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jeffrei
23-07-2004, 03:37 PM
I will return to this thread when I can. If someone knows how to help me post PGN please PM. Specifically I would like to know if it's possible to post multiple (let's say 7) games in one PGN viewer, thus making the page easier for people to read. Actually it isn't too bad on my computer but perhaps we should have a 'don't click here if you haven't got broadband' warning in the thread heading?

Anyway, the story goes that (inspired at least in part by Yermolinsky's The Road To Chess Improvement), Chris Wallis and Zhigen Lin have decided to annotate all their games from now on. I was hoping that this corner of the BB might be a place where they could put the games - good and bad - on display. I hasten to add that the comments will all be their own...although for the purposes of the Vic Open games it's likely that the wordier bits of Zhigen's notes are actually by Chris!

jeffrei
23-07-2004, 03:38 PM
Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.12
Round: 1.42
White: Van Dijk, Marieke
Black: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Result: 0-1
ECO: D04
WhiteElo: 691
BlackElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 61
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e3 {COLLE SYSTEM} 3... g6 4. a3 Bg7 5. Nbd2 $146 5...
O-O 6. Bd3 b6 7. c3 Bb7 8. O-O Nbd7 9. b4 Ne4 10. Bb1 $2 ({I expected} 10. Qc2
{.}) 10... Nxc3 $17 11. Qc2 Nxb1 12. Rxb1 12... e5 $6 {
releases White's dark-squared bishop} 13. Bb2 $2 (13. dxe5 Nxe5 14. Bb2 Nxf3+
15. Nxf3 Bxb2 16. Qxb2 $17) 13... e4 $1 $19 {winning the exchange by force} 14.
Ne1 (14. Ne5 Ba6 15. Rfd1 Nxe5 16. dxe5 Bd3) 14... Ba6 15. Qb3 Bxf1 16. Nxf1
Nf6 17. Rc1 17... Qd6 {I was trying to stir up some kind of attack, but I
later quit this plan and started opening files.} 18. g3 Rfc8 19. Ng2 a5 20. Bc3
axb4 21. Bxb4 c5 22. Bc3 cxd4 23. Bb4 Qe5 24. Qb2 (24. exd4 Qxd4 25. Rd1 Qc4
26. Qe3 {although White is lost, this is his best try.}) 24... Rxc1 25. Qxc1
dxe3 26. Nfxe3 d4 27. Nc4 Qc7 28. Bd2 Rc8 29. Nxb6 Qxc1+ 30. Bxc1 Rxc1+ 31. Ne1
0-1

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.12
Round: 2.16
White: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Black: Jager, Jesse
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: B31
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1861
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 110
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. e4 1... c5 {SICILIAN DEFENCE} 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {
SICILIAN DEFENCE: ROSSOLIMO VARIATION} 3... g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. d3
Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. h3 {stopping 8...Bg4} 8... Qc7 9. Be3 b6 10. Qd2 e5 11. Bh6
11... Bd7 $146 12. Rad1 (12. Qg5 {was slightly better.}) 12... Ne8 13. Bxg7
Nxg7 14. Qh6 f6 15. Qe3 Be6 (15... Ne6 $11 {
White has lost his edge and now has to defend a bit.}) 16. Rde1 Bf7 17. Nd2 Ne6
18. Ne2 {Protecting the weak f4 and d4 squares.} 18... g5 19. Rc1 Qd7 20. Nb3
a5 21. Nd2 Nd4 22. b3 a4 23. Nxd4 cxd4 24. Qf3 Kg7 25. Ra1 Ra6 26. Rfb1 b5 27.
Nf1 27... axb3 $6 {The control of the a-file for Black doesn't really matter.}
28. axb3 Qa7 29. Qd1 Ra8 30. Rxa6 Qxa6 31. Ng3 Bg6 32. Kh2 Qa5 33. Rc1 c5 34.
Qg4 Ra7 35. Qd1 b4 36. Qg4 Qc7 37. h4 h6 38. h5 Bh7 39. Nf5+ Bxf5 40. Qxf5 Qf7
41. Qg4 {I didn't want a draw yet so I resisted playing 41 g4.} 41... Ra6 42.
g3 Qc7 43. Kg2 Qf7 44. f4 44... Kh7 $4 45. fxe5 $4 {Missing a win with 45 Qf5+!
} (45. Qf5+ $1 45... Kg7 46. fxg5 hxg5 (46... fxg5 47. Qxe5+ $18) 47. h6+ $1
47... Kxh6 48. Rh1+ Kg7 49. Qc8 $18) 45... fxe5 46. Qf5+ Qxf5 47. exf5 47... g4
$13 48. Re1 Ra2 49. Rxe5 Rxc2+ 50. Kf1 Kg7 51. Re4 Kf6 (51... Rd2 $1 52. Rxg4+
Kf7 53. Rg6 Rxd3 54. Rxh6 Rxb3 55. g4 c4 56. Rc6 d3 57. h6 Rb1+ 58. Kf2 58...
d2 $19) 52. Rxg4 Kxf5 53. Rg6 53... Rc3 $4 {
The wrong idea, this gives me time for:} ({The correct idea is:} 53... Rd2 {
winning the d3 pawn, not the b3 pawn.}) 54. Ke2 $1 54... Rxb3 55. Rxh6 Kg4
1/2-1/2

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.13
Round: 3.13
White: Campara, Miralem
Black: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Result: 0-1
ECO: B01
WhiteElo: 1851
BlackElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 112
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. e4 1... d5 {SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bd3 {
This move is not very good because it allows me to easily swap offlight-squared
bishops with ...Bc8-f5.} 5... c6 6. h3 {This is a pretty silly line, but it
has a long history, and was first played by Adolf Andersson in 1873!} 6... Bf5
7. Nf3 e6 ({I considered} 7... Bxd3 {
but I thought it was too early, I wanted him to trade.}) 8. Qe2 $146 (8. Bxf5
Qxf5 9. Ne5 {threatens to trap the queen with 10 g4, but I saw that Black
could defend after 9...Bb4.}) ({After} 8. O-O {I planned to play} 8... Bd6 $1 {
equalizing.}) 8... Bxd3 9. Qxd3 Nbd7 10. Bd2 Qc7 11. O-O Bd6 12. Rfe1 O-O 13.
Ne2 e5 14. dxe5 (14. Nc3 $1 14... Rfe8 15. Rad1 15... Rad8 {
with a drawish position.}) ({I saw} 14. Ng3 14... exd4 15. Nxd4 $11) 14... Nxe5
15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. Nc3 Rad8 17. Qe2 Rfe8 18. Be3 Bxc3 19. bxc3 Nd5 20. Qf3 Nxe3
21. Rxe3 Re7 22. Rae1 Rde8 23. Rxe7 Rxe7 24. Re3 h6 25. Qe2 Rxe3 26. Qxe3 c5
27. Qe8+ Kh7 28. g3 b6 29. h4 Qb7 30. a4 Qc7 31. Kg2 Qb7+ 32. f3 Qd5 33. Qe4+
$4 {Losing the game} (33. Qe2 $15 {was White's best try.}) 33... Qxe4 34. fxe4
Kg6 35. Kf3 Kf6 36. Kf4 Ke6 37. c4 g6 38. c3 f6 39. g4 a6 40. h5 gxh5 41. gxh5
41... a5 $1 42. Ke3 Ke5 43. Kf3 f5 44. exf5 Kxf5 45. Ke3 Kg4 46. Ke4 Kxh5 47.
Kd5 Kg5 48. Kc6 h5 49. Kxb6 h4 50. Kxc5 h3 51. Kb6 h2 52. Kxa5 (52. c5 h1=Q 53.
c6 Kf5 54. c7 54... Qa8 $19) 52... h1=Q 53. Kb6 Kf6 54. a5 (54. c5 54... Ke7
$19) 54... Ke6 55. a6 Kd7 56. Ka7 Qc6 0-1

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.13
Round: 4.5
White: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Black: Jensen, Kai
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: B17
WhiteElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 125
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. e4 c6 2. d4 2... d5 {CARO-KANN DEFENCE} 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 4... Nd7 {
CARO-KANN DEFENCE: KARPOV VARIATION Karpov's favourite variation, aiming to
play ...Ng8-f6 without incuring the doubled pawns.} 5. Ng5 {
This variation almost put the 4...Nd7 Caro-Kann out of business in the 1980s.}
5... Ngf6 (5... h6 $2 6. Ne6 $1 6... Qa5+ 7. Bd2 Qb6 8. Bd3 8... fxe6 $4 9.
Qh5+ Kd8 10. Ba5 $18 {
was the ridiculous continuation in Nunn-Ki.Georgiev, Linares 1988.}) 6. Bd3 e6
7. N1f3 7... h6 $2 ({After} 7... Bd6 {8 Qe2 is usually played, since after 8. .
.h6 9 Ne4 Nxe4 White wants to recapture with the queen. After the less
accurate} 8. O-O h6 9. Ne4 Nxe4 10. Bxe4 Nf6 11. Bd3 {
we transpose to the position which ended up occurring in the game.}) 8. Ne4 $2
({I got confused here and forgot that} 8. Nxe6 $1 {is very strong, and has
been known since Geller-Meduna, 1986 to be better than the retreat. Now
instead of the weak 8...Qe7? which was tried in DEEP BLUE-Kasparov,
Philadelphia 1997, Black should play} 8... fxe6 {, but after} 9. Bg6+ Ke7 10.
O-O {he still is left with a terrible position.}) 8... Nxe4 9. Bxe4 Nf6 10. Bd3
10... Bd6 {Black has a solid position.} 11. O-O Qc7 12. h3 {Something like 12
Re1 or 12 Qe2 was better - there's no guarantee that 12 h3 will come in useful.
} 12... O-O $146 13. c3 b6 14. Qe2 Bb7 15. Re1 15... c5 {
Black has equalized now, White shouldn't of allowed this.} 16. dxc5 Qxc5 17.
Be3 Qh5 18. Bd4 (18. Nd4 {was probably better, to avoid the doubled pawns.}
18... Qxe2 19. Rxe2 19... Nd5 {leads to a very sterile position.}) 18... Bxf3
19. Qxf3 Qxf3 20. gxf3 $15 {I think this is a touch better for Black - the two
bishops aren't worth much here and my kingside pawns are weak.} 20... Nh5 (
20... Nd5 {I was going to meet with} 21. Be4 {.}) 21. Be3 Rac8 22. Rad1 Rfd8
23. Rd2 Bc5 24. Red1 Kf8 25. Ba6 Rxd2 26. Rxd2 Rc7 27. Be2 Ke7 28. f4 Nf6 29.
Bf3 $15 29... Bd6 30. Rd4 Bc5 31. Rd2 {
I was hoping for him to repeat because I was losing.} 31... Rd7 32. Rxd7+ Kxd7
33. Kf1 Kd6 34. Ke2 Nd5 35. Kd3 a5 36. Be4 36... g5 $5 37. fxg5 Bxe3 38. fxe3
hxg5 39. Bf3 f5 40. Be2 e5 41. Bh5 e4+ 42. Kd4 f4 43. exf4 (43. Kxe4 43... Nf6+
$19) 43... gxf4 44. Bg6 e3 45. Bh5 Nf6 46. Bf3 Ke6 47. b4 Kf5 48. bxa5 bxa5 49.
c4 Nd7 50. h4 $2 {This blunder should have thrown away the game.} (50. Bg4+ Kg5
(50... Kf6) 51. c5 Nb8 52. Ke4 Nc6) 50... Ne5 $1 $19 {I missed this move.} 51.
Bd1 51... Nxc4 $4 {This turns a won position to a lost one.} (51... Nc6+ $1 $19
{seems to win.}) 52. Kxc4 Ke4 53. h5 f3 54. Bxf3+ $2 {Even though I had lots
of time on the clock, I missed 54 Kc3!, which leads to a long forcing
variation that wins for White.} (54. Kc3 $1 54... e2 55. Bxe2 $1 55... fxe2 56.
Kd2 $1 56... Kf5 57. Kxe2 $1 57... Kg5 58. Kd3 $1 58... Kxh5 59. Kc4 $1 59...
Kg6 60. Kb5 $1 60... Kf6 61. Kxa5 $1 61... Ke7 62. Kb6 Kd8 63. Kb7 $1 {
and Black is one move too slow.}) 54... Kxf3 55. h6 e2 56. h7 e1=Q 57. h8=Q
Qb4+ 58. Kd3 Qe4+ ({Black can win the a-pawn with} 58... Qb1+ 59. Kc4 59...
Qxa2+ {, but the position is easily drawn after} 60. Kb5 {.}) 59. Kc3 Qe1+ 60.
Kb3 Qb4+ 61. Kc2 Qe4+ 62. Kb3 Qb4+ 63. Kc2 {At this point my opponent offered
a draw. Since my king cannot escape the checks of the Black queen I decided to
accept.} 1/2-1/2

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.13
Round: 5.8
White: Kempen, Leon
Black: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Result: 1-0
ECO: D03
WhiteElo: 1974
BlackElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 123
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bg5 {TORRE ATTACK} 3... e6 $6 (3... Ne4 {
was a better move.}) 4. e3 Nbd7 5. Bd3 Be7 6. Nbd2 b6 7. O-O O-O 8. h3 Bb7 9.
Rc1 {this, to me seemed like a waste of time because White is going to play c3!
} 9... c5 10. c3 10... Qc7 $146 (10... c4 {was a considered alternative.} 11.
Bc2 $11) 11. Bh4 Rfe8 12. Re1 Rac8 13. Bg3 Bd6 14. Bxd6 Qxd6 15. Nf1 h6 (15...
c4 16. Bc2 $11) 16. Ng3 Qb8 17. Nh2 Rcd8 18. Bb5 a6 19. Bxd7 Rxd7 20. Ng4 Nxg4
21. Qxg4 Qd8 22. f4 Qf6 (22... c4 {to me didn't seem like a useful move.}) (
22... Qe7 $1 {was missed} 23. Nh5 g6 24. Ng3 24... Kg7 $15) 23. Nh5 Qg6 24.
Qxg6 fxg6 25. Ng3 Rf7 26. Nh1 (26. Nf1 {with the idea of Nd2-Nf3-Ne5.}) 26...
g5 27. fxg5 (27. g3 gxf4 28. exf4 g5 29. fxg5 29... hxg5 $14) 27... hxg5 28.
Rf1 e5 29. Rxf7 Kxf7 30. Kf2 Ke6 31. Rc2 (31. Kg3 exd4 32. exd4 32... Kd6 $11 {
in most cas es Black has a better chance of getting an advantage andmaintaining
it.}) 31... Rc8 (31... g4 32. hxg4 Rf8+ 33. Ke1 {was a good try.}) 32. Rd2 cxd4
33. exd4 e4 34. Ke3 Rf8 35. Rf2 35... Rxf2 $2 (35... Rf6 {
probrably would've been better.}) 36. Nxf2 Kd6 37. Ng4 Bc8 38. Ne5 Be6 39. b3
b5 40. g4 a5 41. Kd2 Bg8 42. Kc1 Be6 43. Kb2 Bg8 44. a4 bxa4 45. b4 $4 (45.
bxa4 $17) 45... axb4 46. cxb4 46... Kc7 $2 (46... e3 $1 {
Note: most other moves win too} 47. Ka3 Bh7 48. Nf3 Bd3 49. Kxa4 Bf1 50. Kb3
50... Bxh3 $19) 47. Ka3 e3 48. Nf3 e2 (48... Bh7 $19) 49. Kxa4 Kb6 50. Kb3
50... Kb5 $2 (50... Bh7 51. Kc3 Be4 52. Ne1 Kb5 53. Kb3 Bh1 54. Kc3 54... Ka4
$19) 51. Kc3 $18 51... Bh7 52. Kd2 Kxb4 53. Kxe2 Kc3 54. Ke3 Be4 55. Nxg5 Bd3
56. Ne6 g6 57. Kf4 Bf1 58. h4 Bd3 59. Ke5 Be2 60. g5 Bd3 61. Nf4 Be4 62. Nxd5+
1-0

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.14
Round: 6.15
White: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Black: Wyss, Felix
Result: 1-0
ECO: D31
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1823
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 63
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. d4 d5 2. c4 {QUEEN'S GAMBIT} 2... e6 {
QUEEN'S GAMBIT: QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED} 3. Nc3 3... c6 {
QUEEN'S GAMBIT DECLINED: 'THE TRIANGLE VARIATION'} 4. e4 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Nd7 (5...
Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Qxd4 7. Bxb4 7... Qxe4+ {
This is the Marshall Gambit, a minefield of theoretical complications.}) 6. Nf3
6... g6 $6 $146 {Black's position looks like swiss cheese after this move.} (
6... Ngf6 7. Bd3 Nxe4 8. Bxe4 Nf6 9. Bc2 Bb4+ 10. Bd2 Qa5 11. a3 Bxd2+ 12. Qxd2
Qxd2+ 13. Kxd2 $14 {happened in Karpov-Korchnoi, Vienna 1986}) 7. Bd3 7... f5 {
It's a sign of the dubiousness of Black's plan that he can't even play ...
Bf8-g7 without having to first deal with Ne4-d6+ by playing another weakening
pawn move.} (7... Bg7 $2 8. Nd6+ Ke7 9. c5 {doesn't really bear thinking about.
}) 8. Nc3 Bg7 9. Bf4 Nh6 10. O-O O-O 11. Re1 Re8 12. Qd2 (12. Ne5 g5 13. Nxd7
gxf4 14. Ne5 14... Qxd4 $11) 12... Nf7 13. Rad1 a6 (13... e5 14. Qe3 $1 $16)
14. Bf1 h6 15. h4 Nf8 16. g3 {
to protect the bishop on f4. I was planning to play Nf3-e5.} 16... b5 17. Ne5
Nxe5 18. Bxe5 Ra7 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. cxb5 ({I should have just played} 20. d5 {
here} 20... Rd7) 20... axb5 21. d5 Rd7 22. Qd4+ Kh7 23. Qe5 23... Qb6 $2 ({
I was expecting} 23... Bb7) 24. dxc6 $1 $18 24... Rxd1 25. Rxd1 b4 (25... Qxc6
26. Bxb5 $18) 26. Na4 (26. Nd5 $1 {
is an even more efficient way to finish off the game.}) 26... Qxc6 (26... Qa7
27. b3 Qe7 28. Qd6 {with a winning advantage.}) 27. Bb5 Qc2 28. Qd6 Bb7 29.
Bxe8 $1 {I didn't calculate this until after Black had played 28...Bb7 - it
should have been worked out before.} 29... Qe4 30. Qe7+ Kg8 31. Bf7+ ({
A quicker finish was at hand with} 31. Qf7+ 31... Kh8 32. Qxf8+ Kh7 33. Rd7#)
31... Kg7 32. Bxe6+ (32. Bxe6+ Kh8 33. Qxf8+ Kh7 34. Qg8#) 1-0

Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.14
Round: 7.12
White: Lea, Tom
Black: Lin, Zhigen Wilson
Result: 0-1
ECO: B01
WhiteElo: 1793
BlackElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 86
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. Nc3 {VAN GEET'S OPENING} 1... d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nxe4 Qd5 4. Nc3 {
SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 4... Qa5 5. d4 Nf6 6. Nf3 c6 7. Bc4 Bf5 8. O-O {
escaping from the main line.} 8... e6 9. Re1 Bb4 10. Bd2 10... Bxc3 $146 11.
Bxc3 Qc7 12. a4 O-O 13. Bb4 Rd8 14. Qe2 14... Bg4 {
to me, this was the best move due to the annoyance of the pin.} 15. Rad1 Nbd7
16. h3 Bh5 17. Bb3 Nb6 18. Rd3 Nbd5 19. Bd2 $4 (19. Bxd5 Nxd5 20. Bd2 {
was much better than the text.}) 19... Bg6 20. Ne5 {in all cases White has to
lose the Rook, because, if 20 Bd5, then Bd3 would've attacked the Queen} 20...
Bxd3 21. Qxd3 Nd7 22. Ng4 N5f6 23. Bg5 23... Qa5 $1 {I missed 24 Bd2, so I
actually thought that I was going to win material, this made my self-esteem go
up.} 24. Bd2 Qh5 25. Ne5 Nxe5 26. Rxe5 Qxe5 27. dxe5 Rxd3 28. cxd3 Nd7 29. d4
Rd8 30. Bb4 Nb6 31. Bc5 31... Nc8 $1 {forcing White to lose the d4 Pawn} 32. a5
b6 33. axb6 axb6 34. Bb4 Rxd4 35. Bc3 Rd7 36. Kf1 Kf8 37. Ke2 Ne7 38. Ba4 Ra7
39. Bc2 Nd5 40. Bd2 Ra2 41. Bc1 c5 42. Bb3 Ra1 43. Kd2 Nf4 0-1

jeffrei
23-07-2004, 03:40 PM
insert PGN here

jeffrei
23-07-2004, 04:13 PM
insert PGN 2 here

skip to my lou
23-07-2004, 05:25 PM
I will work on load time + multiple games soon.

A bit overloaded at the moment, esp with mtbuller site etc. Got alot of work to get through.

jeffrei
23-07-2004, 05:31 PM
Thanks Jeo,

Like I said, the lag isn't too bad on my computer cause it's pretty fast and I've got broadband. Seriously, can we put a 'slow load' warning on the thread title? I'd hate for people to have their computers crash because they opened this thread.

Normally things won't be so bad since I'll just be doing one game at a time instead of 7.

skip to my lou
23-07-2004, 05:47 PM
It loads within 20 seconds on dialup + 500Mhz P3. I see no "extreme" problem with it, but it is a bit annoying when there are plenty of games, nothing that can crash the computer though.

jeffrei
23-07-2004, 05:50 PM
Thanks Jeo.

I'm going to leave off posting Chris's Vic Open games for a while, since:

a) he hasn't emailed me notes to his game with Rujevic yet.

and

b) people might want to comment on Zhigen's games and I don't want to flood them with games.

I should say, though, that Chris's annotations are more in-depth than Zhigen's...he's the one that's a fan of Yermolinsky's The Road To Chess Improvement. Anyone else have an opinion on that book?

Kevin Bonham
23-07-2004, 10:09 PM
Why did Jager offer a draw in the round 2 game? It's not an obvious draw, at least not to me. I'd say Black has all the play and could even still be winning despite the inaccurate 53...Rc3. Time trouble?

jeffrei
24-07-2004, 12:29 AM
Good question! I'm sure I asked the exact same thing to Zhigen at the time but I can't remember what he said. I'll ask him when I see him next, or maybe he'll actually join the BB and answer that way.

jeffrei
24-07-2004, 08:43 PM
Zhigen says:

"It was about 7pm, so he was pretty hungry, he really thought it was a draw."

In the past few years I've come to realize that this sort of thing happens quite a lot in tournament play, and over time ends up costing the draw-offeror/draw-taker a whole stack of half-points, not to mention some valuable experience. As a coach I've tried to prevent it by generally forbidding students from offering draws and also forbidding students from accepting draws unless:

a) their position is worse (onus on them to provide convincing reasons why).
b) the position is so dead drawn that even a relatively weak opponent would be expected to virtually always hold the draw (barring freak accidents such as leaving pieces en prise, etc).

The policy is still in its infancy, so we're not yet sure how to punish transgressors...

Kevin Bonham
24-07-2004, 11:47 PM
In the past few years I've come to realize that this sort of thing happens quite a lot in tournament play, and over time ends up costing the draw-offeror/draw-taker a whole stack of half-points, not to mention some valuable experience.

Hell yeah. I never had the foresight to annotate my games when I was a junior but I've been retro-annotating them (right from the start) as a spare time project over the last few years. I noticed that in most of my drawn games from my first few years one side was either winning or nearly so in the final position. And watching club games where draws are agreed, quite a lot of them aren't draws either.


As a coach I've tried to prevent it by generally forbidding students from offering draws and also forbidding students from accepting draws unless:

a) their position is worse (onus on them to provide convincing reasons why).
b) the position is so dead drawn that even a relatively weak opponent would be expected to virtually always hold the draw (barring freak accidents such as leaving pieces en prise, etc).

This sounds like good advice. I do something like this too - almost never offer draws, view incoming draw offers with great scepticism. Probably I need to get even more sceptical in weekenders - eg when I'm a pawn down and each side has 10 mins left and I'm offered a draw by a lower rated player, I should be backing my ability to outplay them in time pressure anyway.


The policy is still in its infancy, so we're not yet sure how to punish transgressors...

Waiting for them to lose a tournament by doing it (been there, done that) is one way, but I guess you'd be wanting something a little bit more pre-emptive.

Garvinator
24-07-2004, 11:56 PM
Waiting for them to lose a tournament by doing it (been there, done that) is one way, but I guess you'd be wanting something a little bit more pre-emptive. Repeatedly showing them how they could have won their 'drawn' position usually would work too.

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 05:19 PM
Still not sure how to enforce these 'draw-rules' I've devised. Yes I am certainly looking for something more pre-emptive but solutions are hard to find. Perhaps the fact that they're putting their games on public display will set Chris and Zhigen against cowardly draws, but frankly it wasn't much of a problem for them anyway. It seems to be the Melbourne kids who've been around for longer (Chris first started playing 'real' tournaments in 2002, Zhigen certainly hadn't done much if anything before 2003) that have serious problems in this area.

I'll be interested to see what you guys think of the position where a draw was agreed in M.Rujevic-C.Wallis from the Victorian Open. I've actually got the PGN now but I know that Chris will get a chance to post the game himself later tonight. The basic scenario is that he's a pawn down with more than enough compensation (IMHO, and in his) but he takes a draw. This is actually very much out of character for Chris and he has vowed not to do it again.

