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peteryang
29-09-2009, 10:22 PM
The participants are

1. Veselin Topalov
2. Magnus Carlsen
3. Peter Leko
4. Dmittry Jackovenko
5. Teimour Radjabov
6. Wang Yue

so far, carlsen has won both his games against topalov and leko, and the other 4 games are draws.

Bill Gletsos
29-09-2009, 11:48 PM
Carlsen,M (2772) - Leko,P (2762) [C45]
2nd Pearl Spring Nanjing CHN (1), 28.09.2009
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Nxd4 Bc5 5.Be3 Qf6 6.c3 Nge7 7.Bc4 Ne5 8.Be2 Qg6 9.0-0 d6 10.f4 Qxe4 11.Bf2 Bxd4 12.cxd4 N5g6 13.g3 0-0 14.Nc3 Qf5 15.d5 a6 16.Re1 Kh8 17.Rc1 Bd7 18.Bf3 Rac8 19.Qb3 b5 20.Ne2 Qh3 21.Nd4 Bg4 22.Bg2 Qh5 23.h4 Ng8 24.Rc6 Nf6 25.Rxa6 Bd7 26.Nxb5 Rb8 27.a4 Ng4 28.Bf3 Qh6 29.Qc4 Nxh4 30.Bxg4 Bxg4 31.gxh4 Bf3 32.f5 Qh5 33.Qf4 Bxd5 34.Nxc7 Bb7 35.Rb6 f6 36.Bd4 Qf7 37.Ne6 Rg8 38.Kf2 Rbc8 39.Bc3 Bd5 40.a5 Rc4 41.Nd4 Ba8 42.Qxd6 Qh5 43.Qf4 Rcc8 44.Rbe6 1-0

Bill Gletsos
29-09-2009, 11:51 PM
Carlsen,M (2772) - Topalov,V (2813) [E90]
2nd Pearl Spring Nanjing CHN (2), 29.09.2009
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.h3 Na6 7.Be3 e5 8.d5 c6 9.g4 Nc5 10.Nd2 a5 11.a3 Nfd7 12.Rg1 a4 13.Qc2 Nb6 14.0-0-0 Bd7 15.Kb1 cxd5 16.cxd5 Rc8 17.Bb5 Bxb5 18.Nxb5 Qd7 19.Nc3 Bf6 20.g5 Bd8 21.h4 Na8 22.Bxc5 Rxc5 23.Qxa4 Qc8 24.Rc1 Nb6 25.Qd1 Qh3 26.Qf3 Qd7 27.Qd3 Kg7 28.Rc2 f6 29.gxf6+ Rxf6 30.h5 Rxf2 31.hxg6 h6 32.Nd1 Rxc2 33.Nxf2 Rc8 34.Ng4 Bg5 35.Nf3 Nc4 36.Nxg5 hxg5 37.Ne3 Nxe3 38.Qxe3 Qa4 39.Qxg5 Qxe4+ 40.Ka1 Re8 41.Rc1 1-0

ER
30-09-2009, 12:54 AM
so far, carlsen has won both his games against topalov and leko, and the other 4 games are draws.
How come Magnus had White in both?

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2009, 01:08 AM
How come Magnus had White in both?

Good question. While all six participants get a 5-5 colour split, Carlsen and Radjabov get the same colour twice in a row three times (in Carlsen's case four blacks in five games after this), Leko and Wang Yue get the same colour twice in a row twice, and Topalov and Jakovenko get the same colour twice in a row once.

I suspect it is possible to do better than that in terms of reducing the number of times in a row that entrants get the same colour, but have not yet tested this thoroughly.

Bill Gletsos
30-09-2009, 02:18 AM
It appears to be a standard double round robin draw with rounds 4 & 5 reversed.

Metro
30-09-2009, 05:43 PM
Official site
http://www.chess-pearlspring.com/www/chess_pk/2009/en/index.htm

peteryang
30-09-2009, 07:01 PM
yay looks lyk carlsen is better against wang yue

Basil
30-09-2009, 08:03 PM
Leking-Wang should be quite a spectacle.

Miranda
30-09-2009, 10:16 PM
Carlsen and Wang Yue drew.

Garvinator
30-09-2009, 10:32 PM
Carlsen and Wang Yue drew.
All 3 games drawn.

