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  1. #676
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Thomas Sowell: affirmative action creates academic failure & resentment

    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  2. #677
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Yet another book by Sowell, who turns 88 this year

    ‘The past must be understood in its own context’
    By John R. Coyne Jr., Washington Times, 19 March 2018

    ANALYSIS/OPINION:
    DISCRIMINATION AND DISPARITIES
    By Thomas Sowell
    Basic Books, 179 pages

    Thomas Sowell, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution who has taught economics at Cornell, UCLA and Amherst, is the author of numerous books on subjects as diverse as philosophy, history and decision-making theory. His book, Basic Economics, has been translated into six languages. He is a contributor to numerous publications, a syndicated columnist and one of those very rare economists who can communicate with laymen in clear, direct and vigorous prose.

    That he served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War, bringing him into daily contact with people many of his academic colleagues know only in the abstract, may help to explain his ability to communicate effectively with an audience infreqently reached by academic economists.

    And that he is also black may reinforce his ability to speak honestly and objectively as he does on the disparities of race that increasingly distort our national debate, providing fuel to demagogues on both sides of the issue.

    In Discrimination and Disparities, Mr. Sowell challenges believers in one-factor explanations, among them discrimination, exploitation or genetics, for differences in economic outcomes.

    At one end of a spectrum of explanations is the belief that those who have been less fortunate and their outcomes are genetically less capable. At the other end of the spectrum, is the belief that those less fortunate are victims of other people who are more fortunate. Yet the great disparities in outcomes need not be due to either comparable disparities in innate capabilities or comparable disparities in the way people are treated by people.

    In all, a sane, balanced and highly informed discussion of many of the central issues of the day. As Steven Pinker, a Harvard professor of psychology and author of Enlightenment Now recently wrote of Thomas Sowell, “even those who disagree are well advised to grasp his facts and arguments.”

    • John R. Coyne Jr., a former White House speechwriter, is co-author of Strictly Right: William F. Buckley Jr. and the American Conservative Movement (Wiley).
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  3. #678
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Watch Thomas Sowell's interviews with Ben Shapiro and Mark Levin on his new book, Discrimination and Disparities

    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 04-04-2018 at 08:26 AM.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  4. #679
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Thomas Sowell Returns
    One of America's top social scientists on what has changed since he sat down with Reason 38 years ago.
    Thomas Winslow Hazlett [Hugh H. Macaulay Endowed Professor of Economics at Clemson University] from the December 2018 issue

    Thirty-eight years ago, Reason contributor Thomas Hazlett and Senior Editor Manny Klausner sat down with University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) economist and social scientist Thomas Sowell for a sprawling interview about race, gender, poverty, economics, and what he viewed as the government's many failed and misguided attempts to lift up poor minorities. Sowell talked about his history as a Marxist, his frustrations with working in government, and why he rejects the label "libertarian," preferring instead to describe himself as "a person who dissents from the current liberal orthodoxy."

    That interview occurred not long after the publication of one of Sowell's most influential and widely read books, Knowledge and Decisions, which resulted in The New York Times labeling him "America's most distinguished black social scientist."

    Q: The late Nobel laureate James Buchanan said that Knowledge and Decisions was the best book he had read on economics since Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations. Some of us loved that book as a grand, eloquent discussion of how economic thinking is everywhere. Is that your proudest achievement?

    A: It certainly was at the time, and it's certainly among the books that I'm proudest of now. I guess my own personal favorite is Conflict of Visions, which is perhaps a third of the size and more readable. Knowledge and Decisions was a tough book to write. It's not as readable as some of the other things I've done.

    Q: You worked at the United States Department of Labor. What turned you away from Marxism?

    A: I realized what I would have been taught had I studied under [public choice economist] James Buchanan. Institutions, including government agencies, have their own agendas, and to think that they're going to carry out the agenda they've been given is very naive. Once I started thinking that way, the whole left-wing vision began to unravel. But, it was nothing I was taught at the University of Chicago, because I was a Marxist both before and after I took Milton Friedman's course.

    Q: Thoughts on the Trump trade war?

