaps most importantly, stable economies innovate better than unstable ones, especially for something like energy for which the investments often run into the billions of dollars and the payoffs play out over decades. But the experience with Kyoto is that its provisions add a significant element of instability.

...

Capablanca-Fan
20-12-2009, 01:57 PM
THE failure of world leaders to strike a legally binding deal to cut greenhouse gas emissions ‘’entirely vindicates’’ the Opposition’s decision to reject the Government’s emissions trading scheme, Tony Abbott claimed yesterday (http://www.theage.com.au/environment/libs-vindicated-on-ets-claims-abbott-20091219-l6r7.html).

But this is the real reason KRudd wanted an ETS before Copenhagen:

Mr Rudd was not in the inner group which finalised the statement. (http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,26507801-952,00.html)
Less chance to be the UN Secretary General now, poor fellow.

But Talkbull prefers to trust the young (http://www.almendron.com/tribuna/28248/it%E2%80%99s-reckless-to-be-a-sceptic-on-global-warming/), and KRudd even gets his information from seven-year-olds (http://www.canberratimes.com.au/news/local/news/general/rudd-takes-gracies-message-to-world/1709157.aspx).

Also, Ian Plimer pointed out the silliness and hypocrisy of the conference (http://www.theage.com.au/environment/libs-vindicated-on-ets-claims-abbott-20091219-l6r7.html):


''To talk about 2 degrees is viewing the planet like the thermostat on the central heating,'' Professor Plimer said.

''Climate is extraordinarily complicated and we humans are blessed with such an air of arrogance and ego, we actually think we can change climate.''

The real game should be improving conditions for the world's poor. ''The amount of money spent on this Copenhagen conference would have been enough to provide electricity and water for a small African nation,'' he said.

Capablanca-Fan
22-12-2009, 11:26 PM
LOL, Fidel Castro is the latest greenstapo hypocrite (http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/copenhagen-the-moment-of-truth-20091222-lb3l.html), even having the nerve to criticize “brutal methods to crush resistance” and “those entitled to express their opinions”? This mass-murdering despot, much beloved by certain churchian leftards, was also reported as saying that we have an obligation to defend the rights of Mother Earth against the model of capitalist development, the culture of life against the culture of death. :lol: Nice follow-up to the cheering of the Copenfloppen delegates of the Despot of Venezuela for his tirades against capitalism, the economic system responsible for the cleanest environments.

Desmond
23-02-2010, 08:14 PM
F4EdtiqSm_4

Capablanca-Fan
13-03-2010, 02:43 PM
Some of the minerals crucial to green technologies are extracted in China using methods that inflict serious damage on the local environment (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/01/business/global/01minerals.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all). China dominates global rare earth production partly because of its willingness until now to tolerate highly polluting, low-cost mining.

...

China produces over 99 percent of dysprosium and terbium and 95 percent of neodymium. These are vital to many green energy technologies, including high-strength, lightweight magnets used in wind turbines, as well as military applications.

To get at the materials, powerful acid is pumped down bore holes. There it dissolves some of the rare earths, and the slurry is then pumped into leaky artificial ponds with earthen dams, according to mining specialists.