Still, I've seen much more egregious examples of the 'cop-out draw'. It's especially bad when juniors agree draws against higher-rated players in positions (usually endgames) where, even if their winning chances are rather less than 100%, their losing chances are virtually 0%. I seem to remember a game from last century where I did much the same thing against Rujevic. :wall:

NOTORIOUS
28-07-2004, 11:09 PM
Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.12
Round: 1.43
White: Wallis, Christopher
Black: Devoy, Sean
Result: 1-0
ECO: C60
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 685
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 51
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {SPANISH OPENING (RUY LOPEZ)} 3... Qf6 $6 {
Surprisingly this has been played 148 times, including once by Sergio Mariotti
(2470)!} 4. O-O Nd4 5. Nxd4 exd4 6. c3 c6 7. Bc4 $146 {This is stronger than
the previously played 7 Be2 because the bishop is more active on c4 than e2.}
7... Bd6 8. cxd4 8... Bxh2+ $2 {
This sacrifice offers no compensation for the piece.} ({I had anticipated} 8...
Qxd4 9. d3 $14 {.}) 9. Kxh2 $18 9... Nh6 (9... Qxd4 {is better.}) 10. Qf3 Qe7
11. d3 O-O 12. Bxh6 Qh4+ 13. Qh3 Qf6 14. Bxg7 (14. Be3 14... d5 {
is also winning for White, but I decided I wanted to swap off queens.}) 14...
Qxg7 15. Qg3 {
Now the queens are swapped off and all swindling chances evaporate.} 15... b5
16. Bb3 d6 17. Qxg7+ Kxg7 18. Rc1 f5 19. e5 d5 20. Rxc6 Bb7 21. Rc7+ Kh6 22.
Rxb7 f4 23. Bxd5 Rad8 24. Be4 Rh8 25. Nd2 Rxd4 26. Rh1 1-0

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:26 PM
[Event "Victorian Open"]
[Site "Box Hill"]
[Date "2004.06.12"]
[Round "2.17"]
[White "Belletty, Malcolm"]
[Black "Wallis, Christopher"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A11"]
[WhiteElo "1857"]
[BlackElo "1642"]
[Annotator "Chris Wallis"]
[PlyCount "60"]
[EventDate "2004.06.12"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 {RETI OPENING} 2... c6 3. e3 (3. d4 {would have transposed
into the Slav Defence (usually reached by 1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 Nf3).}) 3... Nf6 (
3... Bg4 {was an interesting possibility. After} 4. Qb3 (4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3
5... Qc7 {makes no difference.}) 4... Qc7 5. cxd5 5... cxd5 {
, Black is at least equal.}) 4. Nc3 (4. d4 {
would again transpose into the Slav.}) 4... e6 (4... Bf5 {
was rejected because of} 5. cxd5 cxd5 6. Qb3 {
, when Black must either sacrifice a pawn for insufficient compensation or play
} 6... Bc8 {.}) (4... g6 {would transpose into a Gruenfeld.}) 5. Be2 (5. d4 {
was better, transposing to a Semi-Slav. The light-squared bishop belongs on d3,
a more active post.}) (5. b3 {is really the only non-transpositional move, but
doesn't present any difficulties.}) 5... Bd6 (5... dxc4 6. Bxc4 6... b5 {
looks like an interesting bid for activity.} 7. Bb3 a6 8. d4 8... c5 {
is a natural continuation. Black is attacking White's centre, and hopes to
give him an isolated d-pawn after the capture c5xd4.}) 6. d4 O-O 7. O-O Nbd7 8.
cxd5 $6 (8. Qc2 {was better. The text gets White into an unfavourable form of
the Queen's Gambit Declined.}) 8... exd5 9. Bd3 {This is a Queen's Gambit
Declined Exchange Variation in which White has lost a tempo moving the bishop
to d3 and has also played e2-e3 before Bc1-g5. Black probably even has the
advantage.} 9... Re8 10. Ne2 $146 {This maneuver doesn't seem to help White.
However, there aren't many constructive things to do. Perhaps simply} (10. Qc2
{was a good alternative.}) 10... Ne4 11. Ng3 $6 {
All this does is loosen up White's kingside pawn structure.} (11. Qc2 Ndf6 12.
h3 {gives Black only a slight advantage.}) 11... Ndf6 12. Qc2 Nxg3 13. hxg3 {
In this position, I had vague thoughts about invading down the h-file. Of
course, I didn't think this would actually happen, and I didn't look at any
variations involving this. My opponent spent a surprising amount of time at
this point: of course,} (13. fxg3 $6 {
didn't deserve much consideration, as after} 13... Qe7 {
Black has a clear advantage, due to White's weak pawn structure.}) 13... Bg4 {
Planning to swap off the light-squared bishops with the maneuver Bg4-h5-g6.}
14. Bd2 {White seems to want to launch a minority attack on the queenside, but
this doesn't seem to be a very good idea in this position.} (14. b3 {
was an interesting alternative, but Black gets the advantage with} 14... Bh5
15. Bb2 Bg6 16. Bxg6 16... hxg6 {.}) (14. b4 {is more accurate, as it saves
the tempi spent on Bd2 (though this move might be necessary later, it may not
be).} 14... Bxb4 {is not good because of} 15. Rb1 Qe7 16. Qb3 a5 17. a3 Bd6 18.
Qxb7 {, when Black's advantage has been reduced.} 18... Bd7 19. Ne5 Bxe5 20.
dxe5 Qxe5 21. Bb2 Qd6 22. Bxf6 gxf6 23. Qb3 {leaves White with almost
sufficient compensation for the pawn, as Black's pawn structure has been
weakened, and his pieces are much less active than White's.}) 14... Bh5 $6 {
This maneuver is actually dubious.} (14... Ne4 $1 {was a stronger alternative.}
15. Bc3 15... Bf5 {
is a likely continuation. White obviously cannot carry out his minority attack.
}) 15. b4 (15. Ne5 $5 {
is a startling move my computer has come up with, and sets a little trap. If}
15... Bxe5 (15... Ne4 {is much better. Black has a clear advantage, as} 16.
Bxe4 dxe4 17. Qxe4 {loses to} 17... Bxe5 18. dxe5 Qxd2) 16. dxe5 16... Rxe5 {
, White has} 17. Bc3 {, winning the pawn back. After} 17... Rg5 18. Bxf6 Qxf6
19. Bxh7+ Kh8 20. Bd3 Bg6 21. Bxg6 21... Rxg6 {, Black doesn't retain the
large advantage he had before, but he must be extremely careful, as Black has
the plan of doubling on the h-file and mating White's king.}) 15... Bg6 16. a4
(16. b5 {loses a pawn to} 16... cxb5 17. Bxg6 hxg6 18. Rfb1 Qd7 19. Qd3 19...
a6 {.}) (16. Rab1 Bxd3 17. Qxd3 a6 18. a4 Qd7 19. b5 cxb5 20. axb5 20... a5 {
leaves Black the advantage, because of his passed a-pawn and White'svulnerable
d5-pawn (his own weakness at d5 is easy to defend and hard to attack). An
interesting plan for Black is a5-a4 and Ra8-a5, targeting the b5-pawn.}) 16...
Bxd3 $2 ({I missed a strong alternative:} 16... Be4 $1 {
, which assures Black of a clear advantage.} 17. b5 {is met by} (17. Rfc1 17...
a6 {prevents the minority attack, as} 18. b5 {loses to} 18... axb5 19. axb5
cxb5 20. Qb3 Bxd3 21. Qxd3 b4 22. Rxa8 Qxa8 23. Rb1 23... Qa4 {
, when Black is a pawn up.}) ({Giving the bishop up voluntarily with} 17. Bxe4
{is bad:} 17... dxe4 18. Ng5 ({After} 18. Ne1 {
, Black maneuvers the queen over to the kingside:} 18... Qd7 19. Rb1 {
(there is nothing better)} 19... Qg4 20. Qd1 20... Qg5 {
gives Black a winning attack: he can follow up with Nf6-g4 and Qg5-h5.}) (18.
Ne5 Bxe5 19. dxe5 Rxe5 20. Bc3 20... Re6 {
and Black is just a pawn up for nothing.}) 18... Rc8 19. Rfc1 19... Qd7 {
and White's knight is out of play.}) 17... Rc8 {, when} 18. bxc6 Rxc6 19. Qb3
Bxd3 20. Qxd3 20... Qd7 {
, when Black has the advantage due to his control of the c-file.}) 17. Qxd3 Ne4
18. Rfb1 (18. b5 {was better. I was trying to evaluate the position after}
18... c5 19. dxc5 19... Bxc5 {, when I thought my piece activity would
probably compensate for the IQP. In fact, the real reason why Black is better
here is that he is about to play a7-a6, breaking up White's pawn position on
the queenside.}) 18... Qd7 {Aiming for Qf5-h5, followed by Re6-h6.} 19. b5 Qf5
20. Rb3 {Protecting the queen against the Ne4xg3 threat.} (20. bxc6 bxc6 21.
Bb4 Bc7 22. Ba3 {was much better, when White might have even equalized.} 22...
Nxg3 23. Qxf5 Nxf5 24. Rb7 {
and White is almost certainly going to regain the pawn.}) 20... Re6 21. Be1 (
21. bxc6 21... bxc6 {was better. Be1 wasn't really necessary - perhaps he
thought I intended g7-g5. In any case, he should have played Be1 only after
g7-g5 had been played.}) 21... Qh5 22. bxc6 (22. Qd1 {was much better,
threatening 23 Nh4, when a queen swap completely neutralizes Black's
counterplay.} 22... c5 23. dxc5 Rh6 24. Nh4 Nxc5 25. Rb4 Ne6 26. Rb3 {
and a draw by repitition would be likely:} 26... Nc5 27. Rb4 Ne6 28. Rb3 28...
Nc5 {.}) 22... bxc6 23. Rab1 (23. Qd1 {
was expected, when White has good chances. He responds to} 23... Rh6 {with} 24.
Nh4 {.}) 23... Rh6 $19 24. Kf1 (24. Nh4 24... g5 {is an easy win.}) 24... Qh1+
25. Ke2 (25. Ng1 25... Rh2 {is obviously won for Black.}) 25... Qxg2 26. Ne5
Rh1 27. Qc2 27... Qf1+ {The king is now forced to go on a journey north.} 28.
Kf3 (28. Kd1 {loses to} 28... Qxe1# {.}) 28... Rh3 (28... Rg1 {
was slightly better, as after} 29. Kf4 {Black mates in five, not seven, with}
29... g5+ 30. Kf5 (30. Kg4 Rxg3+ 31. fxg3 (31. Kf5 Qh3+ 32. Ng4 32... Rf3# {
- see below!}) (31. Kh5 Qh1#) 31... f5+ 32. Kh5 Qh3#) 30... Nxg3+ 31. Kxg5 (31.
Kg4 Ne4+ 32. Kf5 (32. Kf3 Rg3#) (32. Kh5 Qh3#) 32... Qh3+ 33. Ng4 Qxg4#) (31.
Kf6 Nh5+ 32. Kf5 Qh3+ 33. Ng4 Qxg4#) 31... Be7+ 32. Kf4 (32. Kg4 Ne2+ 33. Kf3 (
33. Kh5 Qh3#) (33. Kf5 Rg5#) 33... Rg3#) (32. Kh6 Rh1#) 32... Nh5+ 33. Kf3 (33.
Kf5 Rg5#) 33... Rg3#) 29. Bb4 {After this, all roads lead to mate!} (29. Kf4 {
leads to a neat mate in seven:} 29... g5+ 30. Kf5 (30. Kg4 {
is best met by the sacrifice} 30... Rxg3+ $1 31. fxg3 (31. Kf5 Qh3+ 32. Ng4
Rf3#) (31. Kh5 Qh1#) 31... f5+ 32. Kh5 Qh3#) (30. Kf3 Rxg3#) 30... Nxg3+ 31.
Kxg5 ({After} 31. Kf6 {, Black mates in five with} 31... Nh5+ 32. Kxg5 ({If}
32. Kf5 {, then} 32... Rf3+ 33. Nxf3 (33. Kxg5 {doesn't help:} 33... f6+ 34.
Kh6 (34. Kxh5 Qh3#) (34. Kh4 Qh3#) 34... Bf8+ 35. Kxh5 Qh3#) ({or} 33. Kg4
33... Qg2+ 34. Kxh5 Rh3#) 33... Qh3+ 34. Kxg5 f6+ 35. Kh6 Bf8#) 32... Be7+ 33.
Kf5 (33. Kg4 Qg2+ 34. Kf5 Qg5#) (33. Kh6 Ng7#) 33... Rf3+ 34. Nxf3 Qh3+ 35. Ke5
f6#) (31. Kg4 {leads to mate after} 31... Rh4+ 32. Kf3 (32. Kxg3 Qh3#) (32.
Kxg5 Be7#) 32... Qh1+ 33. Kxg3 Qh3#) 31... Be7+ 32. Kf4 (32. Kg4 Rh4+ 33. Kf3 (
33. Kxg3 Qh3#) 33... Qh1+ 34. Kxg3 Qh3#) 32... Nh5+ 33. Kf5 (33. Kg4 Qg2+ 34.
Kf5 Qg5#) 33... Rf3+ $1 34. Nxf3 Qh3+ 35. Ke5 35... f6# {While my opponent was
thinking over his move, I was trying to make my way through this maze.}) 29...
Rxg3+ 30. Kf4 g5+ (30... g5+ 31. Kf5 Qh3+ (31... Rf3+ {is more spectacular:}
32. Nxf3 (32. Kg4 Qh3#) 32... Qh3# {.}) 32. Ng4 Rf3# (32... Qxg4# {was the move
my opponent seemed to prefer in our post-mortem, but I like mating with the
less valuable piece for some reason.})) 0-1

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:30 PM
[Event "Victorian Open"]
[Site "Box Hill"]
[Date "2004.06.13"]
[Round "3.9"]
[White "Wallis, Christopher"]
[Black "Rothlisberger, Marcel"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "1642"]
[BlackElo "1892"]
[Annotator "Chris Wallis"]
[PlyCount "74"]
[EventDate "2004.06.12"]

1. e4 1... d5 {SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3
5... Bg4 {According to my database, Ian Rogers has played this variation 25
times, including a game against Karpov!} 6. h3 Bxf3 (6... Bh5 7. g4 Bg6 8. Ne5
e6 9. Bg2 {is the main line here, and was played by Karpov against Larsen in
Mar del Plata 1982. I think it secures a pleasant advantage for White.}) 7.
Qxf3 c6 8. Bd3 (8. Bd2 {is usually played here, and the old game
Rubinstein-Bernstein, San Sebastian 1911 went} 8... Nbd7 9. O-O-O e6 10. Bc4
Qc7 11. Rhe1 {with a slight advantage to White.}) 8... e6 9. Bd2 Nbd7 10. O-O-O
$146 ({Previously only} 10. O-O {had been seen here.}) 10... Bb4 11. a3 Be7 (
11... Bxa3 {was an alternative. After} 12. bxa3 (12. Nb1 {loses to the simple}
12... Bb4 {
, getting the bishop out and blocking the attack to the queen at the same time.
}) 12... Qxa3+ 13. Kb1 Qb4+ 14. Ka1 14... Qxd4 {, Black has three pawns for
the piece, and White's king is slightly exposed, but the position is in
White's favour.}) 12. Rhe1 $14 {The position is better for White because of
the two bishops and his space advantage.} 12... Qd8 {
This looked strange to me - if the queen wants to retreat, why to d8?} ({
Why not} 12... Qb6 {, when the queen is more active?}) (12... O-O $6 {
is dubious, as White can launch a massive attack with} 13. g4 $1 {.}) 13. Ne4 (
13. Qg3 {was a move I looked at. I thought, however, that} 13... Nh5 {
just forced} 14. Qf3 {.} ({In fact,} 14. Qg4 14... Nhf6 15. Qe2 {
is good for White.}) 14... Nhf6 {.}) 13... Nxe4 14. Bxe4 (14. Rxe4 Nf6 15. Rh4
15... Qd5 {is better for Black.}) (14. Qxe4 Nf6 15. Qe2 Qxd4 16. Bc3 {
probably offers adequate compensation for the pawn.}) 14... Nf6 15. Bg5 (15.
Bd3 15... Qxd4 {is a very murky position. White has lots of compensation, but
I wasn't sure wether it was enough.}) 15... O-O (15... Nxe4 {
was the move I had expected, when after} 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. Rxe4 {
I thought I had a slight advantage.}) 16. Bd3 (16. Bxf6 Bxf6 17. Qh5 {
was also considered by me, but I thought Black was okay after} 17... h6 ({
In fact,} 17... g6 {is even better.})) 16... Qd5 17. Qxd5 cxd5 18. Re3 Rfc8 19.
f4 $2 {Planning to play f5 and then exchange on e6, giving Black a weak and
backward pawn. If Black plays exf5, then his d5-pawn is weak. 19 f4 is,
however, a tactical oversight.} ({I was considering maybe} 19. Kb1 {
, which is better than 19 f4 but in truth White does not have much here either.
}) 19... h6 20. Bh4 20... Ng4 $1 {
I missed this. Black gets rid of the h4-bishop.} 21. hxg4 Bxh4 22. g3 Bf6 23.
Bf1 (23. Be2 {
would be more clumsy, as the bishop might get in the way of White's rooks.})
23... Rc7 24. Kb1 {Getting the king off the h6-c1 diagonal.} ({
I couldn't have played} 24. f5 $2 {because of} 24... Bg5 {.}) 24... Rac8 25. c3
g6 26. Bd3 a6 27. Rh1 (27. f5 $1 27... gxf5 28. gxf5 {has the advantage of
liquidating the doubled pawns. White's edge isn't worth much, but at least
I've got something to play with.}) 27... Kg7 28. Re2 ({the 'minority attack'}
28. f5 {doesn't really do anything now, since Black can just sit tight with}
28... Re7 {.}) 28... g5 (28... b5 $2 {loses a pawn to} 29. Reh2 Rh8 30. g5 $18)
29. f5 Re7 30. Rhe1 Rce8 31. Bc2 {This was played to give White the
possibility of Bc2-b3 if the d5 pawn becomes vulnerable.} 31... e5 (31... exf5
32. Rxe7 Rxe7 33. Rxe7 Bxe7 34. Bxf5 (34. gxf5 $6 34... g4 {
wins the g3 pawn. After} 35. Bb3 Bd6 36. Bxd5 36... b5 {
only Black has winning chances.}) 34... Bd6 {the position is drawn.}) 32. Bb3
exd4 33. Rxe7 Rxe7 34. Rxe7 Bxe7 35. cxd4 Bf6 36. Bxd5 b6 37. Bb7 Bxd4 ({
It would have been better to play on, as after} 37... Bxd4 38. Bxa6 {
only White has winning chances.}) 1/2-1/2

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:32 PM
[Event "Victorian Open"]
[Site "Box Hill"]
[Date "2004.06.13"]
[Round "4.6"]
[White "Dizdarevic, Mehmedalija"]
[Black "Wallis, Christopher"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "1970"]
[BlackElo "1642"]
[Annotator "Chris Wallis"]
[PlyCount "100"]
[EventDate "2004.06.12"]

1. e4 1... d5 {SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4
Bf5 6. Bd2 c6 7. Nf3 e6 8. Qe2 Bb4 9. O-O-O Nbd7 10. a3 Bxc3 11. Bxc3 Qc7 12.
Ne5 Nxe5 13. dxe5 Nd5 14. Bxd5 cxd5 (14... exd5 $6 {is bad because of} 15. g4 {
, when White's pawns create serious threats after either} 15... Bd7 ({or} 15...
Bg6 16. h4 {.}) 16. f4 {.}) 15. Bb4 Rc8 16. Rd2 Qc4 17. b3 $6 $146 {
Setting a very cheap trap.} (17. Qxc4 {avoids unnecessarily weakening the
queenside and leads to a very equal ending after} 17... Rxc4 {
. This happened in Lugo-Eisen, Internet ICC 2000}) 17... Qxe2 (17... Qxb3 $4 {
loses the queen after} 18. Qb5+ Rc6 (18... Kd8 19. Ba5+ b6 20. Qxb3 $18) 19.
Qxc6+ bxc6 20. cxb3 $18) 18. Rxe2 18... Kd7 {I think Black has a microscopic
advantage now, due to White's weakness on c2, but it's very hard to make
anything of it. The presence of opposite-coloured bishops also makes the
position even more drawish. Some variations below include drawn
opposite-coloured bishop endings.} 19. Rd1 Rc6 20. Kb2 (20. c4 {
is interesting, but Black can respond with} 20... b5 $1 {, forcing} 21. c5 (21.
Rd4 21... Rhc8 {transposes.} (21... bxc4 22. bxc4 Rhc8 23. Re3 Rxc4+ 24. Rxc4
Rxc4+ 25. Rc3 {makes it extremely difficult for Black to win, as he cannot play
} 25... Rxc3+ 26. Bxc3 {
, which is just a dead-drawn opposite coloured bishops position.})) 21... Rhc8
22. Rd4 22... a5 $1 23. Bxa5 Rxc5+ 24. Kd2 24... Rc1 {, which favours Black.})
20... Rhc8 21. Rc1 ({If} 21. c4 21... Ke8 (21... b5 $5 {is also interesting.}
22. cxb5 Rc2+ 23. Rxc2 Rxc2+ 24. Ka1 Rxf2 25. Rd2 (25. Bc5 $5 25... Rxg2 26.
Bxa7 {plans to use White's advanced passed pawn to compensate for his material
disadvantaged.}) 25... Rxd2 26. Bxd2 d4 27. Kb2 {is equal.}) 22. cxd5 Rc2+ 23.
Rxc2 Rxc2+ 24. Ka1 exd5 25. Rxd5 {I was planning on taking the perpetual with}
25... Rc1+ (25... Rxf2 26. Rd2 Rxd2 27. Bxd2 {is drawn.}) 26. Kb2 Rc2+ 27. Ka1
27... Rc1+ {.}) 21... Ke8 22. f3 22... d4 {
Black creates a passed pawn, but it didn't turn out to be very useful.} 23. Rd2
d3 24. c3 24... a5 $6 25. Bd6 $6 (25. Bxa5 $1 {
I didn't think about enough. I just missed that after} 25... Rc5 26. Bb6 Rxe5
27. Bd4 $1 27... Re2 28. Rxe2 dxe2 29. Re1 {I'm likely to drop a pawn.}) 25...
b5 26. b4 axb4 27. Bxb4 27... Rc4 {There is no way for me to make progress.}
28. Kb3 (28. g4 Bg6 29. h4 {worried me more. I would have played} 29... h6 {
, when there isn't a way for White to make progress - g4-g5 is well-met by
h6-h5, and h4-h5 doesn't achieve anything after Bg6-h7.} (29... h5 30. Rg1 hxg4
31. fxg4 Rf4 32. h5 Be4 33. Rh2 {is fine for White.})) 28... Ra8 (28... f6 29.
g4 Bg6 30. h4 h6 31. h5 Bh7 32. exf6 32... gxf6 {is the only way to keep
playing, opening up the position, but White still holds:} 33. Re1 e5 34. Re3 {
, and there doesn't seem to be a winning plan.}) 29. Rcd1 {
The next twenty one moves are pointless.} 29... Rc6 30. Ra1 (30. Rxd3 {
worried me a bit, but Black is ok after} 30... Bxd3 31. Rxd3 31... Rac8 {
, when a draw is likely.}) 30... Ra4 31. Re1 Ra7 (31... Rc4 {There was wrong
with just playing this and then shifting the king from e8-d8-e8!}) 32. Re3 Rac7
33. Re1 (33. g4 Bg6 34. h4 34... h6 {achieves nothing.}) ({
White's position isn't very healthy after} 33. a4 33... bxa4+ 34. Kxa4 Ra6+ 35.
Kb3 35... Ra1 {, when the rook generates all sorts of threats.}) 33... Ra7 34.
h4 h6 35. Re3 Rac7 36. Re1 Ra7 37. Re3 Rac7 38. g3 Rc8 39. Re1 Rc4 40. Ra1 {
White has managed to improve his position slightly, as he now gets the a3-a4
push in by force.} 40... R4c7 41. a4 Ra7 42. a5 {The pawn on a5 is not going
to do anything unless Black is careless, so the position is still equal.} (42.
Rda2 {was reasonable, but after} 42... bxa4+ 43. Rxa4 Rxa4 44. Rxa4 Rd8 45. Bd6
{a completely drawn position is reached, as} 45... f6 {does nothing after} 46.
Ra7 fxe5 47. Re7+ Kf8 48. Rd7+ Ke8 ({Obviously not} 48... Kg8 49. Rxd8+ $18 {.}
) 49. Re7+ {, with perpetual check.}) 42... Ra6 43. Re1 (43. Rad1 Bg6 44. Rxd3
$5 {concerned me much more than earlier, but Black is fine after} 44... Bxd3
45. Rxd3 45... h5 {, when White has no way forward.}) 43... Rc7 44. Rc1 ({
Advancing the kingside pawns with} 44. g4 44... Bg6 45. h5 Bh7 46. Rg1 {
doesn't make progress if Black plays the risky-looking} 46... f6 $11 {
. Besides, White had ten minutes left on his clock (three minutes less than me)
, so he probably didn't want to try for a win.}) 44... Rac6 45. Ra1 ({
A winning try was} 45. Bd6 45... Rb7 46. g4 Bh7 47. Ra1 Rc4 48. a6 Ra7 49. Rda2
Kd7 (49... Rf4 50. Ra5 d2 51. Rd1 Bd3 52. Rxd2 Ra4 53. Rxa4 bxa4+ 54. Kxa4 Bxa6
55. Kb4 Rb7+ 56. Kc5 Rb3 57. Kd4 {
is probably drawn, but White has the winning chances.}) 50. Bf8 h5 51. Bxg7
hxg4 52. fxg4 Rxg4 53. Bf6 {
, but if Black plays accurately to reach this position, then he should draw.})
45... Ra6 46. Re1 Rc8 47. Rc1 Rac6 48. Ra2 Ra8 49. Rca1 Raa6 50. Rc1 Rc4
1/2-1/2

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:34 PM
Event: Victorian Open
Site: Box Hill
Date: 2004.06.13
Round: 5.10
White: Wallis, Christopher
Black: Stojic, Dusan
Result: 1-0
ECO: B52
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 1947
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 87
EventDate: 2004.06.12

1. e4 1... c5 {SICILIAN DEFENCE} 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ {
SICILIAN DEFENCE: MOSCOW VARIATION} 3... Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Qxd7 5. c4 5... e5 {
This used to be popular. Black's position is solid, but White can easily
secure the advantage. You can see that White is better because his bishop is
better than Black's.} 6. d3 (6. Nc3 {has usuall y been played here - more
flexible since White may want to forgo d2-d3 for a while}) 6... Nc6 7. Nc3 g6
8. Be3 Bg7 9. Nd5 ({Probably better was} 9. O-O {
, with a plan of a2-a3 followed by b2-b4.}) 9... f5 $6 $146 {Black seems to be
trying to play in King's Indian fashion, with a kingside pawn storm, but this
usually does not work without the light-squared bishop.} (9... Nge7 10. a3 (10.
Bh6 {had been considered by me during the game, but is not very good after}
10... O-O {.}) 10... O-O 11. O-O f5 12. Rb1 f4 13. Bd2 h6 14. b4 g5 15. h3 Rab8
16. Bc3 Rf7 17. Nh2 Nd4 18. Bxd4 exd4 19. Qg4 Qxg4 20. Nxe7+ Rxe7 21. hxg4 Kf7
22. bxc5 dxc5 23. Rb5 Rc8 24. Rfb1 Rcc7 25. Nf3 Ke6 26. Kf1 Kd6 27. Ke2 Kc6 28.
a4 Be5 29. a5 Rcd7 30. Rh1 Rd6 31. Rhb1 Rdd7 32. Nd2 Bd6 33. a6 b6 34. Rh1 Re6
35. Rh5 Rg7 36. Rb1 Rgg6 37. Kf3 Be5 38. Rb5 Re8 39. Nb1 Ree6 40. Na3 Re8 41.
Rb1 Kc7 42. Nb5+ Kb8 43. Rbh1 43... Ree6 {
1/2-1/2 Sokolsky,A-Plater,K/Moscow 1947/MCL (43)}) 10. O-O ({I was looking at}
10. exf5 10... gxf5 {and then 11 Nh4 or 11 Ng5, but then I thought he could
just castle queenside with advantage.}) (10. Ng5 {was another move I looked at,
with the aesthetically pleasing Ne6 planned next move. After} 10... O-O-O {
, however, White has just wasted a move on Ng5.}) 10... Nge7 11. Nc3 (11. Bg5 {
was better. Then, I had thought} 11... Nxd5 12. cxd5 12... Ne7 {
wasn't very good for White, but he is doing well after} 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. Qa4+
$1 14... Qd7 (14... Kf7 15. b4 {
is bad for Black in view of the opening of the c-file.}) 15. Qxd7+ Kxd7 16. Ng5
{, when he has an endgame advantage due to his better minor piece.}) 11... O-O
12. Rb1 {Preparing b2-b4.} 12... h6 (12... Nd4 {
is perhaps slightly better. White meets this with} 13. Nd2 {, when after} 13...
Rae8 {Black has more space than his opponent, and probably the advantage.}) 13.
h3 $6 {With this I wanted to stall Black's idea of g5-g4.} 13... f4 (13... Nd4
{was a strong alternative. It leads, after} 14. Nd2 14... Rae8 {, to almost
exactly the same position as in the variation given after Black's 12th move,
except h2-h3 and h7-h6 have been played.}) 14. Bd2 g5 15. Nh2 $6 ({Better was}
15. Nd5 {, after which Black can't play} 15... Nxd5 {, since after} 16. cxd5 (
16. exd5 {, with control over e4, is also good.}) 16... Ne7 17. b4 $14 {
White has the advantage because of both Black's bad bishop and the fact that
Black is going to get tied down defending on the queenside after bxc5 or ...
cxb4.}) 15... Qe8 (15... Nd4 {
was much better, getting the knight on to a good square.} 16. Nf3 {
was my intending move, with the idea that} (16. Qh5 {is interesting,
threatening Nh2-g4, winning the h6-pawn. During the game I thought this idea
looked a little bit crude.} 16... Qe8 17. Qg4 17... Qc8 {
looks good for Black because of the d4-knight.}) 16... Nec6 {is met by} 17. Nd5
{. In fact, after} 17... Nxf3+ 18. Qxf3 Nd4 19. Qd1 19... f3 $1 20. g4 20... h5
{, White's position starts to collapse. He has to play} 21. Kh2 {
, after which Black has the winning} 21... Kf7 $1 {
, intending to invade down the h-file with his rooks.}) 16. a3 16... a5 {
I thought this looked strange since b5 is weak. I took advantage of this with}
({I expected} 16... Nd4 {, when I would have played} 17. b4 $14 {
, with a slight advantage.}) 17. Nb5 {
, putting my knight on an excellent square.} (17. b4 $5 {is an interesting
idea. It is similar to Benko Gambit (1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 b5!?) in that White
is giving up a pawn to open files for his major pieces.} 17... axb4 18. axb4
Nxb4 19. Nb5 Na6 20. Qb3 {is a likely variation. The position is unclear.} (20.
Nxd6 $5 {is risky, but can be played.} 20... Qd7 21. Nxb7 Rfb8 22. Na5 Qxd3 23.
Nf3 {looks unclear. Of course,} 23... Qxe4 24. Rxb8+ Rxb8 25. Bc3 {
would not be a good idea for Black.})) 17... Qg6 18. b4 $6 (18. Qg4 $1 {
was much better. White is threatening to double attack Black's weak b7 and d6
pawns.} 18... Nd4 19. Nxd4 exd4 20. b4 $14 {This gives White an advantage due
to Black's serious pawn weaknesses (at d6 and b7).}) 18... b6 19. Qg4 h5 20.
Qd7 Rfd8 (20... axb4 21. axb4 Ra2 22. Rfd1 {
is better for White, as Black will find it difficult to find his pawns.}) 21.
Qc7 g4 22. Kh1 (22. hxg4 {was worse. After} 22... hxg4 23. Qxb6 axb4 24. axb4 {
, Black wins with} 24... Kf7 $1 {, planning a decisive attack down the h-file.}
) 22... Qe6 (22... gxh3 {is met by} 23. gxh3 {
, when a White rook will be well-placed on the g-file.}) 23. Qxb6 gxh3 24. g3
Rab8 ({After} 24... Rdb8 25. Qc7 axb4 26. axb4 {,} (26. gxf4 26... bxa3 {
and White is just a pawn down.}) 26... d5 $1 {is a very nice tactic! If White
captures on d5, then Black replies with Nxd5, and if c/exd5, then Qxd5 with
check, followed by Rxb5, winning back the piece, and leaving Black a pawn up.
The positions after this are very unclear.} (26... Ra2 27. Bc3 d5 28. gxf4 dxe4
29. Rg1 {is not an improvement on 26...d5.})) 25. Qa6 axb4 26. axb4 26... Ra8
$2 {Black probably missed Nc7.} (26... fxg3 27. fxg3 Qg6 28. Rg1 (28. Rf3 28...
Rf8 $1 29. Rxf8+ (29. Be1 Rxf3 30. Nxf3 Rf8 31. Nh4 31... Qg4 {
is winnning for Black.}) 29... Rxf8 30. Rg1 Nxb4 31. Bxb4 cxb4 32. g4) 28...
Ra8 29. Qb7 Ra2 30. Be1 30... Bh6 {
was better. White cannot defend against the numerous threats.}) 27. Nc7 $1
27... Rxa6 28. Nxe6 28... Rc8 {
Relying on a simple trick to defend against the b4-b5 fork.} 29. gxf4 (29. b5 {
is met by} 29... Ra2 {.}) 29... Bh6 30. b5 Ra2 31. Bc3 (31. fxe5 $1 {
was much better. White wins after} 31... Bxd2 32. exd6 Kf7 33. Nxc5 {
, when the army of White pawns forces Black to give up material.}) 31... exf4
32. Nxc5 $2 {Terrible! White overlooks in time trouble that} (32. Nf3 {or}) (
32. bxc6 Kf7 33. d4 Kxe6 34. d5+ Kf7 35. e5 $1 {are easy wins.}) 32... dxc5 33.
bxc6 Nxc6 34. Rg1+ Kf7 ({I was hoping for} 34... Kh7 35. Rb7+) (34... Kf8 {
can't be played because of} 35. Rg6 $18 {.}) 35. Rb7+ 35... Kf8 $2 ({I knew}
35... Ne7 {had to played. I wasn't completely sure about to continue, but I
was planning to look at} 36. Nf3 $1 {, getting the knight into the action.
This leads to great complications, but White comes out with a clear advantage:}
36... Rxf2 (36... Rd8 37. Ng5+ Bxg5 (37... Ke8 38. Bf6 {
, and Black has no defence against all the threats.}) 38. Rxg5 Rxf2 39. Rg7+ {
and White wins a piece.}) (36... Rc2 37. Ne5+ Kf8 (37... Ke8 38. Ng6 $1 38...
Nc6 (38... Ng8 {is met by the amusing} 39. Nh8 $1 39... Ne7 40. Bf6 {
, and again Black is defenceless against White's threats.}) (38... Nxg6 39.
Rxg6 Rxc3 40. Rxh6 $18 {and White will mate in a few moves.}) 39. Rh7 Rxc3 40.
Rxh6 Rxd3 41. Nxf4 Rf3 42. Rg8+ Kd7 43. Rg7+ Ne7 44. Ng6 $18) 38. Nd7+ Kf7 (
38... Ke8 39. Bf6 {
and the threat of Bxe7 followed by a discovered check is winning.}) 39. Bf6 $1
39... Rg8 40. Bh4 Rxg1+ 41. Kxg1 {and again, White's threats are winning.}) 37.
Ne5+ Ke8 (37... Kf8 38. Ng6+ Nxg6 39. Rxg6 {
and, as in the game, Black's bishop is trapped.}) 38. Ng6 Ng8 (38... Nc6 {
loses to} 39. Rh7 h2 40. Rb1 Bf8 41. Nxf8 {, as after} 41... Kxf8 42. Rh8+ {
he loses the rook on c8.}) 39. Nh4 $1 (39. Nxf4 {is less clear.}) 39... Ne7 (
39... Kf8 40. Nf5 {and Black can't cope with the various threats, including 41
Nxh6 Nxh6 42 Bg7+, 41 Rxg8+ Kxg8 42 Ne7+, and 41 Rxg8+ Kxg8 42 Nxh6+.}) 40. Bf6
Bf8 ({The knight cannot run away, as} 40... Nc6 41. Rg8+ {is a forced mate:}
41... Bf8 42. Ng6 Rf1+ 43. Kh2 Rf2+ 44. Kxh3 {
, and there is no defence to the threat of Rxf8 mate: only computer moves like}
44... Rc7 {avoid instant mate.}) 41. Bxe7 Bxe7 42. Rg8+ Kf7 (42... Bf8 43. Ng6
$18) 43. Rxc8 $18) 36. Rg6 $1 $18 36... Rb8 37. Rxb8+ Nxb8 38. Rxh6 Nd7 39.
Rxh5 Ra3 40. Be1 Rxd3 41. Rd5 Rxd5 42. cxd5 c4 43. Nf3 43... Nc5 $2 44. Bb4 1-0

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:36 PM
[Event "Victorian Open"]
[Site "Box Hill"]
[Date "2004.06.14"]
[Round "6.5"]
[White "Wallis, Christopher"]
[Black "Kempen, Leon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A45"]
[WhiteElo "1642"]
[BlackElo "1974"]
[Annotator "Chris Wallis"]
[PlyCount "87"]
[EventDate "2004.06.12"]
1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 {TROMPOWSKY OPENING} 2... c5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 4. d5 d6 5. e3 (5. c3 {is perhaps better. The aim of this move is to restrain Black's
dark-squared bishop.}) 5... Bf5 6. Bd3 $146 {An interesting novelty. I wanted
to exchange light-squared bishops, but perhaps this is not so good, since I am
left with some weak light squares.} ({Probably better was} 6. Ne2 6... h5 7.
Nf4 Qb6 8. Qc1 Nd7 9. a4 h4 10. a5 Qc7 11. Nc3 $14 {
, as played in Adams-Hon, London 1992,}) 6... Bxd3 (6... Bg6 {
was the other option. White secures a slight advantage by} 7. Ne2 Bg7 (7... Qb6
8. Nbc3 Nd7 9. Qd2 Bg7 10. O-O-O $14 {
White is slightly better because of his superior development.}) 8. Nbc3 Nd7 9.
Qd2 $14 (9. f4 $5 $14 {is also good.})) 7. Qxd3 Qb6 8. Qb3 $6 ({Much better was
} 8. Nc3 $1 {, a pawn sac I considered. I thought Black was doing well after}
8... Rg8 {
, though. This is actually not true: White gets a slight advantage with} (8...
Qxb2 {is far too dangerous:} 9. Rb1 Qa3 10. Rxb7 Nd7 ({I saw that} 10... Qc1+
11. Nd1 {, which is just winning for White.}) 11. Nb5 Qc1+ 12. Ke2 {
White has the threat of Nb5-c7+. Black's only chance is} 12... Rb8 (12... Kd8
13. Nxa7 c4 14. Qf5 {is hopeless.}) 13. Rxa7 Ne5 14. Qf5 (14. Qe4 {
leads to a draw by perpetual check:} 14... Rxb5 $1 15. Qa4 15... Kd8 $1 16.
Ra8+ (16. f4 16... Rg8 {
changes nothing: White has nothing better than to force the draw.}) 16... Kc7
17. Qa7+ Rb7 18. Qa5+ $11) 14... Bh6 15. a4 $18 {
White's extra pawn should be enough to win, but he must be very careful.}) 9.
g3 (9. Nge2 {is also possible, but Black is fine after} 9... Nd7 {.} ({bad is}
9... Rxg2 10. Ng3 {, when the rook is trapped, and will have to sacrifice
itself for the g3 knight after Ke1-f1 by White.})) 9... Nd7 10. O-O-O {
. Black has to deal with the threat to his h7-pawn now:} {After} 10... Rg6 {,}
11. f4 {is one way to gain the advantage (with plenty others in reserve).}) (8.
Nd2 Qxb2 9. Rb1 Qxa2 10. Rxb7 10... Nd7 {, and White's best seems to be} 11.
Qb5 Rd8 (11... Qa1+ 12. Nb1 12... Rd8 {leads to nothing after} 13. Rxd7 Rxd7
14. Qb8+ Rd8 15. Qb5+ {, with perpetual check.}) 12. Rxd7 Rxd7 13. Qb8+ Rd8 14.
Qb5+ {with perpetual check.}) 8... Nd7 (8... Qxb3 9. axb3 9... a6 {
would have been similar to the game.}) ({Another good move would have been}
8... Rg8 {. After} 9. g3 ({After} 9. Qxb6 9... axb6 10. Kf1 (10. g3 Bg7 11. Nc3
f5 12. Nge2 12... Ra5 {makes no huge difference.}) 10... f5 11. Nc3 (11. c3 {
is bad because now White's d5-pawn is vulnerable. Black gains a significant
advantage with} 11... Na6 ({or} 11... Bg7 {.})) 11... Bg7 12. Nge2 {Black has a
n advantage due to his powerful dark-squared bishop. He should aim for the
advance b6-b5-b4 with} 12... Ra5 $15) 9... Qxb3 10. axb3 10... f5 {
, Black's bishop will have a good life on the h8-a1 diagonal.}) (8... c4 $2 9.
Qxc4 $1 {would be embarrassing for Black, as his intended} 9... Qxb2 $4 {
runs into} 10. Qc8# {.}) 9. Nf3 (9. Ne2 {This is usually a good square for the
knight in this variation, as it can then go to either f4 or g3, in both cases
eyeing the h5 square.} 9... Rg8 10. Ng3 {probably gives White an edge.}) 9...
Rg8 10. O-O {This is the first time I have ever castled in this variation! It
was probably correct here, as the other defences either leave White's king in
the centre (Rg1) or create weaknesses (g2-g3).} (10. g3 {.}) 10... a6 {
Black isn't playing for some far-fetched plan of b7-b5. Instead, this move
intends to make the rook on a1 bite on granite after a queen exchange, and the
subsequent opening of the a-file.} 11. c4 (11. Nbd2 Qxb3 12. Nxb3 {avoids doubl
ed pawns, but leaves the knight in a dodgy position. Black's pawns can
probably avalanche forwards with} 12... a5 {
, and gain time on the knight en route.} 13. a4 {
just ties the a1-rook down to the defence of the a4-pawn. After} 13... Nb6 {
, White will find it very difficult to defend both d5 and a4. Black will reply
to} 14. Rfd1 {with} 14... Rg4 {, hitting the a4-pawn.}) 11... Qxb3 12. axb3
12... O-O-O {White must now concentrate on achieving the liquidation of his
doubled pawns, by playing b3-b4. I couldn't see any way for me to make
progress elsewhere.} (12... f5 {looked much better to me.} 13. Nc3 Bg7 14. Rfd1
Bf6 15. Ra2 15... h5 {probably gives Black the advantage.}) 13. Nc3 {Connecting
the rooks, and planning a maneuver to f4, where the knight defends g2.} 13...
Bg7 14. Ne2 14... Ne5 $6 {This lets White get a relatively comfortable game,
with Black's bishop imprisoned behind its pawns.} (14... f5 {
looks more threatening, unleashing the 'Dragon' bishop on g7.} 15. Ng3 Bxb2 (
15... e6 $2 16. Ng5 Bxb2 17. Nxf7 Bxa1 (17... Rdf8 $2 18. Ra2 exd5 19. Nxd6+
Kc7 20. Ndxf5 dxc4 21. Rxb2 cxb3 22. Rxb3 c4 23. Rc3 b5 24. Ra1 {
, and the pawns are stopped in their tracks.}) 18. dxe6 $1 18... Be5 19. f4 Bg7
20. Nxd8 Kxd8 21. exd7 Rf8 22. Rd1 Kxd7 23. Rd5 {is better for White.}) 16.
Nxf5 Bf6 17. Ra3 {
leaves White with a reasonable position, though it is slightly uncomfortable.})
15. Nxe5 fxe5 16. b4 (16. Ng3 {
was recommended by Jesse Jager just after the game.} 16... Bf6 {
, however, makes White's knight look a bit useless on g3:} 17. Nh5 17... Bh8 {
is good for Black.}) (16. Ra4 {was an improvement, however, as Black doesn't
get the possibility of played 17...b3, as in the game.}) 16... cxb4 (16... e4 {
looked better to me during the game.} {After} 17. bxc5 (17. Rfb1 cxb4 18. Ng3 {
also gives White an advantage.}) 17... Bxb2 18. Ra2 Be5 19. c6 $1 {
, however, White's rooks are about to wreak havoc on the queenside.}) 17. Ra4 (
{Better was} 17. b3 {, preventing b4-b3. After} 17... Bh8 18. Ra4 Rg6 19. Rxb4
Rdg8 20. g3 20... Kc7 {, the position looks about equal.}) 17... Kd7 $6 (17...
b3 $1 {was surely a better move, as White is forced to waste another tempo
(now or about ten moves from now!) rounding up the b3 pawn.}) 18. Rxb4 {
White now has a slight advantage.} 18... Rb8 19. Nc3 Rgc8 20. Ra1 20... e6 $6 {
There doesn't seem to be much Black can do at the moment, but this does
nothing to help him.} 21. Rd1 (21. Kf1 {was a strong alternative, centralizing
the king and getting rid of any back-rank problems.}) 21... Bf8 22. h3 {
This was played to give my king an escape hole.} (22. Kf1 {was probably better.
}) 22... Be7 23. Na4 b5 24. cxb5 24... Rxb5 $4 {A dreadful blunder.} (24...
axb5 25. Nc3 25... Rc5 {would have been about equal.}) 25. Nb6+ (25. Rxb5 axb5
26. Nb6+ Kd8 27. Nxc8 27... Kxc8 {was another way to win.}) 25... Rxb6 26. Rxb6
exd5 27. Rxd5 Ke6 28. Rd2 Rc1+ 29. Kh2 Ra1 30. b4 h5 31. Rb7 {
The plan is to play Rb7-a7, followed by b4-b5.} 31... Ra4 32. Rc2 (32. Ra7
32... d5 {might give Black some chances of counterplay by creating a passed
pawn with d5-d4.}) 32... f5 33. Rc8 33... Bf6 {The bishop is now trapped.} (
33... Ra2 34. Re8 {just wins the e7 bishop.}) 34. Re8+ Kd5 35. Rf7 Bh4 36. g3
Bxg3+ (36... Bg5 37. Rg8 Bh6 38. Rg6 {was my intention.} (38. Rxf5 {
would be better: there is no need to hurry.})) 37. Kxg3 Rxb4 38. Rxf5 h4+ 39.
Kg2 a5 40. Ra8 a4 41. Rg5 Kc4 42. Rg4+ Kb3 43. Rxb4+ Kxb4 44. Kf3 1-0

jeffrei
28-07-2004, 11:38 PM
[Event "Victorian Open"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2004.??.??"]
[Round "7.3"]
[White "Rujevic, Mirko"]
[Black "Wallis, Christopher"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "2296"]
[BlackElo "1642"]
[Annotator "Chris Wallis"]
[PlyCount "38"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

1. e4 1... d5 {SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. d4 e5 4. dxe5 4... Qxd1+ {
Black gambits a pawn for rapid development, and attacking chances against
White's king.} ({Of course not} 4... Qxe5+ $2 5. Be2 {, when White is going to
develop his pieces while gaining tempi on the enemy queen.}) 5. Kxd1 Nc6 6. Bf4
({The main line,} 6. f4 6... Bf5 7. c3 7... O-O-O+ {
is known to offer Black sufficient compensation.}) 6... Nge7 $146 {Threatening
to win back the pawn with ...Ng6-e5. 6...Bc5 and 6...Bf5 are more common in
grandmaster practice but my move is also fine for Black.} 7. Bd3 Ng6 8. Bxg6 (
8. Bg3 8... Ngxe5 {
gives Black the advantage, mainly because of White's badly placed king.}) (8.
Ne2 Nxf4 9. Nxf4 9... Nxe5 {gives Black the advantage because of both White's
vulnerable king and the two bishops.}) 8... hxg6 9. Ne2 Bf5 (9... Bc5 10. f3 (
10. Nbc3 Bf5 11. f3 O-O-O+ 12. Kc1 12... Rde8 {
regains the pawn while retaining an advantage:} 13. Ng3 (13. g4 Bd7 14. Ne4
14... Bd4 {is excellent for Black.}) 13... Nxe5 (13... Bd4 {is also good.}) 14.
Nce4 14... Bb6 {, and Black is better because his rooks have far better scope.
White's rook on a1 will take time to get out, while the h1 rook is tied down
to the defence of h2.}) 10... Bf5 {was a good alternative.}) 10. Kc1 (10. Ng3 {
worried me more.} 10... O-O-O+ 11. Nd2 11... Bc5 {
, however, is very good for Black.}) 10... Bc5 11. f3 11... Nb4 {
White's only defence to threat against c2 is} 12. Na3 {
. The position is of course much better for Black. After} 12... O-O-O {
, the a1-rook is completely shut out of the game, the a3 knight is stuck on
the edge of the board, the f4-bishop doesn't really do anything because of the
pawn on e5, the knight on e2 is passive, and the h1-rook has no good squares
to develop to.} 13. g4 (13. Rd1 $2 {is bad because of} 13... Nd5 14. Nc4 (14.
Bg3 Ne3 15. Rxd8+ Rxd8 16. Nc3 16... Nxg2 {is winning for Black as well.})
14... Nxf4 15. Nxf4 (15. Rxd8+ Rxd8 16. Nxf4 {loses a piece to} 16... Rd4 {.})
15... Rxh2 16. Rxd8+ Kxd8 17. Kd2 g5 18. Nd3 (18. Ne2 18... Rxg2 {
leaves Black with an extra pawn and the two bishops.}) 18... Rxg2+ 19. Kc3
19... b5 $1 {, and Black has a winning position.}) 13... Be6 14. Rf1 14... Nd5
$6 ({Better was} 14... Nxa2+ {which didn't look attractive, as White's rook
might get into the game via the a-file.} 15. Kb1 Nb4 (15... Bxa3 16. b3 {
gives White reasonable chances.}) 16. Bg3 16... Rd7 {, however, looks winning
for Black, who no longer has to worry about being a pawn down.}) 15. Bg3 15...
Ne3 {Here I saw that I had a forced draw, if I wanted it.} 16. Re1 Ng2 17. Rf1
17... Ne3 $2 {Although I thought a bit more over the next few moves, I'd
already decided to draw.} (17... Be3+ 18. Kb1 18... Rd2 {was the line I was
trying to calculate. I could find no forced win, but with Fritz it looks like
Black might have one.} 19. Nc1 (19. Nc3 Rhd8) 19... Rhd8 20. Nd3 (20. c3 {
is met by} 20... Rd1 21. Rxd1 Rxd1 22. Kc2 Rd2+ 23. Kb1 23... Bd5 {
, when White is going to lose material.}) 20... c6 $1 {
, and the threat of b7-b5-b4 is decisive.}) (17... Rd7 {was the move which was
analysed during a short post-mortem (I was sitting there doing nothing while
three IMs demonstrated some interesting variations). I had also considered
this during the game.} 18. Nc3 {is best, when} (18. Kb1 18... Rhd8 {
basically forces} 19. Nc3 {, when} (19. Nc1 19... Rd1 {
is obviously hopeless for White.}) 19... c6 $1 {is the most accurate win.} 20.
Rc1 {(there is absolutely no useful move White can play)} 20... Be3 21. Rh1
21... b5 {is an amusing way to win a piece!}) 18... Rhd8 19. h3 19... g5 {
leaves Black with a completely won position. There is absolutely nothing White
can achieve from here.}) 18. Re1 Ng2 19. Rf1 19... Ne3 {Although it was
gratifying for me to achieve a draw in my first ever game against an IM, being
happy with draws is not compatible with my aim of becoming the best player in Australia by the start of 2009 (I start Year 12 then), and next time I will
fight for the win.} 1/2-1/2

jeffrei
14-08-2004, 07:44 PM
VICTORIAN OPEN 2004 (BHCC, 12/6/04-14/6/04)