Bill Gletsos
01-10-2009, 09:54 PM
[Event "Nanjing"]
[Date "2009.10.01"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Jakovenko"]
[Black "Carlsen"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B92"]
[WhiteElo "2742"]
[BlackElo "2772"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Be3 Be6 10. Qd2 Nbd7 11. a4 Nb6 12. a5 Nc4 13. Bxc4 Bxc4 14. Rfd1 Rc8 15. f3 Rc6 16. Kh1 Qc8 17. Rac1 Rd8 18. Nd5 Bxd5 19. exd5 Rc4 20. Qd3 e4 21. fxe4 Rxe4 22. c4 Re8 23. Bg1 Bf8 24. Nd4 g6 25. Rf1 Bh6 26. Qf3 Rf4 27. Qd3 Ng4 28. Nf3 Rfe4 29. Rc3 Ne3 30. Re1 Qg4 31. Re2 Qh5 32. Bxe3 Rxe3 33. Rxe3 Bxe3 34. Qe2 Qh6 35. c5 dxc5 36. d6 Re6 37. d7 Bg5 38. Qd1 Bd8 39. Rxc5 Qf8 40. Rd5 Qb4 41. b3 Re3 42. Nd2 Qc3 43. Nf3 Qb4 44. Nd2 Qf4 45. Nf3 Rc3 46. Qe2 Qe3 47. Qxe3 Rxe3 48. Rd4 Kf8 49. Rb4 Rd3 50. Rxb7 Rd1+ 51. Ng1 Bxa5 52. g4 Ke7 53. Kg2 Rxd7 54. Rxd7+ Kxd7 55. Kf3 Kd6 56. Ke4 Kc5 57. Kd3 Kd5 58. Nf3 Bd8 59. h3 h6 60. h4 h5 61. gxh5 gxh5 62. Ke3 Kc5 63. Kd3 Kb4 0-1

peteryang
02-10-2009, 08:01 PM
and carlsen picks up his fourth win in five games, against teimour radjabov...

he is now second in live ratings, about 12 points from topalov.

Nicholas D-C
02-10-2009, 08:15 PM
I wonder how much difference training with Kasparov will have made for Carlsen...

Tony Dowden
02-10-2009, 09:26 PM
I wonder how much difference training with Kasparov will have made for Carlsen...

:hmm: Obviously a big one psychologically - Radjabov played like a possum caught in headlights.

Bill Gletsos
02-10-2009, 09:35 PM
Carlsen, M (2772) - Radjabov, T (2757) [B30]
2nd Pearl Spring - Nanjing, China (5), 02.10.2009

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 e6 4.0–0 Nge7 5.c3 a6 6.Ba4 b5 7.Bc2 Bb7 8.Qe2 d5 9.e5 d4 10.Be4 Qb6 11.d3 Rd8 12.a4 Nd5 13.axb5 axb5 14.cxd4 cxd4 15.Nbd2 Nf4 16.Qd1 Nb4 17.Nb3 Bxe4 18.dxe4 Nfd3 19.Bg5 Rc8 20.Nfxd4 Nxb2 21.Qe2 Nc4 22.Rfc1 Bc5 23.Nxb5 0–0 24.Nxc5 Nxe5 25.Be7 1–0

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2009, 09:50 PM
The tournament crosstable at the halfway point is hilarious because only Carlsen has any wins at all and he has four of them. Unless he wants the ratings points badly he may well go into draw mode in the second half since five draws from here would certainly win it.

Tony Dowden
04-10-2009, 09:10 AM
The tournament crosstable at the halfway point is hilarious because only Carlsen has any wins at all and he has four of them. Unless he wants the ratings points badly he may well go into draw mode in the second half since five draws from here would certainly win it.

Agreed, but I'm not too sure if Carlsen knows how to go into 'draw mode' ;)

Jesper Norgaard
04-10-2009, 01:34 PM
:hmm: Obviously a big one psychologically - Radjabov played like a possum caught in headlights.

Problem is, all of "the others" played like possums when facing Magnus. Maybe they shouldn't have allowed him to put on that red Dragon outfit, it worked like cryptonite against them. :P

But seriously, I think second part will be quite different for Carlsparov, he has suddenly become a big favorite psychologically in all of his last 5 games, a completely new situation since he was not a big favorite rating-wise before the tourney. I predict at least 3 draws in his games if not more. Still drawing all 5 would have a pretty good chance of winning the tourney.

Miranda
04-10-2009, 02:16 PM
I think the best part of the tournament is seeing the costumes the participants wear. They look so out of place!

Carlsen is doing amazingly, all he needs to do now is play in draw mode and he'll probably win.

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2009, 04:55 PM
Still drawing all 5 would have a pretty good chance of winning the tourney.

Better than that; drawing all five would give him equal first at worst. He currently leads by two points; if he draws all five then he gets 2.5 from the second half and nobody else can get more than 4.5 from that half. Indeed the only way five draws would not be good for outright first would be if Wang Yue mirrored Carlsen's form from the first half by drawing with Carlsen and winning every other game.

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2009, 08:05 PM
Jakovenko - Topalov.

