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Jesper Norgaard
22-07-2009, 03:24 PM
Here is another little pawn endgame - with opposition! White moves and wins. How can White win? Black has the opposition and a pawn more, but still loses.

8/8/2p5/k1p1K3/p1P5/P7/8/8 w - - 0 1

Igor_Goldenberg
22-07-2009, 03:35 PM
1.Kf5 Ka6 2.Ke6 Ka7 3.Ke7 Ka6 4.Kd8!

White holds short or long opposition and moves towards d8

Jesper Norgaard
22-07-2009, 03:56 PM
1.Kf5 Ka6 2.Ke6 Ka7 3.Ke7 Ka6 4.Kd8!

White holds short or long opposition and moves towards d8

One last little hurdle is how to win after 3...Ka8 4.Kd6! Kb7

(easy :owned: ) More important is to understand why not ...

Igor_Goldenberg
22-07-2009, 05:02 PM
One last little hurdle is how to win after 3...Ka8 4.Kd6! Kb7

(easy :owned: ) More important is to understand why not ...
5.Kd7 Kb6 6.Kc8 The principle is the same

Jesper Norgaard
22-07-2009, 05:11 PM
5.Kd7 Kb6 6.Kc8 The principle is the same
Comment
Yes what you have to avoid is being too greedy to soon 5.Kxc5?? Kc7 6.Kb4 Kb6 is perhaps surprisingly a draw

Axiom
22-07-2009, 05:16 PM
Beautifully axiomatic this puzzle .
Love it !

Jesper Norgaard
22-07-2009, 10:53 PM
Beautifully axiomatic this puzzle .
Love it !
Axiom, I don't think I understand what you are saying. The only thing I know is that you don't think the puzzle is Jesperistic or Igoristic. Otherwise I haven't a clue! Should I check the dictionary for 'axiomatic'?

Are you by any chance referring to that we are speaking in tongues, 'white text'? My brain cells are burning :doh:

ER
23-07-2009, 10:27 AM
This is a great ending Jesper, is it a study or it occured in an actual game? By the way I use normal text because I haven't found the solution yet but I am working on it!

Igor_Goldenberg
23-07-2009, 10:33 AM
This is a great ending Jesper, is it a study or it occured in an actual game? By the way I use normal text because I haven't found the solution yet but I am working on it!
It is a study-like book example.

ER
23-07-2009, 12:00 PM
It is a study-like book example.
Thanks Igor, those studies can be very useful! I have recently discovered some studies of a Soviet era composer. His name is F.M. (F.M. part of his name and not FIDE title ;)) Simchovich and I found his works very interesting!

Jesper Norgaard
25-07-2009, 12:41 AM
This is a great ending Jesper, is it a study or it occured in an actual game? By the way I use normal text because I haven't found the solution yet but I am working on it!
Igor says it is a study-like book example. I saw it in a compendium of endings made by Euwe (can't find it in my collection right now, so can't give you the title). A nice and relatively easy example of pawn endgame with opposition, I find that players above say 1600 are either clueless on 1.st. move or get the idea pretty quickly.

You might want to check the white text in earlier posts (hint, hint!)

ER
25-07-2009, 01:30 AM
Igor says it is a study-like book example. I saw it in a compendium of endings made by Euwe (can't find it in my collection right now, so can't give you the title). A nice and relatively easy example of pawn endgame with opposition, I find that players above say 1600 are either clueless on 1.st. move or get the idea pretty quickly.
You might want to check the white text in earlier posts (hint, hint!)

Thanks for all the info Jesp, actually before I follow your suggestion (which is welcomed anyway) I 'll give it another go tomorrow morning before I give up and look at the idea! I think the opposition theme, is a hint in itself though, as you have implied already!

Spiny Norman
25-07-2009, 05:56 AM
Based on very rough and quick analysis, looks like the best idea for White is to play:

1.Kf5

with the idea being as follows:

Black currently has the opposition, however he cannot maintain it because of a lack of maeouvering space. With 1.Kf5 White wins the opposition, because Black is constrained by both (a) the side of the board; and (b) White's c-pawn which controls the b5 square. Play might proceed as follows:

1.Kf5
1...Ka6 2.Ke6 (maintaining the opposition) and so on as below ...
1...Kb6 2.Kf6 Kc7 3.Ke7 and wins using standard K+P endgame technique:
3...Kc8 4.Kd6 Kb7 5.Kd7 Kb6 6.Kc8 Ka7 7.Kc7 and the win is easy

Igor_Goldenberg
25-07-2009, 03:49 PM
correct. You may see the white text now:D

Spiny Norman
26-07-2009, 07:41 AM
correct. You may see the white text now:D
Ah ... :doh: ... one difference I can see is that an IM sees it much faster than a bunny like me!