    A: Oh my gosh, an utter disaster. I happen to believe that the Smoot–Hawley tariffs had more to do with setting off the great depression of the '30s than the stock market crash. Unemployment never reached double digits in any of the 12 months that followed the crash of October 1929, but it hit double digits within six months of passage of Smoot–Hawley, and stayed there for a decade.

    Q: What about the view by President Trump that other countries are ripping us off by running trade surpluses?

    A: It's pathetic. The very phrase "trade surpluses" gives half a story. There are countries that supply mainly goods, physical goods, and there are other things like services that other countries provide, and the United States gets a lot of money from providing services. To talk about one part of the trading and ignore the other part fails to understand that money is money no matter whether it's from goods or services.

    When you set off a trade war, like any other war, you have no idea how that's going to end. You're going to be blindsided by all kinds of consequences. You do not make America great again by raising the price to Americans, which is what a tariff does.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  5. #680
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Thomas Sowell Returns
    One of America's top social scientists on what has changed since he sat down with Reason 38 years ago.
    Thomas Winslow Hazlett [Hugh H. Macaulay Endowed Professor of Economics at Clemson University] from the December 2018 issue

    Thirty-eight years ago, Reason contributor Thomas Hazlett and Senior Editor Manny Klausner sat down with University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) economist and social scientist Thomas Sowell for a sprawling interview about race, gender, poverty, economics, and what he viewed as the government's many failed and misguided attempts to lift up poor minorities. Sowell talked about his history as a Marxist, his frustrations with working in government, and why he rejects the label "libertarian," preferring instead to describe himself as "a person who dissents from the current liberal orthodoxy."

    That interview occurred not long after the publication of one of Sowell's most influential and widely read books, Knowledge and Decisions, which resulted in The New York Times labeling him "America's most distinguished black social scientist."

    Q: The late Nobel laureate James Buchanan said that Knowledge and Decisions was the best book he had read on economics since Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations. Some of us loved that book as a grand, eloquent discussion of how economic thinking is everywhere. Is that your proudest achievement?

    A: It certainly was at the time, and it's certainly among the books that I'm proudest of now. I guess my own personal favorite is Conflict of Visions, which is perhaps a third of the size and more readable. Knowledge and Decisions was a tough book to write. It's not as readable as some of the other things I've done.

    Q: You worked at the United States Department of Labor. What turned you away from Marxism?

    A: I realized what I would have been taught had I studied under [public choice economist] James Buchanan. Institutions, including government agencies, have their own agendas, and to think that they're going to carry out the agenda they've been given is very naive. Once I started thinking that way, the whole left-wing vision began to unravel. But, it was nothing I was taught at the University of Chicago, because I was a Marxist both before and after I took Milton Friedman's course.

    Q: Thoughts on the Trump trade war?

    A: Oh my gosh, an utter disaster. I happen to believe that the Smoot–Hawley tariffs had more to do with setting off the great depression of the '30s than the stock market crash. Unemployment never reached double digits in any of the 12 months that followed the crash of October 1929, but it hit double digits within six months of passage of Smoot–Hawley, and stayed there for a decade.

    Q: What about the view by President Trump that other countries are ripping us off by running trade surpluses?

    A: It's pathetic. The very phrase "trade surpluses" gives half a story. There are countries that supply mainly goods, physical goods, and there are other things like services that other countries provide, and the United States gets a lot of money from providing services. To talk about one part of the trading and ignore the other part fails to understand that money is money no matter whether it's from goods or services.

    When you set off a trade war, like any other war, you have no idea how that's going to end. You're going to be blindsided by all kinds of consequences. You do not make America great again by raising the price to Americans, which is what a tariff does.
    So which point Capa Fan do you want to concentrate on? Sowell's turnover from Marxism or his opposition to Trump's trade war? I would not trust Trump to take the rubbish bin out. You won't get much of an argument on that point. Was the last para yours? You should make clear somehow.
    Zionism is racism as defined by the UN, Israel by every dirty means available steals land and water, kill Palestinian freedom fighters and civilians, and operates an apartheid system to drive more Palestinians off their land

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