In which Topalov plays a wild and woolly piece sac and Jakovenko fends it off OK for a while and then completely self-destructs within five moves.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Qa4+ Bd7 6.Qb3 dxc4 7.Qxc4 0-0 8.Bf4 Na6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 Nh5 11.Be3 cxd4 12.Qxd4 Bc6 13.Be2 Qa5 14.0-0 Nb4 15.Qh4 Nc2 16.g4 Nxe3 17.fxe3 Bh6 18.Nd1 Kh8 19.gxh5 Rg8 20.Kf2 Rad8 21.hxg6 Bxf3 22.Kxf3 Rxg6 23.Qe4 f5 24.Qc4 Qd2 25.Rc1 Rc6 26.Qh4 Qxc1 27.Qxe7 Rg8 28.e6 Qd2 29.Kf2 f4 0-1

Metro
05-10-2009, 05:03 PM
Topalov-Carlsen
Wang-Jakovenko
Radjabov-Leko

peteryang
05-10-2009, 05:37 PM
carlsen looks lyk hes in trouble against topalov...

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2009, 06:01 PM
At the moment he's a pawn down but should not have much trouble drawing.

They are playing pretty fast; they are in the endgame on move 30 while the others are at moves 14 and 12 and Wang Yue vs Jakovenko isn't even out of theory yet.

peteryang
05-10-2009, 06:36 PM
yeah, now it looks lyk draw..

Garvinator
05-10-2009, 06:39 PM
They are playing pretty fast; they are in the endgame on move 30 while the others are at moves 14 and 12 and Wang Yue vs Jakovenko isn't even out of theory yet.
Carlsen has just received his extra 30 mins and now has 1 hr 48 mins on the clock ;) Draw just agreed on move 43.

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2009, 08:10 PM
All drawn. Only 5 out of 21 games between these titans have been decisive so far.

Kevin Bonham
06-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Tonight Topalov, Carlsen and Jakovenko all won!

Carlsen - Wang Yue swayed back and forth (Wang was winning, then Carlsen, then it was drawish.) Finally Wang managed to trip over defending a very tricky position with KRN2P vs KRNN. There is a very neat line Wang missed (or declined) that could have forced the game to KPP vs KNN. However the KPP vs KNN position is lost according to tablebase - although two knights cannot force mate against a bare king, they can sometimes force mate against king and pawns. I include a sample line in brackets.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 Nbd7 7.Nxc4 Qc7 8.g3 e5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.Bf4 Nfd7 11.Bg2 g5 12.Ne3 gxf4 13.Nxf5 0-0-0 14.Qc2 Ng6 15.0-0 Kb8 16.Rfc1 a5 17.b4 axb4 18.Nb5 Qe5 19.Nbd4 Bc5 20.Nb3 h5 21.Rab1 Ba7 22.Bxc6 fxg3 23.hxg3 Rc8 24.Qd3 bxc6 25.Qxd7 Rc7 26.Qd3 h4 27.Nbd4 hxg3 28.Rxb4+ Ka8 29.Nxg3 Rd8 30.e3 Nh4 31.Kf1 Qa5 32.Rcb1 Nf3 33.Nb3 Qd5 34.Qxd5 cxd5 35.Rd1 Rc2 36.Rf4 Ne5 37.Nd4 Rc4 38.Nde2 Rxf4 39.Nxf4 d4 40.Nge2 Nc6 41.e4 Rb8 42.Nd5 Rb2 43.Nef4 Kb7 44.Nd3 Rb3 45.Ke2 Ra3 46.f4 Rxa4 47.Rb1+ Kc8 48.Rc1 Kb7 49.e5 Ra3 50.Rh1 Ra5 51.Nf6 Bb8 52.Rb1+ Kc8 53.Rc1 Kb7 54.Ne4 Ra3 55.Rh1 Bxe5 56.fxe5 Nxe5 57.Nd6+ Ka6 58.Nb4+ Kb6 59.Rc1 Re3+ 60.Kd1 Rb3 [Here it is: 60...Ka5 61.Nd5 Re1+ 62.Kxe1 Nd3+ 63.Kd2 Nxc1 64.Kxc1 f5 But now white wins by blocking the f-pawn, winning the d-pawn then executing a two knights vs pawn mate, for instance (c/- tablebases) 65.Nf4 Kb4 66.Kc2 Kc5 67.Nf7 Kc4 68.Ne5+ Kb4 69.Kd3 Kc5 70.Nc4 Kb5 71.Kxd4 Kb4 72.Ne5 Kb5 73.Ned3 Kc6 74.Kc4 Kd6 75.Kb5 Kc7 76.Ne5 Kd6 77.Nc6 Kd7 78.Kc5 Kc7 79.Ne7 Kb7 80.Ned5 Ka6 81.Kb4 Ka7 82.Ka5 Kb7 83.Kb5 Ka7 84.Kc6 Ka6 85.Nb6 Ka5 86.Kc5 Ka6 87.Nc4 Kb7 88.Kd6 Kc8 89.Na5 Kd8 90.Nb7+ Ke8 91.Ke6 Kf8 92.Nd6 Kg7 93.Ke5 Kh7 94.Kf6 Kh6 95.Nc8 Kh7 96.Ne7 Kh6 97.Ng8+ Kh7 98.Kf7 Kh8 99.Nd5 f4 100.Ndf6 f3 101.Ne7 f2 102.Ng6#] 61.Nd5+ Ka7 62.Ra1+ Kb8 63.Kc2 Rh3 64.Rb1+ Ka7 65.Rb7+ Ka6 66.Rb6+ Ka5 67.Rb5+ Ka4 68.Nb6+ Ka3 69.Rxe5 1-0

Wang Yue did not care to make Carlsen demonstrate that he could win with KRNN vs KR. Shame IMO as the technique would have been instructive for many watching.

Capablanca-Fan
06-10-2009, 10:35 PM
Carlsen - Wang Yue swayed back and forth (Wang was winning, then Carlsen, then it was drawish.) Finally Wang managed to trip over defending a very tricky position with KRN2P vs KRNN. There is a very neat line Wang missed (or declined) that could have forced the game to KPP vs KNN. However the KPP vs KNN position is lost according to tablebase - although two knights cannot force mate against a bare king, they can sometimes force mate against king and pawns. I include a sample line in brackets.
Thanx for that. Even the 50 move rule would not save him if Carlsen played near perfectly,

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 Nbd7 7.Nxc4 Qc7 8.g3 e5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.Bf4 Nfd7 11.Bg2 g5 12.Ne3 gxf4 13.Nxf5 0-0-0 14.Qc2 Ng6 15.0-0 Kb8 16.Rfc1 a5 17.b4 axb4 18.Nb5 Qe5 19.Nbd4 Bc5 20.Nb3 h5 21.Rab1 Ba7 22.Bxc6 fxg3 23.hxg3 Rc8 24.Qd3 bxc6 25.Qxd7 Rc7 26.Qd3 h4 27.Nbd4 hxg3 28.Rxb4+ Ka8 29.Nxg3 Rd8 30.e3 Nh4 31.Kf1 Qa5 32.Rcb1 Nf3 33.Nb3 Qd5 34.Qxd5 cxd5 35.Rd1 Rc2 36.Rf4 Ne5 37.Nd4 Rc4 38.Nde2 Rxf4 39.Nxf4 d4 40.Nge2 Nc6 41.e4 Rb8 42.Nd5 Rb2 43.Nef4 Kb7 44.Nd3 Rb3 45.Ke2 Ra3 46.f4 Rxa4 47.Rb1+ Kc8 48.Rc1 Kb7 49.e5 Ra3 50.Rh1 Ra5 51.Nf6 Bb8 52.Rb1+ Kc8 53.Rc1 Kb7 54.Ne4 Ra3 55.Rh1 Bxe5 56.fxe5 Nxe5 57.Nd6+ Ka6 58.Nb4+ Kb6 59.Rc1 Re3+ 60.Kd1 Rb3 [Here it is: 60...Ka5 61.Nd5 Re1+ 62.Kxe1 Nd3+ 63.Kd2 Nxc1 64.Kxc1 f5 But now white wins by blocking the f-pawn, winning the d-pawn then executing a two knights vs pawn mate, for instance (c/- tablebases) 65.Nf4 Kb4 66.Kc2 Kc5 67.Nf7 Kc4 68.Ne5+ Kb4 69.Kd3 Kc5 70.Nc4 Kb5 71.Kxd4 Kb4 72.Ne5 Kb5 73.Ned3 Kc6 74.Kc4 Kd6 75.Kb5 Kc7 76.Ne5 Kd6 77.Nc6 Kd7 78.Kc5 Kc7 79.Ne7 Kb7 80.Ned5 Ka6 81.Kb4 Ka7 82.Ka5 Kb7 83.Kb5 Ka7 84.Kc6 Ka6 85.Nb6 Ka5 86.Kc5 Ka6 87.Nc4 Kb7 88.Kd6 Kc8 89.Na5 Kd8 90.Nb7+ Ke8 91.Ke6 Kf8 92.Nd6 Kg7 93.Ke5 Kh7 94.Kf6 Kh6 95.Nc8 Kh7 96.Ne7 Kh6 97.Ng8+ Kh7 98.Kf7 Kh8 99.Nd5 f4 100.Ndf6 f3 101.Ne7 f2 102.Ng6#] 61.Nd5+ Ka7 62.Ra1+ Kb8 63.Kc2 Rh3 64.Rb1+ Ka7 65.Rb7+ Ka6 66.Rb6+ Ka5 67.Rb5+ Ka4 68.Nb6+ Ka3 69.Rxe5 1-0


