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  1. #46
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyD
    John Harraway (no 'o' as Rincewind points out), the (recently retired?) Senior Lecturer of Mathematics and Statistics at Otago University, was a strong club player in his time but, from the perspective of having played him occasionally over a ten year period around 1975–1985 (the more recent occasions being in simuls I conducted at the university), I very much doubt he was ever strong enough to have been placed in the NZ championship and so can't be the mysterious 'P'.
    Not so sure about that, Tony. You would have played him when you were at your peak and he was one or two decades past that 1967 champs. Similarly, I played Trundle long after that year, and if that were the only thing to go on, it would seem unlikely that he placed so highly, but he really did.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  2. #47
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
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    Ortvin's book gives P Harraway for 1967

    After seeing Tony D's post I checked the only relevant book I have last night. Ortvin Sarapu, in his 'Mr Chess: The Ortvin Sarapu Story', on page 41, refers to the very interesting 1967 NZ champs tournamant- which featured P Harraway (christian name still unknown, but probably not John) and several very strong visitors, including the tournament winner GM Averbakh. I quote from the great Ortvin (RIP and over 20 times NZ champion - still I believe the most national titles for any chess player in the world) below:

    "In 1967 the Canterbury Ches Club [another one I Adamski used to play at, e.g with flukey Lukey, in the 1990s] celebrated its centenary, and Christchurch was the venue for the New Zealand Championship. The organisers decided to hold a14-round Swiss tournament. It was an international competition and the highest placed New Zealand player would take the title. For me it also served as preparation for the Interzonal, to be held later that year. Al Hollander [RIP and against whom I Adamski have a 1-0 record as I upset him with a Goring Gambit in the Premier Reserve one year], then president of New Zealand Chess Association, was to be thanked for arranging this tournament.

    Fourteen Australians turned up, including a newcomer to Australia from Hungary, Paul Dozsa, and IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso came from the Philippines. The leading invited player was former Soviet champion [and endings expert - his book Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge I Adamski found great] GM Yurii Averbakh. Averbakh, who was the president of the Soviet Union's Chess federation, won with ease, giving only two draws for 13 points. 1 Y Averbakh (URS) 13 points; 2 R Cardoso (PHI) 11.5; 3 P Dozsa (HUN) 11; 4 O Sarapu (NZD) 10.5; 5 A Flatow [his relative Fred is still playing in Sydney - Adamski] (AUS) 10; 6-7 D [Doug] Hamilton (AUS) and M Fuller [the great Max IM only recently became inactive - Adamski] (AUS) 9.5; 8 D Hester (AUS) 9; 9-11 B Anderson [Bruce - still semi-active in NZ and who later represented NZ at bridge as well as chess - Adamski], G Trundle (NZD) and P Harraway (NZD) 7 etc.

    The New Zealand players finished in the following order: 1 O Sarapu 10.5 points; 2-4 B Anderson, G Trundle and P Harraway 7. A good result for Trundle and Harraway. I was not pleased with my fourth place. Still, it was my ninth title."

    So, yes, P Harraway was quite strong and for George Trundle and him I think this was their best ever result.

    Finally, RW, I can see that John Harraway has very similar applied mathematics and stats interests to your own as well as being a very capable chess player in years gone by. I do hope you meet up in my birth city of Dunedin - the Edinburgh of the South - Dunedin is Gaelic for Edinburgh.
    Last edited by Adamski; 10-10-2008 at 05:16 AM.
    God exists. Short and to the point.

    Secretary of, and regularly arbiter at, Rooty Hill RSL Chess Club. See www.rootyhillchessclub.org.

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  3. #48
    Reader in Slood Dynamics Rincewind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adamski
    A Flatow [his relative Fred is still playing in Sydney - Adamski]
    Are you sure this is not Fred? His first initial is A.
    So einfach wie möglich, aber nicht einfacher - Albert Einstein

  4. #49
    CC International Master Brian_Jones's Avatar
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    Alfred!

  5. #50
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
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    Congratulations to Solo and Daryl on a great result! Commiserations to my friend flukey, but at least he got some notable scalps!
    God exists. Short and to the point.

    Secretary of, and regularly arbiter at, Rooty Hill RSL Chess Club. See www.rootyhillchessclub.org.

    Psephological insight. "Controversial will only lose you votes. Courageous will lose you the election." Sir Humphrey Appleby on Yes Minister.

    Favorite movie line: Girl friend Cathy to Jack Ryan in "Sum of all Fears". "What kind of emergency does an historian have?".

