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  1. #1
    CC International Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    Difficult endgame study in my game!?

    I played a game that I have analyzed with Fritz 8, and Fritz always play the position to a draw, clueless of how to progress, while after very extensive analysis I have come up with a winning plan - or so I think. But I am not quite sure. Perhaps someone with the latest Rybka can figure out whether it is a win?

    Black to move and win!? :

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    The first part is pretty straight forward. White played the mistake 1.Bb5-a4 (Ba6 must be a draw) and I played 1...Nh5? and latter pushed the f5 pawn to no avail, it was a draw. The right method is 1...Ne2+ 2.Kh2,Kf2 and the white King is further stuffed into the corner. If 3.Bb5??,Nc3 White can't stop Nd1-e3xg2 so it's all over - but Black's knight can't reach e3 or e1 without White cooperating. Thus 3.Bb3 is right - how can Black make progress?
    Last edited by Jesper Norgaard; 30-12-2008 at 07:10 PM.

  2. #2
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
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  3. #3
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Here are a couple of example lines I played about with using Fritz 11. In the 2...Nc3 line black won a pawn but I do not think it is enough. In the 2...Kf2 with 3.Bb3 Nd4 black was able to maneuver for what looks like a winning breakthrough with ...g4, ...Ng5 and ...h3 winning the f-pawn and creating a passed pawn. As with any very long lines generated using computers there are bound to be other ideas that should be looked at.

    The question is can white stop this ...g4/...Ng5/...h3 plan. Not sure yet.

    With such positions even a super-strong computer is unlikely to be able to just look at the position and give a clear verdict, unless perhaps you leave it on overnight.

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  4. #4
    CC International Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    Here are a couple of example lines I played about with using Fritz 11. In the 2...Nc3 line black won a pawn but I do not think it is enough. In the 2...Kf2 with 3.Bb3 Nd4 black was able to maneuver for what looks like a winning breakthrough with ...g4, ...Ng5 and ...h3 winning the f-pawn and creating a passed pawn. As with any very long lines generated using computers there are bound to be other ideas that should be looked at.

    The question is can white stop this ...g4/...Ng5/...h3 plan. Not sure yet.
    Thank you Kevin, you found at least two crucial lines and the ...g4/...Ng5/...h3 plan is definitely part of my winning plan - if it wins!
    Here is what I have worked out:

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  5. #5
    CC International Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    I think I made a mistake in my earlier analysis, going into a drawn position:

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    Here is the same position with the pawns e4 and h3 removed which is a draw:

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    So that means I should return my attention to the position with the black pawn on f4 instead of h4 (white pawns on e4,g4,h3), which did not seem completely clear from Kevin's analysis. If that position also loses then I can conclude that the "study" really was correct, although simply emerged from the OTB game Jorge Martín del Campo - Jesper Nørgaard Club Mercenarios Mexico 17.th. August 1995 (drawn in 108 moves).
    Last edited by Jesper Norgaard; 01-01-2009 at 10:33 AM.

  6. #6
    CC International Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    I have since acquired Rybka and have gotten to the following conclusions:

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    The variation with hxg4 and gxh3 for white does not hold much more promise since the black free f4-pawn becomes a menace, so I think the "study" does hold water.

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