Wang Yue did not care to make Carlsen demonstrate that he could win with KRNN vs KR. Shame IMO as the technique would have been instructive for many watching.
I guess the defender's side is hard enough with KRN vs KR, that he didn't think it was worth playing against two of the steeds. He'd already suffered because of their cooperation from move 60 or so. It would not be as difficult as KBN vs K, I think.

Jesper Norgaard
07-10-2009, 02:50 AM
There is a very neat line Wang missed (or declined) that could have forced the game to KPP vs KNN. However the KPP vs KNN position is lost according to tablebase - although two knights cannot force mate against a bare king, they can sometimes force mate against king and pawns.

Maybe Wang didn't see Re1+ which is a neat simplification combination. But it is also possible that he knew that this would be dead lost. With the f-pawn blocked on f5, tablebases announce mate in 29, which means it is really low difficulty. There are positions with mate in 115 with this material, so it really depends on which pawn is blocked, and how far ahead. It seems center pawns are better for the attacker since either flank can be reached quickly with the temporarily blocking knight.


Wang Yue did not care to make Carlsen demonstrate that he could win with KRNN vs KR. Shame IMO as the technique would have been instructive for many watching.
I think it is a pity we did not get KNN vs KPP on the board, but KRNN vs. KR (possibly with one or two pawns) I think is just a massacre if there is no immediate threats of e.g. exchanging rooks, the black king is stuck in mating nets very quickly.


I guess the defender's side is hard enough with KRN vs KR, that he didn't think it was worth playing against two of the steeds. He'd already suffered because of their cooperation from move 60 or so. It would not be as difficult as KBN vs K, I think.

Actually I disagree with KRN vs. KR to be difficult to defend, unless the defending king is in a precarious situation at the rim, it seems impossible to gain coordination to drive him away from the center. Cooperation between attaking king and knight is poor. Instead in KRB vs. KR is much more difficult to defend, since the king and the bishop coordinates well to fend of sidechecks and still managing to advance towards the enemy king.

My list of difficulties (from 1 to 10, 10 is most difficult)

1. Difficult queen endings 10
2. Difficult KNN vs. KP endings 9
3. Easy KNN vs. KP endings 8
4. Defending KR vs. KRB 8
5. KNB vs. K 6
6. Easy queen endings 5
7. Defending KR vs. KRN 4
8. Winning KRNN vs. KRPP 3

I put in some "winning" or "defending" while the other positions it is equally difficult to win or defend. Also I assume human vs. human play, with human vs. computer with Nalimov tablebases, of course no. 2 and no. 3 are much more difficult. Also winning Q vs. R is quite difficult against computers whether they have Nalimov or not.

I am sure some will disagree about no. 5 since many grandmasters have missed this - but since I manage to win in Blitz against computers with N+B, it shows that with the proper training, it is just technique.

Miranda
07-10-2009, 08:18 AM
Carlsen is 2 points above everyone else, with only 2 rounds to go. Worst case scenario, he loses his next two games and ties for first place!