ZHIGEN LIN (1644)
Score: 5/7

1: W vs Marieke Van Dijk (691): 1-0
2: W vs Jesse Jager (1861): 1/2-1/2
3: B vs Miralem Campara (1851): 1-0
4: W vs Kai Jensen (unr): 1/2-1/2
5: B vs Leon Kempen (1974): 0-1
6: W vs Felix Wyss (1823): 1-0
7: B vs Tom Lea (1793): 1-0

CHRIS WALLIS (1642)
Score: 5.5/7

1: W vs Sean Devoy (685): 1-0
2: B vs Malcolm Belletty (1857): 1-0
3: W vs Marcel Rothlisberger (1892): 1/2-1/2
4: B vs Mehmedalija Dizdarevic (1970): 1/2-1/2
5: W vs Dusan Stojic (1947): 1-0
6: W vs Leon Kempen (1974): 1-0
7: B vs Mirko Rujevic (2296): 1/2-1/2

jeffrei
14-08-2004, 08:02 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 1: DH Tigerstyle vs DH FisH (3.5-0.5)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.07.23
Round: 1.1
White: Wallis, Chris
Black: McDonald, Julian
Result: 1-0
ECO: B22
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 1849
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 41
EventDate: 2004.07.23

1. e4 1... c5 {THE SICILIAN DEFENCE} 2. Nf3 e6 ({I expected} 2... d6 {.}) 3. c3
{SICILIAN DEFENCE: C3 SICILIAN} 3... Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. d4 5... Nc6 $2 (5... cxd4
{is the main line.}) 6. Bd3 $2 (6. c4 $1 {gives White a clear advantage. In
the post-mortem my coach said he remembered a game in which Gareth Charles was
convincingly mauled by David Smerdon in this line, but it doesn't show up on
my database.} 6... Nc7 (6... Ndb4 7. dxc5 Qc7 8. Bf4 Bxc5 9. a3 {
would be almost winning for White, as Black must sacrifice a piece:} 9... Na6
10. b4 Naxb4 (10... Be7 {loses to} 11. b5 {.}) 11. axb4 Bxb4+ 12. Nbd2 {
when Black shouldn't have enough compensation.}) (6... Nb6 7. d5 exd5 8. cxd5
Nb4 9. d6 {looks basically winning for White:} 9... N6d5 {is the only try, when
} 10. Bd2 {gives White a winning position.}) 7. d5 exd5 8. cxd5 Nb4 9. d6 Ne6
10. Nc3 {, and Black's position is unenviable. An attempt at breaking out with}
10... f6 {fails to} 11. exf6 Qxf6 12. Bc4 {, when even Garry Kasparov would
probably have trouble getting Black's position untied.}) (6. dxc5 {was once pla
yed by Karpov but I think 6 c4 is better. Not sure about this though and I
wouldn't mind some feedback from the BB posters.}) 6... d6 (6... cxd4 7. cxd4 {
worried me more. Black can either transpose back to the main line with b7-b6,
or play} 7... Qa5+ $1 8. Bd2 (8. Kf1 {
is not very appealing for White, but he might be okay.}) 8... Qb6 {
, when White has to give up a pawn for a lead in development.}) 7. O-O ({
I considered} 7. dxc5 {, but didn't like} 7... dxe5 {, when White has to play}
(7... dxc5 8. Qe2 Be7 9. O-O 9... O-O {transposes to the game.}) 8. b4 {
. However, I misevaluated this completely: White has the advantage here.}) 7...
dxe5 (7... cxd4 8. cxd4 dxe5 9. dxe5 {was what I expected, as now the f8
bishop has more scope (after the removal of the c5-pawn).}) 8. dxe5 Be7 9. Qe2
(9. Re1 {was expected by my opponent, but I wanted to remain flexible, as that
rook might be best on d1. Also, I wanted to weaken my opponent's pawn
structure by threatening mate after 9...0-0.}) 9... O-O 10. Qe4 10... f5 $146 (
{After} 10... g6 11. Bh6 11... Re8 {
, I thought I had a huge advantage following} (11... f5 12. exf6 Rxf6 13. Nbd2
{is terrible for Black.}) 12. Nbd2 {. Interestingly, the only game on Megabase
2004 that's ever gone this way before involves one J.Schroeder, a chess player
and writer from America who I think would fit in well on this BB (just check
out his vocabulary). The following game isn't accurate at all but it gives an
idea of the sort of attack Black is in for:} 12... a6 13. a4 b6 14. h4 Bb7 15.
h5 Qd7 16. Rfe1 Rad8 17. hxg6 fxg6 18. Qg4 Bf8 19. Bxg6 hxg6 20. Qxg6+ Bg7 21.
Ng5 Nf4 22. Qh7+ Kf8 23. Qh8+ {
1-0 Kaech,R-Schroeder,J/Seattle 1989/EXT 2004 (23)}) 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. Qe2 (12.
Qh4 $4 {immediately just blunders a piece to} 12... Qxd3 {.}) 12... Nd5 13. Rd1
13... Qc7 {As the threat to the d3-bishop has been removed, the conditions are
now right for the queen's maneuver to h4:} 14. Qe4 Nf6 (14... g6 {
would loosen Black's structure for no real reason:} 15. Bh6 Rd8 16. Na3 {
gives White an obvious advantage.}) 15. Qh4 15... e5 $2 {This actually gives
White a forced win. However, I was uncertain of it, and played instead} ({
Simply} 15... Bd7 {was a good alternative, when I intended} 16. Bg5 h6 17. Bxf6
Bxf6 (17... Rxf6 18. Qe4 18... g6 {is much better.}) 18. Qe4 {
, when Black is in huge trouble.}) 16. Bg5 $2 {. My idea was to provoke a
weakening advance of the Black king's protective shield, but I missed a
complicated win.} (16. Ng5 $1 {
was much better. I was uncertain of the positions after} 16... e4 (16... g6 {
is met by} 17. Qh6 $1 17... e4 (17... Bd6 {is met by the crushing blow} 18.
Nxh7 $1 18... Qxh7 (18... Nxh7 19. Qxg6+ Kh8 (19... Qg7 {loses to} 20. Qxd6 {.}
) 20. Qxh7+ Qxh7 21. Bxh7 Kxh7 22. Rxd6 {, and White is just two pawns up.})
19. Bc4+ Kh8 20. Rxd6 Bf5 21. Qxh7+ Kxh7 22. Be3 Ne4 23. Rd1 Rad8 24. Na3 {
, and White's extra pawn should be winning.}) 18. Bf4 $1 ({bad would be} 18.
Bc4+ 18... Kh8 19. Nf7+ $2 (19. Bf4 $1 {would still win.}) 19... Rxf7 20. Bxf7
Ne5 21. Bb3 21... Bg4 {, when Black has enormous compensation for the exchange:
} 22. Rf1 (22. Rd2 {would be bad for White after} 22... c4 23. Bc2 (23. Bd1 {
loses to} 23... Bxd1 24. Rxd1 Nfg4 25. Qh3 (25. Qf4 Rf8 26. Qg3 {
is completely won for Black after} 26... Bd6 27. Bf4 27... Rxf4 $1 28. Qxf4
Nf3+ 29. gxf3 Bxf4 30. fxg4 Bxh2+ 31. Kh1 Bf4 32. Na3 e3 33. Kg2 (33. fxe3 Qc6+
34. Kg1 Bxe3+ 35. Kh2 35... Qf6 {, with irresistible threats.}) 33... Qb6 34.
Rab1 (34. fxe3 Qxe3 35. Rd8+ Kg7 36. Rd7+ 36... Kh6 {
, and White cannot deal with Black's mate threats.}) 34... exf2 35. Rd4 (35.
Kf1 {loses to} 35... Qe6 {.}) 35... Be5 36. Rd2 (36. Rxc4 36... Qe3 {
is an easy win for Black.}) 36... Qe6 37. Kxf2 37... Qxg4 $19 {.}) 25... Bc5
26. Be3 Bxe3 27. fxe3 Qb6 28. Rd2 Nxe3 29. Kh1 29... Nd3 {, when Black's
knights give him more than enough compensation for the minor material
disadvantage:} 30. Na3 Rf8 31. Qh4 Qd6 32. Rg1 Rf4 33. g4 33... g5 {
is one way the game might continue. The g5 pawn is invulnerable, as after} 34.
Qxg5 {Black wins with} 34... Rf2 {.}) 23... g5 $1 {This is an amusing move.
The threat is to trap White's queen with Nf6-g8, and there's absolutely
nothing White can do about it!} 24. Qxg5 Rg8 25. Qh6 Nf3+ 26. Kh1 (26. gxf3
Bh5+ 27. Kf1 27... Qxh2 {is apparently a mate in eight for Black.}) 26... Rg6
27. Qf4 Qxf4 28. Rd8+ Bxd8 29. Bxf4 29... Ne1 {, and Black is winning.}) 22...
Rf8 23. h3 Be2 24. Re1 24... Bd3 {is pretty unclear.}) 18... Qb6 (18... Qxf4 {
loses to} 19. Bc4+ Kh8 20. Nf7+ $1 20... Rxf7 21. Qxf4 {.}) 19. Bxe4 (19. Bc4+
Kh8 20. Nd2 Bf5 21. g4 $1 {is another way to win.}) 19... Qxb2 20. Bd5+ Kh8 21.
Nd2 {is obviously a crushing position for White.}) 17. Bc4+ Kh8 18. Nf7+ Rxf7
19. Bxf7 19... Ng4 {, but this is winning for White:} 20. Qg3 {
forces the exchange of queens:} 20... Qxg3 21. hxg3 Bf5 22. Na3 {, and while
things are still not 100 % clear, White is likely to win. Black's best appears
to be} 22... Nce5 {, but White is doing splendidly after} 23. Bc4 {.}) 16... h6
(16... g6 {was a bit better. I then intended} 17. Qh6 $6 {, but this is less
clear than if there were a knight on g5, rather than a bishop. Indeed, Black
seems to be holding well after} (17. Nbd2 {would be better.}) 17... Be6 {.})
17. Bxh6 {This sacrifice wins, but I missed a much quicker alternative.} (17.
Qc4+ {was rejected because I couldn't find the simple win after} 17... Kh8 {,}
18. Nh4 $1) 17... gxh6 18. Qxh6 18... b5 {I had missed this idea in my
calculations before playing Bxh6. Instead, I had looked at the following:} (
18... Rf7 {, when I saw that the simple} 19. Bc4 {wins.}) (18... Bd8 {
, when again} 19. Bc4+ {wins.}) (18... Kf7 {
was a completely irrelevant variation which I gave a short glance at.} 19. Qg6+
Ke6 20. Bf5#) (18... Na5 {
is not so good when the white bishop has not been drawn away from d3:} 19. Qg5+
Kh8 20. Nxe5 {is a simple win.}) 19. Bxb5 ({Quicker was} 19. Qg5+ {, when after
} 19... Kh8 (19... Kf7 {loses to} 20. Qg6+ Ke6 21. Bf5#) 20. Nh4 {
, White has decisive threats.}) 19... Na5 20. Qg5+ Kh7 21. Nxe5 {My opponent
thought until his time reached about one minute, when he simply resigned,
saying 'well played'. I hope it has been well analysed as well!} 1-0

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.07.23
Round: 1.3
White: Lin, Zhigen
Black: Lau, Vincent
Result: 1-0
ECO: D00
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1570
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 67
EventDate: 2004.07.23

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 {THE TROMPOWSKY OPENING} 2... d5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 4. e3 (4. c4 {
seems to attain better results.}) 4... Bf5 (4... c5 {seems quite strong here}
5. c4 {was my idea.}) 5. c4 c6 6. Nc3 6... Qa5 $2 {
This blunder has been made 3 times before on Megabase 2004.} 7. Qb3 $146 7...
Nd7 8. cxd5 ({Better was:} 8. Qxb7 8... Rb8 9. Qxc6 Rxb2 10. Qc8+ Qd8 11. Qxd8+
Kxd8 12. c5 $1 $18) 8... e5 9. dxe6 Bxe6 10. Bc4 Bxc4 11. Qxc4 Nb6 12. Qb3 Rg8
13. g3 (13. Nge2 {was better} 13... Rxg2 14. Ng3 {and the knight controls the
f5 and h5 squares, where the queen would go to get to h3 or f3!}) 13... Qf5 14.
Rc1 ({I considered:} 14. Nge2 {
but I turned it down because Black gets chances to swindle.} 14... Qf3 15. O-O
15... h5 {but I missed:} 16. d5 $1 $18) 14... h5 15. Qc2 Qa5 16. Qe4+ Be7 17.
Nge2 Rd8 (17... f5 18. b4 $1 18... Qxb4 19. Qxf5 Rg5 20. Qh7 $18 {Black can't
even play 20...0-0-0 here because the f7 pawn falls victim to the queen.}) 18.
h4 Nc4 19. Rc2 ({I considered} 19. b3 19... Nb6 {but I didn't like the pin on
the c3 knight without the protection of the b2 pawn.}) 19... Kf8 $5 20. Qd3 Nb6
21. Nf4 Nd5 22. Nfxd5 Rxd5 23. O-O $1 23... Rd6 $2 24. Ne4 {
I wanted to trade off pieces and I did just that.} 24... Re6 25. Nc5 Bxc5 26.
Rxc5 Qxa2 27. Rxh5 b6 28. Qa3+ $1 {Simplifying the position further.} 28...
Qxa3 29. bxa3 Ke7 30. Rc1 Kd6 31. Kf1 31... Rc8 $2 (31... Kd7 $5 {
was one of Black's good options in this position.}) 32. d5 $1 32... Re5 $2 {
Simplifying the game to an point where White gets a forced win!} 33. Rxe5 33...
fxe5 $2 (33... Kxe5 {
could make the game last a bit longer, but I don't see any point in this!}) 34.
Rxc6+ $1 1-0

jeffrei
14-08-2004, 08:07 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 2: Melbourne vs DH Tigerstyle (1.0-3.0)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.07.30
Round: 2.1
White: Pecori, Ascaro
Black: Wallis, Chris
Result: 0-1
ECO: D02
WhiteElo: 1997
BlackElo: 1642
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 86
EventDate: 2004

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 {THE LONDON SYSTEM} 3... c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6.
Qb3 c4 7. Qxb6 (7. Qc2 {
is the main line here. My opponent thought he'd be slightly worse after} 7...
Bf5 8. Qc1 {. However, according to theory, White is equal in the boring
positions which follow.} (8. Qxf5 {is suicide.} 8... Qxb2 {
wins material for Black.})) 7... axb6 {Black's plan here is to liquidate his
doubled pawns by advancing b6-b5-b4, followed up by an exchange on c3.
Somewhere in between this position and the capture on c3, Black should develop
his bishop, and also prepare to castle, so that his other rook's influence can
be felt on the queenside. I was wondering which order I should do all this in.
I remembered a game I had played in the Ballarat Begonia, which had gone
almost exactly like this. I had played the b6-b5 advance as soon as possible,
and decided to do so again.} 8. Nbd2 (8. Na3 {
, threatening intrusion at b5, is better.} 8... Ra5 {is one of the various
moves Black has in this position. He gets perfectly adequate compensation
after} 9. Bc7 Bf5 10. Bxb6 Ra6 11. Bc7 Kd7 12. Nb5 12... e6 {.}) 8... b5 9. Be2
Bf5 (9... Bg4 {was another development of the bishop I considered, but I
decided that the bishop would be much more useful down the h7-b1 diagonal.}) ({
Why not} 9... b4 {immediately? Black's only problem, his slow development, is
not going to trouble him much, as there's no way for White to take advantage
of this.} 10. e4 {was the only thing that worried me, but Black has 'somewhat'
better chances after} 10... dxe4 11. Ng5 Nd5 12. Be3 b5 13. Ndxe4 (13. Ngxe4 f5
14. Nc5 bxc3 15. bxc3 15... f4 {loses a piece for nothing.}) 13... h6 14. Nh3 (
14. Nf3 {loses to} 14... f5 15. Nc5 (15. Ned2 bxc3 16. bxc3 16... f4 {
again loses a piece - see 13 Ngxe4.}) 15... bxc3 16. bxc3 16... Nxc3 {
, when Black's material advantage is decisive.}) 14... Bxh3 15. gxh3 15... e6 {
.}) 10. O-O {Probably even Tarrasch would agree that White's development
advantage isn't doing much for him right now.} (10. Nh4 {
was the only move which concerned me much: I planned} 10... Bd7 {
, but White seems to be doing well after} (10... Bg6 11. Nxg6 hxg6 12. Bf3 {
is very good for White.}) 11. O-O ({My opponent thought that} 11. Nhf3 {
would also be good - which it is.}) 11... b4 12. e4 {. He is not that bad, in
any case, and the fact that his rooks have access to the b1 square makes a
huge difference.}) (10. a3 {would have been met by} 10... b4 (10... e6 11. O-O
{prevents the b5-b4 push.})) 10... b4 ({
Delaying the b5-b4 push any longer wouldn't be a good idea: after} 10... e6 {
, White gets in} 11. a3 {, when he is fine.} (11. Nh4 {
was another reason not to play e7-e6.})) 11. Ne5 (11. Nh4 {
would again have been met by} 11... Bd7 {. White now has} 12. e4 {
. I wasn't completely sure about what to play. I was looking at} 12... e6 (
12... h6 {is a good alternative:} 13. e5 13... Nh7 {is better for Black.}) 13.
e5 13... Ng8 {.}) (11. Bg5 {
is interesting, but Black shouldn't worry about the doubled pawns after} 11...
bxc3 12. bxc3 e6 13. Bxf6 13... gxf6 {
- in fact, all this has done is open the g-file for Black.}) 11... e6 12. h3 $2
$146 {This tempo was too important to waste on a move such as this: it was
better to play} (12. Bf3 {
, when White has good chances of getting in the e3-e4 push.}) (12. Nxc6 12...
bxc6 {was what I was hoping for. The d5-pawn is completely solid, which takes
the sting out of e3-e4 pushes, while Black retains his queenside play. There
is also no way for White to dislodge the bishop from the h7-b1 diagonal.})
12... bxc3 13. bxc3 13... Ba3 $1 {Go back and refresh yourself on my comments
to my seventh move. It's all been achieved! Consequently, Black is completely
winning.} (13... Ra3 {was another move I considered, but I thought that this
was not as effective as Ba3. White has} 14. Rfc1 {
, when his position seems hard to crack.}) 14. g4 Bc2 ({
The other move I looked at,} 14... Bg6 {would not be very good: after} 15. Nxg6
hxg6 16. Rfb1 Rxh3 17. Rxb7 {
, Black's advantage is minimal, if it even exists. What's the rook doing on h3?
}) ({an interesting tactical shot which would have also been effective was}
14... Ne4 $5 {Then,} 15. Nxe4 (15. gxf5 Nxd2 16. fxe6 16... fxe6 {is actually
a variation I had seen during the game. White is losing material in an
interesting way:} 17. Rfe1 Bb2 18. Rad1 18... Bxc3 {.}) 15... Bxe4 16. f3 16...
Bc2 {was the reason I rejected the whole variation, as I thought that f2-f3
might improve White's chances. Indeed, after} 17. Nxc6 bxc6 18. Rf2 {
, he is not doing so badly, as the move} 18... Bb2 (18... Bg6 {
retains a clear advantage, but maybe not a decisive one.}) 19. Raf1 Bg6 (19...
Ba3 20. Bxc4 20... Bg6 {transposes.}) 20. Bxc4 Ba3 (20... Bxc3 21. Rc1 Be1 22.
Rxe1 dxc4 23. Rc1 Bd3 24. Rb2 {is better for White, in view of his inability
to challenge White's control of the b-file, due to the f4-bishop's watch over
the b8-square.}) 21. Bb3 21... Kd7 {, and White's slight advantage shouldn't
really give winning chances. The position seems headed for a draw, as long as
Black defends carefully.}) 15. Bd1 {There was nothing much better: White is
dropping a pawn by force. Here I stopped to calculate for a while, and
realised that I wouldn't be winning the a2-pawn (see the variations after my
seventeenth move).} 15... Bxd1 (15... Bg6 16. Nxg6 16... hxg6 {was another
variation I considered, but I didn't want to lose control over b1. After} 17.
Rb1 Rxh3 18. Rxb7 Bc1 19. Nf3 {, things are less clear than in the game.}) 16.
Rfxd1 {My opponent offered me a draw here. Aside from the fact that I am not
going to take draws in positions such as this (see my last note to the game
with Rujevic), my fourth board player came along at this moment and recorded
his result - a loss.} 16... Bb2 17. Rab1 Bxc3 (17... Rxa2 {was what I had
intended at first back at move 15, but I realised that White had some nice
tactics:} 18. Ndxc4 $1 18... dxc4 19. Rd2 {
, and White is winning the b2-bishop. He probably even has the advantage.}) 18.
Rxb7 18... Nxe5 $2 (18... Ra7 {
was the other move I considered, but I thought that after} 19. Rxa7 (19. Nxf7
Rxb7 20. Nxh8 20... Kf8 {is obviously winning for Black: the knight is trapped.
}) 19... Nxa7 {, White would be able to hold the draw.}) (18... Nd8 $1 {
should have been obvious. The a2-pawn is falling:} 19. Rb6 (19. Rc7 Ba5 20. Rc5
Bxd2 21. Rxd2 21... Ne4 {is ruinous for White.}) 19... Rxa2 20. Ndf3 20... Ne4
{, and White has no hope.}) (18... Rb8 {was another move I considered, but it
has some tactical problems (which I actually didn't see).} 19. Nexc4 $1 {
is a very amusing move.} ({the reason I rejected Ra8-b8 was that after} 19.
Rxb8+ 19... Nxb8 {, the knight is less active than on a7 (as would happen
after 18...Ra7). I missed White's tactical shot} 20. Nexc4 dxc4 21. Bxb8 Ke7
22. Be5 {, when it is Black who is fighting for a draw.}) 19... Rxb7 20. Nd6+
Ke7 21. Nxb7 Ra8 22. Rc1 $1 22... Bxd2 23. Rxc6 {
, and Black is unlikely to hold a draw.}) 19. Bxe5 (19. dxe5 19... Bxd2 $2 (
19... Nd7 $2 20. Nxc4 {was a variation which really horrified me at first, but
then I realized that I had Bxd2.}) (19... Ng8 {
is much better. Black retains a clear advantage: White's f4-bishop is a joke.})
20. exf6 (20. Rxd2 Ne4) 20... c3 {My calculations were interrupted here when
my opponent moved. However, it seems that White is going to draw after} 21.
fxg7 Rg8 22. Rc7 {(the only move)} 22... Rxg7 23. Be5 Rg6 (23... Kd8 24. Rb1
Rg5 25. Rbb7 {is winning for White, as after} 25... Rxe5 $2 26. Rxf7 Kc8 27.
Rfc7+ Kd8 28. Rxh7 Kc8 29. Rbf7 {, there is no way to prevent checkmate on h8.}
) 24. Bxc3 Bxc3 25. Rxc3 h5 26. a3 hxg4 27. h4 {.}) 19... O-O $6 (19... Nd7 {
was something else I looked at. However, in some time trouble, I didn't really
get the chance to evaluateproperlythepositionafter} 20. Bxg7 (20. Nb1 Ba1 21.
Na3 $1 21... Rxa3 22. Rxa1 {is better, but Black has the upper hand after}
22... h5 23. g5 f6 24. gxf6 gxf6 25. Bd6 25... Ra6 {.}) 20... Rg8 21. Bh6 21...
Rg6 {, which is better for Black.}) 20. Nb1 20... Ba5 {The rook's influence on
a2 is removed. In exchange for this, Black's monstrous c3-pawn is unleashed.
White will have to carefully monitor its threats - and this requires that he
keeps a rook and knight at home.} (20... Ba1 {is an odd looking move, but
seems to be better. The point is that while the bishop is rendered impotent on
a1, so is the knight on b1! White has to play} 21. a3 {to try and free himself
(intending to defend the pawn using his bishop), but Black clearly has the
upper hand after} 21... Rfc8 {.}) (20... Ne4 21. f3 21... Nc5 {
was a funny line I considered, but I thought that after} 22. Rb5 {
my pieces would have perfomed too much acrobatics: after} 22... Na4 23. Rc1 {
, White is doing fine.}) 21. f3 {A small crowd was beginning to gather around
the board here. I really hate that - whenever both players are in time trouble,
everyone has to increase the tension!} 21... Rfc8 {Giving the passed pawn some
support. My opponent was down to his last few minutes.} 22. Rc1 22... Rc6 {
Planning to swap off one of White's two active pieces, the rook on b7.} 23. Kf2
{This was surprising. I thought White would be trying to improve his defenses
on the queenside. However, there isn't much he can do there.} (23. Rc2 {
would have defended a2, and is the only constructive alternative to 23.Kf2.}) (
23. Bxf6 23... gxf6 {would have landed White in an unfavourable case of bishop
vs knight. Black's damaged structure means very little.}) 23... Rb6 (23... Ne8
{was another move I considered.} 24. a4 f6 25. Bg3 25... Kf8 {is slightly
better for Black, due to his powerful protected passed pawn, and also White's
exposed pawn on a4.}) 24. Rxb6 Bxb6 25. Nc3 Nd7 26. Bd6 26... Ra6 {
Setting up some cheap tactics, which later win the game.} 27. Bb4 (27. Rb1 Bxd4
28. exd4 28... Rxd6 {and Black is just a pawn up.}) (27. Bg3 {would be much
more resilient. This might look surprising (doesn't the bishop belong right in
the action?), but it is true. The problem is that on b4 the bishop is a bit
exposed, for example to the Nd7-b8-c6 maneuver (as happens in the game).})
27... Nb8 {I wanted to improve the position of my knight, which wasn't doing
much on d7. This is the best way to give White problems (which must have been
difficult to solve, considering he was forced to play at under a minute a move)
.} 28. Rb1 Nc6 29. Bd6 (29. Bc5 {was something which I was very concerned
about. I was trying to find something after} 29... Bxc5 30. dxc5 {when my oppon
ent moved. In fact, this is probably White's best variation. He is likely to
hold the draw comfortably, and possibly even get winning chances.}) (29. a4 {
, trying both to block some of the scope of Black's a6-rook and also trying to
make White's passed pawn a bit more threatening, was another choice.After}
29... Nxb4 30. Rxb4 30... Kf8 {, however, Black retains his advantage.}) 29...
h6 {Creating some luft for the king.} (29... Nxd4 30. exd4 Bxd4+ 31. Kf1 Bxc3
32. Rb8# {is one of the variations which inspired 29...h6.}) 30. a3 $2 {
Finally, White blunders (I think he was down to 30 seconds when he played this)
.} ({The move} 30. Ke2 {was better, as it loses no material.} 30... Bxd4 $2 {
was actually the move I was planning to play!} 31. exd4 Nxd4+ 32. Ke3 {
refutes this, however, as after} 32... Rxd6 33. Kxd4 {
White is just material up (I didn't see 32 Ke3).}) 30... Nxd4 $1 31. Bb4 (31.
exd4 Bxd4+ 32. Ke2 32... Bxc3 {wins for Black.} ({or} 32... Rxd6 {.})) (31.
Rxb6 Rxb6 32. Bc5 {alarmed me for only an instant, as Black has} 32... Rb2+ {.}
) 31... Nc2 32. Nd1 Nxb4 33. Rxb4 (33. axb4 33... Ra2+ {
is obviously winning for Black.}) 33... Bc5 34. Rb8+ Kh7 35. Rb7 35... Rxa3 {
Intending to promote the c-pawn if White takes the f-pawn.} ({The move} 35...
Kg6 {was better. I rejected it because my king's position looked a bit risky,
but now that I look at this position in a more calm state, I can't see what I
was worried about.} 36. f4 36... Rxa3 {
, and the White pawns certainly can't deliver any checkmates.}) 36. Rc7 (36.
Rxf7 c3 37. Rc7 37... c2 {is losing for White.}) 36... Ra2+ 37. Kf1 (37. Ke1
37... Bb4+ {is lost for White, who is just losing a tempo.}) 37... Bb4 38. e4 {
This doesn't do anything favourable for White - it just makes it easier for
Black to get two connected passed pawns.} 38... Rd2 39. Ne3 (39. Nf2 39... c3 {
is winning for Black.}) 39... c3 40. exd5 exd5 41. h4 (41. Rd7 d4 42. Nc4 42...
c2 {and the pawn promotes.}) 41... d4 42. Nd5 (42. Nc4 Rd1+ 43. Ke2 43... c2 {
is hopeless for White.}) 42... Ba3 43. Rxf7 c2 (43... c2 44. Nf6+ 44... Kg6 {
leaves White with nothing.} (44... Kh8 {can even be played, as the 'checkmate',
} 45. Rf8+ {, is met with} 45... Bxf8 {.})) 0-1