  6. #51
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flukey
    I had seen the position after 16 ... Nc6 on Chess Publishing just 2 days before ... and noticed it ended in perpetual check. It was quite frustrating sitting at the board, remembering 16 .. Nc6, and not releasing what the exact point was. I knew ... g6 was the resource but couldn't make it work.
    Could Black have tried returning some material and forcing exchanges with 16...Nf5 17.Bxf5 exf5 18.Re1 Bd7?
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    Could Black have tried returning some material and forcing exchanges with 16...Nf5 17.Bxf5 exf5 18.Re1 Bd7?
    Yes, this was blacks best chance ... still pretty good for white though.

    Upon looking at the position after 16 .. Nc6 further, I am now convinced that black is just lost after 17. Qf7 kh8 18 Kh1! (rather than 18 Qh5 drawing) as 18 ... g6 19 Bg6 qe7 20 Qf4! is winning and 18 ... Qg8 just looks looks disgusting.

    So 5 Bd2 is undoubtedly better than perhaps thought and maybe Solo is right that the early ... Nh6 lines are a better bet for black.

  8. #53
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flukey
    Yes, this was blacks best chance ... still pretty good for white though.
    What's the best continuation? While White is recovering material, Black exchanges the active minors and unravels, and White still has broken K-side Ps. But I see your point after 16...Nf5 17.Bxf5 exf5 18.Re1 Bd7 19.Qxd4 Bc6 20.Nxf5, where White's pieces are active, but Black might hold the endgame after 20... Qg5+ 21.Qg4 Qxg4+ 22.fxg4. Better than a quick loss in the middlegame. 19... Qg5+ just allows White to gain the g-file afte 20. Kh1 then Rg1.

    Quote Originally Posted by flukey
    Upon looking at the position after 16 .. Nc6 further, I am now convinced that black is just lost after 17. Qf7 kh8 18 Kh1! (rather than 18 Qh5 drawing) as 18 ... g6 19 Bg6 qe7 20 Qf4! is winning and 18 ... Qg8 just looks looks disgusting.
    But how does White exploit this disgust? Probably with 19.Qf4 Nd8 20.Rg1 Bd7 21.Rg5 g6 22.Qg3 with irresistable threat of Bxg6.

    Quote Originally Posted by flukey
    So 5 Bd2 is undoubtedly better than perhaps thought and maybe Solo is right that the early ... Nh6 lines are a better bet for black.
    Seems like quite an important game for theory then, if 15. Qf4 leaves Black hoping that White will force a perpetual.
    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 11-10-2008 at 11:47 AM.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    What's the best continuation? While White is recovering material, Black exchanges the active minors and unravels, and White still has broken K-side Ps. But I see your point after 16...Nf5 17.Bxf5 exf5 18.Re1 Bd7 19.Qxd4 Bc6 20.Nxf5, where White's pieces are active, but Black might hold the endgame after 20... Qg5+ 21.Qg4 Qxg4+ 22.fxg4. Better than a quick loss in the middlegame. 19... Qg5+ just allows White to gain the g-file afte 20. Kh1 then Rg1.


    Seems like quite an important game for theory then, if 15. Qf4 leaves Black hoping that White will force a perpetual.

    I think 20 Nf5 is a slight niggle for white, certainly black can only draw at best. White also has 20 Qe5 Qd7 21 Nf5 Rf8 22 Nd4 with an edge as well


    I think it had already been shown that black was struggling after 15 Qf4 - see Perelshteyn-Berg 2003 when white played 18 Kh1!

    The annoying thing was that the perpetual check line on chess publishing site was probably just a pre-arranged draw!

  10. #55
    Illuminati Bill Gletsos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adamski
    After seeing Tony D's post I checked the only relevant book I have last night. Ortvin Sarapu, in his 'Mr Chess: The Ortvin Sarapu Story', on page 41, refers to the very interesting 1967 NZ champs tournamant- which featured P Harraway (christian name still unknown, but probably not John) and several very strong visitors, including the tournament winner GM Averbakh. I quote from the great Ortvin (RIP and over 20 times NZ champion - still I believe the most national titles for any chess player in the world) below:

    "In 1967 the Canterbury Ches Club [another one I Adamski used to play at, e.g with flukey Lukey, in the 1990s] celebrated its centenary, and Christchurch was the venue for the New Zealand Championship. The organisers decided to hold a14-round Swiss tournament. It was an international competition and the highest placed New Zealand player would take the title. For me it also served as preparation for the Interzonal, to be held later that year. Al Hollander [RIP and against whom I Adamski have a 1-0 record as I upset him with a Goring Gambit in the Premier Reserve one year], then president of New Zealand Chess Association, was to be thanked for arranging this tournament.

    Fourteen Australians turned up, including a newcomer to Australia from Hungary, Paul Dozsa, and IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso came from the Philippines. The leading invited player was former Soviet champion [and endings expert - his book Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge I Adamski found great] GM Yurii Averbakh. Averbakh, who was the president of the Soviet Union's Chess federation, won with ease, giving only two draws for 13 points. 1 Y Averbakh (URS) 13 points; 2 R Cardoso (PHI) 11.5; 3 P Dozsa (HUN) 11; 4 O Sarapu (NZD) 10.5; 5 A Flatow [his relative Fred is still playing in Sydney - Adamski] (AUS) 10; 6-7 D [Doug] Hamilton (AUS) and M Fuller [the great Max IM only recently became inactive - Adamski] (AUS) 9.5; 8 D Hester (AUS) 9; 9-11 B Anderson [Bruce - still semi-active in NZ and who later represented NZ at bridge as well as chess - Adamski], G Trundle (NZD) and P Harraway (NZD) 7 etc.

    The New Zealand players finished in the following order: 1 O Sarapu 10.5 points; 2-4 B Anderson, G Trundle and P Harraway 7. A good result for Trundle and Harraway. I was not pleased with my fourth place. Still, it was my ninth title."

    So, yes, P Harraway was quite strong and for George Trundle and him I think this was their best ever result.

    Finally, RW, I can see that John Harraway has very similar applied mathematics and stats interests to your own as well as being a very capable chess player in years gone by. I do hope you meet up in my birth city of Dunedin - the Edinburgh of the South - Dunedin is Gaelic for Edinburgh.
    There is an article on the 1967 Championship written by Alfred (Fred) Flatow in the February 1967 issue of Chess in Australia. In the list of scores at the end of the article it lists J Harraway not P Harraway.
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  11. #56
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    The 2009 George Trundle Masters will be on again from this Saturday the 26th to Sunday the 5th October. The players in seeding order are:

    1. Michael Steadman
    2. Gawain Jones
    3. Nic Croad
    4. Ralph Hart
    5. Stephen Lukey
    6. Bob Smith
    7. Bruce Watson
    8. Stephen Solomon
    9. Darryl Johansen
    10. Tim Reilly

    I will be missing a certain football match on Saturday , and my squash grand final next Tuesday . I won my semi last night in an epic 5 setter
    I played my best for Him Pa Rumpumpumpum

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  12. #57
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
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    Good luck, Solo!

    Quote Originally Posted by Solo
    The 2009 George Trundle Masters will be on again from this Saturday the 26th to Sunday the 5th October. The players in seeding order are:

    1. Michael Steadman
    2. Gawain Jones
    3. Nic Croad
    4. Ralph Hart
    5. Stephen Lukey
    6. Bob Smith
    7. Bruce Watson
    8. Stephen Solomon
    9. Darryl Johansen
    10. Tim Reilly

    I will be missing a certain football match on Saturday , and my squash grand final next Tuesday . I won my semi last night in an epic 5 setter
    Good luck, Solo! Early preparation for your Aus Champs campaign, too!
    God exists. Short and to the point.

    Secretary of, and regularly arbiter at, Rooty Hill RSL Chess Club. See www.rootyhillchessclub.org.

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  13. #58
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    Newsflash, Steadman beat Gawain Jones!

  14. #59
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    Scores and games are on newzealandchess website, thanks to Ewen Green and Ian McNally. After 2 rounds: Solomon, Steadman 2/2; Lukey 1.5; Jones, Johansen, Watson, Reilly 1; Hart .5; Croad, Smith 0.
    I played my best for Him Pa Rumpumpumpum

    Do what you do do well

  15. #60
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
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    Top seed

    Interesting that Steadman is top seed. His rating must have shot up to be above Jones. But of course he did beat him so I guess it is justified.

    Good luck to Darryl and flukey too. Going well so far.
    God exists. Short and to the point.

    Secretary of, and regularly arbiter at, Rooty Hill RSL Chess Club. See www.rootyhillchessclub.org.

    Psephological insight. "Controversial will only lose you votes. Courageous will lose you the election." Sir Humphrey Appleby on Yes Minister.

    Favorite movie line: Girl friend Cathy to Jack Ryan in "Sum of all Fears". "What kind of emergency does an historian have?".

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