ER
07-10-2009, 03:04 PM
de bienvenue conquérant en arrière de Paris ! :P

Tony Dowden
07-10-2009, 07:13 PM
Carlsen - Wang Yue swayed back and forth (Wang was winning, then Carlsen, then it was drawish.) Finally Wang managed to trip over defending a very tricky position with KRN2P vs KRNN. There is a very neat line Wang missed (or declined) that could have forced the game to KPP vs KNN. However the KPP vs KNN position is lost according to tablebase - although two knights cannot force mate against a bare king, they can sometimes force mate against king and pawns. I include a sample line in brackets.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5 Nbd7 7.Nxc4 Qc7 8.g3 e5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.Bf4 Nfd7 11.Bg2 g5 12.Ne3 gxf4 13.Nxf5 0-0-0 14.Qc2 Ng6 15.0-0 Kb8 16.Rfc1 a5 17.b4 axb4 18.Nb5 Qe5 19.Nbd4 Bc5 20.Nb3 h5 21.Rab1 Ba7 22.Bxc6 fxg3 23.hxg3 Rc8 24.Qd3 bxc6 25.Qxd7 Rc7 26.Qd3 h4 27.Nbd4 hxg3 28.Rxb4+ Ka8 29.Nxg3 Rd8 30.e3 Nh4 31.Kf1 Qa5 32.Rcb1 Nf3 33.Nb3 Qd5 34.Qxd5 cxd5 35.Rd1 Rc2 36.Rf4 Ne5 37.Nd4 Rc4 38.Nde2 Rxf4 39.Nxf4 d4 40.Nge2 Nc6 41.e4 Rb8 42.Nd5 Rb2 43.Nef4 Kb7 44.Nd3 Rb3 45.Ke2 Ra3 46.f4 Rxa4 47.Rb1+ Kc8 48.Rc1 Kb7 49.e5 Ra3 50.Rh1 Ra5 51.Nf6 Bb8 52.Rb1+ Kc8 53.Rc1 Kb7 54.Ne4 Ra3 55.Rh1 Bxe5 56.fxe5 Nxe5 57.Nd6+ Ka6 58.Nb4+ Kb6 59.Rc1 Re3+ 60.Kd1 Rb3 [Here it is: 60...Ka5 61.Nd5 Re1+ 62.Kxe1 Nd3+ 63.Kd2 Nxc1 64.Kxc1 f5 But now white wins by blocking the f-pawn, winning the d-pawn then executing a two knights vs pawn mate, for instance (c/- tablebases) 65.Nf4 Kb4 66.Kc2 Kc5 67.Nf7 Kc4 68.Ne5+ Kb4 69.Kd3 Kc5 70.Nc4 Kb5 71.Kxd4 Kb4 72.Ne5 Kb5 73.Ned3 Kc6 74.Kc4 Kd6 75.Kb5 Kc7 76.Ne5 Kd6 77.Nc6 Kd7 78.Kc5 Kc7 79.Ne7 Kb7 80.Ned5 Ka6 81.Kb4 Ka7 82.Ka5 Kb7 83.Kb5 Ka7 84.Kc6 Ka6 85.Nb6 Ka5 86.Kc5 Ka6 87.Nc4 Kb7 88.Kd6 Kc8 89.Na5 Kd8 90.Nb7+ Ke8 91.Ke6 Kf8 92.Nd6 Kg7 93.Ke5 Kh7 94.Kf6 Kh6 95.Nc8 Kh7 96.Ne7 Kh6 97.Ng8+ Kh7 98.Kf7 Kh8 99.Nd5 f4 100.Ndf6 f3 101.Ne7 f2 102.Ng6#] 61.Nd5+ Ka7 62.Ra1+ Kb8 63.Kc2 Rh3 64.Rb1+ Ka7 65.Rb7+ Ka6 66.Rb6+ Ka5 67.Rb5+ Ka4 68.Nb6+ Ka3 69.Rxe5 1-0

Thanks Kevin :) In the KNN vs KP(P) ending its amazing what the K and N can do on their own without the other N being involved.

In the game note that Wang missed late chance. Apparently 59...Ra5! leads to a draw because it prevents a White N getting to d5. It seems simple enough but easy to overlook because the rook had been on a5 earlier and it can be counter-intuitive to 'rewind'.

And earlier on the commentators (and everyone's engines last night) were saying that 32.Rxc6! wins immediately because it wins a second pawn and simplifies at the same time (spot the loose N on h4 in one key line). After the game both players admitted they'd completely missed it.

In addition 23...Ne7! was actually close to winning for Black which means that either one of Carlsen's 22.Bxc6 or 21.Rab1 are probably suspect.

Apart from that Carlsen played remarkably accurately. His ability to calculate deeply, allied with his astonishing positional understanding (can you believe he's only 18????), means that we are going to be treated to some wonderful Carlsen games for many years :D

ER
07-10-2009, 07:21 PM
de bienvenue conquérant en arrière de Paris ! :P
Ops Pardon my French, but I have a slight suspicion the way I have constructed the above sentence it reads more like "Welcome conqueress of the back of Paris" :eek: rather than the intented "Welcome back Conqueress of Paris"! HELP!:hmm:

Kevin Bonham
07-10-2009, 07:53 PM
In the game note that Wang missed late chance. Apparently 59...Ra5! leads to a draw because it prevents a White N getting to d5. It seems simple enough but easy to overlook because the rook had been on a5 earlier and it can be counter-intuitive to 'rewind'.

This is not the only plausible move 59 either. For instance 59...Rb3 is playable as the king cannot get near the rook without it going to b2 and the knight checking the king away; the problem with 59...Re3+ 60.Kd1 Rb3 by comparison is that the white king is driven one square closer to the action and therefore able to throw the black rook off the b-file. 59...d3+ and 59...Ka5 also appear to be non-losing. It seems that by bringing the king closer 59...Re3+ technically loses (if white can win the KNN vs KPP) and after 60...Rb3 black becomes more seriously lost.