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.07.30
Round: 2.3
White: Fletcher, Andrew
Black: Lin, Zhigen
Result: 0-1
ECO: C55
WhiteElo: 1756
BlackElo: 1644
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 96
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 {THE ITALIAN GAME} 3... Nf6 {
ITALIAN GAME: TWO KNIGHTS DEFENCE} 4. d3 {
Over the years this has become a very respectable opening.} 4... Be7 5. Bg5 $5
{This move is very uncommon.} 5... d6 6. h3 O-O (6... Na5 $5 7. Bb5+ (7. Bb3
Nxb3 8. axb3 8... O-O {Black is a touch better due to the advantage of the two
bishops and a threat of d5 sooner or later.}) (7. Nbd2 {probrably is the best
response here, and the response I was expecting if I had played 6...Na5.}) 7...
c6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 {and now Black can take the bishop at leisure.}) 7. Nc3
7... Kh8 $146 {with the idea of Ng8 and f5.} (7... Na5 {
should have been preferred, again with the plan of 'winning' the bishop-pair.})
8. Bxf6 $6 {Stopping my plan, I could still play here 8...Bf6, and then Be7,
but g4! stops f5, Black would have to play g6 to acheive f5.} 8... Bxf6 9. Qd2
(9. Qe2 {with the idea of 0-0-0 also is met by} 9... Nd4 $1 10. Nxd4 (10. Qd1
$15 {and Black has an edge.}) 10... exd4 11. Nb5 (11. Nb1 {
is probrably the best option.} 11... c6 12. Nd2 $15) (11. Na4 Bd7 12. b3 12...
b5 {and White is alive no more.}) (11. Nd5 Bg5 12. h4 (12. f4 $2 12... Bh4+ 13.
Kd2 13... c6 {and Black gets the initiative.}) 12... Bh6 $1 $17) (11. Nd1 11...
c6 {with the idea of d5!} 12. O-O d5 13. exd5 cxd5 14. Bb3 14... Be6 $17) 11...
c6 12. Na3 12... d5 {and White's semi-closed position is opened.}) 9... Nd4 $1
10. Nxd4 10... Bg5 $1 {The only move that keeps Black's edge.} 11. Qe2 exd4 12.
Nb5 12... c5 $2 {Missing the earth-shattering 12...d5!} (12... d5 $1 13. Bb3 (
13. Bxd5 {loses to} 13... c6) (13. exd5 13... Re8 {winning the queen.}) 13...
c6 14. Na3 14... f5 $19 {is crushing for Black.}) 13. h4 Be7 (13... Bh6 $5 {
I analysed} 14. g4 Bf4 15. Qf3 15... Qf6 $2 16. g5 $16 {
, missing the obvious 15...Qa5+!.}) 14. f4 a6 (14... d5 {
again, with similar ideas with 12...d5!} 15. exd5 (15. Bxd5 15... Qa5+ {
gaining a piece.}) 15... a6 16. Na3 (16. d6 Bxh4+ 17. Kf1 17... axb5 $19 {
gaining a piece.}) 16... b5 17. Bb3 c4 18. dxc4 18... Bxa3 {
with very good chances of a win!}) 15. Na3 Be6 16. O-O-O b5 17. Bb3 (17. Bxe6
fxe6 18. Qg4 $11 {with a probrably drawn position.}) 17... Qd7 {
with the idea of 18...Bg4!} 18. f5 Bxb3 19. axb3 Bf6 (19... a5 $5 20. g4 a4 21.
bxa4 Rxa4 22. g5 $13 {isn't so strong.}) 20. g4 Be5 21. Qf3 21... f6 $1 {
Locking things up.} 22. g5 Rad8 23. Qg4 Qe7 24. Rdg1 Rg8 25. h5 25... h6 $2 (
25... fxg5 $1 26. Qxg5 (26. Nb1 Bf4+ 27. Nd2 27... d5 $17) 26... Qxg5+ 27. Rxg5
27... Bf4+ $19 {and Black gains a rook for all his hard work.}) 26. gxh6 gxh6
27. Qf3 27... Rg5 $1 ({Originally I planned to play} 27... Rxg1+ 28. Rxg1 28...
Rg8 {and thought that he would play 29.Rg8+, but this isn't forced because of}
29. Rg6 $1 $16) 28. Rxg5 fxg5 29. Nb1 Bf4+ 30. Kd1 30... Qf6 {
I'm playing with a slight advantage here.} 31. Re1 Be5 (31... d5 $17 32. Qh3
Rf8 33. Qf3 dxe4 34. dxe4 34... c4 $17) 32. Nd2 Rg8 33. Rg1 Rg7 34. Ke2 Re7 35.
Rg4 $2 35... Bf4 {with an incidental threat of 36...Qf5!} 36. Rg1 36... Qe5 $2
(36... Qxf5 {I could of played this 3 times in a row!}) 37. Ra1 37... g4 $1 (
37... Qxf5 {I could of played this 3 times in a row!}) 38. Qg2 Bxd2 (38... Qxf5
{I could of played this 3 times in a row!}) 39. Kxd2 Qf4+ 40. Kd1 $1 {
All other moves lose here.} 40... Ra7 41. Ra3 g3 42. f6 Qh4 43. Qf3 43... Rf7
$2 (43... Qg5 $1 44. f7 Rxf7 45. Qxf7 g2 46. Qf8+ Kh7 47. Qf7+ Qg7 48. Qf5+ Kh8
49. Qc8+ 49... Qg8 $19 {with excellent winning chances.}) 44. e5 dxe5 45. Rxa6
Qf4 46. Qa8+ ({I looked at} 46. Qxf4 46... exf4 47. Ke2 47... g2 {
and assumed it was good for me when actually it wasn't.}) (46. Ke2 {
and White has no problems.}) 46... Kh7 47. Qe4+ $2 (47. Qd5 Rc7 48. Qg2 $15 {
and Black has a hard time to win.}) 47... Qxe4 48. dxe4 g2 0-1

jeffrei
14-08-2004, 08:12 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 3: DH Tigerstyle vs Bosnia 1 (1.5-2.5)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.06
Round: 3.1
White: Wallis, Chris
Black: Dizdaravic, Mehmedalija
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: B07
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 1970
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 126
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 3... g6 {THE PIRC DEFENCE} 4. Be3 c6 5. Qd2 5... Qa5
$5 {Looking through my database before the game I realised that Dizdarevic was
fond of ...Qd8-a5 sallies in the Pirc. However, I had no way of predicting
this exact line.} (5... b5 {is usually played.}) 6. Nf3 ({If} 6. O-O-O {, then}
6... b5 {is troublesome for White.}) 6... Bg7 (6... Ng4 {is well met by} 7. Bg5
{, when the knight has gone to the side for no good reason.}) 7. h3 {This move
h as been played by 2600 GM Joel Benjamin. It's a useful move which prevents
both ...Nf6-g4 and ...Bc8-g4. White also declares his intention to castle
kingside. h2-h3 does not fit in with queenside castling and a quick attack on
the kingside.} (7. O-O-O {would again be risking too much:} 7... b5 {
, and Black has a very fast attack.}) 7... a6 $146 (7... Nbd7 8. Bd3 O-O 9. O-O
e5 10. a4 Re8 11. Rfd1 exd4 12. Nxd4 Nc5 13. Bf1 Qc7 14. f3 a5 15. Nde2 Bf8 16.
Kh1 Be6 17. Nf4 Bd7 18. Qf2 Ne6 19. Nfe2 Bg7 20. Rd2 d5 21. Rad1 dxe4 22. Bb6
e3 23. Bxe3 Nd5 24. Nxd5 cxd5 25. b3 Bc6 26. Nd4 Nxd4 27. Bxd4 Bxd4 28. Rxd4
Re5 29. f4 Re4 30. Bd3 Rxd4 31. Qxd4 Re8 32. Rf1 Qe7 33. Rf3 Qe1+ 34. Kh2 Qd1
35. Re3 Rxe3 36. Qxe3 Qa1 37. h4 Qf6 38. Kg3 d4 39. Qe1 b6 40. Bc4 h6 41. Qe2
Kf8 42. Qg4 Ke7 43. Qc8 Bd7 44. Qc7 Qf5 45. Kh2 Qf6 46. Kg3 Qf5 47. Kh2 Qf6 48.
Kg3 {1/2-1/2 Benjamin,J-McNab,C/Bled 2002/EXT 2003 (48)}) 8. Bd3 Nbd7 9. Ne2 $6
{This move was played to enable c2-c3, propping up the pawn on d4 against
possible ...c6-c5 pushes.} ({The reason the move I played was dubious is that
there was a much better alternative,} 9. Bh6 $1 {
, which lands Black in very serious trouble. Castling would be dangerous, so}
9... Bxh6 (9... O-O 10. O-O-O {
, and White has a faster attack than his opponent.}) 10. Qxh6 {, and Black has
to find some way to castle queenside. Of course, it would be suicide to leave
his king in the centre.}) 9... Qxd2+ 10. Bxd2 (10. Nxd2 {, intending the
advance f2-f4, was an interesting alternative. However, I thought that the
knight really belonged at f3. It cannot go back there if White's intention is
f2-f4:} 10... O-O 11. f4 c5 12. c3 12... b6 {
, and the pressure on e4 forces the White knight to remain where it is.}) 10...
O-O 11. O-O b5 12. a4 Bb7 13. Ng3 Nb6 14. b3 {This move is perhaps not very
good. It mantains the tension between the White a- and Black b-pawns, but it
opens the long diagonal for the bishop on g7. I realized this shortcoming, but
didn't like the look of 14 axb5.} (14. axb5 14... cxb5 {, when Black has the
c-file opened up for him, and, more importantly, the bishop on b7 is released.
Still, this was a better choice. White might have a slight advantage.}) 14...
Nfd7 {
This was expected. Black prepares the c6-c5 advance by releasing his g7-bishop.
} 15. Bc3 {This doesn't look like a very good idea. White doesn't have time to
transfer his bishop to the long diagonal, and it doesn't achieve much, either.}
(15. c4 {was the other move I considered, but I thought that it weakened the
long diagonal too much, as the pawn cannot defend d4 after this. After} 15...
bxc4 16. bxc4 c5 17. Rab1 17... a5 {, Black has an excellent position.}) 15...
Rac8 (15... c5 {would be premature: White has} 16. axb5 axb5 17. Bxb5 {.}) 16.
Rfe1 Rfe8 17. a5 $6 {This was criticized severely by my opponent during the
post-mortem, who said he thought that his position might even be winning now!
With good defence from White, however, this is probably not true. Still, Black
definitely has the advantage. This is a good example of a 'down-trend' (read
Yermolinsky's book!). White's position is getting worse.} 17... Na8 18. Bb2 (
18. e5 $2 {
was the move I was hoping to play at move 17, but then I realized that} 18...
c5 $1 {would be very strong.}) 18... c5 19. c3 (19. c4 {
was the other move I was considering. It was rejected because of} 19... bxc4
20. Bxc4 cxd4 21. Bxd4 Bxd4 22. Nxd4 22... Ne5 {.}) 19... Nc7 20. Re2 Ne6 21.
Rd2 21... h5 $6 {This is the move which lets me, ages later, to draw the game!
It was better to leave this pawn at home, with} (21... d5 {
, when after my planned} 22. e5 {, Black has} 22... f6 23. Re1 fxe5 24. dxe5
24... Red8 {, with the advantage.} ({or} 24... Rf8 {, also with the advantage.}
)) 22. Re1 Rc7 23. Ne2 {Depriving the e6-knight of the f4-square.} 23... Rec8
24. Rc1 $2 {
Blundering the exchange - I'm not going to claim it was a clever trap!} (24. d5
{was a move I was about to play, and would indeed be a lot better. After} 24...
Nef8 25. c4 Bxb2 26. Rxb2 26... b4 {
, the position will probably wind up as a draw.}) 24... Bh6 $2 {This is bad,
because White actually gets some dangerous compensation for the exchange.} (
24... d5 $1 {
would have been much better, when White will not be able to hold on.}) 25. d5 {
This was necessary - I had to make sure that Black had absolutely no way of
progressing on the queenside in order topullthisoff!} 25... Nd8 (25... Ng7 {
would have left Black's position in a less cramped state, and also would have
made the migration of his pieces to the kingside a lot easier.}) 26. c4 26...
b4 $2 {This just makes it easy for White.} ({Maybe the text was played out of
a wish to keep the d3-bishop completely bad. However, after} 26... bxc4 27.
Bxc4 {, the additional open line (down the b-file) would make it slightly more
difficult for White.}) 27. Rf1 {Very good. Getting over the horror of losing
the exchange, I begin to look forward to some fun on the kingside.} 27... Bxd2
28. Nxd2 Ne5 29. Bc2 {Black's strategy is simple: he must get his pieces over
to the kingside, and he must do this as soon as possible (so that he doesn't
get mated!).} 29... Rb8 30. f4 Nd7 31. e5 ({Equally good was} 31. f5 {
, but, down to my last few minutes, I was concerned about} 31... g5 {
, when my kingside play appears to have been stopped. White has, however,} 32.
h4 $1 {, when he gets sufficient compensation for the exchange.}) 31... Bc8 32.
Ne4 Nb7 (32... dxe5 33. fxe5 {would of course be suicidal. White would have
every reason to play for a win after this.}) 33. exd6 Nxd6 34. Nxd6 exd6 35.
Ng3 $6 (35. f5 $1 {was better, immediately posing problems. White would have
more than enough compensation for the exchange after this.}) 35... f5 $1 36.
Re1 Nf8 37. Nf1 Kf7 38. Nd2 {Around here I devised my drawing plan. I would
simply bring my knight to f3,my king to f2, bishop to d3, and rook to d1, then
challenge Black to make progress.} 38... Re7 39. Rd1 {The reason I wanted to
keep my rook on the board was that I thought Black's manoeuvre ...
Nd7-f6-g8-h6-f7-d8-b7 might win the exposed pawn on a5. This would not have
been possible, however, as my bishop could eliminate this knight when it
reaches f6. Keeping rooks on the board does not make it any more difficult to
draw, however.} 39... Bd7 40. Nf3 Nh7 41. Kf2 Rbe8 (41... Rg8 {
, with the idea of following up with ...Nh7-f6, is simply met by} 42. h4 {. If}
42... Nf6 {, then} 43. Ng5+ Kg7 44. Nh7 Kxh7 45. Bxf6 Ree8 46. Bg5 {is an easy
draw for White, who just needs to swap off rooks, and then play Bc2-d3-c2.})
42. Bd3 Kg8 43. Rd2 Re4 44. g3 R4e7 45. Rd1 Rf8 46. Rd2 Nf6 47. Bxf6 Rxf6 48.
h4 Rf8 49. Re2 Rfe8 50. Rxe7 Rxe7 51. Bc2 Kg7 52. Bd3 Kf6 53. Ng5 Be8 54. Bc2
Bf7 55. Bd3 Bg8 56. Bc2 Rb7 57. Bd3 Rc7 58. Be2 (58. Bc2 $2 {
would have been met by} 58... Bxd5 $1 59. cxd5 59... c4 {
, when Black would probably have won in my time trouble.}) 58... Rc8 59. Bd3
Rc7 60. Be2 Re7 61. Bd3 Rc7 62. Be2 Rc8 63. Bd3 Rc7 1/2-1/2

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.06
Round: 3.3
White: Lin, Zhigen
Black: Kondzic, Ferid
Result: 1-0
ECO: B01
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1989
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 111
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 1... d5 {THE SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 2... Qxd5 {The Scandinavian
Defence, this opening has increased dramatically in popularity in the last few
decades.} 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 5... Bg4 $6 {
This move is alright but White has the chance to gain the advantage.} ({
I expected} 5... c6 {.}) 6. h3 Bxf3 (6... Bh5 7. g4 Bg6 8. Ne5 {
and then the idea of h4-h5.}) 7. Qxf3 c6 8. Bc4 (8. Bd2 {
seems to be normal here.}) 8... e6 9. O-O Qc7 10. Ne4 $146 ({I didn't play} 10.
Bf4 {because of} 10... Bd6 {.} (10... Qb6 $5 11. Rfd1 Qxb2 12. Rab1 Qxc2 13.
Rxb7 $18)) 10... Nxe4 11. Qxe4 11... Be7 $2 (11... Nd7 {
was expected, after which I would've played} 12. c3 {.}) 12. Bf4 Bd6 13. Bxd6
Qxd6 14. f4 $1 ({I looked at} 14. c3 {but I thought it was too drawish.}) 14...
Nd7 15. f5 e5 16. dxe5 Qxe5 ({Obviosuly} 16... Nxe5 {was expected.}) 17. Rfe1
Qxe4 18. Rxe4+ Kd8 (18... Kf8 {I planned to play} 19. Rae1 {and after} (19. Rd1
$16) 19... f6 20. Re7 Ne5 21. R1xe5 fxe5 22. Rxb7 {
and Black's position is undefendable.}) 19. Bxf7 Rf8 20. Be6 Nc5 21. Rd4+ Kc7
22. Rad1 Rfd8 23. Rxd8 (23. b4 Rxd4 (23... Nxe6 24. fxe6 Rxd4 25. Rxd4 Rd8 26.
Rf4 $18) 24. Rxd4 Nxe6 25. fxe6 Re8 26. Rd7+ Kc8 27. Rxg7 Rxe6 28. Rxh7 $18)
23... Rxd8 24. Rxd8 Kxd8 25. Bg8 $1 {White quickly gains a tempo.} 25... h6 26.
g4 b6 27. h4 $2 {
This is probably the mistake here as it weakens the support of my pawn-chain.}
(27. Kf2 $1) 27... Ke7 28. Kf2 Kf6 29. Kf3 h5 30. g5+ $5 {
Obviously I thought this was winning except it wasn't.} (30. Be6 {
I also saw, but I rejected it because of} 30... hxg4+ 31. Kxg4 Nxe6 32. fxe6
Kxe6 33. Kg5 Kf7 34. h5 Kg8 35. Kf5 Kh7 36. Kg5 $11) 30... Kxf5 31. Bf7 g6 32.
Be8 Ne6 33. c3 33... c5 {From here on I can't remember the move order but I'm
sure it is transpositional.} 34. Bc6 Ke5 35. Be4 35... Nf8 $2 (35... Nf4 $11)
36. Bd3 Kd5 37. Ke3 Ke5 38. Be4 a5 39. a3 Kd6 40. Bd3 Ke5 41. Bc2 Kd5 42. Bb3+
c4 43. Ba4 Kc5 44. Be8 Kd5 45. Bf7+ Ke5 46. Bxc4 Kf5 47. Kf3 Nd7 48. Bd3+ Ke6
49. Kf4 Ne5 50. Be4 Kd6 51. Bc2 Kd5 52. b3 Kd6 53. Be4 b5 54. Ke3 a4 55. bxa4
bxa4 56. Kd4 1-0

jeffrei
19-08-2004, 07:09 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 4: DH Tigerstyle vs BH New Life 1 (3.5-0.5)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.13
Round: 4.1
White: Wallis, Christopher
Black: Lojanica, Milenko
Result: 1-0
ECO: B40
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 2023
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 75
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 1... c5 {SICILIAN DEFENCE} 2. Nf3 e6 3. c3 {
SICILIAN DEFENCE: ALAPIN VARIATION (C3 SICILIAN)} 3... Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 (4... d5
{would probably have transposed to the game after} 5. exd5 Qxd5 (5... exd5 {
is possibly stronger, giving positions similar to those in a French Tarrasch
(1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Nd2 c5 4 exd5 exd5).}) 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 7... Nf6 {.}) 5.
cxd4 d5 6. exd5 (6. e5 6... Qb6 {transposes into a variation of the French
which isn't considered very dangerous for White. I definitely didn't want this.
}) (6. Nc3 {was another move I seriously considered. However, after} 6... dxe4
(6... Nf6 7. e5 Ne4 8. Bd3 {looks good for White.}) 7. Nxe4 {, I was uncertain
about wether my piece activity would compensate for the isolated d-pawn. I
thought that} 7... Qb6 {, hitting b2 and making sure the queen keeps the
pressure on d4 even after Bc8-d7, might be a good move.}) 6... Qxd5 (6... exd5
{leads to a drawish position, and is what I was worried about. White has only
a slight edge.}) 7. Bd3 (7. Be3 {
would have probably transposed to the main line of this variation after} 7...
Nf6 {, when} 8. Nc3 8... Qd6 {reaches an interesting position, in which
White's piece activity probably slightly outweighs Black's structural
advantage (the isolated d-pawn).}) 7... Nf6 (7... Nxd4 {loses to} 8. Nxd4 Qxd4
9. Bb5+ {.}) 8. O-O 8... Bd6 $6 (8... Be7 {, leaving open both d6 and d8 for
the queen, is better. Black should try to have his queen putting pressure on
the d4-pawn. Also, it is less exposed to any sort of attack on d8.}) 9. Nc3 Qh5
(9... Qa5 {was perhaps a bit better. The queen might want to drop back to b6
at some stage.}) 10. Ne4 {This doesn't force the exchange of knights - in fact,
Black probably should not have played} 10... Nxe4 {. The problem is that White
now gets in the d4-d5 push without any problems, securing the advantage.} (
10... Be7 {looks better to me. After} 11. Nxf6+ Bxf6 (11... gxf6 $5 {
, intending to place the rook down the g-file, is interesting.}) 12. Re1 O-O (
12... Bxd4 13. Nxd4 Qxd1 14. Rxd1 Nxd4 15. Be3 {gives White truck-loads of
compensation-he has the two bishops, his rooks will soon be active while his
opponent's are on their home squares, and Black's c8-bishop is miserable.}) (
12... Nxd4 13. Nxd4 {doesn't turn out well after} 13... Qxd1 14. Rxd1 Bxd4 15.
Bb5+ {.}) 13. Be3 {, the position looks equal. Black does have the weakness on
d4 to target, but White has an energetic position.}) (10... Bc7 {
, keeping the bishop pointing at White's king, also looks interesting. After}
11. Re1 (11. Nxf6+ 11... gxf6 {gives Black dangerous attacking possibilities.})
11... Nd5 12. Bd2 {
, White probably has sufficient piece activity for the isolated d-pawn.}) 11.
Bxe4 11... Bd7 {This allows d4-d5, and was therefore not very good.} (11... O-O
{was better. White seems to have enough activity for his structural weakness
(the isolated d-pawn), and has a number of moves here:} 12. h3 (12. Re1) (12.
Be3) (12. Bxc6 12... bxc6 {is probably what Black was worried about, but he
must have a good game here, due to the two bishops, which have a pretty open
position to work in.})) 12. d5 {With the isolated d-pawn's disappearence,
things look a bit grim for Black, as the activity of White's pieces should
give him a sizable advantage.} 12... Ne5 $2 {
A very serious tactical error. I was hoping for this!} (12... exd5 {
was expected.} 13. Qxd5 (13. Bxd5 {
was what I was going to play at first, but then I saw that in the variation}
13... O-O-O 14. Bxf7 {
, Black is not obliged to take the bishop straight away, and can play} 14...
Bxh2+ (14... Qxf7 15. Qxd6 Bg4 16. Qg3 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Qxf3 18. gxf3 {
also worried me a bit.}) 15. Nxh2 15... Qxf7 {, with the advantage.}) 13...
Qxd5 14. Bxd5 {, and I thought that White would have the advantage after} 14...
O-O 15. Be3 {, and he does. His rooks can move to the d and c files on the
next two moves, and his bishops are in excellent positions.}) 13. Bf4 $1 13...
exd5 ({Obviously,} 13... Nxf3+ 14. Bxf3 Qf5 15. Bxd6 {cannot be played.}) (
13... f6 {loses a piece to} 14. dxe6 Bxe6 15. Qxd6) (13... Nc4 {loses to} 14.
dxe6 Bxe6 15. Bxd6 Rd8 16. Qa4+ {.}) 14. Bxd5 (14. Qxd5 {
would be a blunder. After} 14... Nxf3+ 15. Bxf3 Qxd5 16. Bxd5 16... Bxf4 {
, White has just lost a piece.}) ({
I wasted a lot of time trying to fathom the complications of} 14. Bxe5 14...
dxe4 15. Qxd6 exf3 16. Bxg7 {
I wasn't very certain about this. However, it does seem to win for White:}
16... Qg5 (16... fxg2 17. Rfe1+ Be6 18. Rxe6+ {
was seen by me. White should mate soon.}) (16... Qg4 {
is the move I was uncertain about. After} 17. Qe5+ Kd8 18. g3 18... Qh3 {
, I thought that I might be in trouble. However, White wins brilliantly:} (
18... Rg8 19. Qa5+ b6 20. Qd5 {is losing for Black.}) 19. Qa5+ Kc8 (19... b6
20. Qg5+ Kc8 21. Rfc1+ Kb7 22. Qd5+ Ka6 23. Qd3+ Bb5 24. Qa3+ Kb7 25. Qxf3+ {
is won for White.}) 20. Rfc1+ Bc6 21. Rxc6+ bxc6 22. Qa6+ Kc7 (22... Kd8 23.
Rd1+ {leads to mate in a few moves.}) 23. Be5+ Kd7 (23... Kd8 24. Rd1+ Ke7 25.
Qb7+ Ke6 26. Qxc6+ Kf5 27. Qf6+ Kg4 28. Rd4+ Kh5 29. Rh4+ {
and White mates soon.}) 24. Rd1+ {
, and the Black king will not survive for long in the open.}) 17. Rfe1+ Be6 (
17... Kd8 {loses to} 18. Bf6+ {.}) 18. Rxe6+ fxe6 19. Qxe6+ Qe7 20. Qg4 Rg8 21.
Qh5+ Kd8 22. Qd5+ {, and White is winning.}) (14. Nxe5 $2 {
leaves White with almost nothing after} 14... Qxd1 15. Rfxd1 (15. Raxd1 {
, which I thought would not enable me to regain the pawn, is also fine:} 15...
Bxe5 16. Bxe5 dxe4 17. Bxg7 Rg8 18. Be5 18... Bh3 {
Here, I thought that I would be losing a pawn. I missed} 19. Bg3 {
, when White has a slight advantage.}) 15... Bxe5 16. Bxe5 dxe4 17. Bxg7 Rg8
18. Be5 18... Rc8 {.}) 14... Bg4 (14... Nd3 {was a peculiar alternative. After}
15. Qxd3 15... Bxf4 {, White wins with} 16. Rfe1+ Kf8 17. Bxb7 Rd8 18. Qa3+ Kg8
19. Qe7 {.}) 15. Bxe5 Bxe5 (15... Bxf3 {loses to} 16. Bxf3 {
, when if Black plays} 16... Qxe5 {, his queen is lost after} 17. Re1 {.}) 16.
Qa4+ (16. Nxe5 Bxd1 17. Bxf7+ Qxf7 18. Nxf7 Kxf7 (18... O-O 19. Nh6+ {
forces Black to create a structural weakness by capturing the White knight.})
19. Raxd1 {would have given Black some drawing chances.}) (16. Bxf7+ {
was another move I considered, but stopped calculating when I noticed Qa4+. It
would transpose to thelineaboveafter} 16... Qxf7 17. Nxe5 Bxd1 18. Nxf7 Kxf7
19. Raxd1 {.}) 16... Kf8 $2 ({If} 16... Bd7 {, White plays} 17. Qe4 f6 18. Rfe1
{
, with a completely won position. This was, however, the lesser evil for Black.
}) 17. Nxe5 Qxe5 18. Bxb7 {White has simply won a piece now.} 18... Rb8 (18...
Re8 19. Qxg4 19... Qb5 {was expected. White is easily winning, however, after}
20. Qf3 Qxb2 21. Bd5 {.}) 19. Qxg4 h5 (19... Rxb7 {loses the rook to} 20. Qc8+
Qe8 21. Qxb7 {.}) 20. Qd7 Rh6 21. Rac1 Re6 (21... Qxb2 {
gives White a quick win with} 22. Rc8+ Rxc8 23. Qxc8+ Ke7 24. Rd1 {.}) 22. Rc7
Re7 (22... Rf6 23. Rc8+ Rxc8 24. Qxc8+ Ke7 25. Rd1 {
forces Black to give up his queen to prevent mate.}) 23. Qxe7+ Qxe7 24. Rxe7
Kxe7 25. Bd5 Rxb2 26. Re1+ Kf6 27. g3 h4 28. Kg2 Rd2 (28... h3+ 29. Kxh3 Rxf2
30. Re3 {would force the exchange of rooks, or else Black loses more material.}
) 29. Bb3 hxg3 30. hxg3 Rd7 31. Re4 g5 32. Kf3 Kg6 33. Ke3 f5 34. Re6+ Kh5 35.
Rf6 Kg4 36. Be6 Re7 37. Kd4 Kh3 38. Bxf5+ 1-0

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.13
Round: 4.3
White: Lin, Zhigen
Black: Lojanica, Zdravko
Result: 1-0
ECO: C87
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1849
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 91
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {THE SPANISH GAME (RUY LOPEZ) The Ruy Lopez, one
of the most respected openings of all time.} 3... a6 {
Black follows the most popular continuation.} ({I was expecting} 3... d6 {
, after which I would've played} 4. d4 $1) 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O d6 (5... Nxe4 {
is the Open Ruy Lopez.}) 6. Re1 Be7 ({Black should've played} 6... b5 {
first, after which I would've played} 7. Bb3 $14) 7. c3 7... b5 {
Black has lost a tempo now.} 8. Bc2 O-O (8... Bg4 {was expected} 9. d3 {
and White has the plan of h3 and Nd2-Nf1-Ng3.}) 9. h3 h6 10. d4 10... Nh7 {
After this move I would never have expected 11...Ng5, I though Black has a
plan of 11... f5.} (10... Bb7 $11 {Black has a playable position.}) 11. Nbd2
Ng5 12. Nxg5 (12. d5 {was missed} 12... Na5 13. b4 13... Nb7 $14) 12... Bxg5
13. Nf3 Bxc1 14. Rxc1 (14. Qxc1 $14 {is an option, with the idea of Qc1-Qe3.})
14... Qf6 15. Qd2 $2 {
I had played too fast and missed the cheap tactic 15...Bh3 and 16...Bh3.} 15...
Rd8 $2 (15... Bxh3 $17 {and Black is a pawn up for good.}) 16. Red1 $2 16...
Bxh3 $1 17. d5 17... Bxg2 $4 ({I aimed for} 17... Na5 18. Nxe5 Bxg2 19. Kxg2
19... Qxe5 $19 {.}) 18. Kxg2 Ne7 19. Ng1 Ng6 20. Qe3 Nf4+ 21. Kf1 g5 22. Ne2 h5
23. Nxf4 exf4 ({I was expecting} 23... gxf4 {
but after a while of thought, I thought it looked silly.}) 24. Qd4 Kg7 25. f3 {
Keeping the pin, I wanted Black to take my queen so I can have an open c-file.}
25... g4 26. Kf2 g3+ 27. Kg2 Rh8 28. Rh1 Rae8 29. Qxf6+ (29. Rh4 $1 {
and Black is forced to lose a pawn!}) ({I had looked at} 29. Qxf6+ 29... Kxf6
30. Rh4 {but missed the winning 29.Rh4!}) 29... Kxf6 30. Bd3 h4 31. Rh3 Rb8 32.
b4 c5 33. dxc6 Rbc8 (33... Rb6 {was the best move} 34. a4 bxa4 35. Bc2 Rxc6 36.
Bxa4 36... Rcc8 $18 {.}) 34. a4 Rxc6 35. axb5 axb5 36. Bxb5 Rb6 37. Bc4 Rc8 38.
Bd5 Rxb4 ({I expected} 38... Kg5 39. Rhh1 39... Rc7 {
and it is more difficult for White to gain the win.}) 39. Rxh4 Rb2+ 40. Kg1 Ke7
41. Rxf4 Rh8 42. Rxf7+ Ke8 43. Ra1 Rb8 44. Kg2 Rg8 45. Ra2 Rg5 46. Rh7 1-0

jeffrei
03-09-2004, 12:54 AM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 5: BH Upwardly Mobile vs DH Tigerstyle (1-3)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.20
Round: 5.1
White: Aghamalyan, Armen
Black: Wallis, Christopher
Result: 0-1
ECO: B01
WhiteElo: 2150
BlackElo: 1642
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 84
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 1... d5 {THE SCANDINAVIAN DEFENCE} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5.
Nf3 c6 6. Ne5 {This was tried by Kasparov against Anand in their PCA World
Championship Match, in 1995 (see below). White soon deviates, to my relief (I
don't know this line all that well).} (6. Bc4 {is the normal move. See my game
against Dizdaravic in the Victorian Open for this:} 6... Bf5 7. Bd2 {
transposes.}) 6... Be6 {Believe it or not, this is the theoretical reason 6
Ne5 isn't a particularly lethal move. The bishop develops to a bizarre square,
but here it does quite a bit - it takes the sting out of White's Bf1-c4 or
Ne5-c4, and makes g2-g4 ineffective. Also, White doesn't have Nf3-g5, hitting
the bishop. If you're still not convinced, then there's another reason why
it's good: Anand played it!} ({If Black plays the routine Scandinavian move,}
6... Bf5 {then g2-g4 may be annoying at some point. ,}) 7. Be2 {This looked
like a bit of a timid development of the bishop to me, and indeed it doesn't
seem to be particularly good.} (7. Bd3 {
was Kasparov's choice against Anand. Their game went} 7... g6 8. f4 Nbd7 9. O-O
Bg7 10. Kh1 Bf5 11. Bc4 e6 12. Be2 h5 13. Be3 Rd8 14. Bg1 14... O-O {, when Ana
nd had a fine position out of the opening (Kasparov-Anand, New York 1995)}) (7.
Bc4 {isn't a good try for White:} 7... Bxc4 8. Nxc4 Qd8 9. O-O 9... e6 {
looks equal.}) 7... Nbd7 (7... Ne4 {
was what my opponent liked in the post-mortem. We considered the pawn sac} 8.
O-O {to be best, simply missing that after} 8... Nxc3 9. bxc3 {
, Black needn't take the pawn, and can just play} 9... Nd7 {
, with a better position.}) (7... Nd5 8. Nc4 ({or} 8. Bd2 {.}) 8... Qc7 9. Ne4
{looks pretty good for White.}) (7... g6 {looks interesting. Then,} 8. O-O 8...
Bg7 {is equal.}) 8. Nxd7 (8. f4 O-O-O 9. O-O 9... g6 {
would have been a nice position for Black.} 10. Bf3 {is met by} 10... Qb6 {.})
8... Nxd7 $146 {A novelty, but probably not a very good one.} (8... Bxd7 {
, followed by ...Bd7-f5 and ...e7-e6 with a typical solid Scandinavian
position, looked good to me, but I wanted something more! This didn't turn out
to be good judgment on my part.} 9. O-O (9. Bd3 Bf5 10. Bxf5 Qxf5 11. O-O 11...
e6 {is excellent for Black. He has a slight advantage.}) 9... Bf5 10. Bf4 10...
e6 {and Black has the advantage. This is a very easy position for him,
compared to what Black usually gets in a Scandinavian, and I suspect this has
a lot to do with the unusual development of the White bishops.}) 9. O-O g6 (
9... Bf5 {was another idea I considered. This is probably about equal.} 10. a3
(10. Bf4 e6 11. a3 {transposes.}) 10... e6 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Qd2 12... Bf6 {
is what might have happened. Black is doing very well.}) 10. Ne4 {At this momen
t, I glanced at the other boards, and saw that they were something like 20-30
moves in already, while I was still on the tenth move! After the game, my
opponent explained that he spent a lot of time looking at Be2-g4. With the
move played, White takes advantage of my odd placement of the bishop.} (10. Bg4
{was pointed out by my opponent in the post-mortem. We looked at} 10... Bxg4
11. Qxg4 Nf6 (11... Bg7 {
is better, but White is still doing reasonably well after} 12. Be3 {
. Perhaps the position is equal after} 12... Nf6 13. Qe2 13... O-O {.}) 12. Qe2
{. We both thought White was better. Black, however, can play} 12... O-O-O {
, with not such a bad position after all.} ({We didn't like the look of} 12...
Bg7 13. Re1 13... e6 {.})) 10... h6 ({If} 10... Bg7 {, then} 11. Ng5 {
looked pretty annoying. Black has plenty of tries here, which leadtointerestin
g play:} 11... Rd8 $5 (11... Nf8) (11... Bf5 12. g4 f6)) 11. c4 {Around about
now, I thought things weren't looking very good for me. The position isn't as
bad for Black as I thought, but it definitely isn't good.} (11. Bg4 {
was another move we looked at in the post-mortem. This is not so good, however:
} 11... f5 12. Qe2 (12. Bh3 12... Bc4 {
ended our discussion of this particular variation.}) 12... fxg4 13. Nd6+ exd6
14. Qxe6+ Kd8 15. Qxg6 15... h5 {, and White cannot really claim any
compensation for the piece: Black's king is safe enough.}) (11. Re1 Bg7 12. Bg4
{is a line we looked at in the post-mortem for a while, but then realized that
the e1-rook was dropping after} 12... Bxg4 13. Qxg4 (13. Nd6+ 13... Kf8 {
changes nothing.} ({White can only hope for} 13... Kd8 $4 14. Nxb7+ Kc7 15.
Nxa5 Bxd1 16. Rxd1 {, when he is just a pawn up.})) 13... Qxe1#) 11... Bg7 (
11... O-O-O {looked much too dangerous. After} 12. a3 {
, the pawn storm is going to be very effective.}) 12. Bd2 Qb6 (12... Qa6 {
was considered by me, but I thought that} 13. d5 {was good.} 13... Bf5 14. Bc3
Bxc3 15. Nxc3 {is definitely in White's favour.}) 13. Bc3 Rd8 14. Qa4 $2 (14.
d5 {was a much better move for White.} 14... Bxc3 {
is forced (not a very good sign), and now:} 15. Nxc3 (15. bxc3 Ne5 16. Qd4 Qxd4
17. cxd4 cxd5 18. dxe5 18... dxe4 {and Black is just a pawn up.}) 15... cxd5
16. cxd5 Ne5 17. Re1 {looks very good for White. We did look at some
variations involving 14 d5 in the post-mortem, but I can't remember them
exactly. We reached the verdict that White is much better.}) 14... O-O $2 {
The bishop is just looking misplaced on e6.} (14... Bxd4 {was not overlooked.
This looked like it might be dangerous for Black, but White isn't actually
getting sufficient compensation for the pawn:} 15. Ba5 (15. Bxd4 Qxd4 16. Nc3 {
might be White's best try, but after} 16... O-O 17. Rfd1 Qb6 18. b4 18... c5 {
, he isn't getting quite enough play.}) (15. Rfd1 Bxc3 16. bxc3 $5 {
is another idea, but then} 16... a5 17. Rab1 Qc7 18. Ng3 18... O-O {
looks good for Black.}) 15... Qxb2 16. Bxd8 Qxe2 17. Rae1 Qd3 18. Bc7 {
is better for Black. The two bishops are worth a lot in this position.}) 15.
Rfd1 (15. Ba5 {wasn't a threat:} 15... Qxd4 {
was my opponent's preference in the post-mortem, and seems to be best:} (15...
Qa6 {was intended, and is very good for Black as well:} 16. Qa3 b6 17. Bb4 Qxa3
18. Bxa3 18... Rfe8 {and Black has the advantage! Still, I prefer 15...Qxd4
(which my opponent thought I was going to play).}) 16. Bxd8 Qxe4 17. Bxe7 (17.
Bf3 Qxc4 18. Qxc4 Bxc4 19. Bxe7 Re8 20. Rfe1 20... Bxb2 {
is a nightmarish position for White. After} 21. Rab1 Bc3 22. Rxb7 Bxe1 23. Rxd7
23... a5 {, Black will win with ease.}) 17... Qxe2 18. Bxf8 Nxf8 19. Rac1 19...
Qxb2 {and Black is winning.}) (15. Rad1 f5 16. Ng3 Qc7 17. Rfe1 Bf7 18. Qa3 {
looks like a very comfortable position for White.}) 15... Qc7 16. Rac1 (16.
Qxa7 $4 {just loses the queen to} 16... Ra8 {.}) (16. d5 Nb6 17. Qa5 cxd5 18.
Bxg7 Kxg7 19. cxd5 19... Bxd5 {
, and Black is a pawn up, for not much compensation.}) (16. Qa3 {was better.}
16... Nb6 17. b3 Nc8 18. Bf3 b6 19. Rac1 {looks a bit uncomfortable for Black.}
) 16... f5 $5 {It looked like I was just slowly being deprived of any active
plan, and so I lashed out. The idea is to get a quick e7-e5 in.} (16... Nb6 {
was better. I felt that a knight invasion to c5 might be possible, but this
can't happen for tactical reasons:} 17. Qb4 (17. Qa5 17... Qf4 {
is excellent for Black.}) 17... Qf4 {, and Black has taken the initiative.})
17. Ng3 (17. d5 $1 {was much better: Getting another two pieces attacking d5
is probably worthwile:} 17... Nb6 (17... fxe4 18. Bxg7 (18. dxe6 Bxc3 19. Rxc3
Nb6 20. Qb3 Qf4 21. Rf1 Rd2 22. Rc2 22... Rfd8 {looks pretty unclear - Black's
knight is completely cut off, but his major pieces are very active.}) 18...
Kxg7 19. dxe6 Qb6 20. exd7 (20. Rf1 Ne5 21. c5 Qxb2 22. Rc2 22... Rd4 $1 {
looks bad for White:} 23. Rxb2 Rxa4 24. Rfb1 b5 25. cxb6 25... axb6 {
, and White can't regain the pawn, as} 26. Bd1 {is met with} 26... Rd4 $1 27.
a4 (27. Rxb6 {drops the f-pawn to} 27... Rd2 28. R6b2 Rfxf2 29. Rxd2 29... Rxd2
{.}) 27... Nc4 {.}) 20... Qxf2+ 21. Kh1 Qxe2 22. Qxa7 {
The natural attacking move} (22. h3 {is the only strong alternative. Then,}
22... Rf2 ({Black can bail out with} 22... Rf3 {, forcing perpetual:} 23. Qb4 (
23. gxf3 Qxf3+ 24. Kg1 Qg3+ 25. Kh1 (25. Kf1 {is mated by} 25... Rf8+ 26. Ke2
Qf2#) 25... Qxh3+ 26. Kg1 26... Qg3+ {etc.}) 23... Rxh3+ 24. gxh3 Qf3+ 25. Kg1
Qg3+ 26. Kh1 Qxh3+ 27. Kg1 27... Qg3+ {etc.})) 22... Rf2 {
is the best here. White's tactic} 23. Qd4+ ({or} 23. Qc5 23... Kf7 24. Qxf2+
Qxf2 25. Rf1 25... Qf6 $1 {, transposing.}) 23... Kf7 (23... Kh7 $2 {
gives Black nothing after} 24. Qc5 {. His king is needed to defend the pawn, as
} 24... Rf7 {leaves Black in strife after} 25. Qb6 Rff8 26. h3 {.} 26... Rf3 {
is Black's only try, but he will find it difficult to defend the rook ending
after} 27. Re1 Qf2 28. Qxf2 Rxf2 29. Rcd1 e5 30. Rxe4 Rf7 31. Rxe5 Rfxd7 32.
Rxd7+ Rxd7 33. c5 {.}) 24. Qxf2+ {turns out to be a mistake.} (24. Re1 {
is better, but Black has the upper hand after} 24... Qxb2 25. Qxe4 Qf6 26. Qg4
26... Rf5 $1 (26... h5 27. Qh3 Rf5 28. Qd3 28... Qd6 {
does not appear to be an improvement.}) 27. Qd1 Qd6 28. Qe2 28... Rxd7 {.})
24... Qxf2 25. Rf1 25... Qf6 $1 {, and Black is just winning after} 26. Rce1 (
26. Rxf6+ exf6 27. Re1 27... f5 {is obviously not an improvement.}) 26... Rxd7
27. Kg1 Rd4 28. b3 Ke6 29. Rxf6+ 29... exf6 {.}) (17... Bf7 {
might be better, but} 18. Bxg7 Kxg7 19. Nc3 Nb6 20. Qa3 cxd5 21. cxd5 {
leaves Black with a miserable positon.}) (17... Bxc3 18. Nxc3 Nb6 19. Qa3 Bf7
20. dxc6 bxc6 21. Qc5 {is obviously much better for White.}) 18. Qb4 18... Be5
$1 (18... Bxd5 19. cxd5 fxe4 (19... Nxd5 {is a blunder, refuted by} 20. Bc4 $1)
20. Bxg7 (20. Qxe4 Bxc3 21. bxc3 (21. Rxc3 21... Qd6 {is fine for Black, as}
22. dxc6 {loses to} 22... Qxd1+ {.}) 21... Rd6 22. c4 (22. dxc6 22... Rxc6 {
is slightly better for White, who has} 23. Bf3 {.}) 22... Rdf6 23. Bf3 23...
Kh7 {looks a bit unclear, but White is probably going to get the advantage.})
20... Kxg7 21. dxc6 (21. Qxe4 Rf4 22. Qe3 22... Rxd5 {is better for Black.})
21... Rxd1+ 22. Bxd1 Qf4 23. Rc2 bxc6 24. Qxe7+ Rf7 25. Qc5 Rd7 26. Be2 {
appears to give White a clear advantage.}) (18... Bxc3 {isn't impressive:} 19.
Nxc3 Bf7 20. dxc6 bxc6 21. Qc5 {, and Black's position isn't enviable.}) 19.
dxe6 Bxh2+ (19... Rxd1+ 20. Rxd1 Bxh2+ 21. Kh1 fxe4 22. c5 Nd5 23. Qxe4 23...
Rf5 {is interesting. The position after 19...Bxh2+ without rooks on c1 or d8
is reached.} 24. Bg4 (24. g3 Bxg3 25. fxg3 Nxc3 26. bxc3 Qxg3 27. Qg4 Qxg4 28.
Bxg4 Rxc5 29. Rd7 Rxc3 30. Rxe7 h5 31. Bd1 (31. Re8+ Kg7 32. e7 {
doesn't work because of} 32... Kf7 {.} (32... hxg4 {loses to} 33. Rg8+ {.}))
31... Rc1 32. Rd7 32... Kf8 {and Black holds the draw.}) 24... Rg5 25. Qf3 $1
25... Qf4 26. g3 Qxf3+ 27. Bxf3 Nxc3 28. bxc3 Bxg3 29. fxg3 Rxg3 30. Rf1 {
gives White technical problems - in fact, the position is probably drawn.}) (
19... fxe4 20. Bxe5 Rxd1+ 21. Rxd1 Qxe5 22. Qxe7 22... e3 {(the only move)} 23.
f4 $1 23... Qxb2 (23... Qxf4 {loses to} 24. Rf1 {.}) 24. Rd8 $1 24... Qa1+ 25.
Bf1 Rxd8 26. Qxd8+ Kh7 27. Qc7+ Qg7 28. e7 e2 (28... Nc8 29. Qxc8 Qxe7 30. Be2
Qb4 31. Qd7+ Kg8 32. Bf1 {is won for White.}) 29. Bxe2 Qd4+ 30. Kf1 {
, and Black has no perpetual:} 30... Qa1+ 31. Kf2 Qd4+ 32. Kf3 Qc3+ 33. Kg4 h5+
34. Kg5 Qg7 35. Qe5 Qh6+ 36. Kh4 {.}) 20. Kh1 fxe4 21. c5 Nd5 (21... Qf4 22. g3
(22. cxb6 {is a mistake:} 22... Qh4 {.} 23. Bg4) 22... Qxf2 23. Qxe4 Kh7 24.
Bh5 Rxd1+ 25. Rxd1 Rf5 26. Bxg6+ Kxg6 27. g4 Qf3+ 28. Qxf3 Rxf3 29. cxb6 {
is winning for White.}) 22. Qxe4 Rf5 23. g3 $1 23... Bxg3 24. fxg3 Qxg3 25. Rd3
{, and White should win from this position. The startling} (25. Qg4 Qxg4 26.
Bxg4 Rf2 27. Rf1 Rxf1+ 28. Rxf1 28... h5 {is not as clear.}) 25... Nxc3 $3 {
is met by} 26. Qxf5 $3 (26. Rxd8+ Kh7 27. Rxc3 Qe1+ 28. Kh2 (28. Kg2 Rf2+ 29.
Kh3 {transposes.}) 28... Rf2+ 29. Kh3 Rxe2 (29... Qg1 {The defensive task
facing White looks impossible. The first threat is Rh2 mate. Okay, 30.Qe5,
then what? Then 30...Qg2+ 31 Kh4 g5+, and White gets mated soon. So, White
needs to play both Bf3 and Qe5 at once.} 30. Rh8+ $3 30... Kxh8 31. Qe5+ Kh7
32. Bf3 {After that ingenious defence, a perpetual check is likely.}) 30. Qf3
Rf2 31. Qd1 Qe4 32. Rg3 Rf4 33. Rg4 Qf5 34. Rh8+ $1 {(again!)} 34... Kxh8 35.
Qd8+ Qf8 36. Qxf8+ Rxf8 37. Rxg6 Rf2 38. Rxh6+ Kg7 39. Rh4 Rxb2 40. Rf4 Rxa2
41. Rf7+ 41... Kg6 {is an easy win for Black, as} 42. Rxe7 {is met by} 42...
Kf6 {.}) 26... Qh4+ 27. Kg2 (27. Qh3 Qxh3+ 28. Rxh3 28... Nxe2 {
isn't bad for Black, who can certainly hold the draw.}) 27... gxf5 28. Rxd8+
Kg7 29. Rxc3 Qe4+ 30. Bf3 {, and White's huge material advantage is decisive.
17 d5 was, therefore, a huge improvement on White's play. If Black was a
computer playing at 8 hours a move, he would have been forced to go in for a
large disadvantage with the alternatives earlier on.}) 17... Bf7 (17... f4 18.
Ne4 Bf5 19. Bf3 {looks very good for White.}) 18. Bb4 (18. d5 Nb6 19. Qa3 Bxc3
20. Rxc3 cxd5 21. cxd5 21... Qe5 {would be good for Black, who has good
chances of either rounding up the d5-pawn, in return, perhaps, for the a7-pawn,
or forcing White's whole army to defend it.}) 18... Nb6 {
My idea of e7-e5 isn't as effective as I thought it would be.} (18... Rfe8 {
was another move I considered, but I thought the text move would simply get me
the advantage, and that this was not necessary.}) 19. Qa3 Rxd4 20. Bxe7 Re8 21.
c5 $4 {This is a terrible blunder. Black just picks up the pawns, with} (21.
Rxd4 Bxd4 22. Bd6 {was what I expected. I wasn't really sure how to continue.}
22... Qd8 {gives Black an advantage.}) 21... Qxe7 22. Rxd4 $6 (22. cxb6 Qxa3
23. bxa3 23... axb6 {was better, as it both avoids losing a piece and also
gives Black a bad queenside structure. It doesn't change the evaluation,
however - Black is winning.}) 22... Bxd4 23. cxb6 Qxa3 24. bxa3 Bxb6 25. Bd3
Rd8 26. Bf1 Rd2 27. Ne2 Bxa2 28. h4 Bb3 29. Kh1 Rd1 (29... Bxf2 30. Nf4 30...
Bf7 {was better, but I wanted to simplify, and rule out any chance that I
might blunder.}) 30. Rxd1 Bxd1 31. Nf4 Bc7 (31... Bxf2 32. Nxg6 Kf7 33. Ne5+
33... Ke6 {was more accurate.}) 32. g3 Bxf4 33. Bc4+ Kg7 34. gxf4 Kf6 35. Kg2
b5 36. Bd3 a6 37. f3 c5 38. Kf2 Ke6 39. Ke3 39... Kd5 {
After this, I realized with horror that I had allowed} 40. h5 {. This doesn't
really offer White chances of saving the game, but it does make my task a bit
more difficult.} 40... gxh5 41. Bxf5 b4 42. axb4 42... cxb4 {White lost on
time. The final position isn't very interesting. As I thought, White has no
counterplay.} (42... cxb4 43. Be4+ Ke6 44. f5+ Kf6 45. Kd2 45... Bb3 {
is an easy win for Black.} (45... Bxf3 46. Bxf3 Kxf5 47. Bxh5 47... Kg5 {
also looks like a win for Black.})) 0-1

[Event "Winter Interclub"]
[Site "BHCC"]
[Date "2004.08.20"]
[Round "5.3"]
[White "Rothlisberger, Marcel"]
[Black "Lin, Zhigen"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D13"]
[WhiteElo "1892"]
[BlackElo "1644"]
[Annotator "Zhigen Lin"]
[PlyCount "136"]
[EventDate "2004"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 {QUEEN'S GAMBIT} 2... c6 {QUEEN'S GAMBIT: SLAV DEFENCE The
Slav Defence, one of the openings that needs least memory to learn.} 3. cxd5 {
I used to play the Stonewall (as Black) with a structure of c6, d5, e6 and f5.
I used the Slav to transpose to that but later I changed to the Queen's Gambit
Declined to transpose because of 3.cxd5 being so popular and annoying.} 3...
cxd5 {QUEEN'S GAMBIT: SLAV DEFENCE: EXCHANGE VARIATION} 4. Nc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 {
Though it is transpositional, 4.Nf3 (then 5.Nc3) is much less popular.} 5...
Nf6 6. e3 {To this point I thought I has ran out of theory moves (and I was
right), I was considering 6...Bg4, but didn't play it because of 7.Qb3, but it
turns out that 7...Rb8 is fully equal!} 6... e6 {
This is somewhat passive, but fine, I couldn't see anything else but 6...Bg4.}
7. Bd3 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. a3 {With a threat of b4.} 9... a6 10. b4 10... b5 {
I was copying because I thought any other moves weren't good.} ({
I thought about} 10... Bd7 {but decided that it was too passive and the h1-a8
diagonal is going to open up soon.}) 11. Bb2 Bb7 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Qe2 $146 {
Obviously I can't play 13...Qe7, copying even if my bishop were on d6, I
wouldn't of played it anyway.} 13... Qb6 14. Rc2 Nb8 15. Rfc1 ({I expected} 15.
Ne5 15... Nbd7 16. f4 {with an equal game.}) 15... Nbd7 16. Nd2 {
I had never seen 17.Nb3 and thought I could go on with my business.} 16... Rc6
17. Nb3 {With a threat of 18.Na5 and 18.Nc5.} 17... Rfc8 18. Na5 (18. Nc5 {
is to White's advantage.}) 18... R6c7 19. Nxb7 Qxb7 20. e4 $2 {This is a mistak
e for many reasons, the first and most obvious one is that it opens up a
position where White has a positional advantage!} 20... dxe4 $2 (20... Nb6 {
is what I should've played, with the idea of 21...Nc4, this position should be
equal at least.}) 21. Nxe4 Rxc2 22. Rxc2 22... Nxe4 $4 {
One of the biggest blunders I have ever made.} (22... Qb8 {
with just a slight advantage to White.}) 23. Bxe4 $4 (23. Qxe4 $1 $18 {
and White has a double-threat, Black has absolutely no defence!!!}) 23... Qb8
24. d5 Rxc2 25. Bxc2 Qd6 ({Originally} 25... Nf8 {
was planned, but I rejected it because of} 26. Qg4 26... f6 $16 {
with a good old boring, losing position.}) 26. dxe6 Qxe6 27. Qxe6 27... fxe6
$14 {
The position is worse for Black, but I trust myself to win endings like this.}
28. Be4 Nb6 29. Bd3 Bf6 30. Bc1 Nc4 31. Bxc4 bxc4 32. Kf1 Kf7 33. Ke2 Ke7 34.
Kd2 Kd6 35. Kc2 g6 36. Bb2 Be7 37. Bg7 Kd5 38. Kc3 Bd6 39. h3 e5 40. f3 Bc7 41.
Bf6 Bb6 42. a4 Bf2 43. Be7 Bd4+ 44. Kc2 e4 45. fxe4+ Kxe4 46. Bd6 Bb6 47. Kc3
Kd5 48. Be7 Bd4+ 49. Kc2 Be5 50. Bd8 Ke4 51. Bg5 Kd4 52. Bd2 Bd6 53. a5 $2 (53.
g4 $11 {and the position is completely equal.}) 53... c3 $1 54. Bxc3+ Kc4 55.
Bf6 Bxb4 56. g4 Bxa5 57. h4 Bb6 58. h5 Bd4 59. Bd8 Bc3 60. hxg6 hxg6 61. Be7 a5
62. Bf8 a4 63. Ba3 63... Bd4 $2 64. Bc1 Bc5 65. Bb2 a3 66. Ba1 Bd4 67. Bxd4
Kxd4 68. Kb3 Ke4 0-1

jeffrei
03-09-2004, 01:24 AM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 6: DH Tigerstyle vs BH Eastern Euros (1.5-2.5)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.27
Round: 6.1
White: Wallis, Christopher
Black: Nemeth, Janos
Result: 0-1
ECO: A45
WhiteElo: 1642
BlackElo: 2050
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 106
EventDate: 2004

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 {TROMPOWSKY OPENING} 2... c5 3. Bxf6 gxf6 4. d5 Qb6 5. Qc1
5... Bh6 $6 {The bishop isn't doing much here.} ({Better was} 5... Bg7 {
, immediately developing the bishop to what is obviously its best diagonal.})
6. e3 (6. Qxh6 $2 {just loses material to} 6... Qxb2 {.}) 6... d6 ({
If Black plays} 6... f5 {, White gets a slight advantage with} 7. c4 $5) 7. c4
$5 7... Nd7 8. Nc3 (8. f4 {, keeping the knight out of e5, was also considered.
I thought it looked a bit ugly after} 8... f5 {, however.}) 8... f5 9. g3 Bg7
10. f4 ({I didn't like} 10. Nge2 10... Ne5) ({, or} 10. Bg2 10... Ne5 {
, so I changed my mind and played 10 f4.}) (10. Nf3 Nf6 11. Nd2 {
is probably White's best chance for an advantage.}) 10... Nf6 11. Bd3 h5 (11...
Ne4 {immediately was expected.}) 12. Nf3 Ne4 13. Bxe4 fxe4 14. Nd2 (14. Ng5 {
was rejected because after} 14... f5 {
, White's knight is completely out of the action.} (14... Qb4 {
looks even better.})) 14... f5 15. Qc2 h4 16. Kf2 (16. O-O-O {is a surprising
alternative, which I didn't even consider. After the natural moves} 16... Bd7
17. gxh4 Rxh4 (17... O-O-O {
is an improvement, after which Black has a slight advantage.} 18. Rdg1 Bf6 19.
h3 Rxh4 20. Rg3 Rdh8 21. Kb1) 18. Rdg1 18... Kf7 {, the piece sacrifice} 19.
Rg2 Rah8 20. Rhg1 20... Bf6 {, the piece sacrifice} 21. Ndxe4 $5 {
looks interesting:} 21... fxe4 22. Nxe4 Bh3 (22... R8h7 23. Nxf6 exf6 24. Qg6+
Ke7 25. Qg8 {is an easy win for White.}) 23. Rg3 (23. Nxf6 Bxg2 24. Qf5 {
leads to perpetual check.} (24. Qxg2 exf6 25. Qg6+ Ke7 26. Qf5 R4h7 27. Qe6+
Kf8 28. Qc8+ {is also a perpetual.} (28. Rg6 28... Qc7 {
doesn't look like a good winning attempt:} 29. Rxf6+ Rf7 30. Rxf7+ Qxf7 31.
Qc8+ Qe8 (31... Kg7 32. Qg4+ {is a perpetual.}) 32. Qf5+ {
is again perpetual check.})) (24. Rxg2 exf6 25. Qg6+ Ke7 26. Qf5 {
is perpetual check.})) (23. Ng5+ Bxg5 24. Rxg5 Kf8 (24... R4h6 25. Rg7+ Kf8 (
25... Ke8 26. Qa4+ Kf8 27. Rg8+ Rxg8 28. Rxg8+ Kxg8 29. Qe8+ {
is a perpetual check.}) 26. f5 Qd8 (26... a6 27. Qe4 Qd8 28. Qf4 Rh5 29. Qg3 {
is a decisive attack for White.}) 27. Qf2 $1 27... b5 (27... Qc8 28. e4 {
doesn't help at all.}) 28. Qf4 Rh5 (28... Rh4 29. Qxh4 Rxh4 30. Rg8+ Kf7 31.
Rxd8 {gives White a decisive lead in material.}) 29. Qg3 Ke8 30. Qg6+ Kd7 31.
Qe6+ Kc7 32. Rxe7+ Kb6 33. Rd7 Qb8 34. Rxd6+ Ka5 35. Ra6+ Kb4 36. Qf6 Kxc4 37.
Qc3+ Kxd5 38. Qd3+ Ke5 39. Re6# {is pretty amusing!}) 25. Rg7 R4h6 26. f5 {
transposes to the variation after Black's 24th move.}) 23... Bf5 (23... R4h6
24. Nxf6 exf6 25. Qe4 {looks like a simple win for White.}) 24. Ng5+ Ke8 (24...
Kf8 25. Qxf5 Qxb2+ 26. Kd1 {is won for White, as soon as his king escapes:}
26... Qa1+ 27. Ke2 Qxa2+ (27... Rxh2+ 28. Kf3 {gives Black no follow up.}) 28.
Kf3 {.}) 25. Qxf5 Qxb2+ 26. Kd1 Qa1+ (26... Bxg5 27. Rxg5 Qa1+ 28. Ke2 Qxa2+
29. Kf3 Rh3+ 30. R1g3 Rxg3+ 31. hxg3 Kd8 32. Qd3 32... Qa1 {
is, unfortunately, a perpetual check.}) 27. Ke2 Qxa2+ 28. Kf3 Bxg5 29. Qc8+ Kf7
30. Qe6+ Ke8 31. Rxg5 Rh3+ 32. R1g3 Rxg3+ 33. hxg3 33... Qxc4 {is a perpetual:}
34. Qc8+ Kf7 35. Qxh8 Qf1+ 36. Ke4 (36. Kg4 {actually loses!} 36... Qd1+ 37.
Kf5 (37. Kh3 {drops the queen to} 37... Qh1+ 38. Kg4 38... Qxh8 {.}) 37...
Qxd5+ 38. Kg4 Qd1+ 39. Kf5 (39. Kh4 Qh1+ 40. Kg4 Qxh8) 39... e6+ 40. Ke4 d5+
41. Ke5 41... Qa1+ {is a funny tactic.}) 36... Qc4+ 37. Kf3 37... Qf1+ {.})
16... Bd7 17. Rab1 hxg3+ 18. hxg3 18... O-O-O {Around here, White's position
begins to look dodgy. His problems are based on both a lack of space and lack
of any sort realistic active plan (b2-b4 is going to be very hard to achieve,
as we shall see).} 19. Kg2 Rdg8 (19... e5 {
might have been an even more efficient move.}) 20. Rxh8 {
Hoping to swap off all the rooks.} 20... Bxh8 ({After} 20... Rxh8 21. Rh1 Rxh1
22. Kxh1 {, White's prospects have improved, but not much.} 22... Qd8 {
is probably winning for Black.}) 21. Rh1 Qd8 22. a3 {
Hoping to play b2-b4 at some stage.} 22... Qf8 23. Nf1 (23. b4 23... Qg7 {
forces} 24. Ne2 {, when} 24... Qg4 25. Kf1 Bf6 26. Rh7 Rh8 27. Rxh8+ 27... Bxh8
{is clearly better for Black.}) 23... Qg7 24. Qe2 Be8 25. Rh3 Qg6 26. Qe1 Bf6
27. Qd2 Qg7 28. Qc2 a6 29. Nd1 {This was played to allow the b-pawn to move.}
29... Bf7 (29... b5 {would not be a smart idea:} 30. b4 {, which I planned to
play, gives White some play on the queenside. Black seems to retain a large
advantage, but this cannot be a good choice.}) 30. Qd2 Qf8 31. b4 31... Qe8 {
White now wins a pawn. I'm not sure if my opponent overlooked that after} 32.
bxc5 dxc5 33. Qa5 {he has no way to defend the c5-pawn.} 33... Bh5 34. Qxc5+
Kb8 35. Nf2 Bf3+ 36. Kg1 Qd7 37. Qb4 Rc8 38. Nd2 Be2 39. Kg2 ({
I'm not sure why I didn't play} 39. Rh2 {
. This seems to even give White winning chances, e.g} 39... Rg8 40. g4 $1)
39... Qd6 (39... b5 {was looked at during the post-mortem.} 40. Qa5 (40. cxb5
40... Bc3 {wins for Black.}) 40... bxc4 41. Qxa6 {
was the position which we focused on.} 41... c3 {is a line we thought we had
refuted. However, it turns out that things are not so clear:} (41... Qxd5 42.
Rh1 Bf3+ 43. Nxf3 exf3+ 44. Kh2 Qb7 45. Qxb7+ 45... Kxb7 {
looks winning for Black as well.}) 42. Qxe2 42... Qxd5 $1 ({Rather than} 42...
c2 43. Nb3 {.}) 43. Ndxe4 (43. Rh1 c2 44. Rc1 (44. Qa6 Rc6 45. Qa4 c1=Q 46.
Qb4+ Kc7 47. Rxc1 47... Rxc1 {just looks winning for Black.}) 44... Bb2 45. Qe1
45... Qc5 {is an easy win for Black:} 46. a4 Bxc1 47. Qxc1 47... Qxe3 {.})
43... c2 44. Rh1 (44. Qd3 44... Qb7 $1 {wins for Black.}) 44... c1=Q 45. Rxc1
Rxc1 46. Qd2 Qc6 47. g4 fxe4 48. g5 Rc2 49. Qd8+ Qc8 50. Qb6+ Qb7 51. Qd8+
51... Rc8 {is winning for Black.}) 40. Qxd6+ exd6 41. Rh6 Bc3 42. Ndxe4 fxe4
43. Nxe4 Bg7 44. Rh7 Bd3 45. Nxd6 (45. Kf3 45... Bb2 {looked hopeless to me,
so I just played the ridiculous game continuation. This actually doesn't seem
to be all that clear:} 46. a4 {(the only move)} (46. c5 Rxc5 47. Rh2 (47. Nxc5
Bxh7 48. Ne6 Bxa3 49. g4 49... b5 {
gives Black no difficulties - the pawns aren't fast enough. After} 50. f5 Kc8
51. Ke4 Bg8 52. g5 52... Kd7 {, the're going nowhere.}) 47... Rc2 48. Rxc2 Bxc2
49. Nxd6 Bxa3 50. Ne8 Kc8 51. e4 51... b5 {is lost for White.}) 46... Rxc4 (
46... Ba3 {is another try.}) 47. Nxd6 Rxf4+ 48. gxf4 Bxh7 49. e4 b6 50. Nc4 (
50. f5 Kc7 51. Nc4 Bd4 52. Kf4 Bg8 53. Ne5 53... Bc3 {freezes White's pawns.}
54. f6 Kd6 55. Nc4+ Kc5 56. Ne5 Bxe5+ 57. Kxe5 57... Bf7 {is hopeless for him.}
) 50... Bd4 51. f5 (51. e5 Kc7 52. Ne3 b5 53. axb5 53... axb5 {
is winning for Black.}) 51... Kc7 (51... b5 52. Na5 Kc7 53. axb5 axb5 54. Nc6 {
presents Black with some difficulties.}) 52. Kf4 Bg8 53. Ne5 Bb2 (53... Bxe5+
54. Kxe5 {gives only White winning chances.}) 54. Nc6 Bf7 55. Ne5 Bg8 56. Nc6 (
56. Nd3 56... Bc3 {achieves nothing.}) 56... Bf7 57. a5 b5 ({
The only other serious winning try,} 57... bxa5 {, doesn't seem to work:} 58.
Nxa5 Bc3 59. Nc4 (59. Nb3 Kd6 60. Ke3 Be8 61. Kd3 61... Bf6 {
is losing for White.}) 59... a5 60. Ke3 a4 61. Kd3 Bg7 62. Kc2 {
looks drawn to me - and Fritz 6 concurs. In fact, his recommendation here is}
62... Kd8 {- not an inspired winning attempt. White can't round up the a4-pawn,
but Black can't support it very well. For example,} 63. Kd3 Bh5 64. e5 a3 65.
Nxa3 Bxe5 66. Nc4 {is an obvious draw.}) ({The "in between check"} 57... Bc1+ {
does give White a slight chance of going wrong. However, it's unlikely White
would play anythingbut} 58. Ke5 {, when Black has nothing better than} 58...
Bb2+ (58... bxa5 59. Kf6 Bh5 (59... Bxd5 60. exd5 Kd6 61. Nxa5 {
is of course drawn.}) 60. Nxa5 Bf3 61. Ke5 {is a draw.}) 59. Kf4 {
leaves us with the same position as after White's 57th move.}) 58. Ne5 Bg8 (
58... Be8 59. Nd3 59... Bc3 {allows} 60. e5 {
, as Black's bishop is no longer attacking d5.} 60... Bd2+ 61. Kg4 Bxa5 62. f6
Bc3 63. Kf5 {gives only White winning chances.}) 59. Nc6 Bc3 60. Ke3 Bf7 (60...
b4 61. Kd3 Bf7 62. Kc4 Kd6 63. Nxb4 Bxb4 64. Kxb4 {
is probably winning for White.}) 61. Kd3 Be1 62. Ke2 Bh4 63. Kd3 Be8 64. Nb4
Be7 65. Nc2 Bd7 66. Kd4 Kd8 67. Kd3 67... b4 $1 68. Kc4 (68. Nd4 Bd6 69. Nf3
Bb5+ 70. Kd4 70... Bf4 {is winning for Black.}) 68... Bb5+ 69. Kb3 Bf6 70. Nxb4
Kd7 71. Kc2 Kd6 72. Nd3 72... Bd8 {is a win for Black.}) 45... Bxh7 46. Nxc8
Kxc8 (46... Be4+ {is an improvement.}) 47. Kf3 b5 48. cxb5 (48. c5 {
gives White five passed pawns, but no way to advance them:} 48... a5 49. e4 b4
50. axb4 axb4 51. e5 51... b3 {is hopeless for White.}) 48... axb5 49. e4 Bb2
50. Ke3 Bxa3 51. f5 Kd7 52. g4 Kd6 53. f6 Ke5 0-1

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.08.27
Round: 6.3
White: Lin, Zhigen
Black: Yachou, Nur
Result: 1-0
ECO: B52
WhiteElo: 1644
BlackElo: 1904
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 89
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 1... c5 {THE SICILIAN DEFENCE} 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ {SICILIAN DEFENCE:
MOSCOW VARIATION The Moscow variation, the 2nd most popular counter in this
position.} 3... Bd7 4. Bxd7+ Qxd7 5. c4 5... Qg4 $6 {
This move, over time has been considered bad and too risky.} 6. O-O Qxe4 7. d4
cxd4 8. Na3 $5 $14 {I knew I had to play this sometime but I was confused with
the move order, 8.Re1 or 8.Nxd4 both lead to White's favour.} 8... Qc6 9. Nxd4
Qd7 10. Re1 $1 {With a plan of Ndb5 then Nxd6.} 10... Nc6 11. Ndb5 Rd8 12. Bf4
{Threatening 13.Nd6 once again.} 12... e5 13. c5 $5 ({The normal} 13. Be3 $14 {
is fine.}) 13... dxc5 (13... f6 $5 14. cxd6 14... Bxd6 $14) 14. Qxd7+ Rxd7 15.
Bxe5 15... Nxe5 $6 (15... Kd8 $1 $15 {is nice way to win the game.}) 16. Rxe5+
Be7 17. Nxa7 f6 18. Re2 $14 {Whtie should only have a slight advantage.} 18...
Kf7 19. Nc8 Bd8 20. Nb5 Ne7 21. Ncd6+ Kg6 22. Rae1 Nf5 23. Nxf5 Kxf5 24. Rc2
Bb6 25. Na3 $5 25... Re8 $2 26. g4+ $1 {Oops!} 26... Kxg4 27. Rxe8 f5 28. Nc4
Bc7 29. Ne5+ Bxe5 30. Rxe5 f4 31. Re1 b6 32. Kf1 g5 33. Rc3 f3 34. h3+ Kf4 35.
Rc4+ Kf5 36. Kg1 h5 37. b4 cxb4 38. Rxb4 g4 39. Rb5+ Kf4 40. Reb1 Ke4 41. hxg4
hxg4 42. R1b4+ Kd3 43. Rxg4 Ra7 44. Rxb6 Rxa2 45. Rb3+ 1-0

jeffrei
03-09-2004, 02:21 AM
Not many people have actually posted replies on this section of the BB (non-asinine comments are invited, by the way). However, several people have brought it up with me in person and I'd like to respond to some questions here:

Q: Who's actually writing the notes?
A: Chris and Zhigen write all of the notes, on their own spare time at home. I just post them because it seems to work better from my computer.

Q: Why don't you post the games Chris and Zhigen lose?
A: I do! All their games are appear here - it just happens that they haven't lost too often in the last few months.

Q: What happened to Zhigen's games from the Dandenong Grades Tournament and the Victorian Championship Reserves?
A: They're going to get posted after the Interclub's over - I want to keep things in order.

Q: Why are you doing this?
A: It isn't one of them marketing puffs we've been hearing so much about lately. I just think that it's positive for the kids involved and could be of considerable historical interest one day.

Q: Aren't you worried about people using the BB to prepare against Zhigen and Chris?
A: Not really - these things are unavoidable in the long run. Besides, their openings are pretty solid.

Recherché
03-09-2004, 03:22 PM
The games and annotations are mostly pretty interesting, from my point of view, but apart from mentioning that I'm not sure I've got much to offer in the way of comments. :)

In particular it was great to see the full game Rujevic-Wallis, I had fun watching that one at the open, and was sorry to miss the end of it (although it looks as though the repetition happened right after I left).

Oh, and with regards to the slow loading issue, I'm on dialup, and as the thread loads I get a series of messages like this:


A script on this page is causing mozilla to run slowly. If it continues to run, your computer may become unresponsive.

Do you want to abort the script?

One message per PGN viewer, so there's quite a few of them, and it takes about 10 seconds to work through each one. Funnily enough though, it's actually quicker to click "cancel" and leave the scripts running than it is to let them abort (although letting them abort would make loading the thread near-pointless). Once I'm through the messages there are no performances issues, however; everything runs perfectly fine.

Perhaps as an alternative to this thread (for anyone who has trouble with it) you could just attach viewerless PGNs (zipped, if worthwhile) for people to download and review with Fritz or CBLight or some other suitable client.

Bill Gletsos
04-09-2004, 12:08 AM
Perhaps it might actually be wise to load the various games into different threads with only 3-4 games per thread rather than all in this thread.
That way the pages would load faster.

jeffrei
04-09-2004, 02:13 PM
Thanks Bill and Rob,

Both of your suggestions have merit, and I'll take them up with Chris and Zhigen next time I see them. Ultimately it's their decision because the thread really was their initiative - the only reason I've been the one making the posts is because I've got a pretty fast computer and it's easier to do from here.

I'd like to add that we really appreciate the work Jeo has done to make such excellent features for this site - I just wish this sort of thing was around when I was a junior! I've heard he might be aiming to later put multiple games in one viewer, and I think to a large extent that'll solve the problems we've been having here.

jeffrei
08-09-2004, 07:07 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: ROUND 7: BH President's Men vs DH Tigerstyle (3.5-0.5)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.09.03
Round: 7.1
White: Hacche, David
Black: Wallis, Christopher
Result: 1-0
ECO: E00
WhiteElo: 2149
BlackElo: 1837
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 49
EventDate: 2004

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. g3 c6 (4... c5 5. cxd5 5... cxd4 {
was an interesting try.} (5... exd5 6. Nf3 {just transposes to the Tarrasch,
usually reached after 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 c5.})) 5. Bg2 Bd6 (5... Be7 {
was, apparently, the normal move. My opponent thought that the system with ...
Bd6 needed me to play e6-e5 very quickly. I thought this would just loosen the
centre, however.}) 6. Nf3 O-O ({If} 6... dxc4 {, White was planning to play} 7.
Nd2 {, recovering the pawn.}) 7. O-O Nbd7 8. b3 b6 (8... dxc4 9. bxc4 9... e5 {
is an interesting variation. Black is probably equal.}) 9. Qc2 Bb7 10. Bb2 ({
My opponent says he almost played} 10. e4 {here. Then,} 10... Nxe4 (10... dxe4
{allows} 11. Ng5 {, which looks complicated.}) 11. Nxe4 dxe4 12. Qxe4 12... Qc7
{looks good for Black.}) 10... Qe7 {My opponent thought that the plan of
Ra8-c8-c7, Qd8-a8 and Rfc8 might be possible. However, it seems far too slow.}
(10... Rc8 11. Nd2 Rc7 12. e4 {is just better for White.}) 11. Rfe1 (11. e4 {
was better.} 11... Nxe4 12. Nxe4 dxe4 13. Qxe4 Nf6 14. Qh4 {
gives White a slight advantage.}) 11... c5 (11... dxc4 12. bxc4 12... e5 {
was probably better.}) 12. cxd5 Nxd5 (12... exd5 13. dxc5 13... bxc5 {
was another try I considered, but I thought that White could play} 14. Nh4 {
, with the advantage.} (14. Nb5 Bb8 15. Ba3 {was a variation mentioned by my
opponent, with the idea that if the knight is kicked by a7-a6, it can go to d4.
This doesn't seem to be a very good idea, though.} 15... a6 (15... Ne4 {
is another possibility.}) 16. Nbd4 16... Qe4 {appears to be in Black's favour.}
) 14... Qe6 15. e4 $1 {is definitely good for White.} 15... d4 (15... Rae8 16.
Nf5 dxe4 17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Rad1 {is better for White.}) (15... Rfe8 16. Nf5
dxe4 17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Rad1 {is also better for White.}) 16. e5 Bxg2 (16...
Bxe5 17. Bxb7 dxc3 18. Bxc3 Rab8 19. Bg2 {
and White is obviously close to winning.}) 17. exd6 Qh3 18. f3 {(the only move)
} (18. Nxg2 Ng4 19. Qf5 Qxh2+ 20. Kf1 20... d3 $1 21. Qxd3 Qh1+ 22. Ke2 22...
Qxg2 {would be winning for Black!}) 18... dxc3 (18... Bxf3 19. Nxf3 dxc3 20.
Qxc3 {looks won for White. He threatens all sorts of things, while Black has
no counterplay.}) 19. Qxc3 Bxf3 20. Qxf3 {should be an easy win for White.}
20... Rae8 ({or} 20... Rfe8 21. Re7 {.}) 21. Qf5 Ng4 22. Nf3 22... Re3 {
appears to give Black good chances at first. However,} 23. Rxe3 Qg2+ 24. Kxg2
Nxe3+ 25. Kf2 Nxf5 26. Rd1 {is terrible for him.}) 13. dxc5 Nxc5 ({
I thought that} 13... Bxc5 {would be met by} 14. Ne4 {
. However, Black probably has a slight advantage after} 14... Bb4 {. I thought
White would be able to play a2-a3. I didn't realize he would have absolutely
no time for this.} 15. Red1 Rac8 16. Qd3 f5 17. Neg5 h6 18. Nh3 (18. e4 {
is met by} 18... Nc5 {.}) 18... Nc5 19. Qd4 19... Rfd8 {
White is tactically in a lot of trouble. After} 20. Rdc1 (20. Qh4 Qxh4 21. Nxh4
Nc3 22. Bxc3 22... Bxc3 {is good for Black.}) 20... Ne4 21. Rxc8 (21. Qe5 {
would be an error:} 21... Ndc3 22. Nf4 22... Bd6 $1 (22... Qf7 {
allows White the amusing possibility of} 23. Nd4 $1 {
, when he has some chances:} 23... Bd6 (23... Rxd4 24. Qxd4 Bc5 25. Qe5 Bd6 26.
Rxc3 $1 26... Bxe5 27. Rxc8+ Bxc8 28. Bxe5 {gives White drawing chances.}) 24.
Qxe6 Bxf4 25. Rxc3 $1 25... Nxc3 26. Bxb7 Rc7 27. Bxc3 Rxc3 28. Qxf7+ Kxf7 29.
Nc6 Rd6 30. gxf4 Rdxc6 31. Bxc6 Rxc6 32. Rd1 {
would be in White's favour, not Black's.}) 23. Qxe6+ Qxe6 24. Nxe6 Nxe2+ 25.
Kf1 Nxc1 (25... Ba6 {is also winning.}) 26. Rxc1 Rxc1+ 27. Bxc1 27... Rc8 {
Black is the exchange up for nothing.}) 21... Rxc8 22. Ne5 (22. Nh4 22... Ndc3
{would also be terrible for White.}) 22... Ndc3 {
, it seems that White won't be able to hold on for much longer.} 23. Re1 {
is met by} 23... Rd8 24. Ng6 Rxd4 25. Nxe7+ 25... Kf7 {
, when the e7-knight is doomed.}) 14. Nxd5 Bxd5 (14... exd5 {
is actually better, but White obviously has the advantage after} 15. Nd4 {
. Black would have had a difficult defensive task,}) 15. e4 Bb7 16. e5 Bc7 (
16... Bb8 {was forced, but White still has the tactic:} 17. b4 Na6 (17... Nd7
18. Ng5 {and the rook is lost as well as the bishop.}) 18. Ng5 g6 19. Bxb7 Qxb7
20. Qc4 {and White gets good attacking prospects on the kingside. His queen is
going to come in to h4 next move.}) 17. b4 Na6 18. Ng5 Qxg5 19. Bxb7 Nxb4 20.
Qxc7 Rad8 21. Qc3 Nd3 22. Re3 Qf5 23. Rf3 Qg6 24. Ba3 Rfe8 25. Bd6 (25. Bc6 {
would have won the exchange.}) 1-0

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.09.03
Round: 7.3
White: Szuveges, Narelle
Black: Lin, Zhigen
Result: 1-0
ECO: D13
WhiteElo: 1796
BlackElo: 1723
Annotator: Zhigen Lin
PlyCount: 129
EventDate: 2004

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. cxd5 {
I didn't actually expect this, I don't know this properly so...} 3... cxd5 4.
Nc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 (5. Bf4 5... e5 $5) 5... Nf6 6. Bf4 {The most natural move.} (6.
e3 {was Rothlisberger-Lin.}) 6... Bg4 $6 (6... Bf5 $5 7. e3 e6 8. Bb5 8... Bd6
$14 {these positions are drawish but White has most chances to win.}) (6... a6
$5) 7. e3 (7. Ne5 $1 7... e6 $5 {and White's advantage can get very annoying.})
7... e6 8. Be2 ({I looked at} 8. Qb3 $1 8... Bb4 $14 {
and White has made Black fight had for equality.}) 8... Bxf3 {
I knew I had to take the knight sometime.} 9. Bxf3 Bd6 10. Bxd6 Qxd6 11. O-O
O-O 12. Qd2 12... a6 {Stopping Nb5.} 13. Na4 Nd7 14. Rac1 Rac8 15. Nc5 Nxc5 16.
dxc5 Qe5 17. Rfe1 Rfd8 18. b4 $14 18... d4 $6 (18... Qf6 {
was second in my disposal but looked somewhat "slow".}) (18... Qf5 $5) 19. Bxc6
dxe3 20. Qxe3 Qxe3 21. Rxe3 bxc6 (21... Rxc6 $11 {and Black has a draw at hand.
}) 22. Ra3 $1 22... Ra8 $14 23. Kf1 Kf8 24. Ke1 Ke7 25. Rcc3 Kd7 26. Rh3 h6 27.
Rag3 Rg8 28. Rd3+ Kc7 29. Kd2 Rad8 30. Kc3 30... Rxd3+ $2 $16 (30... Rd5 $1 31.
Rdf3 f6 32. Rhg3 a5 33. Rxf6 axb4+ 34. Kc4 $1 34... gxf6 35. Rxg8 35... Rd2 {
was the most complex line, obviously I could never see this, but it was worth
knowing that Black had a defence.}) 31. Rxd3 f6 32. a4 e5 33. Kc4 Rb8 34. h4
34... g6 {Black is lost now.} 35. Rd6 Rf8 36. Re6 Kd7 37. Rd6+ Kc7 38. b5 cxb5+
39. axb5 axb5+ 40. Kxb5 h5 41. Kc4 g5 42. g3 gxh4 43. gxh4 Rg8 44. f3 e4 ({
I can't believe I missed:} 44... Rd8 $3 45. Rxd8 Kxd8 46. c6 f5 47. Kd5 e4 48.
fxe4 fxe4 49. Kxe4 Kc7 50. Kd5 Kc8 51. Kd6 Kd8 52. Kd5 Kc7 53. Ke5 Kxc6 54. Kf5
Kd6 55. Kg5 Ke6 56. Kxh5 56... Kf5 {and a draw!?}) 45. fxe4 {
Black is lost (again).} 45... Rg4 46. Kd5 Rxh4 47. Rxf6 Rh1 48. Rf7+ Kd8 49.
Rh7 h4 50. Ke6 Rc1 51. Rxh4 Rxc5 52. Rh8+ (52. Kd6 $1) 52... Kc7 53. e5 Rc1 54.
Ke7 Re1 55. e6 Kc6 56. Rh5 Re2 57. Rf5 Re1 58. Rf6 Rh1 59. Rf2 Rh7+ 60. Rf7 Rh6
61. Rf1 Kd5 62. Rd1+ 62... Ke5 $2 (62... Kc6 {also doesn't work after} 63. Rc1+
Kb7 64. Kd7 {and White just queens the pawn.}) 63. Kd7 Kf6 64. Rf1+ Ke5 65. e7
1-0

jeffrei
18-09-2004, 04:25 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB 2004 (BHCC, 23/7/04-3/9/04)

ZHIGEN LIN (1644)
Score: 6/7

1: W vs Vincent Lau (1570): 1-0
2: B vs Andrew Fletcher (1756): 1-0
3: W vs Ferid Kondzic (1989): 1-0
4: W vs Zdravko Lojanica (1849): 1-0
5: B vs Marcel Rothlisberger (1892): 1-0
6: W vs Nur Yachou (1904): 1-0
7: B vs Narelle Szuveges (1787): 0-1

CHRIS WALLIS (1642)
Score: 4.5/7

1: W vs Julian McDonald (1849): 1-0
2: B vs Ascaro Pecori (1997): 1-0
3: W vs Mehmedalija Dizdarevic (1970): 1/2-1/2
4: W vs Milenko Lojanica (2023): 1-0
5: B vs Armen Aghamalyan (2150): 1-0
6: W vs Janos Nemeth (2050): 0-1
7: B vs David Hacche (2169): 0-1

jeffrei
18-09-2004, 06:53 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB: FINAL: DH FisH vs DH Tigerstyle (3-1)

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.09.11
Round: 8.1
White: Bjelobrk, Igor
Black: Wallis, Christopher
Result: 1-0
ECO: D12
WhiteElo: 2387
BlackElo: 1837
Annotator: Chris Wallis
PlyCount: 87
EventDate: 2004

{Bjelobrk, and almost all the members of his team, played their games
'handicapped' - they arrived 7 minutes late.} 1. d4 1... d5 2. c4 2... c6 {
SLAV DEFENCE} 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. cxd5 cxd5 6. Qb3 Qc7 7. Bb5+ (7. Bd2 {
is the normal move order.} 7... Nc6 8. Bb5 8... e6 {
would then transpose to the game.}) 7... Nc6 8. Bd2 (8. Ne5 {
is the other move, but really shouldn't give White anything.}) 8... e6 9. Bb4
Bxb4+ 10. Qxb4 Qe7 11. Qxe7+ Kxe7 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Nc3 (13. Ne5 {is met by}
13... c5 {.} 14. dxc5 Rhc8 15. c6 15... Nd7 $1 {
is the funny tactic holding this up.} 16. Nxd7 (16. cxd7 {loses to} 16... Rc1+
{.}) 16... Rxc6 17. Nc3 17... Kxd7 {
gives Black a slight advantage. White can try} 18. O-O-O {. Nevertheless, after
} 18... Rc4 19. f3 Bg6 20. h4 20... h5 {Black has mantained his advantage.})
13... Nd7 {Keeping White's knight out of e5, and preparing an advance of the
c-pawn. I vaguely knew that this line was a bit theoretical, and now looking
at my database I see that there are 18 games that have reached this position,
mostly GM ones. Bareev and Dreev have played Black here, so my position must
be sound!} 14. Rc1 $146 {This move is a novelty.} 14... Rhc8 15. Na4 Rab8 ({
A bit better was} 15... Be4 {, when the position is equal. Black's backward
c-pawn is not a huge problem, as Black gets play down the b-file, and can
probably achieve an e6-e5 push. After the move played, White's knight is stuck
defending the b2-pawn.}) 16. O-O (16. b3 {appears more logical, relieving the
knight of its duty. White could now consider playing Kd2/Ke2, cutting out any
Bf5-d3 ideas.}) 16... Rb5 {
Setting up Nd7-b6, a maneuver aimed at improving my pawn structure.} ({
Better was} 16... Bd3 {. I thought that after} 17. Rfe1 ({After} 17. Rfd1 17...
Be2 18. Rd2 Bxf3 19. gxf3 {, Black can play} 19... Nb6 20. Nxb6 (20. Nc5 {
goes down to} 20... Nc4 {, when the b2-pawn is lost.}) 20... axb6 {, a version
of what happened in the game, except this time Black's rook is safe at home.
This would definitely give Black an advantage.}) 17... c5 $1 {
This is the idea behind Bd3, which I missed.} 18. dxc5 18... Bb5 {(the point)}
19. Nc3 19... Bc6 {Both the c5-pawn and the b2-pawn are under attack, so one
of them will have to be lost.} (19... Ba6 {allows} 20. c6 Rxc6 21. Nxd5+ Kd6
22. Nc3 {, with a clear advantage to White.}) 20. Re2 (20. Rc2 20... Nxc5 {
is of about equal value.}) 20... Nxc5 {gives Black a large advantage, because
of his active rooks and knight. His bishop isn't too bad, either - the
maneuver Bb7-a6 looks worth a try.}) 17. Rc3 {
Played quickly. This just lets me go through with my plan.} (17. b3 {
was what I looked at the most. I planned} 17... Ra5 {
, intending Nd7-b6 again. I missed that after} 18. Rc3 18... Nb6 {,} (18... Bg4
{leaves Black with a good position. Ra5 was the right move, but for different
reasons than expected.} 19. Rfc1 Bxf3 20. gxf3 20... Kd6 {
gives White a slight advantage, but alert defence would draw comfortably.}) 19.
Ne5 {is possible. Then, Black is struggling.} 19... Nc4 {(best)} 20. Nxc4 dxc4
21. Rfc1 (21. Rxc4 {blunders the exchange to} 21... Bd3 {.}) 21... Bd3 22. Ra1
{(enabling the knight to move)} 22... cxb3 23. axb3 Bb5 24. Rc5 {
gives White the advantage.}) (17. Nh4 Bg4 18. h3 Bh5 19. g4 Bg6 20. Nxg6+ hxg6
21. b3 {was probably White's best idea. He is probably a bit better.}) 17...
Nb6 18. Nxb6 (18. Nc5 {is obviously met by} 18... Rxb2 {. This was the point
of Rb8-b5. It got my rook in front of the knight, enabling the capture of the
b-pawn in this variation.}) 18... axb6 19. b3 19... f6 {
Much too slow. There were some good alternatives, such as:} (19... Ra5 20. a4
20... c5 {was a variation I didn't like because of} 21. Rfc1 c4 22. Nd2 {
. This doesn't seem to be bad, however - what's wrong after} 22... Rca8 23.
bxc4 Rxa4 24. cxd5 exd5 25. Kf1 25... Bd7 {
? If anything, Black is better, so White has to choose something else.}) (19...
c5 {was also perfectly good.} 20. Rfc1 {again worried me, but after} 20... c4
21. Kf1 (21. bxc4 Rxc4 22. Rxc4 22... dxc4 {is very good for Black. I saw this,
but decided that White had better tries on move 21.}) (21. Nh4 21... Bd3 {
doesn't achieve anything.}) 21... Ra8 22. bxc4 22... dxc4 {
, Black has a clear advantage.}) 20. Ra1 {Suddenly, I realized that something
had gone wrong. White threatens the advance of his queenside pawns. I
responded with} 20... Ra5 {, as this seemed to be forced in any case. However,
as I now realize, it was not.} (20... c5 {was again much better.} 21. a4 Rb4
22. a5 c4 23. Nd2 bxa5 24. Rxa5 24... Bd3 {again gives Black the advantage.})
21. a4 Kd6 (21... b5 {was better. After} 22. Rc5 22... Rca8 {
, Black has the advantage.}) 22. b4 Raa8 (22... Ra7 {
was the right square. Black is probably still a bit better.}) 23. Nd2 c5 24.
dxc5+ bxc5 25. b5 {This isn't a very good idea. The pawns are just not fast
enough. After c5-c4 by Black, there is no simple way to support the b-pawn,
and therefore it is impossible to advance the a-pawn.} (25. bxc5+ Rxc5 26. Rxc5
26... Kxc5 {was expected. Black's active king gives him an advantage.}) 25...
Rcb8 {Annotating this game is beginning to get a bit frustrating - I've seen
so many ways I could have got a crushing position! One such way was} (25... c4
{, and White is actually in a pretty desperate situation.} 26. Kf1 (26. e4
26... Bg6 {doesn't do much.}) 26... Kc5 27. Ke2 Bd3+ 28. Kd1 28... e5 {
looks completely won for Black.}) 26. Rca3 26... c4 {
Getting something right, for the first time in a few moves.} 27. f3 Bd3 28. Kf2
{Both players were beginning to get short of time.} 28... Kc5 29. f4 29... Kb4
{This activation of the king doesn't look like the best idea.} (29... e5 30.
fxe5 fxe5 31. Nf3 31... Rf8 {was much better. White is in deep trouble.}) 30.
Nf3 30... Rxb5 $2 ({It was better to retreat with} 30... Kc5 {.}) 31. Rxd3 ({
I was counting on} 31. axb5 31... Rxa3 32. Rxa3 Kxa3 33. b6 c3 34. b7 c2 35.
b8=Q 35... c1=Q {, when I certainly have no chance of losing.}) 31... cxd3 ({
After} 31... Rxa4 32. Rb1+ Kc5 33. Rxb5+ Kxb5 34. Nd4+ Kc5 35. Rd2 {
, Black had better chances of holding on.}) 32. Rb1+ Kc3 ({The point is} 32...
Kxa4 33. Ra1+ Kb4 34. Rxa8 {
. This was a far better variation than what I played.}) 33. axb5 {Both players
were in time trouble. The following moves are pretty amusing - I keep on
sacrificing pawns for no reason.} 33... Kc2 34. Rf1 e5 35. fxe5 fxe5 36. Nxe5
Re8 (36... d2 {can always be met by} 37. Ke2 {.}) 37. Nf3 Rb8 38. Ra1 Kb2 (
38... Rxb5 {loses to} 39. Nd4+ Kb2 40. Nxb5 Kxa1 41. Ke1 {.}) 39. Ra5 g5 40. g4
(40. Nxg5 {, calling my bluff (that's really all it was) was of course better.}
) 40... Rc8 41. b6 41... Rc2+ {
Pointless, as the rook has to go back next move anyway.} 42. Kg3 Rc8 43. Rxd5
Kc2 44. e4 1-0

Event: Winter Interclub
Site: BHCC
Date: 2004.09.10
Round: 8.3
White: Vijayakumar, Rukman
Black: Lin, Zhigen
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: B01
WhiteElo: 1679
BlackElo: 1723
Annotator: Lin, Zhigen
PlyCount: 93
EventDate: 2004

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 2... Qxd5 {
The Scandinavian Defence, the 8th most popular counter to 1.e4.} 3. Nc3 Qa5 4.
d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 c6 6. Bd2 $5 {Preparing Ne4 to double Black's f-pawns.} 6... Qb6
(6... Bf5 7. Ne4 $1 7... Qc7 8. Nxf6+ 8... gxf6 $14) 7. Na4 $1 7... Qd8 ({
I was choosing between 7...Qd8 and} 7... Qc7 {, there is some difference
between them, 7...Qd8 attacks the d4 pawn while 7...Qc7 protects the b7 pawn
and prepares a Bd6 battery which can be stopped by c4-c5.}) 8. Bd3 $146 8...
Bg4 9. Be3 $5 (9. c3 9... e6 $1 $14 {and Black now has threats of something
like b5 then after Nc5 to play Bc5 with the better pawn structure.}) 9... e6 (
9... Qa5+ $1 10. c3 (10. Nc3 {turns to a somewhat normal Scandinavian where
White's bishop is misplaced on d3.}) 10... Bxf3 $1 11. gxf3 $11 {
and Black has full equality.}) 10. O-O Bd6 11. h3 Bh5 12. c4 O-O 13. Qb3 Bxf3 (
13... Qc7 $1 14. Ne5 14... c5 {with complete equality.}) 14. Qxb7 Bxg2 (14...
Bh5 $4 15. Qxa8 Qc7 16. d5 $1 16... c5 17. Rfe1 Rc8 18. g4 exd5 19. cxd5 Nxg4
20. hxg4 Bxg4 21. Be4 Bd7 22. Nxc5 $1 $18 {
after all that Black was lost the whole time.}) 15. Kxg2 Qc7 (15... Qd7 $6 {
with the idea of Qd7 to play Nbd7.} 16. Qxa8 Na6 17. Qxf8+ $16 (17. Nb6 $16))
16. Qxc7 (16. Qxa8 Nbd7 17. Qxf8+ 17... Nxf8 {I wonder why White didn't play
this, my guess is about White's king safety but nevertheless the position is
somewhat to White's favour.}) 16... Bxc7 17. Nc3 Nbd7 18. b4 Rab8 19. b5 Ba5
20. Ne4 (20. bxc6 $1 20... Bxc3 21. Rac1 Bb2 22. Rc2 $18 {
and the knight is incidentally trapped.}) 20... Nxe4 (20... cxb5 $1 21. cxb5
Nd5 22. a4 22... N7b6 {with a nice position for Black.}) 21. Bxe4 cxb5 22. Bc6
Nf6 23. Bxb5 23... Ne4 {
With the main idea of Nd6 or Nc3, but it's probrably not so effective anyway.}
24. Kf3 $2 24... Nd2+ 25. Bxd2 Bxd2 26. Rfd1 Bg5 27. Rab1 Rfc8 28. Rb3 Kf8 29.
Rdb1 Rd8 30. Rd1 Rb6 (30... Ke7 $1 31. Ra3 Rb7 32. Ra6 $14) 31. c5 Rb7 32. a4
Rc7 33. Rdd3 Bf6 34. Ke4 g6 (34... a5 $5 {
with the idea of stopping a5-a6 and the whole Rb7 idea after that} 35. Bc4 Bh4
36. f3 e5 37. Kxe5 Bf6+ 38. Ke4 Re7+ 39. Kf4 Rc7 40. Ke3 Re7+ 41. Kd2 Rc7 42.
Kc3 Rxc5 43. Rb7 43... Rdd5 $3 44. f4 Rc8 45. Kb3 Rxd4 46. Rxf7+ Ke8 47. Rxd4
47... Bxd4 $11 {.}) 35. a5 Bg7 36. f4 Ke7 37. a6 Rdc8 38. Ba4 Kd8 39. Rb7 Re7
40. Rdb3 (40. d5 {
is just winning with many mate threats leading to material losses.}) 40... Rec7
41. Kd3 Bh6 42. Ke4 Bg7 43. Kd3 Bh6 44. Ke4 44... Bg7 {
It was a threefold repitition here but I was unaware.} 45. R3b4 Ke7 46. d5 f5+
47. Kd3 1/2-1/2

jeffrei
18-09-2004, 07:00 PM
CV WINTER INTERCLUB 2004: FINAL (BHCC, 10/9/04)

ZHIGEN LIN (1644)
Score: 0.5/1

8: B vs Rukman Vijayakumar (1643): 1/2-1/2

CHRIS WALLIS (1642)
Score: 0/1

8: B vs Igor Bjelobrk (2393): 0-1