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Jesper Norgaard
30-07-2009, 06:52 AM
This is a game from 2005, where I used half an hour as White finding the wrong move. Ouch! But it was quite difficult, and worthy of a full analysis. Boxes and non-white text are welcome! This is a real brain cruncher exercise.

White to move and win. I small hint is perhaps that I played 21.Rdxd6 Qc1+ 22.Kh2 Qf4+ 23.Kg1 Qc1+ and we took the "tablas" (draw). The point of Rdxd6 is that it permits the hidden threat 21...cxd6 22.Qxf3 and it is mate in the bottom that allows all of this. Note also that after 21...Qc1+ White is even worse if playing 22.Bf1? Rxf2 as he can't protect the pinned Bishop on f1.

5r1k/pQp3pp/3bR3/6q1/2B5/1P3r1P/P1P2PP1/3R2K1 w - - 0 21

Igor_Goldenberg
30-07-2009, 10:41 AM
21.h4 looks interesting but bloody complicated after 21...Bh2+.
For example:
22. Kh1 Qxh4 23.Qxf3 (23.gxf3 loses to 23...Bg3+ 24.Kg1 Qh2+ 25.Kf1 Qf2#) Bg3+ 24.Kg1 Bxf2+ 25.Kf1 Bc5 26.Qxf8+ Bxf8 27.Re8. Too many checks from there, but if black can't rook on e8 with checks then Rdd8 is inevitable winning the bishop.
Possible line:
27...Qh1+ 28.Kf2 Qh4+ (rood d1 is untouchable) 29.Kg1 escaping checks
27...Qf6+ 28.Kg1. Black does not have time to prevent Rdd8 winning the bishop.


What does the iron brain say?

Jesper Norgaard
30-07-2009, 11:23 AM
21.h4 looks interesting but bloody complicated after 21...Bh2+.
For example:
22. Kh1 Qxh4 23.Qxf3 (23.gxf3 loses to 23...Bg3+ 24.Kg1 Qh2+ 25.Kf1 Qf2#) Bg3+ 24.Kg1 Bxf2+ 25.Kf1 Bc5 26.Qxf8+ Bxf8 27.Re8. Too many checks from there, but if black can't rook on e8 with checks then Rdd8 is inevitable winning the bishop.
Possible line:
27...Qh1+ 28.Kf2 Qh4+ (rood d1 is untouchable) 29.Kg1 escaping checks
27...Qf6+ 28.Kg1. Black does not have time to prevent Rdd8 winning the bishop.


What does the iron brain say?

You are absolutely on the right track. In the game I dismissed 21.h4 pretty quickly because of the "obvious" 21...Bh2+ 22.Kxh2 Qxh4+ 23.Kg1 Qxf2+ with perpetual check. But then 22.Kh1 Qxh4 23.Qxf3 Bg3+ 24.Kg1 Bxf2+ 25.Kf1 Bc5 26.Qxf8+ Bxf8 27.Re8 is critical for Black as you say. Most of your variations and arguments seem okay. But the brainy defense is 27...Qf6+ and 28.Kg1 will not work because of 28...Qb6+ and perpetual check via b6, f6 and h6. So White has to come out in the open with 28.Ke2 Qf5! 29.Rdd8 Qxc2+ and once again White is finding it difficult to avoid perpetual check. The end of my (then) analysis runs 30.Ke3! Qc3+ 31.Ke4! Qc2+ 32.Ke5 Qc3+ 33.Ke6 Qf6+ 34.Kd7 Qf5+ 35.Kc6! (35.Kxc7 Qc5+ gives perpetual check) Qc5+ 36.Kb7 Qb6+ 37.Kc8! and White escapes the perpetual checks and wins!!

This is true beauty in Chess in my opinion, but alas I was not able to catch it in an OTB game. I'm sure I would have catched it in a correspondence game though. Pretty amazing, White has to run with his King from g1 to c8 to find the hiding place!

Would you agree this is beauty in Chess?

Igor_Goldenberg
30-07-2009, 11:34 AM
Would you agree this is beauty in Chess?

Wouldn't be playing otherwise.:lol:

I saw 28...Qb6+, but didn't see 29...Qh6+. I guess it's too far.
In a practical game I would go for this position because it's a risk free and white king escape route can be considered when the position is reached. Even after 29...Qh6+ white can go back to Ke2 line (which I saw but dismissed in favour of 28.Kg1). I would be confident during the game (maybe foolishly so:D ) that I'd escape the perpetual. Of course I am not sure whether I'd find 35.Kc6! or the whole escape route.

Jesper Norgaard
30-07-2009, 03:20 PM
Of course I am not sure whether I'd find 35.Kc6! or the whole escape route.
No neither would I. But on the contrary I'm dead sure my opponent would not OTB have found the two key moves 27...Qf6+ and more importantly 28...Qf5! which look pretty silly to a human player, at least to my opponent (I showed him this and as far as I remember he thought 28...Qf5 was a ridiculous move). In fact he is an avid corr player like I was, and I'm sure we would both have found this whole line if we had been playing corr.

I also start showing this exercise telling people that the winning plan is a King's march from g1 to c8, if they can find out how, and they all look at me like I'm crazy. A bit like the exercise that Pillsbury created with the theme "which piece/pawn is the least likely to checkmate?" and then it turns out it is exactly the least probable looking pawn that checkmates ... :clap: