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Adamski
19-04-2009, 10:55 PM
New Zealand NM Professor Richard Sutton passed away last Friday. He had been a well known and well liked part of the NZ chess scene for many years. Over his last few weeks my father often played chess with him in Dunedin. He represented NZ at Olympiad level and will be greatly missed.

Basil
19-04-2009, 11:34 PM
May he rest in peace. Perhaps you could disinter a game he would be proud of to reflect his style, be it swashbuckling or maddeningly stodgy! To represent at Olympiad level, The Prof obviously had talent.

ER
20-04-2009, 12:03 AM
Thanks Jonathan for letting us know ... RIP Professor, and I am sure Dr Sarfati would have some experiences/memories of Richard Sutton the player that would like to share with the rest of us!

Capablanca-Fan
20-04-2009, 12:08 AM
That's very sad news. Dr Dowden (TonyD) probably knew him better than anyone else on ChessChat, since they played in Dunedin quite a lot, and I know TonyD respected Prof. Sutton's skill highly. I didn't know him so well but played him a few times. But from what I do know, he will be missed as a leading Kiwi player as well as a perfect gentleman.

Richard Sutton won the NZ Champs twice, played in the NZ Olympiad team, and was a professor of law. In his youth he was apparently known as "Tricky Dicky", a compliment to his tactical sharpness. But I admired his skill with the bishop pair, e.g.:


Ortvin Sarapu vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1370823), 86th New Zealand Championship 1979, Semi-Slav Defense
Kai Jensen vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1467443), Auckland University Open Tt 1977, Ponziani Opening
Arcadios Feneridis vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1501511), 69th NZ Ch 1962, Ruy López Marshall declined, one of his own favourite games (as selected for an article in New Zealand Chess, August 1980 (part of a profile on him by Robert Smith)

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d5 9.d4 [Fenny was normally a d4 player, and Sutton was very experienced in the Marshall. However, this method of declining gives Black active play without having to sacrifice a pawn] 9...exd4 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd4 [cxd4 is better than this, despite the IQP] 11...Nxd4 12.Qxd4 Bb7 13.Nd2 c5 14.Qe4 [14.Qg4 was better but Black still has a very good game] 14...Bf6 [14...Re8] 15.Nf1 Re8 16.Qxe8+ Qxe8 17.Rxe8+ Rxe8 18.Bxd5 [Giving up the B-pair can't have been pleasant, but Black was threatening ...c4 then ...b4, as I have carried out in a very similar position] 18...Bxd5 19.Ne3 Be6 20.h3 b4! 21.cxb4 cxb4 22.a3 b3 23.Kf1 Rc8 24.a4 Bd4 25.Ke1 f5 [The old Steinitz strategy of using pawns to drive back the N] 26.Nd1 Rc2 27.a5 Bc4 28.Ne3 Re2+ 29.Kd1 Bb5! 30.Nxf5 Bc5 31.Be3 Bb4 [Sutton: The final position represents a delightfully economical use of the limited forces available] 0-1

Another of Sutton's own favorites, in that same article was this game where Sutton used a number of tactical finesses to beat back an unsound gambit: Ortvin Sarapu vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1443931)
72nd New Zealand Championship 1965, Smith–Morra Gambit accepted.

An example of sharpness in a mating attack is Ewen McGowen Green vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1512060), 86th NZ Ch 1979, Semi-Slav Defense: Botvinnik System.

Even in his later years, Sutton could play a sharp attacking game, e.g. this 19-move smash Sean Watharow vs Richard John Sutton (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1395804), Queenstown Classic 2006.

Adamski
20-04-2009, 12:29 PM
Thanks Jono for a full contribution - and fitting games well meeting Gunner's request.

FYI the last time I saw Richard was at Queenstown - the Open before last. I travelled there with my father and the first person we saw as we were approaching (and looking for!) the venue to watch some of the main event (I only played in the Rapid) was Prof. Richard Sutton. My father and he were good friends through the Otago Chess club where they both played. Dad told me that in Richard's latter days he still played a very good game of chess. He used to enjoy dad going for a weekly or so visit to play him while he was in the hospice. (A propos to not very much, one year Jono stayed with us when he was playing in the NZ champs in Dunedin and I played in the large Swiss Premier Reserve.)

Davidflude
20-04-2009, 01:20 PM
I remember Richard Sutton but it was a long time ago. I got beat

Capablanca-Fan
20-04-2009, 01:21 PM
(A propos to not very much, one year Jono stayed with us when he was playing in the NZ champs in Dunedin and I played in the large Swiss Premier Reserve.)
Are you sure that it wasn't the South Island champs? I know I stayed with TonyD one year for the Champs (I think 1991/2).

Davidflude
21-04-2009, 09:45 AM
Arcadios Feneridis was the first player in New Zealand to beat Sarapu.

Ewen McGowen Green played for New Zealand in several Olympiads. He coached Bobby Chang while he was in New Zealand.

Capablanca-Fan
21-04-2009, 10:49 AM
Arcadios Feneridis was the first player in New Zealand to beat Sarapu.
Indeed so (at least in the NZ Champs). I wrote his obit for NZ Chess not long ago that mentioned this among other things (plus some annotated games, some of which I've posted on Fenny' ChessGames page (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=85104)). Fenny was almost 100 when he died, and was playing reasonable blitz when he was in his 90s.


Ewen McGowen Green played for New Zealand in several Olympiads. He coached Bobby Chang while he was in New Zealand.
I didn't know that, but Ewen is an excellent coach, and in his younger days was the best blindfold simul player in Australasia.

Adamski
08-05-2009, 06:49 PM
Are you sure that it wasn't the South Island champs? I know I stayed with TonyD one year for the Champs (I think 1991/2).You are probably right. Dad also recalls the time clearly when you stayed at our home and you did finish among the prizewinners.

Back on topic the newspaper that dad used to be the editor of, Dunedin's Otago Daily Times, published an excellent and full obituary of Richard in their edition of 2 May 2009. Dad sent me a copy. To see it online you need to subscribe to their web site and access the archives at a small cost- odt.co.nz.
BTW the story was written by a chess player - in my days (long gone, though I have revisited since and on one of those visits seen John Gibb) at the Otago Chess Club and the Otago University Chess Club he was a member of both. John Gibb wrote the obituary. Quentin J or maybe TonyD would be able to confirm if John still goes to the OCC. The obit is well worth reading and if someone is motivated (Arosar, Peter Parr and/or Brian Jones?) could be used as the basis for an obit in an Australian publication or web site.

Brian_Jones
09-05-2009, 08:40 AM
FYI the last time I saw Richard was at Queenstown - the Open before last.

Richard Sutton also came along one day to spectate at the 2009 Queenstown Classic. I think they were on holiday and just popped in to see the chess!

I had met Richard before but can't remember where (maybe Christchurch?)

Adamski
10-05-2009, 01:56 PM
2 interesting facts from the ODT obituary:
In 2005 Prof. Richard Sutton was awarded the FM title.
At his death he was NZ's highest rated senior player.

Adamski
18-05-2009, 06:10 AM
There is now a short obituary and photo of Richard on WFM Helen Milligan's web site, http://newzealandchess.co.nz/

Capablanca-Fan
18-05-2009, 09:52 AM
The Otago Daily Times chess column (now by Quentin Johnson) has a tribute to Prof. Sutton here (http://otagochess.wikispaces.com/ODT090505) — includes the following miniature against a very worthy opponent with Black in 2004, to win the South Island Champs late in life for the second time (annotations from the column):

1. e4 c5
2. Nc3 d6
3. g3 Nc6
4. Bg2 g6
5. d3 Bg7
6. Be3 Rb8
{The Closed Sicilian can be very tricky for Black if he commits his kingside too early, becoming the target of a dangerous attack. So Black makes early preparations for his queenside counterplay.}
7. Nge2 Nd4
8. Nc1?! {White is confused by his opponent's move order and plays for a set-up that might be seen after say} [8. O-O e6 9. Qd2 Ne7 10. Nc1 O-O 11. Nd1 b6 12. c3 Ndc6 13. Bh6 d5 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 etc. Sutton is alert and switches to a line where the knight's absence from the kingside is missed]
8... Nf6!
9. h3 O-O
10. Qd2 e5
11. f4?! {Misplaced aggression. White should castle and play to evict the d4 knight by 12 Nd1 followed by c3. Black now takes over the initiative.}
11... Nh5!
12. Bf2 {If} [12. N1e2 to defend the g-pawn then 12 ... Nxe2 13. Nxe2 exf4 14. gxf4 Bxb2 winning a pawn.]
12. ... exf4
13. gxf4 f5! {Another possibilty was to win a rook and two pawns for two pieces with} [13... Nxf4! 14. Qxf4 Nxc2+ 15. Kd2 Nxa1, but Richard is understandably reluctant to give up his marauding knights with White's king starting to look homeless! Black immobilises, undermines and rounds up the weak f4 pawn.]
14. Nd5 fxe4
15. dxe4 Be6
16. c3 Bxd5
17. exd5 Nxf4
18. cxd4 {Finally ridding himself of the powerfully placed knight. But it is too late to save his broken postion.}
18... Nxg2+
19. Kd1 Qf6!
{White resigns as he must lose more material to Black's queen invasion: The attacked bishop has no good square} [20. Be3 Qf3+] {and if either} [20. Rf1 Qf3+ 21. Qe2 Bxd4! 22. Qxf3 Rxf3 23. Ke2 Rbf8 24. Nd3 c4!] {wins the bishop or} [20. Nd3 Qf3+ 21. Kc2 Rbe8] and the threat of 22... Re2 wins at least the exchange. Richard had more spectacular games appear in this column, but in this one he made winning with Black in under 20 moves look almost easy.}
0-1

Adamski
18-05-2009, 01:04 PM
Jono, who did Richard beat in that game? I can of course look up the ODT but for the sake of time I thought I'd get an answer here.

Adamski
18-05-2009, 01:13 PM
As above. I asked the question because my internet connection is slow today and the ODT link would not load. Now it has.
No doubt, Tony, there were other games where you got your own back!

Tony Dowden
18-05-2009, 09:13 PM
I was White! I played like a stunned mullet - that is I thought it was a normal game until I suddenly realised I had been blown out of the water in only 20 moves by some very tricky and accurate moves.

Sorry I didn't notice this thread (postscript - or Adamski's last post above) before now - busy with uni work and, when logging on here, preoccupied by my scheme to drum up some support for the SIO - and will therefore definitely do something to rectify the situation over the next several days. For starters I am reasonably confident he has the biggest plus score anyone ever had against me ...

But for now, I'll just say that Richard was a wonderful person as well as a truly remarkable chessplayer who, despite a busy academic career in law where he made significant contributions of both national and international importance, played very strongly for more than four decades.

Capablanca-Fan
18-05-2009, 10:17 PM
I was White!
Yes, quite a handicap in this case: judging by all the games in this thread, Prof. Sutton seemed to have an advantage playing Black!

Tony Dowden
25-05-2009, 09:41 PM
Today I received a letter from Richard's wife Kensie and it reminded me it is about time I contributed something substantive to this thread. To be honest I think I've been procrastinating because I knew this process would be emotional - as Richard was a person I greatly admired and eventually got to know quite well. I will write in serial form as different thoughts and aspects come to mind. I trust this will be interesting to others.

Early memories

Richard was one of the foremost Kiwi players of his era. Despite a very sucessful career as a law academic he was part of a very small elite band of players who in the 1960s and 1970s (arguably just Richard and Paul Garbett) who could consistently compete with Estonian emigre IM Ortvin Sarapu (who won the NZ title an astonishing 20 times and would surely have become a GM had he stayed in Europe). Richard won the NZ Championship title in 1962/63, 1970/71 and 1971/72. He also represented NZ at the Skopje Olympiad in the then Yugoslavia (now Macedonia) in 1972. Richard was a NZ National Master, a US National Master (acquired when studying at Harvard University), and, belatedly in his mid-60's when his FIDE rating rose above 2300, he was awarded the FIDE Master title. He was by far the strongest non-IM I ever played against and would have been a worthy holder of the IM title.

I don't know when I first played Richard but, as I was brought up in Dunedin, it must have more or less coincided with his 1980 move from Auckland to a professorship in the Law Faculty at Otago University in Dunedin. I started a leisurely BSc at Otago Uni in 1980 and my Elo rating rose above 2000 at about the same time, so we must have been paired up several times in the period between 1980-1984 when I was active in Otago. In 1981-82 I came 2nd= in the NZ championship (hosted by Auckland's North Shore Chess club) and had a FIDE rating peak of around 2245 (I think), so I was supposedly a decent player by NZ standards.

Richard was a terrifying opponent! As such he was my 'bete noire' - although much too nice a person to deserve such a sobriquet. I found I couldn't find any weaknesses. Almost everybody else had a weakness (over-confidence, scratchy openings, scared of losing, amenable to a well-timed draw offer, appreciably weaker in a time scramble and the like). One other NZ player also genuinely scared me: Paul Garbett. Richard and Paul learned that the only way to compete with Sarapu was to win lots of games and, over time, became fierce competitors. Paul seemed the complete player but on occasion he could get carried away. And the first two times we played thats exactly what happened and I won both games - which rather spoiled any aura of invincibility. (I have profiled Paul on purpose. I will talk a more about Paul in a later instalment because he was a special friend of Richard).

Back to Richard. I won a classical game against him in 1982 (almost accidentally, in the ending) and I think I scraped the occasional draw (I do remember drawing the Black side of a Winawer French but I'm fairly certain it was a rapid game). The fact of the matter is that he won game after game after game (after game!) against me in those days. He just knew much more about chess, calculated more deeply and accurately and, with his well-honed active positional style, was especially well equipped to stave off my often aggressive but comparatively crude and anti-positional play. Although he must have cost me buckets of Elo points I don't ever remember feeling like I deserved to win or even draw. Richard had an excellent memory (think of all those law cases!), an intimidating ability to select relevant lines then analyse them deeply and accurately, and (despite his busy career) a impressive undertstanding of main line opening sytems. He was also a very fine judge of how to wrest and nuture the initiative. While I often managed to bamboozle other opponents with creative or unexpected play, Richard was (politely) contemptuous of incorrect play (as was made clear in innumerable post mortems). As Jono has already pointed out, his use of the two bishops was deadly - wither with major pieces in the middle game or in tandem against B +N in the endgame. No doubt I learned a great deal from Richard in the 1980's and must have greatly modified my (unsound and anti-positional) play thanks to all the drastic 'lessons' he taught me.

My contemporary and good friend Tony Love was one of the few Otago players who manged to do quite well against Richard. Tony (now retired from active play) was strong (Elo 2330 at his peak in the early 1980s - playing in the 1986 Dubai and 1988 Moscow olympiads) and a gifted positional player who was especially good at prophylaxis - something Richard found frustrating (and something I only discovered by reading Dvoretsky's primers 20 or so years later). Tony drew with Richard several times and sometimes earned himself a precious win (as recounted ad nauseum on many occasions). The only other player to consistently better Richard around the mid-80's was Ben Martin who (as far as I could make out) generally out-calculated Richard. Ben was a phenomenal talent (Otago's best ever?) and became an IM (with an Elo peak just shy of 2400) before semi-retiring into the parallel universe of mathematical algorithms. Years later I realised that Richard did have a small but perceptible weakness: he would rarely shy away from a principled fight in a main line variation and he was willing to pay a relatively high price for the initiative.

**************

ER
26-05-2009, 01:09 AM
Hello Tony!
I read your latest entry with extreme interest and was very happy of your decision to have a series of articles based on your memories/experiences from the great man. I also look forward to diiscussions based on remarks/responses by other readers who would like to add their knowledge on the Professor's Chess and other stories!
Excellent work!:clap: :clap: :clap: keep it up!

Adamski
26-05-2009, 12:50 PM
Hello Tony!
I read your latest entry with extreme interest and was very happy of your decision to have a series of articles based on your memories/experiences from the great man. I also look forward to diiscussions based on remarks/responses by other readers who would like to add their knowledge on the Professor's Chess and other stories!
Excellent work!:clap: :clap: :clap: keep it up!Ditto from me. Well put JaK and very well expounded, Tony! I look forward to your next instalment.
One thing I'll add about Richard - I never heard anyone have an unkind word about him. A true gentleman , who is already greatly missed.

Tony Dowden
26-05-2009, 05:55 PM
Hello Tony!
I read your latest entry with extreme interest and was very happy of your decision to have a series of articles based on your memories/experiences from the great man. I also look forward to diiscussions based on remarks/responses by other readers who would like to add their knowledge on the Professor's Chess and other stories!
Excellent work!:clap: :clap: :clap: keep it up!

Thanks JAK :P

Tony Dowden
26-05-2009, 05:56 PM
Ditto from me. Well put JaK and very well expounded, Tony! I look forward to your next instalment.
One thing I'll add about Richard - I never heard anyone have an unkind word about him. A true gentleman , who is already greatly missed.
Thanks Jonathanski :)

Capablanca-Fan
12-06-2009, 11:44 AM
I don't want to lose this thread, so I'll post a gamelet where Prof. Sutton caught a ~1800 player in a book trap in a normal time limit game at the Wellington/Civic Chess Club about 15 years ago:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Nc3 Nxc3 5.dxc3 Qe7? 6.Ng5 f6 7.Bf7+ Kd8 8.Ne6+ 1-0

Tony Dowden
19-07-2009, 09:59 PM
Richard Sutton enjoyed chess. His busy academic career meant that he only rarely played in the NZ Championship (even though he always easily qualified, right up until when he retired from chess just several months before he passed on). Nonetheless, Richard still managed to end up with a massive total of 449 NZ Master points, 7th on the all-time NZ list. in later years several points would have been earned in Island events - I think he won the South Island title 7 or 8 times (but I can't verify this). I know his last SI title was 2004 though, because our last round game is featured earlier in this thread!

Richard especially enjoyed club chess. He won the Otago Chess Club Championship a remarkable 11 times between 1982-2006 (with some years not counting because for part of the 1990's he was based in Wellington helping the government reform national legislation). In the earlier years of Club play he had some good tussles with FM Tony Love. In the late 1980's Otago super-talent IM Ben Martin was the only player to consistently trouble Richard. [Parenthetically, given that he bested me practically all the time, I should mention the only year I managed to nose ahead of Richard in the OCC Ch'p was 1982]. In 1998 Richard (aged 60) won the Club title for the sixth time. Then he really turned it on - winning five straight titles in 2002-2006 leaving a string of 2000-ish players, including myself, in his wake. During this period the Otago CC committee was keen to have some Otago-based events FIDE rated. It was during this period that Richard's FIDE rating topped 2300 and the whole NZ chess community expressed its collective delight when he was awarded his FM title in 2005.

As a testament to his love for club chess, and as a 'thank you' to the wider NZ chess community, Richard decided to personally sponsor the 2007 Queen Birthday tournament in Dunedin to the tune of $5000. In the Queens Birthday event the previous year Richard had had some uncharacteristic losses (dropping a rook against Hamish Gold for instance) and I suspect he sensed that celebrating in 2007 was especially timely, not withstanding it being more or less 50 years since he'd started club chess. The tournament turned out to be a truly wonderful weekend with the Club rooms bursting at the seams. (Just like the 1970's during the Bobby Fischer boom minus the cigarette smoke). IM Russell Dive (Wellington) and IM Paul Garbett (Auckland) headed a 'who's who' of national players with just a little local disappointment that (relatively inactive) IM Ben Martin (Christchurch) had very recently entered fatherhood and opted not to play. I was especially pleased to make it back to Dunedin from Tasmania and was delighted to be invited to speak about Richard at the prizegiving. The event was won by Richard's good friend and longtime rival Paul Garbett (who was a house guest of Richard's for the event). Richard had four wins but, as in the previous year, misfired in a couple of games (ironically against me in one) and didn't make it to the top boards. Not bad for nearly 70 though!!

In December last year I managed a 24 hr visit to Dunedin wedged around a North Island conference with only enough time to see my immediate family. However my mother had a message from Kensie Sutton that Richard hoped I could drop in and see him for perhaps half an hour. I went around to Richard's house and despite his lively, witty and intensely intellectual conversation lasting a leisurely and enjoyable two hours(!), I gradually realised he was rather more seriously ill than I had supposed.

Richard J Sutton (23 September 1938 - 17 April 2009) - Emeritus Professor, Dean of Law, legal scholar, FIDE Master (2005), US Master (1968), National Master (1963), triple NZ Chess Champion (1963, 1971, 1972) - was a man of immense intellect, dignity, compassion and conviction. He was an understated but unabashed Christian of the Anglican persuasion. He loved life and loved chess. On his lifelong passion for chess he explained:

Chess is my microcosm, my own private world in which thought, logic, principles and ambition coalesce (Richard Sutton, 2008)

Tony Dowden
29-07-2009, 08:05 PM
Apologies for not saying more about chess, as such, in 'Part 2'. I wanted to add something more profound about Richard's chess style but in truth I don't understand chess well enough to do this properly!

Here's a stab at it though. I think Richard had an excellent understanding of the interplay between the dynamic and static factors of positional chess. This was perhaps the single greatest difference in our chess strength - Richard was absolutely streets ahead of me on this score.

I am willing to hazard a guess that Richard - who was NZ champion in 1963, don't forget - played through and throroughly understood some of Russian GM Leonid Stein's wonderful wins in the 1960's. One game especially sticks in my mind: Stein-Petrosian (USSR Ch, 1961). The intriguing thing about this crushing win by White which exploits the full scope and attacking potential of the two bishops combined with major pieces is that, at a pinch, Richard - who loved the two bishops - could have been handling the White pieces.

When I find time - and when I work out how to import PGN scores - I'll post the above game and some of Richard's more striking games in a later post (Part 2 of this postscript I suppose!)

Adamski
29-07-2009, 11:37 PM
Many thanks for the work you have put into this thread. It has become a fitting memorial to Professor Richard. Well done. (And, yes, as per 2 PMs I sent you, Ax is right on how to do the pgn thing.)

Capablanca-Fan
30-07-2009, 01:26 AM
Here's a stab at it though. I think Richard had an excellent understanding of the interplay between the dynamic and static factors of positional chess. This was perhaps the single greatest difference in our chess strength — Richard was absolutely streets ahead of me on this score.
Might simply have been a difficult opponent; the rating difference was not that great IIRC. Was Janovsky really streets ahead of Chigorin with his +15-5=6 score (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?yearcomp=exactly&year=&playercomp=either&pid=19523&player=&pid2=10016&player2=&movescomp=exactly&moves=&opening=&eco=&result=) for example, or just a bęte noire? Same with for example Korchnoi's not quite so huge huge plus against Tal of +13-6=29 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?yearcomp=exactly&year=&playercomp=either&pid=15866&player=&pid2=14380&player2=&movescomp=exactly&moves=&opening=&eco=&result=).


I am willing to hazard a guess that Richard — who was NZ champion in 1963, don't forget — played through and throroughly understood some of Russian GM Leonid Stein's wonderful wins in the 1960's.
Thanx, I didn't know that about him.


One game especially sticks in my mind: Stein-Petrosian (USSR Ch, 1961). The intriguing thing about this crushing win by White which exploits the full scope and attacking potential of the two bishops combined with major pieces is that, at a pinch, Richard — who loved the two bishops — could have been handling the White pieces.
This one (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1106505)?

Tony Dowden
01-08-2009, 01:55 PM
Many thanks for the work you have put into this thread. It has become a fitting memorial to Professor Richard. Well done. (And, yes, as per 2 PMs I sent you, Ax is right on how to do the pgn thing.)

Thanks for your messages Jonathan,

I wasn't clear, sorry. I know how to post pgn here in ChessChat but I don't have a database and I haven't been able to overcome the technological challenge related to extracting games scores in pgn format from some of the on-line sources.

Cheers, Tony

Tony Dowden
01-08-2009, 01:58 PM
This one (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1106505)?[/QUOTE]

Yes, that's the right game!

Adamski
29-08-2009, 05:21 PM
See New Zealand Chess, July 2009, Vol. 36, No.3. Includes games, one of which is 2 B's v B+N win as Black over Sarapu.
Cover photo + pages 9 -1 4. I have them scanned (courtesy of my dad in Dunedin) so can email on request.

Tony Dowden
29-08-2009, 06:09 PM
Thanks Jonathan,

The Sarapu-Sutton endgame was one I thought I'd like posted here actually.

Would you mind sending me the relevant scanned pages from 'NZ Chess'?

Thanks!

Cheers, Tony

Adamski
29-08-2009, 06:20 PM
Thanks Jonathan,

The Sarapu-Sutton endgame was one I thought I'd like posted here actually.

Would you mind sending me the relevant scanned pages from 'NZ Chess'?

Thanks!

Cheers, TonyDone - but annotated.