Capablanca-Fan
07-10-2009, 08:10 PM
Ops Pardon my French, but I have a slight suspicion the way I have constructed the above sentence it reads more like "Welcome conqueress of the back of Paris" :eek: rather than the intented "Welcome back Conqueress of Paris"! HELP!:hmm:
Would not conqueress be the feminine form conquérante?

ER
08-10-2009, 02:55 PM
Would not conqueress be the feminine form conquérante?
Correct, my position is falling apart already and I can anticipate getting THE GLARE from Miranda next time we play against each other! :eek:

Jesper Norgaard
08-10-2009, 04:54 PM
This is a propos to the Magnus-Wang ending where two knights against pawn was a possibility, Wang clearly had experience with this ending before - see it and weep (for Anand!)

A hilarious ending but I guess Wang Yue did not believe he could pull off the "heroic" defence once again against Magnus with pawn against two knights:

[Event "18th Amber Blindfold"]
[Site "Nice FRA"]
[Date "2009.??.??"]
[White "Wang Yue"]
[Black "Anand,V"]
[Round "11"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2739"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[ECO "D12"]

59.Rxg3 Nxg3 60.a5 bxa5+ 61.Kxa5 Kc5?? {Oh dear, my my,} (61...Ne4 62.c4 Nc5) {is mate in 39 moves according to Nalimov tablebases, a relatively easy KNN vs. KP winning position} 62.c4 {now it's a draw, but could still be tough to defend} 62...Ne4 63.Ka4 Nd4 64.Ka5 Nc3 65.Ka6 Ne6 66.Kb7 Na4 67.Ka6 Nb6 68.Kb7 Nd7 69.Ka6 Nd8 70.Ka5 Nb6 71.Ka6 Kc6?? {Whaaat, there must still be chances with }(71...Nc6) {followed by releasing the black king which of course can't block the pawn - the two knights will never mate the white king without intervention from the black king} 72.c5 Nc4 73.Ka7 Ne6 74.Kb8 Nd8 75.Ka7 Nb7 76.Kb8 Na3 77.Ka7 Nb5+ 78.Ka6 Nc3 79.Ka7 Nd5 80.Ka6 Nb4+ 81.Ka7 Kc7 82.c6 {maybe he is just hoping to win on time, otherwise he could just as well gobble it up now, there will be no chances for mate anymore} 82...Nc5 83.Ka8 Ne4 84.Ka7 Nd6 85.Ka8 Nxc6 1/2-1/2

No need for an arbiter intervening it's stalemate! That would have won in Iceland 700(?) years ago, because stalemate was considered a (lesser) win.

Anand played the ending like a blind man without his cane ... :)

Kevin Bonham
08-10-2009, 05:23 PM
I guess it being blindfold gives him some excuse but even so it is interesting that he was not able to implement the basic principle. Even I know that there is a line behind which the pawn must be stopped with one knight. I couldn't state that line offhand without a reference, and I know it's up and down between different files, but I know the basic concept that you stop the pawn with a knight as far back as you can.

Jesper Norgaard
08-10-2009, 11:50 PM
Even I know that there is a line behind which the pawn must be stopped with one knight. I couldn't state that line offhand without a reference, and I know it's up and down between different files, but I know the basic concept that you stop the pawn with a knight as far back as you can.
I think Troitzky developed the theoretical line a5-b6-c5-d4-e4-f5-g6-h5 at which a black pawn must be stopped. Then Karsten Müller developed the "practical" line a5-b6-c5-d5-e5-f5-g6-h5 which corresponds to positions that can be won with the theoretical best attack/defense within the 50 moves rule, which of course is in effect in OTB games (and in corr I guess). A win in 115 moves is probably difficult to book even with less perfect defense against a human opponent. I often win in 25 moves against black f5 with white Nf4 if the "box" has 3 minutes for the whole game - but of course it has no Nalimov tablebase (or else I would scramble to win within 50 moves :) )

Funny I misspelled the above with the Nali-move database ... that is exactly what it is, a database full of moves, he he. :hmm:

lost
09-10-2009, 12:16 AM
Carlsen wins tournament with one round to spare!!

Well done Magnus and I'm guessing if he wins his last game he will hit the 2800 rating mark.

lost

lost
09-10-2009, 04:40 PM
Carlsen beats Jakovenko and and should hit the 2800 rating. Congratulations to Carlsen if this the case.

Well done.

lost

Kevin Bonham
09-10-2009, 05:20 PM
TWIC is showing it as a 3002-strength performance, which is amazing.

Metro
09-10-2009, 06:10 PM
TWIC is showing it as a 3002-strength performance, which is amazing.
Truly awesome:clap: :clap: :clap:

Winning from world number 1 Topalov by 2.5 point margin!
I wonder, what is Fischer and Kasparovs best results as a 18 y.o.?

Kevin Bonham
09-10-2009, 07:10 PM
Truly awesome:clap: :clap: :clap:

Winning from world number 1 Topalov by 2.5 point margin!
I wonder, what is Fischer and Kasparovs best results as a 18 y.o.?

Chessmetrics gives several c.2800 strength performances by either around that age but even allowing for a bit of rating inflation (Chessmetrics rates according to the standard of the time), nothing like this.

Capablanca-Fan
10-10-2009, 12:17 AM
Carlson should be able to shatter Kaspy's record as the youngest ever real World Champ.

Tony Dowden
10-10-2009, 01:12 PM
Carlsen should be able to shatter Kasparov's record as the youngest ever real World Champ.

... if politics don't intervene ...

Kevin Bonham
10-10-2009, 11:54 PM
... if politics don't intervene ...

Or incompetence.

Jesper Norgaard
11-10-2009, 09:08 AM
I think Troitzky developed the theoretical line a5-b6-c5-d4-e4-f5-g6-h5 at which a black pawn must be stopped. Then Karsten Müller developed the "practical" line a5-b6-c5-d5-e5-f5-g6-h5 which corresponds to positions that can be won with the theoretical best attack/defense within the 50 moves rule
I misrepresented the Troitzky line which can be seen here :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troitzky_line#Troitzky_line
So the line should be a4 and h4 instead of a5 and h5, as in a4-b6-c5-d4-e4-f5-g6-h4
For instance this position that I quickly threw on the board is a win in 93 moves with Nc3, Kb1 or Kb2 (amazing that Nc3 and Kb1 can be exactly same strength mating in 93 moves, perhaps it is by move transposition to the same positions):

8/5k2/8/1N6/p7/N7/K7/8 w - - 0 1

Or this position which has the longest number of moves to reach mate in 115 for black to move:

8/k7/8/4Kn2/8/P7/8/1n6 b - - 0 1

Still some of these positions are still beyond the comprehension of most grandmasters and they will often head to the wrong corner if defending such a position, as Karpov did against Topalov in a famous game (Karpov lost).

In the actual position above, drawing chances with the 50-move rule should be good. Just fight for every inch of the center before accepting to go to the rim or a corner!

Jesper Norgaard
11-10-2009, 09:35 AM
Carlson should be able to shatter Kaspy's record as the youngest ever real World Champ.
Amazing 3002+ performance by Carlsen (Carlsparov?) I'm so happy I chose "Magnus" as the name for my twin son in honor of the Norwegian prodigy, when Magnus Carlsen was around 50.th. place in the world 4 years ago, and look now Magnus the Magnificent is second in the world and on the rise! He has 3 years to beat Kasparov's record. I don't know how soon he will be able to get a title match, and whoever is the champion is not likely to give him a free match until FIDE WC-cycle demands it.

Miranda
11-10-2009, 11:33 AM
I'm so happy I chose "Magnus" as the name for my twin son in honor of the Norwegian prodigy
:eek: You named your son after Magnus Carlsen? That's pretty cool... what did you name the other twin?



Correct, my position is falling apart already and I can anticipate getting THE GLARE from Miranda next time we play against each other!
Hopefully I'll be too busy winning our game to glare at you ;)

ER
11-10-2009, 11:53 AM
Hopefully I'll be too busy winning our game to glare at you ;)
ok then you do the winning, I 'll do the glaring! :cool:

Jesper Norgaard
11-10-2009, 01:52 PM
:eek: You named your son after Magnus Carlsen? That's pretty cool... what did you name the other twin?

Thanks Miranda!

My Mexican wife Greta preferred Danish names but got to choose my twin daughters name, so she was named Majken after a tv host Maiken/Majken Wexø, so nothing to do with chess. It is a derivative of the month of May though (in Danish maj). We are not quite sure if Wexø's first name is actually spelled with j or with i, but we preferred j because the Danish name for May is with j.

Kevin Bonham
13-10-2009, 01:31 AM
Jeff Sonas has an article attempting to compare Carlsen's performance with other past great performances here (http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=5828).

One thing I will say about that is that Topalov's performance in winning San Luis 2005 was stronger than it looks on paper because Topalov went into his shell in the second half of the event, needing only draws to win it and not caring how much he won it by so long as he did. If the (preunification) FIDE world title had not been on the line in that event he could have easily made a higher score in the second half. So I would say that Topalov at San Luis in 2005 is the real strongest tournament performance of the past five years.

Sonas considers Carlsen's result to be the strongest by a teenager of all time. It is interesting that apart from Fischer, all those who recorded a performance in his top 20 teenage performances were either Kasparov or post-Kasparov players.